The East Carolinian, August 28, 1979






Let us dare
jo r�ad, think,
speak
and write
lhe Last Carolinian
Telephone
Numbers
757-6366
757-6367
757-6309
Vol. 54, No. 1
36 pages today
Greenville, N.C.
Tuesday, August 28, 1979
Circulation 10,000
Financial aid available
in many different forms
if hichard building houses the dean of men. the
an of women, the registration office, and the
offices of men's and women's housing to name a
few.
We have a new name
It was some 55 years ago that the voice of the
students first appeared on this campus in the form
ol a newspaper, known as THE TECO ECHO. For
many years THE TECO ECHO served the purpose
as the voice of the east Carolina Teachers Training
School.
Then one day, still many years ago, the
Greenville college became known as East Carolina
Teachers College. It was though that the name of
the newspaper should reflect the new name of the
school, and thus it became The East Carolinian.
The East Carolinian would become the
journalistic pride of the small college.
With the coming of the 1960's the nation
witnessed great unrest among it's youth and the
"New Left" movement was sweeping college
campuses across the country.
With the coming of the 1960's the nation
witnessed great unrest among its youth, and the
"New Left" movement was sweeping college
campuses across the country.
The era of teh Vietnam war, riots, Woodstock,
Kent State, draft dodging, and the general rebellion
against "the establishment" gave birth to a "new"
newspaper on the ECU campus: FOUNTAINHEAD.
FOUNTAINHEAD; "the source of all knowledge '
and truth
The newspaper was undoubtedly the most
accurate reflection of the time, a reflection of
rebellion.
FOUNTAINHEAD proudly proclaimed beneath it's
banner and the truth shall make you free
From the date of it's inception on September 9,
1969, FOUNTAlNHEAD's emphasis was on the war,
the civil rights movement, and "student's rights
FOUNTAINHEAD had it's greatest readership
during the first years. The paper was hand
delivered to every dorm room on campus by the
staff. There were times when students would
literally beat down the office doors to get copies of
the paper as soon as it rolled off the presses. The
students hungered for news, and they got it.
Then along about the mid 1970's the paper
focused on news features, entertainment, and a
close "watchdog" scrutiny of the student govern-
ment.
Housing short
for students
One oi KOUNTAINHEAD's age old problems was
alwavs a shotage of manpower. There were months
when the news desl was manned by only the
editors, with no reporters to give assignments to.
For these and many other reasons, students
became disgruntled with the newspaper, it simply
did not offer anything interesting to read. Hog
market reports and announcements of club meetings
just don't seem to stimulate reader interest.
The paper's appearance was not all that hot
either. The Juniors and Seniors at ECU can
certainly remember the old tabloid format.
The paper was about the size of a magazine, like
Rolling stone. This small size greatly restricted the
amount of news and advertising that could be
printed, and it greatly restricted the amount of
news and advertising that could be printed, and it
greatly restricted attractive layout.
It was one year ago today that the first
broadsheet FOUNTAINHEAD was printed, after five
years as a tabloid.
The conversion to broadsheet was one of the
first, and probably, the most significant changes to
please turn to page 8
column I
By LISA DREW
Assistant News Editor
Because of the rising cost of an education, about
50 percent of all students attending ECU this year
will receive some type of financial aid. Three types
of assistance are offered here to eligible students
who wish to obtain financial aid: gift-aid, the
Educational Loan Program, and student employment.
Gift-aid consists of grants and scholarships.
Although these two terms are often used
interchangeably, they differ in that a grant is based
on need, while a scholarship is based on merit or
ability as well as need. A recipient of gift-aid is not
under an obligation to repay the money,
and any student who warrants aid may receive it.
Mr. Robert M. Boudreaux, of the ECU financial aid
office, stresses that although a student may receive
money through gift-aid, a satisfactory academic
record must be maintained. If, at the end of a
semester a student receives' an academic warning,
money for following semesters may be withheld
until the student improves his or her grades and
reapplies for aid.
The most widely distributed grant is the Basic
Educational Opportunity Grant Boudreaux
explained that a certain amount ot money is
allocated each year from the federal government for
BEOC.fThi- year the amount was $2.5 million) If
the University mast exceed that, the extra money
will be given upon request. Boudreaux added, "We
don't run out of money for basic grants
The Educational Loan Program provides
temporary funding that must be repaid after the
borrower finishes school. Since some loan programs
have become more lenient and some do not have an
income cutoff point, Boudreaux points out that the
applications for this year have tripled over last year.
Some loan programs have cancellation clauses
which, under special circumstance allow certain
percentages of loans to be forgiven
The National Direct Student Loan has an
exception for borrowers who become teachers of low
income or handicapped students in primary or
secondary schools. If this is the case and the
institution is non-profit, NDSL will allow as much as
lOOpercent of the loan to be forgiven.
Under theNursing Student Loans program, a b
orrower may cancel up to 85 percent of a loan over
a period of five years after he or she becomes
employed as a full-time registered nurse.
Student Employment is another type of financial
aid offered to students, which is available in several
forms at ECU.
The largest program is the College Work-Study
Program which allows students to work within the
university or at recognized jobs outside of the
university, and participants receive pay according to
minimum wage guidelines. CWS is funded 80
percent by the federal government so that only 20
percent of a students earnings are paid by ECU.
Oilier forms of student employment are PACE,
Self-Help, and Off-Campus Part-time Employment.
PACE is the Summer Off-Campus Work-Study
Program. This enables students to work full-time (40
hours a week) during the summer to earn (none)
toward the next's school expenses. Each participant
is expected to save 80 percent of his or her
earnings for college expenses.
Self-Help is the University Part-time employment,
v ith institutional funds, ECU employs a limited
number of students to work in various locations of
the university on a part-time basis. Recipients of
other forms of financial aid may not accept a job in
this program without prior consent of a financial aid
administrator.
Off-Campus Part-time Employment assist ap-
plicants and or their spouses in securing part-time
employment in the Greenville area.
Although financial aid is given to all who are
eligible for it. Bordeaux stresses that recipients are
under obligation to maintain an acceptable academic
standing according to university policy. He also
added that anyone with questions about financial aid
should come to the office which is located on the
second floor of Whichard building. "We can direct
anyone to the right place or give them the help
thev need
r C�lumn ' ft I� �
Campus police offer services
��fc � �,��. tUo k;il- onrl th. oar r��nt which includes t'll hp Susnicious oeoole. for instance, male or I
With the doors of
ECU opening for fall
semester 1979, we once
again have freshmen
wondering if they will
be left out in the cold.
ECU's residence
halls, which have a
normal capacity of
5,568, are filled for the
fall semester. Dan
Wooten, Director of
Housing, said the wait-
ing list is composed of
approximately 75 men
and 128 women, a total
of 203 still without
housing.
ECU is again faced
with a severe housing
shortage but there is
still optimism about
finding adequate hous-
ing for students. Ac-
cording to Wooten,
some students will be
worked into the dorms,
some will live temporar-
ily above the Infirmary,
and others will seek
housing off campus.
It is expected that
the students assigned
three-in-a room and in
the Infirmary, will be
able to move during the
first month of the
semester into regular
semi-private rooms as
vacancies are created.
Chancellor Brewer
noted that all possible
steps are being taken to
alleviate the housing
situation for ECU stu-
dents.
"The supply of off
mation which is usually
maintained by the
Housing Office has been
exhausted. This, coupled
with the shortage of
residence hall space,
has created a critical
situation fqr students
presently seeking hous-
ing Dr. Brewer said.
"The University is in
desperate need of assis-
tance from residents in
the community who may
be in a position to rent
space in their homes
Brewer said. "Anyone
interested in offer ing
assistance is asked to
call the Housing Office
at East Carolna Uni-
versity, 757-6450 or
757-6639
By LISA DREW
Assistant News Editor
A college campus, like most communities, offers
lany services to its population. The more obvious
' these are generally well-known, while quite often
ne most important services remain obscure and are
taken for granted. A service like this exists on
ECU's campus; that is, the campus police.
The ECU campus police is comprised of 20
unifored officers, two of which are female, a
detective, and a director and assistant director of
security, all of whom attend security training
sessions each week during the school year. These
people make up a unit that offers 24 hour
assistance and protection for all students, faculty,
and staff. It is not a coincidence that our campus is
a relatively safe place to be; these people keep it
that way.
Sargent Lynne Singleton, ECU's Crime Preven-
tion Officer, says that although crime does exist on
our campus, it is not anywhere near the proportions
that it is on many campuses. Of the two most
common crimes on any campus, theft and assault,
theft is the more prevalent on ECU's campus.
Figures cited by Singleton on reported theft
crimes on campus for 1978 show that there were
136 breaking and entering indidents, 390 larcenies,
four motor vehicle thefts, and 187 bicycles reported
stolen totalling 163,859 taken from faculty,
students, and staff. "There is crime on campus,
and these figures justify that Singleton says, but
adds that in 1978 there was not one reported
assault and ony one each year during 1977 and
1976.
Sargent Singleton is proud of the efficiency and
.concern of the campus police force but she would
like to see more people become aware of its
services.
� Campus police officers are on duty 24 hours a
day, seven days' a week. With the exception of the
supervisor who patrols in a car, the officers patrol
on foot in designated "beats
The campus is divided into five "beats" or
areas, the different beats are the high-rise dorm
and Mendenhall area; the classroom area; Cotten,
Jarvib, Fleming, Slay, Umstead, and the library
UNC Chancellor resigns
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
Chancellor Ferebee
Taylor, of the University
of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill has resig-
ned from his post due
to ill health.
Taylor had suffered
a heart attack in June,
and has since been on
a reduced work sche-
dule. The University
said that no other
factors are figured in
tovlnr'c t�r�ic�r�n
The resignation will
be effective as of
January 31. Taylor will
return to the University
as a Law Professor in
the Fall of 1980.
Taylor was quoted
by the Raleigh News
and Observor (Aug. 22,
1979) as saying "The
heart attack which 1
suffered on June 7 has
compelled me to
reasses my future role
in the University at
Chapel Hill. While my
recovery has gone well,
mv doctor has advised
me to leave tne
pressures and demands
of the chancellorship as
soon as it is feasable .
I will leave the
chancellorship with the
disapointment .of having
had my time in this
position cut short, but
with the satisfaction of
feeling that I have
given my utmost in this
capacity and with the
excitement of antici-
pating a new challenge
in the School of Law
area; the hill; and the car beat which includes 111
outlying areas such as Minges and the Allied
Health building.
Singleton points out that during "prime-time"
periods such at 10 to 2 a.m officers' shifts
overlap so that there are extra police on duty.
"And on Thursday nights she adds, "we have an
overlap of everybody
When patrolling at night, officers make sure that
the dorms are locked at 1 a.m. "for the safety of
the residents and are on hand to let them into
the building after this time.
The campus police also offer a 24 hour dispatch
service. This means that someone will answer the
phone at any time of night or day. Singleton says
that "this is something we have fought for for a
long time and she urges everyone to use tne
number (757-6150) for assistance or for reporting
anything.
Operation Identification is another service offered
by the campus police. At the beginning of each
school year, an officer visits each dorm and will
mark for anyone any personal belongings with an
electric pencil. The mark is either an I.D. number
or a driver's license number which is recorded with
the security office. This aids in the recovery of
stolen property and Singleton urges all residents to
take advantage of this free service.
'Crime Prevention is the anticipation,
recognition, and appraisal of a crime risk
and the initiation of some action to remove
or reduce the riskSgt. Lynne Singleton
Since Sargent Singleton is the Crime Prevention
Officer, she has her own program of crime
prevention on campus. There are two parts to the
program: a slide presentation and an assault and
rape prevention program.
The slide presentation covers basic crime
prevention tips and offers suggestions to everyone
in general. The assault and rape prevention program
for female students includes a film entitled "How to
say no to a rapist and survive" which Singleton
feels is "a very good, informative film She
hopes to expand this program to include other films
in this area.
The first of these programs for this year is
scheduled for September 24 in Garrett Dorm.
Singleton will visit each dorm throughout the year
to present the program, and everyone may attend.
In addition, she is tentatively planning to bring the
program to different sorority houses and the dorms
on the hill.
Singleton feels that students are generally very
supportive and receptive of what she is doing, and
she strongly encourages "all students, especially
freshmen, to attend these programs
In addition to these programs, Sargent Singleton
would like to try and establish a system that would
work with residents in the dorms. She compares the
idea to "Neighborhood Crime Watch" programs
that exist in many communities.
The plan, if utilized, would be based on the
same principle as signing up for visitation
privileges Instead of just so many names, however.
Singleton would like to see some genuine
enthusiasm with residents really looking out for each
other. "We're not asking you to tell on your
neighbor. We're talking about things that shouldn't
be. Suspicious people, for instance, male or female.
Just be alert to what's going on around you
because if vou're not this is when you'll get ripped
off
Singleton feels that the biggest problem will be
generating the enthusiasm for a project like this.
She hopes that if residents can be made to realize
the need for such action, they will voluntarily and
earnestly participate.
"Basically, it's just common sense" she says,
but Sargent Singleton has some suggestions for
students that will make them less vulnerable to
theft or assault.
� Always lock your door in the dorm, even when
leaving for only a few minutes and when you are
asleep.
� Never leave keys over doors, behind memo
boards, or under trash cans. "These tricks have
been around a long time and everybody knows
about them
� Always take keys out of the doors when
unlocking your rooms.
� Keep transoms closed and locked when leaving
your room.
� Never prop open doors after hours that should
be locked. "If you leave these doors open, you are
leaving yourself open to anyone who might come
in.
� Always lock bicycles. Use a long, heavy chain
with a lock.and key and loop it through as many
moveable parts as possible. Utilize bike racks for
your own safety.
� Report any suspicious persons in or around the
dorms.
please turn to page 2
column 1'
Sgt Lynn Singleton
I
� IllWjifclllHfc'ii !fe�llPii'ff�1JBW"r
� �





ftM 2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 2 Auqu 1f7i
Z-asf ueei workmen put the finishing touches on the renovated Jarvis Hall.
Jarvis renovations completed
The renovations are complete and after months
of worry, students started moving into Jarvis dorm
on Saturday, August 25.
The dorm's eighty-six rooms will house
approximately 166 students. Most of the rooms will
be occupied by two girls per room. However, there
are some single rooms which will be occupied by
one girl.
Renovations consisted of complete rewiring,
Keep safe
continued from pg. 1
� Always lock your car.
� Have keys ready when you go to unlock your
car. "Don't stand there fumbling for them
� Always check your back seat when you get into
your car at night.
� Make sure the inside light works.
� Never leave valuables in your car.
� Trv to walk with someone if you must go out
at night.
Stav away from dark or wooded areas and
bushes.
� Keep alert of your surroundings as you walk so
that you are less likely to be taken by surprise.
1 guess the main thing I'm stressing is to be
alert and get involved Singleton says. "Report
anything that seems suspicious. We realize that
crime occurs on this campus and we do our best to
protect you from it. But unless you report it,
there's nothing we can do about it
installation of smoke detectors and fire alarms,
individual air conditioning units in each room,
overhead fluorescent lights, carpeting throughout
dorm, except in each individual room, new ceilings,
a new roof, and the entire building painted.
According to Carolyn Fulgum, Dean of Women,
the air conditioning units were installed as a result
of requests from students and the concern of the
administration for the comfort of the students. She
hopes the students will remember that even though
it is air conditioned, to be energy conscious and
keep the state-wide trend of lower energy use.
Due to the cost of renovations, Jarvis will be 50
dollars more than the other residence halls. Dean
Fulgum feels the increase in price will help cover
the costs to the University, but that depends on
how well the students take care of the building and
how wisely they run the air conditioners.
Because of the new renovations, air conditioning
especially, Jarvis is already filled and has a long
waiting list for hopefuls.
According to Dean Fulgum, "we are one of the
few universities in North Carolina that give
returning students, instead of freshmen, first choice
for space in a residence hall, and in essence
freshmen have to seek housing off campus
Along with the major renovations, new lobby-
furniture has been installed, desks, tables, and beds
in each individual room have been refinished and
new desk chairs have been added. Also a new
plastic strip in braille for blind students has been
placed on the building.
With the renovations of the residence halls,
comes a good sign that the administration is
concerned about the students and their comfort.
Hopefully in the next few years we will see a lot of
changes for the good of the students as well as for
ECU.
Why First State Bank is the
right bank for
ECU students
Jerry Powell, president of East Carolina's Alumni
Association and executive vice president of First
State Bank, welcomes you to ECU and your new
hometown.
First State's ECU alumni
understand ECU students.
College registration is frustrating. Because
getting adjusted to new friends, new classes, new
places and a new bank isn't easy. First State's
bankers know very well the problems of ECU
students. Manv of us are East Carolina alumni. And
Greenville Is Your New
Hometown. First State
Rjk lf Ir Q OHf �Jrrk��i�T117Tfc l'iat w we want ECU students to bank with us
UttllfV �� A UUI ilUlllCIUWJlAbout all vou have to do is eive us ypuT addresi
Bank.
One book you'll get free is
your First State checkbook.
Your checking account is especially important to
you. Because you're on your own now. And it's
important to keep accurate records of all your
expenses, like books, tuition, fees, room, board,
laundry and clothes. But when you bank at First
State, one expense you won't have is your
checkbook. We give every ECU student who opens
a new eccouni a trial order of ECU Pirate checks.
And, if you fiVve money problems, come see your
hometown banker at First State. We'll understand,
and we'll try to help. We're familiar with the
problems of ECU students because we're at home
in a college town.
give us ypur address
and make a deposit. We'll do the rest, because we
want to make getting adjusted easier for you. When
you open your account, be sure to register for a
free 50 savings bond and ECU t-shirts we're giving
awa. You'll find that getting adjusted in Greenville
is a little easier when you bank with your friends at
First State Bank.
See Jerry Powell
Jerry Jones
Pam Kachmer
Tommy Lantfston or
Jackie Arnold.
Welcome to Greenville. We
hope you'll feel at home.
Locations Greenville.
Downtown office- corner
of 3rd and Evans.
Northwest Branch
Memorial Drive
Greenville Branch
Memorial Drive
Winterville Branch
Main Street
Open Saturday 9 12
ror all these reasons, it's much easier to bank
bere in Greenville than in your old hometown. So,
lart a checking account here at First State. You
can make deposits closeby. Our Downtown office,tat
the corner o( 3rd and Evans is near shopping areas
and onlj about 3 blocks from campus. If you're out
near the Carolina East Mall, or the medical school,
ve have two locations on Memorial Drive. And, for
your convenience, our Winterville branch is open
Saturday mornings. So come into First State, have a
Pepsi with Jerry Powell, Jerry Jones or Pam
Kachmer and open your new account. You'll be
glad you did because we'll make you feel right at
home.
FIRST STATE BANK
Call 756-2427 mfdt
WELCOME STUDENTS
TO THE STUDENTS SUPPLY STORE - WRIGHT BUILDING -
Owned and Operated By East Carolina University
TO SERVE YOU
WE HAVE THE LARGEST USED BOOK INVENTORY IN THE AREA SHOP EARLY FOR
USED USED BOOKS AND SAVE 25 ON YOUR TEXTBOOK PURCHASES
Shop our full line of Calculators and
accessories. We offer we a 30-day
FREE Replacement on defective units
We have a Large Inventory of Back Packs,
tote-bags and art portfolios-
Many colors and styles to choose from.
WE OFFER THE LARGEST INVENTORY OF ART SUPPLIES IN EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA
We welcome you to Browse
in our Tradebook Department-
We will gladly special order books
Shop in our Large Soft Goods Department
Have your own design
made with our imprinting service
t
WE HAVE EMPLOYED EXTRA STAFF AND WILL OPERATE EXTRA REGISTERS SO WE CAN BETTER SERVE YOU
Posters - Desk Pads - Lamps - Ash Trays - Book Ends - Bulletin Boards - Clocks
STUDENTS SUPPLY STORE
WRIGHT BUILDING
MONFRI. 8:30-5:00
SAT. 9:00-12:00
VISA AND MASTER CHARGE CARDS ARE
WELCOME AT THE
STUDENTS SUPPLY STORE
SPECIAL NOTICE
The Students Supply Store Will
Remain Open Until 6 pm on
Aug. 30, 31 end Sept. 4, 5 end 6
For Your Convenience





28 August 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 3
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die
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at the NEW
and Pitt Plaza!
28-September
L.T.D Devotion
The Knack: Get the Knack
Mike Cross: Bounty Hunter
Molly Hatchet: Molly Hatchet
KC & the Sunshine Band: Do You Wanna Party? Charlie
LPs & Tapes
Raydio: Rock On
Spyro Gyra: Morning Dance
The Jones Girls: The Jones Girls
Nantucket: Your Face or Mine?
Band: Million Mile Reflections
GRAND OPENING SPECIAL!
The first 200 customers who come
to the NEW Record Bar in
Carolina East Mall and buy 2 LPs
will receive a FREE Magic Roller
record cleaner!
LPs
Tapes
Earth, Wind & Fire: I Am
Teddy Pendergrass: Teddy
REO Speedwaaon: Nine Lives
Cheap Trick: Live at Budokan
little River Band: First Under the Wire
Robin Williams: Reality, What a Concept
GRAND OPENING SPECIAL!
The first 200 customers who come
to the NEW Record Bar in
Carolina East Mall and buy
2 tapes will receive a FREE 8-track
or cassette head cleaner!
CLASSICAL CONNOISSEUR CLUB
� Special sales �
� Special orders at sale prices �
� Classical News newsletter �
TAPE GUARANTEE
One year pro-rated tape warranty
on all pre-recorded tapes
� Over 3,000 tapes to choose �
COMPLETE LINE OF ACCESSORIES
VEEKLY BLANK TAPE SALE!
20 OFF
One brand on sale each week!
� Maxell �
� Memorex �
� TDK �
� Scotch �
RECORD & TAPE CARE
� Disc Washer �
� Soundguard �
For cleaner records & better sound
� Savoy Tape Cases �
To carry and store all your
8-track and cassette tapes
45's
Choose from a
complete line of
hit singles and
12" disco discs
HASSLE-FREE
RETURN POLICY
SPECIAL ORDERS
If you can't find it, please ask! We'll be happy to order itat NO EXTRA CHARGE!
&&�
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RECORDS & TAPES
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VISA
"SOUNDS DELICIOUS!
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V'C'CCfriwJvC�SJi�iwfr,v
Carolina East Mall � Pitt Plaza
master charge
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The East Carolinian
Editorials
& Opinions
Tuesday, August 28,1979 Greenville, N.C.
Free to print
what is right
In this first edition of the newly
resurrected nameplace East Carolinian
we feel we must reaffirm a statement
made to th�s editor by CBS News
Correspndent Ed Bradley last year �
the irreguardless of a paper's source
� whether it be a commercial
conglomerate or a university or
college broadsheet � whether it's
published with million dollar presses,
or run off by hand; as long as it is
printed or published in the United
States it is free to print' what it
knows to be right.
This is a right that must be
jealously guarded. The reasons are
many and varied. One need only look
to the USSR, and their infamous Tass
official news agency from their
government. The Soviets let their
citizens know only what is in the best
interests of the Communist party, and
the free press is not allowed a hand
in letting the people know who are
being targeted by the secret police �
atrocities that we have only hears
rumors about here, because � except
for the American news correspondents
there, the people in the country have
no idea of the real workings of their
government.
To this end at least, we see
ourselves in the role of watchdog over
government. If we see examples of
government waste we are going to tell
you about it. If we see a situation
develop wliich could be detrimental to
any of the services that the students
receive here, you will know about it
as soon as we do.
To this end, we have entered on a
new commitment of excellence, a
commitment which will hopefully
become apparent to all of you during
the coming weeks and months. Our
main goal is accuracy, as well as
credibility. We want students to read
this paper and react to it. Otherwise,
there would be no purpose for it's
existence.
This brings us back to our first
point. Freedom of the press ids
guaranteed to us through the First
Amendment, and even though certain
restrictions have been placed on it by
the Supreme Court, we feel that is
still a viable part of this society �
and we are prepared to battle for it
in any area � including a court of
law � to preserve it. To do less
would deny the public their right to
know. Without this right, there wold
be no America as we know it today.
Students are also
hurt by financial
woes of country
Economically speaking, this year
has to be the worst yet for college
students. As inflation increases, so
do costs for students. We see
evidence of this in the increased
number of students seeking less
expensive dorm residency over apart-
ment life. However, the dorms, as
well as all local apartments, are
reported to be overflowing. No relief
is in sight as there is still a waiting
list of 175 students for dorm rooms.
The cost of food follows housing
closing in the rave to empty student
pockets. Even tuna helper and peanut
butter are budget breakers now.
As dorm housing is inadequate
for the number of students enrolled,
there are more day students than ever
and they are likely to have trouble
getting to campus due to the high
cost of gasoline. More and more we
will be seeing the motorized bike in
action. It is also possible that we may
see longer bus routes with more stops
created as a result jf the gas
situation � if the buses can afford
the fuel.
With not koowing if you can afford
gas or even f it will be available, it
might be wise, to think twice about
dishing out $25 for a parking sticker
(which incidentally does not ensure
All in all we students could find
this a very trying time � it may
mean: going downtown only twice a
week instead of every night, cutting
beach trips to every other weekend,
getting drunk only the night before
exams, eating at Daryl's only once a
week, going to class because you can't
afford to do anything better and
maybe even getting involved in
campus activities, which might put a
crimp in campus apathy (heaven
forbid). Could it be that the sorry
shape of the economy will be the long
awaited boost to getting students to
care at ECU?
Not only are students in for a
change in life style, but ECU may
benefit in the process. An unstable
economy always effects changes and
student life is no exemption. As the
old saying goes, we must all learn to
"tighten our belts a little Perhaps
we can capitalize on this time to
strengthen student involvement here
at ECU, and leave behind us some
sort of reminder that we existed, and
that ECU was made better for our
efforts. Fur years may not be very
long to make an impression or to
prove oneself, but its all we give to
the President of this country, so let's
not find ourselves voted out in the
next generation for lack of involve-
ment.
miiiw)moiabt&
Kennedy's games
It shouldn't surprise us that Ted
Kennedy is making his once-every-four
year plans for making the press
wonder whether or not he will run.
One, Kennedy makes sure he is
well covered, and two, he has the
famous family name in American
politics to back him up. His major
liabilities seem to be the tragic
episode near Martha's Vineyard 10
years ago, and his separation from his
wife, Joan.
Still, the charisma of the Kennedy
family make the possibility of a
current day Camelot a very real one.
Consider first of all the trend in
American politics, where guilt for the
energy crunch has been directed at
Carter and his energy department.
Consider, too, the outsider who came
from Georgia, and broke into the
inner circle.
Americans are ready for a change.
In 1976, after the horror of Water-
gate, they elected someone far from
the political arena � someone who
was not involved in Washington
politics. Later, problems in leadership,
which Carter himself admitted, means
that Americans are reader for a
leader figure.
This readiness, if reflected in the
primaries before the election day
itself, may well see the third Kennedy
brother run for political office. His
liabilities will not hurt him, if the
American people continue their cur-
rent dissatisfaction with Jimmy Carter,
and the Republican opposition doesn't
come up with a strong candidate to
face him.
This appears to be the case.
Despite the cleanliness of the several
Republican candidates whare are even
now appearing on the honzorv,
Watergate will be a factor. The horror
of a U.S. President resigning for the
first time has not yet been forgotten
by the American people, and the
Republican party will suffer for it for
years to come.
Finally, the Carter Administration
will have a rough road ahead to try
for re-election. The President has told
the people that the next few years
will be lean ones � he cannot say, in
a campaign speech, that things in the
country will be wonderful in years to
come.
The recent Cabinet shakeup should
show us that Carter is willing to
make a change, both to help firm up
his shaky ground at the White House,
and to boost his own popularity. One
wonders, though, if the Cabinet
shakeup is not a clear case of "too
little, too late
Behavior is explored
By G.C. CARTER
Uppity Women
I've always, thought
that the term "appro-
priate behavior" wa a
little strange-sounding.
But it must be taken
into consideration that
I've got an extreme
dislike for totalitarian
viewpoints on freedom
of expression.
� "Appropriate beha-
vior" is taught to us by
our parents from an
early age, and func-
tions, for the most part
to save our lives until
we are old enough to
realize that fire burns
and automobiles some-
times do not stop for
people who are crossing
the street.
After this first reali-
zation that( we as
children can indeed
think, then comes the
extention of "appro-
priate behavior to
include "appropriate
thoughts and beliefs
Which is OK. It's
called culture. It's a re-
flection of the way we
view the world. A
people's culture reveals
the value systems
which they hold. It tells
us much about a
people, the particular
ways from the past
which they choose to
hold on to.
Some cultures are
rigidly enforced on a
people; others seem to
blossom by nature.
It has become a
twentieth-century fad
among certain "civil-
ized" cultures, to self-
righteously propogandize
against the rigid con-
trols and enforcement of
"appropriate thoughts
and beliefs that cer-
tain other "civilized"
cultures are prone to
exhibit.
The East Carolinian
Male BarnesEditor
Steve Bachner��Production Manager
Karen WendtNews Editor
L� DrewAssistant Newi Editor
�� )Features Editor
Richard GreenAssistant Features Editor
Charles ChandlerSpoils Editor
Jimmy DupreeAssistant Sports Editor
Robert M. SwaimDirector of Advertising
Terry HerndonAssistant Director of of Advertising
Paul LinckeAdvertising Technical Supervisor
ii i�wi mn 'ipiimafcuun
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Bs M
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put
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er
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unmenti
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28 August 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 5
LC
His
the
:ur-
:er,
n't
to
jral
fcven
:on,
ror
the
Rter
the
for
it ion
try
told
lears
, in
the
is to
lould
to
up
use,
One
Ibinet
'too
CCKi-
ient of
oughts
it cer-
nized"
ne to
How to survive
in college
f
By MARC BARNES
Editor
Doubtless main of
J
you will enjoy many
new and exciting ad-
ventures when first you
come to college. You
may stay up all night
tor the first time to
study. You may fall in
love with the girl (or
guy, as the case may
be) of your dreams.
There will be at
least one time where,
doin, your laundry for
the first time, you may
put your brand new
Pirate rug in the wash-
er along with your
underwear, and your
unmentionables will be
purple for six months
� much to the delight
(and scorn) of your
hallmates.
There is one thing
that will almost cer-
tainly happen to you �
that moment when a
professor or instructor
hands back a piece of
work � maybe it will
be an exam, or some
homework, or an art
project � and he writes
something on it to this
effect, "THIS IS THE
WORST PIECE OF
BRAIN DAMAGED
SWILL I HAVE EVER
SLL.N IN MY LIFE
So you have worked
on it for 14 hours
straight � neglecting
your sehoolwork, your
girlfirend, the fact that
you still need to write
Dad for more money,
eating, laundry, bug-
killing, cleaning the
beer cans our of your
ear, washing the three
da) old macaroni and
cheese our of your pots
in the bathroom (that
last one is for you,
Jailbait, you know who
you are), and various
and sundry other small
chores. So you have
really put your all into
it, and now all you get
is insults, low grades,
and other abuse from
this man who doesn't
know what he is talking
about.
So you get mad, and
you say to yourself, "I
am going to show that
ff?!t$ The next time
a project, or a test
comes your way, you
REALLY put out, and
get the work done in
plenty of time, and you
walk up to the in-
structor's table in real
anticipation, only to fine
that you have gotten a
D instead of an F.
In total desperation,
you abbandon the ship
(your dorm) and set up
temporary housekeeping
at the Library until it
closes, and then as
Eggs N 24 or Sambo's,
in order to make the
grades come up to pre-
serve peace with your
parents. Then, it hap-
pens � once, just once,
you get a C or a B or
even, and A if you are
lucky, and if this course
happens not to be
Freshman Composition.
Only one person has
ever made an A in
Freshman Comp. It
happened in 1947.
It is then you will
know that you are a
college student. Tiie
firs! time a professor
pulled this stunt, the
year vu 1787, and it
was at what is now the
University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill.
The point is this: Pro-
fessors will scare the
living daylights our of
you to see if you are
willing to work. The
fact of life is, folks, if
you are not willing to
work, and work hard,
you would be better off
doing something else
with your time.
It is important not to
get discouraged, how-
ever. We who are
seniors can say that to
you now, but we got
just as discouraged as
you will get at times.
Don't give up. As soon
as you get used to
living away from home,
which is half the battle,
the classes will start to
get easier.
One more thing. Re-
creation is absolutely
necessary. Don't get
yourself into a rut,
where you find all you
are doing is studying.
While in college, you
will make friends you
will keep for life, and is
is possible that you may
get married at the end
of vour four vear stay
here. So, go have a
good time. Remember
that there is a time and
a place for everything.
Don't go out and have
a good time if you need
to get studying done,
and don't study when
you need a breather
and need a change of
pace. Fo over the Men-
denhall and bowl, or
see a movie on Friday
night, or go downtown
to a disco. At the end
ol the week, give your-
self a break, you de-
serve it.
ASbout your parents
� for God's sake, let
them know you are still
alive. Write them once
a week, and if that's
not possible, give them
a call. They are anxious
to know how you are
doing, and you will find
that things are easier
when you go back home
for a weekend if they
have an idea of what
you are up to.
Your parents will
notice that you have
changed when you go
home for Christmas
during the winter. And
you will have. This is
the first big change that
will accompany you into
adulthood � a change
of you being responsible
for your own happiness
and success. Don't wor-
ry about them quest-
ioning you to begin
with � they will get
used to the new you,
and everything that has
changed.
Finally, be good to
yourself, and to the
people around you. The
great New Journalist
Tom Wolfe said that
the Seventies are the
years of the Mr gen-
eration � supposedly,
we are all concerned
with ourselves and our-
selves only, and to hell
with everyone else. This
doesn't have to be that
way. Be friends to that
cretin who is your
roommate, talk to others
on your way to class,
and above all, get
involved with waht is
going on around you.
Welcome from
the chancellor
August 23, 1979
Dear Students:
We are so glad you
are back! The campus
and the vvfiole Green-
ville area is not the
same without the tingle
of excitement that our
students add to the
place. I know that I am
speaking for your
friends on the faculty
and staff and in the
entire region when I
say that we sincerely
welcome all of you.
This year, I think we
will get off to a great
start. There will be
some construction in-
conveniences with
respect to parking lots,
the renovation of the
McGinnis Auditorium
and the long overdue
construction work of
Wright Auditorium.
Jarvis Dormitory has
been renovated and is
the lirst air-conditioned
dormitory on the
campus. For about two
or three weeks, all of
you may find it a wise
act to see if you can
discover some friends
who live in Jarvis!
The construction of
the parking lot around
Mendenhall should in-
crease the morale of the
students, although it
may decrease some of
the business at the car
wash places. Anyhow,
when the lot is com-
pleted, the mud holes
will be gone, and we
will eventually transform
the area into an effic-
ient parking lot and a
nice looking place, for
we plan to plant 60
trees there this winter.
Also, we will have a
special shuttle bus
system from the Belk
lot on Charles Street to
the Mendenhall lot from
7:30 AM to 4:00 PM
Monday through Friday.
To everyone, and
particularly the students
with us for the first
time, we urge the
wisdom of a vigorous
start in all academic
programs this fall. All
of us will help you
make your years here
rewarding, both now
and for the future.
iMeaso take advantage
of everything that East
Carolina University has
to offer, and please
give of those talents
you have to offer the
University community.
I know that you face
the future with � con-
fidence at East
Carolina, and we pledge
to you to be
accountable in the
highest canons of
academic responsibility.
K e want East Carolina
to continue its strides in
the idiom of a great
university, and we are
glad that we can all
work together towani
this end.
Most Cordially vour.
Thomas B. Brewer
isor
The all new stuaent newspapt
The East Carolinian, is in need of
qualified journalism students to fill
key positions at the newspaper for the
coming year.
Only persons who are knowledge-
able and qualified in the field of
newspaper work need apply.
Applicants must be willing to
devote an adequate amount of time to
their jobs, be dependable, and willing
to accept work assignments with
responsibility.
All interested persons should apply
in person at the offices of The East
Carolinian on the second floor of the
Publications Center, across the side-
walk from the new wing of the
library.
The following positions are avail-
able:
Editorial Writers � This position
involves researching and writing
editorials as directed by the Senior
Editor. Journalism 4400 is recom-
mended.
Assistant to the Editor � Will assist
the Senior Editor with editing copy
for the editorial page. Will assist in
layout of Editorial page. Will assist
the Senior Editor in recruiting and
training columnists and editorial wri-
ters. Will assist the Senior Editor in
researching editorials. Will handle the
Senior Editor's correspondence. Will
research The News and Observer, the
Da7y Reflector, and other college
papers for story ideas and forward
those ideas to the proper desk editor.
Completion of Journalism 3200 is
extremely important, but not manda-
tory.
Cartoonists � To provide the Senior
Editor with editorial cartoons and
other such artwork as is requested.
Layout Workers � This position
involves past-up of copy, typeing
headlines, and proofreading.
One editor position � Com-
pletion of Journalism 3200 is strongly
recommended.
Typesetters � Must be able to type
quickly and accurately. This job
involves setting into type all stories
on a VDT.
Librarian � Is responsible for keeping
the Morgue supplied with papers and
for making sure that copies of the
paper are always on hand. Is
responsible for indexing the papers so
individual stories in past issues can
be easily found. Is responsible for
filing photos in the photo morgue.
Reporters � These positions are open
on the news, sports, and features
desks. Involves writing of assigned
stories. An ideal opportunity for all
journalism students.





e 6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 28 August 1979
ECU School of Medicine
investigating vaccination
Bn
GEORGETTE HEDRICK
rA.L News Bureau
Investigators at the
East Carolina University
School oi Medicine are
exploring alternatives
tor a new vaccine a-
gainst Hemophilus in-
fluenzae, the major
cause ol spinal menin-
gitis and other serious
ns in children.
Dr. Dan M. Granoff,
e professor oi
atrics and director
pediatric infectious
says the goal
the project i to
l various coin po-
the bacterial
vsliuh ma)
immunit) in
hildren.
: i b)
National
i g and
ults
tht- disease not because
the) have been infected
vwtli this particular
agent, hut because their
bodies hae been in
contact with other bac-
teria with closely related
structures
The structure of the
bacteria will come under
close inspection b
Granofl and his col-
leagues during the
study. The project will
focus on antibodies
which work against sur-
face components ol the
bacteria other than the
capsule. The other units
ma) be capable ol
stimulating antibodies in
young children who fail
to respond to the cap-
sular vaccine, Granofi
said.
e plan to do a
systematic study ol the
outer cell membrane ot
the organism to tr to
define, chemically and
immunologically, the
surface components of
the bacteria that appear
to be important in
immunity he said.
"Chemical methods will
be used to separate the
cell wall into its pro-
teins and other consti-
tuents to see it any of
them show potential for
developement into a
vaccine
He noted that many
vaccines useful in voung
infants art- primarily
composed of proteins.
Spinal meningitis
was a latal disease
before the introduction
ot antibiotics in the
1940's. Today, medica-
tion and intensive care
can save about 95 per-
cent ol the children
infected. But Granoff
a 20 percent of the
survivors may be left
with residual effects
ranging from mild be-
havioral problems to
mental retardation and
seizures.
Granoff said the He-
mophilus bacteria has
become resistant to
many of the antibiotics
used to treat the di-
sease. He also said that
changes in society have
altered the way in
which the disease is
transmitted.
Physicians used to
see isolated cases of the
disease in a family he
said. "But now with
changing child care pat
terns � day care
renters, extended fam-
ilies and the use ol
frequent babysitters �
to
P5?-
we re finding more
children under live
ear old brought to-
gether for long periods
ol time. We're begin-
ning to notice outbreaks
which lead us to believe
that the disease is more
contagious than we ori-
ginally thought
In a study conducted
by Granofl earlier this
year in Fresno, Calif
he and members of the
local health department
found that in one day
care center where two
cases of the disease had
been reported, 50 per-
cent ot the children
were infected wit the
bacteria.
W hat i needed to
prevent the disease is
an effective immuniza-
tion program. "In other
childhood diseases �
polio, tetanus and
whooping cough � we
ne e r develop cu res ,
but we do control these
diseases with vaccines.
W need that control
for spinal meningitis
because advanced tech-
nology and treatment
.ire not effective .in re-
ducing the spread ol
infection or the re-
sulting disabilities
said Granoff.
� i i �
CXecn U-oe
OPTICIANS
Adjacent to East Carolina Eye Clinic
5
t
1

i
opticians
association
of amenca
OVER 1000 FRAMES
TO CHOOSE FROM
Single vision-White glass Lenses
Bifocal Lenses-White Glass
Single vision Photo Gray Lenses
Single Vision Photo Gray Extra
Bifocal Lenses Photo Gray
CONTACT LENSES
$21.50
$31,501
$26.50
$30.50
$38.50!
Bausch & Lomb Soflens Or Milton Roy Nature Vue
Soft Lens
Semi Soft Lens
Hard Lens
$129.50
$105.00
$95.00
CLEAR VUE OPTICIANS
A tittle bit of artistry appears at the
construction site of the Brodv
Medical Science Building.
GREENVILLE, NC 752-1446
PHYSICIANS QUADRANGLE
OFFICE HOURS
Berkley Mall 9AM -530PM
Goldsboro MON TUES THURS FRI
y AM -1 PM
WEDNESDAY
BUILDING A
1705 W 6TH ST
114 E Walnut
Downtown Goldaborol
P
Bv DOWA
Th
(lorn

each,
appn
I
it
It
amt
Park
will b
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1
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. �
4� "
0
� 4.
4 4'
� "�

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0
WE'VE DONE IT AGAIN
ANOTHER FIRST IN GREENVILLE DISCO
NEW
Spectacular
Light Show
And
Special Effects
-MANY-
More Surprises
sec
NEW
Totally Electric
Dance Fl
Pulsating To
The Music
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COME DRESSED TO IMPRESS-
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TGIF
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28 August 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 7
.50
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Parking problems and fees explained
By DONNA PADGETT
Staff Writer
The cost of day,
dorm and staff parking
stickers this year is $25
each, up from $10 last
year. The increase was
approved by the ECU
Board of Trustees, and
it is financing the
paving of the parking
lots on the west end of
campus, a study of the
traffic and parking
situation on campois,
preparation of a parking
lot beside Belk
dormitory, and the
salary of an additional
traffic officer.
The increased charge
for traffic stickers is
expected to generate
$113,500 this year. Of
this amount, $55,000
will be applied to the
$230,000 loan for the
parking project, which
Parking problem
will be serious
By DONNA PADGETT
Staff Writer
is expected to be paid,
off in five years, $36,00
will be spent on the
parking and traffic
study, $8,500 is alloca-
ted for the lot beside
Belk, and $14,000 is to
be paid in the salary
and fringe benefits for
the new officer, Vice-
Chancellor Moore said.
The parking and
traffic study, to be
undertaken by a Raleigh
consulting firm, will
study present patterns
and make recommen-
dations. One possible
improvement might be
the construction of a
parking deck over the
lot at the bottom of
College Hill Drive. Such
a lot would cost about
$lmillion, Moore said.
as a
reorgia pine.
By LISA DREW
Assistant News Editor
Because of the cost of
A situation which Director of Security and Traffic such a project or of
Joe Calder calls "extremely bad" will exist on buying real estate for a
campus this fall-and it involves parking. new lot, it will probably
More than 700 parking spaces, including all the be five years before
spaces for university registered vehicles in the additional parking is
unpaved parking lots behind and to the west of added.
Joyner Library and Mendenhall Student Center at "Land in this
the west end of the campus, will be unavailable tobacco town is as high
through the middle of December.
The lot between the Jenkins Alumni Building
and Erwin Hall where state vehicles and some staff
members have parked will also be out of use.
The parking lots which are affected have already
been closed off. Trees have been cut and the
surface has been plowed, Calder said.
Sewers will be put in the area and curbs and
gutters will be installed. The entire area is being
paved.
According to Calder, the "surplus" of parking
on the west end of campus has been used by
dormitorv students at that end of campus, day
students, and some staff and faculty. The lQt
between the Jenkins Building and Erwin Hall has
been used for approximately 25 to 35 state vehicles
and 15 to 20 staff vehicles, most of which were
associated with the division of Continuing Education
housed in Erwin Hall.
December 14 is the completion date for the
project. Calder said, which is being done by Barrus
Construction Company at a cost of $230,000.
Vice Chancellor for Business Affairs Clifton G.
Moore said that the project had required several
change of plans in order to save trees whose
proposed removal had been protested locally. Of the
150 trees in the lots being paved, 99 were saved,
6 were transplanted, and 42 more will be planted,
for a total number of 147 trees to be in the parking
lots after paving, Director of Physical Plant James
Lowry said. Only 3 trees were lost.
Moore said.
Moore gave these
figures for parking at
other campuses: at the
University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill,
$72 for all sticker but
fringe parking, $12, and
$36 for night parking;
at North Carolina State
University, $55 for staff
stickers, $40 for fringe
parking, $40 for day
and dorm parking, and
$10 for night parking,
costs for stickers at
the University of North
Carolina campuses at
Charlotte and Greens-
boro were comparable
to ECU's new rates.
The new night rates
are $12, up from $5
last year. Calder said
that there had been
more complaints about
the cost of the night
stickers than of any
others.
At the end of last
week, 600 staff stickers,
150 day stickers, and 20
freshmen and dorm
slckers had been sold,
Calder estimated. The
sale of day, freshmen,
and dorm stickers -were-
running about the same
as last year at that
time, but ' fewer staff
stickers had been sold
than at the same time a
year ago, Calder said.
Bicycle stickers cost
$1 each this year, but
these are permanent
stickers which do not
have an expiration date.
Calder said that in
"avouple of weeks"
traffic officers would
begin to cut the locks
and chains and take
bicycles that are not
registered. ECU's traffic
regulations state,
"All bicycles oper-
ated on the East
Carolina University
campus must be regis-
tered with the Traffic
Office and bear a bi-
cycle license. All
bicycles found on
� campus in violation of
this section will be
impounded until proof
of ownership is
determined
"We've got to get
serial numbers irf the
files protect
students Calder said.
Bicycles which do
not have serial
numbers, such as some
French bikes, will be
stamped with social
security numbers.
Bicycles with regis-
tration stickers which
are not parked in
accordance with ECU's
regulations are also
subject to impoundment.
Calder specifically
mentioned the parking
of bikes in buildings as
cause for a bicycle to
be taken. �
If a bicycle is
impounded, there is no
charge if it has an ECU
sticker If not, there is
a $3 impounding fee.
Impounded bicycles
may be reclaimed at the
traffic office. The
burden of proof is on
the owner to prove
ownership, such as
a bill of sale with a
bicycle's serial number.
Impounded bicycles
are kept outside the
traffic office a couple of
weeks, Calder said,
then stored about a
year or a year and a
half, after which they
are sent l� state
salvage where they are
sold.
Locks and chains are
removed at owners
expense, Calder told
The East Carolinian.
Figures were not
obtained on the number
of bikes stolen last
year, but Cader said
that bicycle thefts were
"within an acceptable
range although
bicycles is 37 to 40 per
cent, a rate Clader
called "good
Calder emphasized .
that it "behooves
students to register
bicycles for their own
protection and that
cables and locks with
keys were the best
protection against
bicylce theft.
In regard to other
traffic regulation, Calder
gave $5 and $15 as the
impoundment fee and
towing charge, respec-
tively, for illegally
parked vehicles. The
owner of such a vehicle
must get a release form
from the traffic office
and reclaim his vehicle
from the towing com-
pany. Ordinarily, a
vehicle is not towed
until a driver has
three parking tickers,
but a vehicle which is
parked illegally in a
handicapped space, in
front of a fire hydrant,
or otherwise obstructi-
vely parked will be
towed. Registered or
unregistered vehicles
are subject to be
towing, if they are
illegally parked. Last
year 25,000 tickets were
written. Calder said that
most parking violations
occured in the early fall
and late spring.
ECU faculty contributes quality
It may be hard to
determine what exactly
makes one school good
or another one better.
Most people will agree,
however, that a school's
faculty is a good
indication of its merit.
In light of this, one can
easily see that ECU is
a superior school
indeed.
"One of the very
obvious things that a
school can do to raise
its standards is to
improve its faculty
says Dr. Susan
McDaniel, assistant vice
chancellor for academic
affairs. Thirty years
ago, she explained, it
was nearly impossible
for a school to acquire
and maintain a good
faculty because of the
scarcity of qualified
people. That situa-
tion has been changing
over the years with
more teachers receiving
terminal degrees in
their respective fields.
ECU has taken full
advantage of this and
has been steadily
expanding and improv-
ing its faculty each
year.
The main reason for
improving the faculty
and raising and main-
taining a school's
standards, Dr. McDaniel
says, is the students.
ouir credibility in the
years to come will be
largely determined by
what you do here she
added.
ECU's faculty is now
made up of close to 800
people from all over the
nation and several
foreign countries, and
more are added each
year. "We are proud of
the fact that faculty wjp
who come here, by and
large, tend to stay
McDaniel goes on to
to leave.
Dr. McDaniel feels
that ECU stands up
very well in relation to
standards of other state
universities. "We have
seen, in past years,
students transfer from
ECU to other schools
and average an entire
letter rade higher. We
have also seen students
transfer here from other
schools and average
flunking out
If ECU now
compares this favorably
to traditionally
"tougher" schools, it
can only be beneficial
to students studying
here and can be
attributed to the con-
cern of the admini-
stration and the quality
of the faculty.
ECU professor honored
ECU News Release
Dr. Yash P. Kataria,
associate professor
medicine and section
head of pulmonary
desease at the East
Carolina University
school of Medicine, has
been elected a Fellow
of the Royal College of
Physicians.
The international
British honor recognizes
outstanding physicians
for superior professional
standing, qualifications
and contributions to
literature.
Kataria received the
distinction for his
research on the diag-
nosis and treatment of
lung diseases, parti-
cularly sarcoidosis. The
results of his investi-
gations have been
widely published in
professional journals and
presented at interna-
tional conferences.
Kataria, who joined
the ECU faculty in
November 1978, also is
a fellow of the
American College of
Chest Physicians.
He currently is
directing the medical
school's lung function
test lab and pulmonary
immunology lab at Pitt
County Memorial
Hospital.
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Page 8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 28 August 1979
1. Medical School Teaching Addition
2. Bed Towers
3. Regional Rehabilitation Center
4. Eastern Area Health Education Center
5. Eastern Carolina Family Practice Center
6. Medical Science Building
7. Animal Research Facility
8. Utility Plant
under construction or proposed
This is a diagram of how the Medical Complex will Medical Science Building is the one designated by
appear from the air when completed. The Brody the number 6.
Newspaper's name changed
continued from pg. 1
take place at FOUNTAINHEAD.
The problems that plagued FOUNTAINHEAD
were more than mechanical. There was an image
problem. No one outside of the campus knew what
FOUNTAINHEAD was; it could have been a shoe
store in Alabama or a grill in Omaha, we had
absolutely no identity with the university
The East Carolinian is a new newspaper, devoid
of the old problems and handicaps of Fountain-
head.
The Trends section has been abolished.
The old Trends section had the lowest reader
interest of any section of the paper according to a
marketing survey that we commissioned during the
summer.
It was decided, therefore to change the section
to replace it with a news oriented feature section.
This new section will offer interesting and
entertaining stories on students and their life here
at the university, with a sprinkling of entertainment
stories primarily concerned with Student Union
presentations, and other forms of campus program-
ming. The change was made to increase readership,
and provide more service to the students.
The staff of the East Carolinian is new, very
new in some cases, they are talented, fresh,
energetic, dedicated, and more than anything else,
they are credible and reliable.
For the first time in the history of the student
newspaper, the staff has modern, new and efficient
equipment and production facilities to work with. The
staff owes many thanks to the Media Board, which
has been most helpful and cooperative.
With the new found feeedom that came from the
inception of the Media Board in January of 1978
many sweeping and beneficial changes took place,
including newer and better production machinery,
wire service, office equipment and num erous other
capital improvements that would have been
impossible under government control.
The newspaper made swift and sure progress.
It's operation has become much more modern,
professional, and sophistocated; we have come of
age as a real news mechanism.
The East Carolinian is dedicated to professional
journalism, for the free press is one of the great
bulwarks of democracy, and it represents the
greatest protection from tyranny.
It is the duty of the East Carolinian to promote
and encourage free thought and continue in it's role
as the champion and voice of the people.
EDITORS NOTE This article was jointly written by
Editor Marc Barnes and Advertising Manager
Robert Swaim.
ECUreceives medical grant
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
A SI.5 million grant
wa received by the
East Carolina Medical
Foundation in June.
As a result, the
board voted to name
the educational facility
the 'Brody Medical
Science Building
According to William
Stanley, the chairman of
the Board of Trustees
Development commitee,
"The grant is the
largest single private
gift ever received by
the University
"The gift reflects a
long-time friendship and
substantial involvement
with ECU by the Brody
family, who have been
important leaders and
contributors to business
and community activities
in the East for 51
years
Chancellor Brewer
made the statement
"We deeply appreciate
the generosity and
confidence shown by the
Brody family in
supporting the continued
development of a
medical school which
already has demonstra-
ted its potential for
greatness and dramatic
involvement in health
care for Eastern North
Carolina
"This is very tan-
gible evidence of the
continuing support to
the School of Medicine
andgreatly reassuring to
me and to our faculty.
The donation is
earmaed for use to
provide Brody Brothers
WECU has problems
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
WECU is still having
problems with the FCC.
Though they were due
to receive the FCC okay
on their construction
permit during the first
part of August, they
have not yet received it.
Not receiving the
permit means that there
is still a possibility that
the station has been
turned down for the
third time.
Jeeter said that he
expected to get the
permit when the FCC
returns from their va-
cation.
But even after he
receives the permit, the
problems will not be
over. After he receives
the permit, then the
media board must ap-
prove the WECU bud-
get. Then bids must be
taken for the equipment
needed to get the
station into operation.
"Hopefully, we'll be
on the air in October.
But I'm not promising
anything said Jeeter.
The station's fre-
quency has been des-
ignated as 91.3 FM. It
can be received only
here in Pitt County.
The station will play,
according to Jeeter,
"Album oriented rock
and jazz He estimated
that there would be
from three to four cuts
of jazz per hour.
Jeeter also said that
there would be "no top
forty or disco, because
that is too readilv
4
available in this mar-
��I.
One distinct advan-
tage for the listening
public will be the fact
that there will be no
advertising on the sta-
tion. Since the station
will be under the dir-
ection of the Media
Board, it will not be
allowed to run any
announcements other
than public service an-
nouncements and News
broadcasts.
Though the type of
music the station will
be playing has been the
subject of quite a bit of
controversy, Jeeter feels
confident that he will
be running a profe-
ssional quality radio
station.
So hopefully we can
look forward to having
our own station in the
month of October.
According to John
Jeeter, "There's no
excuse for not having a
broadcast station on this
campus
Professorships, and will
also provide scholar-
ships, as well as giving
aid to the recruitment
and retention programs
for the disadvantaged
and minority students.
The board adopted a
resolution which read in
part: "We gratefully
accept this gift and
dedicate the Universitv
and School of Medicine
to the high goal of
excellence in service to
the people of North
Carolina, especially
those in rural com-
munities where the
need for adequate
modern health care is
so great
East Carolina Univ-
ersity will forever be
indebted to the Brody
Family for their friend-
ship, understanding and
support was the
resolution adopted by
the board.
?
t

't
WESTERN SlZZhm
fan
B KARE

eui
The SGA
has ended,
oi Trustee?,
a decision
Chancellor
cided in tai
Melvin, wh
assumed thl
SGA preside
The Boar
tht-v have
whatsoever
monev for
na tive Presj
with the kl
consent oi
vin.
The d
adopted i
session b
board.
The repl
that Chanctj
"took the
Lvtnelieoxis-
Dlniners-
Parties-
Speeial Oceassions
Call 7B8-S71 for
Reservations
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758-2712
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it





ant
Call or walk in
28 August 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN P�gt 9
orships, and will
p-ovide scholar-
as well as giving
i the recruitment
Intention programs
ie disadvantaged
tinorit) students.
board adopted a
in which read in
e gratefully
this gifi and
he the University
! of Medicine
e high goal of
r- in service to
teople of North
pa, especially
in rural com-
ies where the
:or adequate
health care is
Carolina Iniv-
wili forever be
I to the Bred)
their friend-
-landing and
wa the
�n adopted by
in
arr
:rn
Counseling available at the REAL Crisis Center
By USA DREW
Assistant News Editor
Of all the services available to any community,
perhaps one of the most beneficial, and quite often,
one of the most disregarded, is the counseling
center�a place where one can go for confidential
information on anything from term papers to V.D.
For over ten years, REAL Crisis Intervention Center
has been providing this area with just that type of
service.
Last Tuesday, Mary Smith was elected by the
center's board of directors to be the new director of
REAL. Ms. Smith has been working at the center
for over three years, first as administrative
assistant, then as program coordinator until last
March when she was placed as acting director
following the death of the present director. As the
new director, she would like active student
awareness of the center.
REAL Crisis Intervention Center was started in
1968 by a group of students at ECU in response to
the problems that many students were having in
adjusting to the many changes that were taking
place in society at the time. The center began as a
"hot line" in one of the students' homes, slowly
developing into the prototype from which the
present center has expanded. The center was
chartered and licensed in 1971, and was financed
totally by ECU until 1971, when it received first
state funding, enabling it to hire a director. At the
Trustees decide in
favor of Brett Melvin
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
The SGA controversy
has ended. The Board
of Trustees, overturning
a decision made by
Chancellor Brewer, de-
cided in favor of Brett
Melvin, who has since
assumed the office of
SGA president.
The Board cited that
"they have no evidence
whatsoever that the
money for 'The Alter-
na tive Press' was spent
with the knowledge or
consent of Brett Mel-
vin.
The
adopted
session
board.
The report did site
that Chancellor Brewer
"took the only possible
decision was
in a closed
by the full
action he might have
taken in this matter It
also stated that he
"was totally correct,
based on the infor-
mation available to
him
After making the
decision the board de-
clared "Mr. Brett Mel-
vin, SGA President El-
ect as the bona fide
president of the Student
Government Associa-
tion.
The report did have a
few things to say about
the printing of the
"Alternative Press
"The Alternative Press'
having been issued at
the last minute and
being unsigned and
hence difficult to berut,
smackes of cowardice,
and must be termed
despicable and scurri-
ious.
same time, it began to receive funds from the
United Way program that made it possible to
maintain two full-time, paid staff members. In 1977,
because of financial pressure that required drastic
cuts in the program, REAL broke away from ECU.
Since then it has been functioning apart from the
campus and is funded by United Way, and by the
state through the Department of Human Resources.
Through the years, REAL has been valuable
to many people in the Greenville area. The
center strives to provide the community with the
services it needs, when it needs
them, by offering free, 24-hour, confidential
information, referral or short-term counseling. There
are 7 basic programs that REAL uses to provide its
scrv ices �
The "Helpline (758-Help), is a 24-hour
telephone service; the "Walk-in center" is REAL's
center itself, located on Evans Street, and is open
24 hours a day for anyone to come in and talk with
a couselor. REAL also has its "off-site center In
special, emergency situations, REAL will send a
team of a male and a female counselor to someone
who needs help. Because of dangers encountered in
the past, the center has limited this service only to
those who cannot get to the center (i.e. a rape
victim in the hospital). Outreach Education is
REAL's program whereby members go out and
speak to groups who have requested information in
certain areas. REAL also has separate programs
for rape, drug or alcohol abuse, and battered wives
or children. These programs provide victims with
the support and encouragement they need to survive
such traumatic events.
Except for the 2 administrative postitions, REAL
is run entirely by volunteers whose only basic
requirement is that they want to work with people.
Each volunteer must complete a 40 hour training
course in dealing with different crises as they occur.
Once the course is completed with a score of 80
percent or better on any tests, the volunteer is then
given an oral examination by the Review Team.
The Review Team is comprised of the instructor,
the program coordinator, and the director, who talk
with the volunteer to see how much of the material
has been absorbed. If the board feels that the
volunteer may be qualified, there is a 24-hour
internship with a trained counselor that must be
completed by the volunteer. Only after having
satisfactorily completed the internship and again
appearing before the Review Team, is the applicant
accepted as a volunteer at the center. This process
may sound threatening to some who are considering
volunteering, but for a serious volunteer it is only a
part of the job. For the center, the entire process is
necessary to ensure the quality of the counselors.
REAL maintains a staff of three resident
counselors, who live at the center in exchange for
their services, and about 10 other volunteer
counselors. To maintain the quality of their
counselors, the center reviews each one every three
months and holds a 2-hour training course in
special areas twice a month. In this way, the
volunteers are being contuinually trained and
evaluated so that they are always prepared to
handle whatever problem may arise.
According to Ms. Smith, the center averages
approximately 300 contacts a month and 30-40
percent of those are students. Since over half of the
volunteers at REAL are students, any students who
The REAL Crisis Center is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, for anyone
are seeking help at the center will find someone
who can relate to their problems and can offer
sound information and advice.
Any student who attends ECU is automatically a
member of Student Volunteers for REAL, the
center's organization on campus. SVFR has its own
advisors, officers, and constitution. The main
purpose and goal of SVFR is to recruit volunteers
and to heighten student awareness of the center.
Over the past few years, SVFR has been mainly
inactive, but, says Ms. Smith, "They are our link to
East Carolina directly. They work in our behalf on
campus, and whether they will become more active
depends on what they want to do. We can't push
them But she would like to see the organization
become more active because she feels they have
done a lot for the center in the past. To reactivate
student interest, Ms. Smith hopes to initiate a
program of forums and workshops on campus.
Ms. Smith feels that the majority of problems
that students seek help with stem from academic
and social pressures. Many students are i nfluenced
by their parents or their peers to achieve certain
goals that the student may feel are unsuitable.
Quite often, as graduation approaches, students beg-
inlo reexamine their own goals and achievements
onlv to become more confused. Both of these
situations can lead to feelings of inadequacy or
failure. Rather than confess these feelings to a close
friend or companion, a student may be more
comfortable discussing them with an anonymous
person.
Students are also influenced socially, and for
some, this can be even more consequential than
academic pressure. A student who has lived a
sheltered life prior to college may come to school
and be confronted with situations that heshe was
not even aware existed. Someone who has embraced
a certain set of values may find, at college,
circumstances that are in complete contradiction to
what heshe had previously thought. Either of these
pressures, academic or social, can be devastating for
many people who are not prepared to handle them.
Although there are many people who do not
seek help because of the socail stigma involved,
Ms. Smith feels that the longer one waits, the
worse a problem can become. She feels that the
first step in solving any problem is the admission
that there is a problem, and that since it can be
done confidentially, help should be sought as early as
possible. Those people that have a friend, who needs
help would do best, she says, to make your concern
and support known, but do not push. Oftentimes, a
situation can be misinterpreted, but a person in real
need will remember an offer of help. Even an act
as simple as leaving REAL's "Helpline" number in
a conspicuous place can help. Many times callers
have told Ms. Smith lhal they had seen the number
and decided to try there first. After all, says Ms.
Smith, "We're always here
REAL is always in need of volunteers. If you
think you would like to help, please contact REAL
at 758-HELP, or come to the center which is located
at ll 17 S. Evans Street.
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
FRATERNITIES
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Sigma Tau Gamma
Lambda CM Alpha
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Delta Sigma Phi
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V. "sri
.�
WELCOME YOU TO
PIRATE COUNTRY
h$t,
� I. � m ii,i�,��iii�h '





PaajJO(iTHEiEASTj
Deaf program
is successful
Fred Mangrubang
SGA making
interior changes
B KAREN WENDT
News Editor
The
m en t
has
in the
Student Govern-
Association(SGA)
a lot of plans
works, and will
be making a lot of
changes in the coming
year.
This year the SGA
will be publishing a
newsletter, which will
concern itself solely
with the happenings in
the SGA.
There are also quite
a lew consititution
changes in the works.
Brett Melvin, president
of the SGA described
some of the changes as
being clarifications of
the duties and respon-
Mbilities of the summer
legislature, including
putting limits on the
amount which can be
spent by the summer
legislature. There had
not previously been
such a provision.
Some other changes
will be in the election
rules. They are trying
to change them so that
instead of bringing
complaints to the
Review Board, any
questions concerning
campaign procedures
will first go through the
elections committee, and
should they feel it
necesary then they will
then go the appeal
board.
In explaining the
changes Melvin spoke
of setting the foundation
for the future and
"rebuilding
Some of the plans
the SGA is making for
the fall are the devel-
opment of a Fine Arts
Forum, an improved
bus schedule and
getting a 35 percent
i. ijority of the eligible
students voting. In the
past there has only
been a 27 percent voter
turnout.
"Student Govern-
ment has several
responsibilites. The first
responsibility is to the
students said Melvin.
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4:30-2:00 Friday and Saturday
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Emergency
Numbers
Campus Police
757-6150
Fire
752-3116
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
East Carolina Uni-
versity's Program for
the Hearing Impaired
has made great strides
since it's beginning
three years ago.
Though the program
only began with sic
deaf students, it has
grown to include ser-
vices for two graduate
students, thirteen regu-
lar students and many
hard of hearing students
who need note taking
assistance during clas-
ses.
The program em-
ploys several full-time
interpreters, as well as
four part-time interpre-
ters.
According to Michael
Ernest director of the
program, "In about five
years, we expect to be
able to train enough
interpreters here to
supply the demand on
campus.
The program in-
cludes counseling, note-
taking services and tu-
toring for both the deaf
and the hearing im-
paired.
It also sponsors the
ECU Sign Language
Club, which is for deaf
students, but which also
allows the hearing to
learn more about sign
language.
The ECU interpreters
have tentatively been
approached to appear at
the next convention of
teh National Association
for the deaf.
The program is also
looking in North Caro-
lina, South Carolina,
and Virginia for other
interested deaf students,
to introduce them to the
ECU program.
During the 1978-1979
school year, the pro-
gram assists students
majoring in sociology,
industrial technology,
home economics, edu-
cation, geography, bu-
siness administration,
special education and
psychology.
One of those stu-
dents was Fred Man-
grubang. Mangrubang
will be graduating after
"He will be the first
graduate of ECU to
have made continual
use of the classroom
interpreters for the deaf
provided by the pro-
gram for hearing im-
paired students ac-
cording to a recent
press bureau release.
Fred maintained a
3.5 grade point average,
and was active in se-
veral campus organiza
tions, including the
science club, ECU's
Handicapped Community
Education Committee,
and has held the office
of Vice President of the
Sign Language Club.
Ernest said, "We're
very proud of Fred.
He's not just a good
deaf student; he's a
good student by any
standards
Mangrubang is plan-
ning on doing graduate
work in education, after
joining the Wilson
School faculty.
"I want to share
with them (deaf stu-
dents) my knowledge
and skills so that they
will be able to function
as capable adults. feel
1 can do this because I
have undergone the ex-
perience of being'deaf
said Mangrubang.
Mangrubang was not
born deaf, but was the
victim of an accident at
the age of 14.
Said Mangrubang, "I
want to help give the
deaf pupil a general
secondary education
corresponding to the
demands of modern so-
cial, scientific and tech-
nical progress
Menu
All Pizzas Include Our Special
Blend of Sauce and Cheese
Our Superb Cheese Pizza
12" small $3.20
16" large $4.75
Domino's Deluxe
Pepperoni, Mushrooms, Onions,
Green Peppers, & Fresh Sausage
12" small Deluxe $5.60
16" large Deluxe $8.35
Additional Items
Pepperoni
Mushrooms
OHves
Onions
Green Peppers
Ground Beef
Sausage
Ham
Double Cheese
Extra Thick Crust
Anchovies
Hot Pepper Rings
12" small $.60 per item
16" large $.90 per item
Stated prices do not include
applicable state sales tax.
We reserve the right to limit our delivery area
Copyright 1979
t 1 �b
�1DOM PIZZ
0060835530
"East Carolina's Party Center"
Welcome Back to Greenville andECU!
Don't miss the excitement 6 nights a week!
Tuesday-CRAAZY TUESDAYsponsored by clubs and groups
Wednesday-GENTS NIGHTS-
Same as LADIES NIGHT for men
Thursday- COLLEGE NIGHT- Same Va price
admission and other specials
Friday- Our Famous END OF THE WEEK PARTY
3:00-7:00 and 8:30-11:00 p.m.
Saturday- PIRATE VICTORY CELEBRATION-
After every game
Sundav-LADIES NIGHT We can't sav enough about this!
FRIDAY AUG 31 - Special BEAT WESTERN CAROLINA PEP
RALLY WITH ECU CHEERLEADERS FROM 3:00-7:00p.m.
NOTICE to all groups and clubs
wishing to hold fund raisers:
Scheduling for 1st semester will be done on Tuesdays
from 1:00- p.m. until 3:00 p.m. through September-
Apply early for good dates!
WATCH FOR OUR SEMESTER SEASON PASSES
THAT CAN SAVE YOU MONEY!
COMING SOON!
pol
set
an
h(
!





id groups
it thisl
JNA PEP
7:00p.m.
lays
iber-
ES
Student Union
has new logo
28 August 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Pag t
STUDENT UNION
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
This will be the new logo of the Student Union.
Look for it on all SU publications.
New soda shop
opens in Wright
By LISA DREW
Assistant News Editor
After several years of planning and construction,
the "soda shop" in Wright building opened last
week, the facility is similar in structure and
organization to the Croatan, but several improve-
ments have been made.
Joe Clark, manager of the Student Supply Store,
points out that there is a larger standing and
seating capacity than in the Croatan in addition to
an extra register. He adds that "we hope this will
help to relieve some of the load at the Croatan
Clark also noted that in response to requests for
healthier types of food "we're trying to upgrade the
food that is served In addition to the basic "fast
foods" offered there are plans to serve fresh salads
and side items prepared daily by a local restaurant.
The facility is completely self-service, but Clark says
that they still plan on hiring part-time student help.
The hours of the new shop will be similar to
those of the Croatan with the exception of nights
and Saturdays. Since the Croatan is opened on week
nights and, according to Clark, "there's hardly
enough business at the Croatan each night to pay
for the light bill the Wright facility will be closed.
Saturday, because the Croatan is closed and the
Student Store is open, the soda shop will be open.
Neither facility is open on Sundays. The hours are:
7:30 a.m. - 5:00 pm Mon. thru Fri.
8:30 am - 1:00 pm Sat.
1 he new shop has no formal name as yet, but
Clark expressed some interest in possibly running a
contest to find one, with some sort of prize for the
winner.
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
The Student Union
has had quite a few
projects in the works
over the summer.
The Student Union is
not the Student Center.
Mendenhall is the stu-
dent center.
The Student Union is
a separate body whose
function is to provide
entertainment for the
students of East Caro-
lina.
The foremost project
dealt with the "identity
crisis" of the Student
Union. A logo contest
was held in the spring,
and early in the sum-
mer a design was
chosen. The logo chosen
(shown above) was done
by Bill Brockman, a
commercial art major
who is also the SU
artist.
They have also been
working on something
which will be known as
Student Affairs Day,
which will include the
SU, the SGA and the
intramurals to name a
few.
The Union has also
been experiencing some
budget problems. The
SU budget has not gone
up in the past eight
years according to
Charles Sune, President
of the SU. The Student
Union receives only
$5.25 of each student
fee which is paid in.
It is with this money
that the Union arranges
to have its films, con-
certs, and other student
activities.
According to Sune,
"We're one of the last
colleges in the country
that still runs first run
films
First run films are
films which are cur-
rently in release, and
which have not been
taken out of the public
Theatre inadequate
market.
So far this fall the
following films have
been booked to play in
the theatre at Menden-
hall.
� Crease
� An Unmarried Woman
� The Eyes of Laura
Mars
� Movie Movie
� Boys From Brazil
� The Buddy Holly
Story
� The Big Fix
� Interiors
� Heaven Can Wait
� Richard Prior in
Concert
� Midnight Express
� Foul Play
� Coin' Soufh
� Capricorn
The Student Union
calendar, and any other
information you would
like to have concerning
any of the departments
of teh Student Union
can be obtained at the
information desk at
Mendenhall Student
Center, and in the
offices of teh SU on teh
second floor.
As Charles Sune put
it, "You can't work all
of the time and that's
where we come in
The Student Union
in the last few years
has also developed
problems which had not
been anticipated when
the budget was drawn
up. �
The inflation rate is
of course, one of the
most prominent.
There has also been
a change in the last
three years 'or so
(according to Sune), of
a law which stated that
non-profit organizations
would not have to pay
royalties on music which
they play. The words
non-profit organization
were removed from the
law so that now the
Union must pay royal-
ties on all concerts, and
even the music which is
played before a film
showing.
McGinnis to undergo major renovation
By LISA DREW
Assistant News Editor
At one time, it may
have been the most
elaborate elementary
school auditorium in the
country. For the needs
of the ECU Drama
department, McGinnis
theatre is no longer
adaptable.
The theatre: waslbuilt
as a part of ECU's
K ahl-CoattsL'boratory
School in 1951. The
school now has a new
location, but its old
theatre has been used
by ECU since inception
of the drama depart-
ment in 1963. David
Downing, an instructor
in the department, says
that the theatre "was
never designed to be
used the way it is now
being used. It was not
designed for the staging
of the New York-style
productions that we do
here. Consequently, it
was inadequate for that
sort of thing Downing
cites several factors that
make the theatre
unsuitable for the type
of productions that the
department puts on.
He explained that
the stage area was too
small to accomodate the
elaborate scenery
involved and added,
"We spent most of our
time just trying to
figure out where we
were going to put those
things
The length of the
theatre posed another
problem. Difficulties
with the acoustics and
the "sight-line" of the
audience were often
experienced. According
to Downing, "when you
were in the back (of the
theatre), you were
really in the back
During musical
productions, the
placement of the
nrrh��tr� oft�n nr-
performance. since the
orchestra area and the
floor of the theatre
were both on the same
level, the audience in
the first several rows
had to view the
performance through the
orchestra. In addition,
the dialogue on stage
vas often inaudible to
these people because of
the volume of the
music.
The lighting in the
theatre was another
hindrance encountered
by the department.
Often, positions of
lights were inadequate
and had to be adapted.
According to Preston
Sisk, also an instructor
in the department, most
of the major advance-
ments in lighting
technique have been
made since the theatre
was built, making the
original system awkward
and outdated. Sisk also
pointed out that some
of the wiring was as
old as the buiding itself
and several small
electrical fires had
occured. "It's just an
unsafe building he
said.
Fortunately, most of
these and other
problems will be
remedied in the near
future. After almost
nine years of planning
and research, designs
for extensive renovations
have been approved and
are scheduled to begin
at the end of this year.
The project will
consist of two phases
and. involve three
buildings. Phase One,
tentatively scheduled to
begin around Christmas,
will include renovations
of the old theatre and
of the dance studies in
the old school. Phase
Two will include the
building of a scene shop,
repairs to classrooms,
and installation of
air-conditioning
ings.
PhaseOne has been
alloted 1.9 million
dollars and is expected
to be completed one
year after actual
construction begins.
Phase Two will cost
around 1.2 million
dollars, but no date has
been set for its
beginning.
The first step of
Phase One will be the
demolition of the
"stagehouse the
entire stage area, with
reconstruction that will
enlarge it to three
times its present size.
The ceiling will be
raised to allow for
better use of flying
scenery that presently
cannot be concealed
because the ceiling is
too low. An entirely
new rigging system for
this kind of scenery will
be installed.
In order to
compensate for the
acoustical and sight-line
problems, the "rake" of
the house will be
increased. This means
that the incline of the
floor toward the back
will be steeper.
Downing says that the
effect this has "is
psychological, but quite
significant
The orchestra area
will be lowered to
create an "orchestra
pit This will put the
orchestra out of sight of
the audience, where
they will not overwhelm
the dialogue � with
their music.
Downing explained
that only if the
renovations are done
"under budget" will
they be able to secure
new lighting systems .
He is concerned that
the lighting be acquired
since he feels that the
department loses many
prospective- sludents
because of its present
equipment. "It's what
they see that makes the
prospective student
doesn't see' the quality
of the teaching or the
production when he
looks at the theatre. It's
important to have a
good facility to attract
them He added that
the theatre would,
however, he rewired.
The plans for the
renovations of the dance
studios include new
flooring. "Adancer can
receive serious leg
injuries if they dance
on a floor that is too
hard Downing
explained When dancing
on a hard -uiiace, the
dancer's body absorbs
all of the shock. The
new flooring will be
designed to eliminate
this problem. It will
consist of a layer of
linoleum and a layer of
plywood on supports
called "sleepers
These supports are
designed to give and
therefore absorb the
shock when a dancer
lauds on the floor.
Phase One plans will
also include new dres-
sing rooms in the
theatre and a new stage
floor.the total seating
capacity will be sightly
reduced due to new fire
codes, but Downing
does not feel that it is
a significant reduction.
Another necessary
addition to McGinnis
will be facilities for the
handicapped, since the
building presently has
no facilities in this area.
Elevators, ramps and
handicap parking will all
be included in the
renovations.
It has taken the
department a long time
to finally secure the
execution of these
plans, but, says
Preston Sisk, "we
wanted the best theatre
we could have for our
money. We had to take
our time with these
plans because when
they're built, there's no
m
&.
0$3
do
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r
H
it
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3r
THE
TREE HOUSE
RESTAURANT
123 E. 5th St.
PRESENTS
Tues 28tta
Ladies Nite
with
Bruce Frye
Ed Ccrtlvechro
Wed 29th
Happy Timesl Student
with
Frank Reilly
Friday 31st Saturday 1st
Special
Quest
Appreciation
Day with
RAINE
Sunday 2nd
Spaghetti
Special
All you can
eat 2.25
All
performance:
begin at 9:3
Monday's 5-8
Pizza Special
sm pizza, with
one ingredient
tossed salad &P
tea Only $2.251
Our kitchen
serves unti
am 7 day
a week
Offering various Italian specialties, pizza,
sandwiches and one of the area's Finest
salad bars. (Our salad bar is open until
9:00 seven days a week)
Mon. thru Sat.
11:30 am til 2 am
Sun.
5:00 pm til 2 am
Glad to have you back





Page 12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 28 August 197$
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The East Carolinian
Sports
Tuesday, Augutt 28, 1979, page 13
Greenville N.C.
Pirates return good nucleus of vets
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
It took Pat Dye five years to get East Carolina
into a bowl game, mainly because the Pirates were
simply not known ,� most parts of the country.
Now that Dye has the Pirates on the map, so to
speak, the question changes from "Can we make
THERE SEEMS "TO BE SUCCESS stories in the
making for both, of East Carolina's draftees in the
recent 1979 National Football League draft.
Linebacker Zack Valentine of Pittsburgh and running
back Eddie Hicks of the New York City Giants are
both well on their way to making their respective
teams.
alentine, a defensive end with the Pirates, was
converted to linebacker by the World Champion
Steelers. Pittsburgh still must cut one more
linebacker, expected to be Valentine, a second-round
pick, or eighth-round draft choice Tom Graves from
Michigan State. Valentine is considered the better
athlete and appears set for a spot on the Pittsburgh
roster.
The futur es of Hicks, the Pirates' fifth leading
all-time rusher, appear a bit more cloudy than those
of Valentine. Hicks suffered a back injury when he
scored a touchdown in New York's preseason opener
against Cleveland. Hicks had gained 32 yards prior
to the injury.
Hicks began practicing with the club again this
past week.
The Giants plan to eliminate one more running
back from their regular season roster, either Hicks
or three-year veteran Bobby Hammond. Hammond
also has suffered from injuries during pre-season.
Rumor has it that the one of these two that is not
selected for the Giant roster will be placed on the
injured reserved list. This would mean that this
player would be unable to play this season but would
be paid and given a shot at making the team next
season.
REMEMBER LARRY GILLMAN? That's right,
the old ECU basketball coach. It seems thai ole
Larry is not through with the sport yet. Believe it
or not, Gillman is a head, basketball coach again.
Yep, he's coaching the St. Louis Streak of the
Women's Basketball League. Gillman is 'also
director of player personnel for the Streak.
ALSO COACHING in the newly formed league is
Terry Kunze, an assistant under Gillman last
season. Kunze coaches the Minnesota Phillies.
MEETING THE FIVE-YEAR MINIMUM tenure
as a head coach for the first time this year, Pirate
football coach Pat Dye ranks 11th among active
college coaches with a 41-15 record and a .732
winning percentage. Dye ranked 10th at the
conclusion of last season, but dropped to 11th when
Chuck Fairbanks left the New England Patriots of
the NFL and became head man at Colorado.
THE MOST RECENT NCAA statistics show the
Pirates tied with Arkansas and UCLA as the 19th
winningest Division 1-A team in the country over
the past five seasons with a .727 percentage.
Post-season contests are not included in these
figures. East Carolina is the only team from the
Carolina's or Virginia included among the top 25
teams on this list.
UPON VISITING THE ECU practice field, one
could become easily alarmed whep they notice an
ambulance sitting in the middle of the battlefield.
But, says Rod Compton, East Carolina's Director of
Sports Medicine, you shouldn't be upset. It is
merely a new acquisition made by Compton and his
staff.
"It's going to add to our capability signifi-
cantly said Compton. "We won't be transporting
any injured athletes, but with this new field
equipment if an athlete ever needed o go to a
hospital we could have him ready to transport when
the ambulance arrives. It can save vital minutes in
an emergency situation
GOOD PASS COMBINATIONS always aid an
offense. Green to Gallaher and Green to Washington
come to mind of Pirate fans. Well, it seems these
same Pirate fans may have another combination to
look forward to in the next few seasons. Nelson to
Harden. That's Carlton Nelson to Reggie Harden.
Both are freshmen and both look superb. In last
Thursday night's intra-squad scrimmage the duo
combined on several spectacular passes. Nelson is
quick as a cat and appears to be made nearly
perfect in the mold of what a Pat Dye-coached
quarterback should be. Harden is as smooth as silk.
His grace reminds one of a swan (pun intended
Lynn Swann fans). Harden did drop several passes
in the scrimmage, but his accomplishments much
outweighed those few mistakes.
PERHAPS THE MOST EXCITING aspect of the
scrimmage was the fact that a spectator had to be
taken from Ficklen Stadium by a number of ECU
coaches. Clevc Bryant, a UNC assistant, was spotted
in the stands by some very alert fans who reported
lit presence to the Pirate coaching staff. How
Bryant found out about the scrimmage (no
announcement at all was made) or why he came
(lH Pirates and Tar Heels do not meet until
October 27) remain a mystery to the ECU staff.
it?" to "Can we stay on top?"
"We have tradition here at East Carolina said
Dye. "And each year that I've been here, that
tradition has grown. Last year we grew, of course,
with our Independence Bowl victory. It will be a test
to see if we can continue growing this year
Returning from last year's Independence Bowl
championship team will be 43 letterman, 13 of
which were starters.
An especially strong area for the Pirates should
be the offenseive backfield where four of last
season's five starters return. The one casualty,
Eddie Hicks, is now giving it a go with the New
York Giants of the NFL.
Leander Green, perhaps the most valuable player
on the squad, returns for his senior season at
quarterback. When healthy, the super-quick Green is
one of the best at his position anywhere.
The running backs are talented and experienced.
Fullback Theodore Sutton led the team in rushing
for the second straight season in 1978 when he
gained 621 yards. This figure does not include the
143 yards he piled up in the Independence Bowl,
which earned him offensive MVP honors for the
game.
Anthony Collins returns as the starting left
halfback The other spot will be manned by Sam
Harrell,tp reserve a year ago. Pirate fans may
remember Harrell's 71-yard touchdown run against
N.C. State last season.
Henry Trevathan and freshman Carlton Nelson
are set to back up Green at quarterback. Nelson has
been quite impressive in pre-season while Trevathan
has improved greatly on his strength and quickness
since last year.
Reserve backs include Marvin Cobb, who gained
192 yards in a scrimmage several weeks ago, Mike
Hawkins, Harold Blue and Roy Wiley.
The receiving corps will miss school record
holder Terry Gallaher. But the starting tandem of
Vern Davenport and Billy Ray Washington appear
quite ready to get the job done. Washington
averaged 30.3 yards for each of his 17 catches a
year ago.
Freshman Reggie Harden should be the backup
at split end. The Windsor, Va. native looks like a
future great. His graceful moves are sure to become
familiar with Pirate fans.
The offensive line looks great as five starters
from last season return. The guard tandem of
Wayne Inman, a second team all-Southern
Independent performer last year, and Mitchell
Johnston, a pre-season pick this year, are a great
pair.
The tackles are Matt Mulholland and Joe
Godette, both starters a year ago. Godette started
at tight end last year after having been a regular
tackle in 1977.
Jeff Hagans is back as the starting center.
Hagans came into his own during the second half of
last season and appears ready to do an excellent
job in 1979.
Depth along the offensive front will have to
come from a group of young, inexperienced players.
Freshman tackle Gary Gambrell has been impressive
thus far.
Defensively, the Pirates may not be able to
encore last season when they finished second
nationally in total defense, sixth in rushing defense,
second in pass defense and eighth in scoring
defense.
Heading the returnees is Mike Brewington, an
All-America candidate at linebacker. Brewington, at
6-4, has all the tools to become a successful
professional linebacker. Pirate coach Pat Dye says
"the Brew" nas played better in pre-season practice
than ever before.
Brewington's sidekick at linebacker will be
Jeffrey Warren. The junior from Snow Hill saw a
great deal of playing time last season and is
expected to fill the position aptly.
Chuck Jackson and Glenn Morris provide good
depth at the linebacking position.
The defensive front was depleted somewhat by
graduation. The big loss was Zack Valentine, the
ex-Pirate defensive end turned linebacker by the
Pittsburgh Steelers.
Tackle Vance Tingler is the only returning starter
along the front, but experienced and ready are
Noah Clark, John Hallow, Cliff Williams and John
Morris. Wayne Poole, Tim Swords, Fee Griffin,
freshman Doug Smith and Nate Wigfall provide
better than adequate depth.
The defensive backfield that was so excellent last,
season returns three regulars from a y&r ago.
Safety Gerald Hall was the only graduate. Charlie
Carter, Ruffin McNeill and Willie Holley will start
again and will be joined by Thomas McLaurin, a
top backup a year ago. Wayne Perry, who had been
expected to battle McLaurin at the free safety spot,
has been hampered by injuries but is expected to
contribute a great deal as the season wears on.
James Freer and freshman Freddie Jones lend
depth to this area.
The Pirate kicking game is set with punter
Rodney Allen and place kicker Bill Lamm both
returning. Allen averaged 39.1 yards a kick last
season. Lamm scored 64 points in '78 as he
connected on 13 of 19 field goal attempts.
Leander Green
i
Green operating the option
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
He's the little big man. He stands only 5-7 but
he holds the hopes and dreams of the 1979 East
Carolina football team.
He is Leander Green, the Pirates spectacular
senior quarterback. With Green, the Pirates are an
explosive, wide-open team. Without him, there could
ye problems, big problems.
This is not to say that Green lacks adequate
ackup help. It is just that no one can measure
just how good Green is at running the offense
called for by Pirate Head Coach Pat Dye.
"The thing is so great about Leander said
Dye, "is that he has the ability to get the football
to all the people at our skill positions. And we have
some excellent people at those positions.
"Leander knows how to react to different
defenses and how to treat those defenses
East Carolina quarterback coach Al Kincaid
attributes much of Green's importance to the Pirates
to the confidence the other team members have in
the Jacksonville native.
"Leander nas done an excellent job of becoming a
leader in the last two years said Kincaid. "His
first year as a part-time regular, his sophomore
season, was a quiet one. He was much less vocal
than he is now. Leander is now one of the team
spokesman. The team trusts him and respects him
Last season when Green was out or forced to
play with a variety of injuries, the Pirate offense
was bad, to say the least. But once Green
recuperated, the Pirates exploded. The turning point
for Green was the October 21 meeting with
Richmond. From that game on, the Pirates were
nearly unstoppable, never totaling less than 300
ECU coach Pat Dye
a barometer
yards in any contest.
Green has been called "the barometer" for the
Pirates. His presence makes the team a power. His
.absence makes the squad struggle
to be respectable.
Last season, with Green out of the lineup, the
Pirate defense was forced to go to extremes to hoid
opponents after the offense has miscued in any
number of ways. Fumbles, interceptions and a lack
of sustained drives all put an extra-heavy burden on
the East Carolina defensive unit.
Therefore, Green's absence not only affected the
offense, but also the defense. . Therein lies another
reason why the Pirates can ill-afford to lose their
starting quarterback.
"We certainly must keep Leander well said
Kincaid. "He just does all things so well. There
could not possibly be a replacement for someone
like that
Though a bit short, Green is strong and
extremely quick. He has an underrated arm and is
an excellent runner.
Running the option is Green's specialty. Long
after he graduates, Pirate fans will remember the
many times he faked a pitchout to a halfback and
darted upfield for a substantial gain. Or perhaps
they'll remember the times he made those impossible
pitches when he appeared swarmed over by an
opposing defense. Maybe they'll even remember his
long passes to Billy Ray Washington.
One thing is for sure, the fans will remember
Leander Green. And they surely are hoping now
that they will be able to look back someday and
recall that Green's senior season was a healthy one.
If they are able to do this, they may have a great
deal to rom.mber u!�out the 1979 version of the
East Carolina Pirates.
ECU nickname 'Pirates'has unusual background
By GEORGE A. THREEWITTS
ECU News Bureau
The pirate, a symbol of East Carolina University
and its athletic teams, was adopted from the legend
and lore of coastal NorthCarolina and was a natural
choice for a nickname when intercollegiate athletics
began at the school more than 42 years ago.
Pirates, fierce and colorful, were prominent in
North Carolina's colonial period. The state's Outer
Banks, which jut far out into the Atlantic were ideal
hideouts for these legendary gangsters of the high
seas. Many had homes and families in the small
villiages along the Carolinian coast.
Edward Teach, best known as "Blackboard" was
a resident of Eastern North Carolina He b�A �
house at Ocracoke on the Outer Banks in 1934.
That year, the Tecoan, the yearbook for what was
then East Carolina Teacher's College carried pirates
as its theme. The pages were filled with paintings
and sketches of patch eyed figures, tall ships and
buried treasure. The book referred to the tales of the
infamous "Teachy the Pirate" often t6ld by natives
in the nearby historic town of Bath.
The men's varsity team, at the time, was known
as "The Teachers a lackluster band of athletes
who had won only two football games in three
seasons of existence. But the student body interest
in pirates quickly resulted in changing the name of
the team to capture the romantic appeal of the
early sea adventurers. The phange brought so much
enthusiasm that in the following year, 1935, the
Pirate football team had a much better season,
r
Prior to the introduction of athletics for men, the
ECTC Athletic Association, comprising women
athletes in basketball, tennis, baseball and archery
were content with the more classical nicknames. A
1930-31 Handbook for ECTC listed the two teams
that made up the Athletic Association as the
Olympians and the Athenians. Their colors were
purple and gold (the same as today's colors) and
the mascot was a wildcat.
Other uses of the pirate theme began in the
lVWs with a literary magaxine named "Pieces of
"Rebel " nme' h�ever was Uter changed to
The college yearbook became the "Buccaneer" i
the 1950s and the pirate symbol, the face of �
bearded, pa,ch eyed ciarattcr with , CFOSsed
emblem onlu, hi Was added to the school seal in
the mid 1960 s.
I
i
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1





Page 14 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 28 August 1979
Brewington, an enforcer
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
He is an enforcer in every respect of the word.
He puts fear into opposing runners, quarterbacks,
receivers and blockers. As a matter of fact, he puts
fear into about anyone that meets him on the
street.
At 6-4, 231 pounds, Pirate linebacker Mike
Brewington is an awesome physical speciman. His
build fits perfectly into the mold of a professional
linebacker. In additon to his size, Brewington has
extreme speed and quickness. He has been clocked
at 1.8 in the 40-yard dash.
Strong is not a powerful enough word to describe
Mike Brewington. "He's the most overpowering
linebacker we've ever had here said East Carolina
Head Coach pat Dye They don't fall forward when
be hits 'em
'Big Brew as his teammates call him, led the
Pirates last season with 149 tackles when he was
named a second team All-Southern Independent
performer. This season All-America honors are
uithin his grasps.
"There i no limit as to how good Mike can
ft says Pirate assistant coach Frank Orgel. "He
has absolutely limitless potential. I don't feel he has
come close to playing to his potential yet, even
though he has been awfully good
� hen Brewington signed with the Pirates out of
Rose High School in Greenville, many expected
super things from him very fast. And why not? He
was listed in PLAYBOY magazine as one of the top
50 freshman in his class.
But it took Brewington until last season to really
assert himself as a star, even though he has been a
starter since midway through his freshman season.
"The reason Mike came along slowly is that we
orought him along slow said Orgel. 'When he
arrived here we were loaded at linebacker. Harold
Randolph and Tommy Summer were here, among
others. There was just no need to push him too
hard. I've seen potentially good players ruined by
being rushed into the college game too fast. So we
kind of let Mike come along at his own pace
The wait was worth it for the Pirates. Dye has
said many times that he now rates Brewington with
a j linebacker in the country. "There are very few
in ike's class said Dve.
Brewington continues a tradition of great
linebackers at ECU. Danny Kepley and Harold
Randolph preceded him. Kepley now plays in the
Canadian Football League. Randolph was drafted
high b) the Dallas Cowboys but failed to make the
team mainly because uf size limitations.
OUT OF
BUSINESS
SALE
STEREO EQUIPMENT LIQUIDATION
Audio Warehouse of Augusta, Ga
owned by Stereo Village has gone
out of business. Stereo Village is
liquidating their remaining inventory
at huge savings.

'Big Brew'
Orgel says that Brewington is probably more
gifted than either Kepley or Randolph. "Mike has
all the took to be a great one said Orge. "He
can play pro ball. Whether he does or not is yet to
be seer But he is good enough to play someday
in the NFL
And play in the NFL is exactly what Brewington
wants to do. His father, a coach at Rose High now,
once played professionally with the Oakland Raiders
and the Green Bay Packers.
"When I was little said Brewington, "I used
to watch my father on television. I said to myself,
'That's what I want to do and I still haven't' lost
grasp of that as a goal
As for his present goals, Brewington savs he
only wants what is best for the Pirates. "People ask
me about being an Ail-American he said, "and I
tell them that that would be nice but the main
thing is winning. If honors come my way, that's
o.k. If they don't, that's o.k. too. I just want to do
all I can to make this a great season at East
Carolina
Classic Clothing
For On or Off
Campus Wear
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At The Clothes Horse you'll find great looking suits
nd jackets for weekend parties and special occasions.
Dress Shirts and Sportswear by Gant;
Sweaters by Coxmoore;
Shoes by Bass, Sperry, and Timberland;
and lots of other clothing for campus wear.
Th�
Horrc

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818 E. 5th Street
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28 August 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 15J
OVERTONES WELCOMES
ECU BACK TO SCHOOL
Located on corner 3rd and Jarvis St.
Kellogg's Frosted Flakes $1.23
Peter Pan Peanut Butter 29
6oz.jar
a
'
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Maxwell House Instant Coffee $3.09
FROSTED
20 oz. package

15 oz. package
1 6oz.jar
Moxwefl
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Kellogg's Frosted Flakes $1.03
Kellogg's Rice Krispies 9r
13 oz. package
Kellogg's Corn Flakes 83'
18oz.package
RICE
CORN
FLA!
10oz. package
Kellogg's Rice Krispies 77'
fi,
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Coca-Cola 78
l6oz. carton of 8
8oz. package
Kellogg's Corn Flakes 47'
Hamburger Helper 2$1.00
Spaghetti-Lasagna-Beef Noodle
Hamburger
Helper
ADOTOIli
V m
612 oz. package
Total Cereal 88
total
Giant 18oz.box
Clorox Bleach 59
half gallon jug
Tide Detergent 98'
Giant Box
Grade "A" Whole Fryers 39 lb.
Charmin Bathroom Tissue 99'
4-roll package
Royal Guest Light Tuna 59'
6oz.can
Royal Guest Sliced Peaches 58'
212Sizecan
Oven Gold Bread 3$1.19
1 y2 pound loaf
Campbell's Tomato Soup 23'
lOoz.can
Campbell's Vegetable Soup 4$1.00
lOoz.can
Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup 4$l .0u
luoz.can
Morton Frozen Pot Pies 28'
8oz. package
Morton pot pies
� FREE 2 litre Coke
� � A ! with $10.00 or
Maxwell House Coffee $2.69 j morefood
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Page 16 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 28 August 1979
Wishbone important to defense, too
ECU Sports Information
For East Carolina's
toothall team and coach
Pat Dye the wishbone
offense is a way of life,
but not just out of
habit. The sixth-year
Pirate coach thinks it
does a lot for his team,
not just on offense.
"The wishbone does
as much for our defense
as it does for our
offense, believe it or
not Dye said of the
formation he first
encountered in the 1970
Astro-Bluebonnet Bowl
when Alabama played
Oklahoma.
"To be a successful
team you must be able
to run the football and 1
don't think there can be
any doubt that the
wishbone is the best
running formation.
Everyone on the offense
must be a complete
football player, able to
block and run and be
physically tough.
"Teams win playing
tough, physical defense,
too, and working
against the wishbone as
we do all spring makes
our defense work hard.
Purples win 39-0
By
CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Last Carolina head
toothall coach Pat Dye
was able to get a good
idea of how his team
stands last Thursday
when an intrasquad
scrimmage was held.
The scrimmage was
played under game con-
ditions.
"I think our defense
did a good job said
Dye of his regulars. "I
thought there was some
good hitting going on
out there
The Purple squad,
manned with first and
second teamers, de-
feated the vastly under-
manned White team
39-0 in the scrimmage.
Highlights included
an 82-yard touchdown'
jaunt by fullback Theo-
dore Sutton and a
50-yard scoring pass
from quarterback Lean-
der Green to Billy Ray
Washington.
The ireshman duo of
quarterback Carlton
Nelson and split end
Reggie Harden got to-
gether on several spec-
tacular pass plays.
Defensively, four in-
terceptions by the Pur-
ple team stand out.
Charlie Carter, Ruffin
McNeill, Chuck Jackson
and freshman Freddie
Jones. Each picked off a
pass from a White
quarterback.
Jones, who hails
from Portsmouth, Va
has been a delight to
the Pirate coaching staff
throughout pre-season
because ol his aggres-
sive style of play.
Of concern to Dye
after the scrimmage was
the condition of the
Pirates. "This was the
first time we have
played in this heat
(Thursday was quite
humid). And it shows
too. We need to do a
lot of conditioning drills,
such as running, if we
are to be ready for
Western Carolina
The Pirate-Catamount
. game is set for Sept. 1
in Ficklen Stadium.
"The wishbone is a
more difficult offense
than most to coach, but
at the same time I
think it's more fun to
coach, too. We have
been running it for
several years now and
are beginning to get
more sophisticated with
it. We can mix in other
things effectively now,
but make no mistake
the wishbone is our
bread and butter
A year ago the
Pirates were cne of only
nine college football
teams running from the
wishbone. The list
included Oklahoma,
Alabama, Texas A&M,
Texas-Arlington,
Appalachian State, Vill-
anova, Penn and Holy
Cross in addition to the
Pirates .
showing the effecti-
veness of the formation,
the 1978 Pirates, on the
way to the Independ-
ence Bowl outrushed
opponents by an
average of 244.7 to
128.8 yards per game
and scored 22.9 points
per game to 11.2 for
the 11 regular season
foes.
Over the last five
years the Pirates are
the nation's ninth most
productive rushing team
with a 272.49 yards per
game average. Another
wishbone team leads,
Oklahoma at 365.15
yards. Appalachian State
is the next closest team
in the state at 248.07,
ranking 20th.
UNC, NCSU tickets
Student tickets for
East Carolian's football
games at N.C. State
and North Carolina will
go on sale on Labor
Day, September 4 at 6
p.m.
Tickets for both
games will be sold for
$4.50 to students with
ECU ID cards. As in
the past, the tickets will
be sold at the ticket
booth located in Minges
Coliseum.
The Sept. 8 meeting
with the Wolfpack and
the Oct. 27 contest with
the Tar Heels are
both sellouts A
very limited supply of
tickets will be available
to ECU students.
In the past, the
tickets to these games
were sold early in the
morning. But due to
excessive noise and
littering made by
students who stayed in
line overnight, the
tickets will be sold in
the late afternoon this
year.
Tickets to Pirate
games at Wake Forest
and Duke are plentiful
and are available to
students at the present
time. Tickets for the
Sept. 15 game against
Duke sell for $5.00 to
students with ECU ID.
Tickets to the Wake
game go for $8.00 each.
Tickets to Pirate
home games are
available at the Minges
ticket office and at the
ticket office located
inside of the Menden-
hall Student Center.
The Attic enters 8th year
The Attic, billed as
North Carolina's number
three nightclub and
home of Greenville Rock
N' Roll, is located at
103 E. 4th St. For 7
vears, quality and di-
versification in music
has been the Attic's
goal.
Tom Haines, man-
ager and owner of the
Attic emphasizes the
importance of a variety
in entertainment. "Col-
lege students can easily
become bored with rep-
etition, so that's why
we offer a larger sel-
ection of bands and
kinds of music than any
other club in the state.
We try to cover the
whole spectrum of pro-
gressive rock entertain-
ment Last year the
Attic used 68 different
groups, both regional
and national, and num-
erous types of music
including album rock,
couniry rock, southern
rock, show rock, blues
rock, blue grass, jazz
and commercial rock.
Although the Attic of-
fers excellent music,
your favorite golden be-
verage, and a large
dance floor, it doesn't
end there. Footsball,
which was introduced to
Greenville by the Attic
in 1972, and was this
vears location for the
$1000 N.C. State Foots-
ball Championship, of-
fers a diversion while
the band is taking a
break or for just plain
old fashioned fun. The
Attic also has the larg-
est TV (7 Advent) in
eastern N.C. which will
feature a closed circuit
view of the band as
well as various movies,
specials, and sporting
events.
Stewart Campbell,
co-manager, feels that
the clubs downtown are
most of
at ECU
because they fill a void
in the students' curricu-
lum. It provides them
with an alternate to
work and study, a place
to relax, unwind, and
socialize. After a big
test, a long term paper
or � a gueling academic
week, nothing beats a
cold brew, a large
crowd, an accomodating
date, and a good band;
all readily available at
the Attic on most any
Tues. through Sun.
night. The admission
price is generally be-
tween $1 and $2 and
the entertainment is
brought to you either
by Brice Street, Blaze,
Choice, Bull, Night-
hawks, Nantucket, Super
Grit, Sutter's, Jesse
Bolt, or one of 50 other
talented acts. As Chip
Gwynn (Staff Writer)
said in a past article in
Fountainhead, "The At-
tic seems to have
reached a certain pla-
teau of success. It has
remained a favorite
night spot of college
students for several
years and has remained
successful because stu-
dents know the Attic is
going to book good
entertainment and they
are willing to go and
see that entertainment
even if they have never
heard of the performing
band
important to
the students
ft.C.M.4
advertisement
SEPT.
1979
ATTIC
N.C. No.
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2
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5
6
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8
9
11
12
IN CONCERT
Nightclub
SEPT.
1979
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Sept 3rdSTEELERS vs. PATRIOTS
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Continual service: 7:30 a.m. -7:30 p.m.
Servomation Corporation
f






28 August 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 17
.C.
i
:ek
1
:30

ECU halfback Sam Harrell on the move
Soccer team looks to
season with optimism
B ALLEN McDAVID
Staff Writer
East Carolina's
soccer team opens its
1979 schedule on Sept-
ember 9 in what Pirate
fans hope will be a
better year than last.
The booters will be
striving to improve on
the 1978 record of
3-11-2.
The Pirate's season
opens with the second
annual Mayor's Cup
Tournament. It was
played in Raleigh last
year. Also vying tor
iirt place in the
tournament will be N.C.
State, Duke, and
Carolina. Play will take
place in Creenvdie this
year. The tournament
should indicate the
tpc of year ahead for
East Carolina in soccer.
The Squad began
practice on August 19
and had an intra-squad
scrimmage on the 23rd.
When they take to the
field in their first game,
there will be quite a
few new faces on the
team. According to
Coach Brad Smith, 25
freshmen will be coming
out for the team, along
with seven transfer
students who will be
eligibe for the fall
season. Among these
will be freshman
sweeper Duane Degae-
tano and junior Steve
Brown. Degaetano was
a member of his all-
State high school team
in New Jersey. Steve
Brown comes to ECU
from Suffolk Community
College in Long Island,
New York, where he
was an All-Region
performer.
The Pirates have 18
regulars returning from
last year's team. "We
lost only two starters, a
goalie, and a sweeper
back said Coach
Smith. Among the
returning is standout
uingman Phil Martin.
Def�nive star Jeff Kar-
po ich will be back to
lend the Pirate booters
his defensive prowess.
The Buc's leading
scorer from 1978 also
will be back in the
person of Brad
Winchell, who led the
attack last year while
he was just a freshman.
This year's schedule
includes 20 games, the
lengthiest schedule ever
played at ECU, con-
sisting of 10 home
games and 10 away.
Some of the big high-
light games of the
season will be contests
with N.C. Slalc, North
Carolin. , Uukr. and
highly -1 ated South
Carolina.
Smith pointed out
that East Carolina
finished third in the
North Carolina spring
League, higher than any
other shcool team in the
state. Two club teams
composed of ex-college
players placed ahead of
the Pirates. As a result
of the booters success
in the spring, Smith
said he is especially
optimistic about the
upcoming season
HARRIS
-m
y.O
Pabst Blue Ribbon
Strohs
Natural Light
Schlitz
CASH & CARRY
1009 D!CKINSON AVENUE
GREENVILLE
BESIDE OLD BILBRO WHOLESALE W
Q
24 12 oz.
24 12 oz.
24 12oz.
12 12oz.
cans $7.48
cans $7.48
cans $7.70
cans $3.69
case sales only
Cigarettes
Bag Ice
$3.52 and $3.62 cartonl
10 lb. bag 59'
Attention Fraternities and Sororities and
Roommates Buy in bulk quanities and savi
Complete line of grocery items
by the case and Vi case
5 lb. box of chicken legs $4.25
5 lb. box of cube steak $8.95
5 lb. box of ground beef $6.95
We also have a good supply of institutional
packs of cups, plates, and napkins.
� .�.
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. a- ft � - -� r
j c �- . �-
LABOR DAY SALE
featuring
TheCHPPENDALE PIPE
British craftsmanship exclusively for
lOX
ZO 0FF
(thru Sept. 3rd.)
Mon Sat.
10:00 -9:00 pi
We have
fine SEGARS
domestic i
Imported
master charge
II
BankAmericaro
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PRESENTS A
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Tues. Night Bill Lester's
"SOUNDS OF THE SOUTH
Wed. Night JEFF CORBETT
Thurs. Night JOHN MOORE
The American Dream
Fri. Night "The Original
Steve Hardy's Beach Party"
Sat Night "TOMMY GARDNER"
Sun. Night "PENNY NTTE"
I
��. �c . srf. tf; . � �; �� d ,
� � �: �i �- � Y�- J . jf �� . .�r4U. ;�.
te eJd-tt r ts r-r4BrKr t
1





Page 18 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 28 August 1979
Pirate ticket
sales good
Bv ALLEN McDAVID
Staff If rtter
ll won't be long
before Pirate fans begin
making their assault
upon Ficklen Stadium
for the beginning of
another season of Pirate
football. If preseason
ticket sales are any
indication, the Bucs
should be playing
before quite a few
packed houses.
'Ticket sales are
going v i v well,
according o Wayne
Newman, director of
Sports Pron.otion, "we
hope to have a sellout
croud on hand for the
opener against Western
Carolina
publicity in the western
part of the state,
niewnam also stated
that the Office of Sports
Promotion will put out
some individual promo-
tion for the Duke and
Wake Forest games.
The home schedule
should also produce
some big
Homecoming
a big draw.
J, ffg'm
Pirate practice action
The State and
Carolina games are
already sold out, but
there are tickets still
available lor the Duke
and Wake Forest
games. Nevvnam
emphasized the impor-
tance ol fiaing a good
following (or the game
in liisloii-Salenr The
W ake game oilers a
chance lor East
Carolina to get more
crowds.
is always
and the
October 13th clash with
the Citadel should be
no different. Another
important contest on the
home slate is the home
finale with .North Texas
State. The ' � Mean
Green" have been
included in many pre-
season Top Twentj lists
which means this game
could be a very wide
open affair. The North
Texas State game will
be a part ol Green-
ville's Tobacco Festival.
In order to better
accomodate ticket
requests, the ECU ticket
office has begun staving
open until d pin on
weekdays. Fans are
advised to go ahead
and buy their tickets
now to be assured of
getting seats.
STUDENT UNION
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
We have an answer
for the energy crisis.
Cinergy!
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Catalog Showroom
2818 E. 10th St, Greenville, N.C
(iim aocU ib fo mane OMuma �h4a, uA a fleaAa&e ,
witii the 4eU il a iemce.
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Phone 756-2414
Brown Bagging Permitted
Fine Wines & Champagne
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OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
Steinbeck's
MEN'S SHOP
WELCOME
We have added a new
store tor you at
Carolina East Mall, carrying
young men's contemporary
fashions. We have Sasson
clothing, Halston sleepwear,
John Henry shirts, Polo Gear
w neckwear, Pierre Cardin leather
goods.
We still have the
good traditional names such as:
Sero, Botany 500, Izod, Lord Jeff,
Jaymar, and the list goes on.
Come by and visit us at any
one of our three locations:
Downtown on the mall
Pitt Plaza
Carolina East Mall
temfcecfe'js
MOTS SHOP
Ov
This story aipt
the July Au
JAR HEEL Ml
and is being
with permisiun.
B JIM SESJ
Kristi
Greenville didn
waterskiing
but dread)
boatload ol title
blue-eyed I
eves she's just
schedule towar
goal of tl
champions!
thing i- for
has plen!
Kris)
years old.
In on
growing
countr) a
recent
art- over tw
waterskters
Kris ti has
climb
her l
Starting on
tl
halt. kr -
(om
was on 1
A j ear
be .
girl ever i
masters
m the
ater SI
ation.
Lat year,
youngt
ever in tl Nd
A si
Fear of the
mune. esf
orders. For
of Dimes-stl
University
to allay the
Wilson M
O
St
y
T





28 August 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 19
4TS
Lying
�ary
isson
rear,
tear
leather
as:
Jeff,
on.
rtMall
Overtoil is world class
ston appeared in
July lugusi 1979
I IK HEEL MAGAZINE
is being reprinted
perm ision.
B JIM SESSOMS
Kristi Overton �
Greenville didn't begin
erskiing until 1974,
alread) she's won a
ttload "I titles. The
ed blonde beli-
- she's just about on
�dule toward her
ii t the national
tmpionship, and one
- for certain: ln
s plent) ol time. You
Kristi is onlj nine
. I
In one ol the tasted
king sports in the
mtr (according to
i nl estimates, there
i i twent) million
rskiers in the U.S.).
ti a - rapidly
to lllr tup ol
i i�! ol competition.
� ii two skis at
ige ol lour and a
kri-u could slalom
ski) at five and'
trick skis at six.
yea later she
ime the youngest
ever to receive a
isters rating in trick
m the American
ater knng Vssoci-
ion.
Last year, a the
. igesl rum pet itor
in the Nationals
the Olympics ol
vaH'rkiing- Kriti won
fourth place behind
junior Girls Champiom
Sally Monnier , an
experienced skier three
sears Kristi's elder. This
year, she has already
taken first place in
tricks and second
overall at the Junior
All-American Tourna-
ment in Florida, and
has her eyes set on this
summer's Nationals in
St. Louis.
The names ot the
tricks she performs
sound like Dr. School's
remedies. There's the
"toe side slide the
Toe trout the "Toe
side slide the " 1 oe
wake back" and the
Toe wake front
kristi describes, "The
-ki has a certain place lor
our foot to go. ou
put it in there and just
turn the ski. go oil the
wake, and turn
backwards The most
difficult trick is the
"toe-O where she
"wraps her loot in the
rope and unwinds all th
way around.
kristi
practices tour
week in tin-
but spring and
practice to
usually
days a
summer,
tall limit
w eekends.
Learning to ki came
cailv to her her father
began at the age ol
seven himself.
Kristi's father is
Parker Overton, an
expert skier in his own
right, president of a
Greenville supermarket
and of Overtoil's
Competition Skis, the
largest mail-order
walerski shop in
America. Says Overton,
"It was very easy
getting kristi up on two
skis. But once she
started tricking ' she
would take some rather
hard falls, and cry like
any normal six-year old
would.So we would
bribe' her with toys to
get her to try again.
But once she made her
first back (180 turn),
the bribing was over.
kristi" other
interests help her skiing
technique. She has
taken acrobatic dancing
and ballet tor years,
and loves to snow ski,
ride horses and play the
piano. But does she
think watersking is a
good sport for a girl
"Yeah" she says matter
ol factly, a it wonder-
ing who would think
otherw ic.
ithout a doubt,
knti is every inch a
normal nine-year old.
Vv hen aked who her
favorit skier is, she
replies with a giggle
and a blush, "Jimmy
McCormick Jimmy, a
nephew of champion
skier Kicky McGormick,
is also nine and a hot
junior trick skier. Not
only that, he is kristi's
boy friend.
She gies little
thought to the hazards
or physical requirements
of the sport. Does she
take bone-rattling spills?
"On the slalom, a lot
Does she need big
muscles to pull behind
a motorboar? Says her
mother, Becky, "She's
so light, the boat can
just barely move and
she'll pop right up on
tin- water
The men in Kristi's
life are all skiers,
naturally enough. Next
to her father, she most
admires bill Person, one
of the foremost
waterski instructors in
the country. In tact,
when given a choice,
kri�ti wants to "either
work lor Daddy (in the
ski shop) or be a ki
teacher like Bill
Peterson
But those goaU are
'way off in the future
Bight now, kristi's
mind is on one thing:
the Nationals in St.
Louis. U ith a deter-
mined look in her eyes,
she says flatly, "1 want
to be overall National
Champion Be warned.
Sally Monnier. kriti
Overtoil means busi-
ness.
A story with a happy,
healthy ending
Fear of the unknown is something to which no one is im-
mune, especially a family with a history of genetic dis-
orders For them, pregnancy is an anxious time A March
of Dimes-supported genetic services program at the
University of Southern California. Los Angeles is helping
to allay those fears The program is headed Dy Miriam
Wilson M.O chief of genetics division
m &
Corner Of Tenth & Evans
752-6303
OPEN 24 HOURS
"YOUR COMPLETE PARTY
BEVERAGE CENTER"
WELCOME BACK
ECU
A notice to our readers
Announcements of club meetings, tryouts, etc
are welcome at the East Carolinian . However, due to space
limitations, we cannot possibly print all that we receive
in each issue.
Therefore, we are asking the students, faculty,
and the staff to send us any press releases that they wish to
appear in the East Carolinian at least a week
or so in advance.
We will consider extenuating circumstances, and we will try to
accomodate as many different groups as we can.
Each press release should state the date of teh paper it is
to appear in, it must be typewritten or neatly printed, and it
must hav a name and a phone number of the president or
advisor of the gorup, in case we need more information.
The East Carolinian editorial and business offices are on the
second floor of the Old South Buildingacross from Joyner
Library) and we are open during regular business hours.
FOR INSURANCE
CALL:
Bill McDonald
Phone: 752-6680
Located on E. 10th Street
(next to King's Sandwich Shop)
STATE FARM INSURANCE COMPANIES
IHOME OFFICES: BLOOMINGTON, ILLINOIS





Page 20 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 28 August 1979
vp.
State title' on line as
Pirates prep for season
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
With an Independence Bowl trophy and a 9-3
record to shew for the 1978 football season, many
would figure that ideas for an encore would be
scarce for the East Carolina Pirates in 1979 But
such m not the case. Head Coach Pat Dye and his
Pirates have two super-big goals as the present
season draws near.
Another appearance in a bowl game is certainly
among the Pirate goals for 1979. But also on the
minds of East Carolina players, coaches and fans is
a state championship.
That's right, a state championship. One of seven
major college teams in North Carolina, the Pirates
have each of the other six clubs on their 1979
schedule. Wins over Appalachian State, Duke, North
Carolina, North Carolina State, Wake Forest and
Western Carolina would certainly qualify the Pirates
as the state's best.
But games against in-state rivals and Atlantic
Coast Conference members are not the only contests
that Dye and the Pirates must be concerned with
Out-of-state teams such as North Texas State
Richmond, and VMI also promise to provide Dye
and company plenty of headaches before the 1979
season is over.
Here's a look at all the Pirate opponents for the
1979 season.
WESTERN CAROLINA
The 1978 season ended on a sour note for
the Catamounts. After rolling to a 4-0 mark in the
Southern Conference, Coach Bob Waters' club
needed only to win one of their two remaining
games with Furman and Appalachian State, both
home contests, to claim the conference champion-
ship. Uell, the Cats lost both games, and so much
for the season.
Western hopes to make up for those losses,
which dropped their season record to 6-5, by
winning the conference championship in 1979.
Leading the way for the Cats is quarterback
Mike Pusey and receiver Gerald Harp. Pusev threw
for 2,946 yards and 14 touchdowns last season He
connected with Harp for 1,145 of those yards Harp
the conference's co-player of the year and the
nation's second-ranked receiver in 1978, grabbed 62
passes, 11 of which were touchdowns.
Evidently Western has the tools for an excellent
passing attack. The problem with the Catamount
oflense ,s that a running game is nearly
non-existent. So is an offensive line. Graduation hits
the line hard as five players who were starters a
year ago have departed. This area is definitely the
team's most glaring problem.
Western's defense should be in good shape
though, as only three lettermen were lo�t to
graduation. The linebacking positions are especially
strong, where the only problem seems to be
deciding who will start.
N.C. STATE
The Wolfpack are the odds-on favorite to win
the Atlantic Coast Conference title this season and
have been ranked in nearly everybody's Top 20.
A total of 14 starters, seven apiece on offense
and defense, return from a year ago. Heading the
hst of returnees is consensus All-American Jim
Richter. But missing from the list of returnees is
another consensus All-American named Ted Brown.
There is absolutely no way that one can
minimize the loss of Brown, but there appears to be
plenty of talent returning to keep the Wolfpack
among the nation's best.
Richter is only the best center in the country
and will be flanked by a talented offensive line
Guard Chuck Stone and tackle Chris Dieterich will
both .ie for All-ACC honors.
Quarterback Scott Smith was named to the
preseason all-conference team and will be joined in
the backfield by fullback returnee Billy Ray Vickers.
The replacement for Brown could come from any of
a half dozen players.
A big offensive weapon for the Wolfpack will be
kicker Nathan Ritter, who Pirate fans may well
remember because of his five field goal, 17-point
performance in the Wolfpack's 29-13 victory over
the Pirates a year ago.
A strong Wolfpack defense is headed by stars
Simon Gupton and Bubba Green up front and
Woodrow Wilson in the backfield.
DUKE
Red means go!
So say the promotions put out by the Blue Devil
offices now that Duke has a new coach in Red
Wilson. The ex-Elon College mentor has Durham
ranting and raving about Blue Devil football for the
first time in years.
But this optimism does not nullify the fact the
Devils return only 11 starters from a 4-7 season in
1978. The 1979 version of Duke football will be
sophomore-laden. As many as 12 sophs could be
starters by the time East Carolina invades Wallace
Wade Stadium on Sept. 15.
The Devils appear strong at wide receiver where
Derrick Lewis, ECU transfer Ron Fredrick, Marvin
Brown, and Chris Castor offer speed and skill.
The void left at quarterback by the graduation of
Mike Dunn will be filled by either senior Stanley
Driskell or sophomore Craig Browning.
The Blue Devil defense, basically young and
inexperienced, has many loose ends. A possible
strong point here could be the defensive backfield
where a trio of seniors return.
Wilson, who sports a 74-32-2 record in the small
college ranks, may find life among the "big boys"
a bit tough in his first season at Duke.
WAKE FOREST
For whatever it means, the Demon Deacons
return 17 starters from last season's 1-10 disaster.
This may be the reason that Coach John Mackovic
is very optimistic about the 1979 season.
After all, he has 34 lettermen returning, one of
which is All-ACC halfback James McDougald.
McDougald, a senior, has gained over 2600 yards in
his three seasons at Wake and appears to be a
good pro prospect
�� � Ml
i
1t. .� M�n��r�W �n4 hie
offensive co-workers to be more productive than a
year ago, when the Deacs scored only 104 points all
season. Eight U.nes Wake was held to a touchdown
or less by their opponents.
Defensively, the Deacs return impressive line-
backers Carlos Bradley and Marc Hester, among
others. B
One depressing note for Mackovic is his team's
schedule. Added to the schedule are teams like East
Carolina, Georgia, Auburn and South Carolina
Missing from the schedule is Virginia, the only
team the Deacs defeated last year.
VMI
Southern Conference champs in 1977, the
Keydets dropped to 3-8 last season. A lackluster
oilensive performance was the main reason.
Coach Bob Thalman, returning for his ninth
season as VMI coach, certainly must hope that his
offense will improve this year.
The VMI offensive backfield returns both running
backs and the flanker, but three-year starting
quarterback Robby Clark has graduated Jeff
Washington, the VMI tailback, gained 636 yards last
year and could blossom into a big star in 1979
Thalman must replace four of last season's seven
regulars along the offensive line. Bob Bookmiller an
all-conierence tackle, will be sorely missed.
Jell Morgan and Tim Cox head up a strong
defensive lront. The l.nebacking corps and secondary
were dented some by graduation but overall the
Keydet defense appears to be plenty tough.
Kicker Craig Jones returns as the nation's 10th
ranked all-time field goal booter. His 42 field goals
are tops among current NCAA kickers.
THE CITADEL
Hie Bulldogs return lb starters from a 5-6 1978
season. B,g improvement this year, right? Yes and
no. Hie team, says Head Coach Ark Baker, will be
better, but the record may not.
The Bulldogs' schedule is described by many as
being the toughest in the school's history.
The only real weakness that The Citadel has is
at quarterback, where Marty Crosby, the team's
all-time leading passer, has graduated.
The backfield is wealthy with the return of
Mump Mitchell, who gained 1,026 yards a year ago
Ihe receiving is talented and plentiful as the
top eight receivers from last season return.
Ihe defense returns nine starters, though both
linebackers, were lost to graduation.
NORTH CAROLINA
The Tar Heels suffered through an unusually
disappointing season last year. Head coach Dick
Crum's first year at the UNC helm resulted in a
dismal 5-6 mark.
But the Tar Heels return a great deal of talent
in 1979 and are expected to move back up to their
eustoman excellence. They have, in fact, been
included in most preseason Top 20 lists.
The backfield is set with "Famous" Amos
Lawrence and Doug Paschall stationed b hind
quarterback Matt Kupec. This area is very deep
with fullback Billy Johnson, super freshman halfback
Kelvin Bryant and sophomore quarterback Chuck
Sharpe ready for duty at any time.
The offensive line must suffer with the loss of
Mike Salzano to the pros, but the trio of Steve
Junkmann, Ron Wooten, and Rick Donnallev form a
superb nucleus for what should be a strong point
lor the Heels.
The defense is good, and great at the
linebacking position. Buddy Curry and Donnell
Nicholson are one of the best tandems around
anywhere.
All-America candidate Ricky Barden heads up a
more than respectable secondary.
Last year the Heels lost four games by a total of
13 points, which proves that there is a fine line that
separates winning and losing. This year North
Carolina should see things from the other side.
APPALACHIAN STATE
There is excitement in the air in Boone.
Sophomore quarterback Steve Brown returns from
last year when he directed the Mountaineer
wishbone attack to a surprising 173.5 yards per
game via the passing attack.
Brown often connected with sophomore split end
Rick Beasley, an all-conference performer last
season. This duo alone gives the Mountaineers a
look of respectability on offense.
Similar respectability was absent from the
Appalachian defensive scheme of things in 1978.
The Apps gave up 27 points per game and allowed
a raesmerizng 72 against Tennessee-Chattanooga.
RICHMOND
Speed to burn. This is the story of the Spider
backfield for 1978. Led by tailback Jesse Williams,
who is a world class sprinter and has been clocked
at 9.3 in the 100 yard dash, Richmond is loaded
with scatbacks.
Quarterback Jimmy Short returns fromlast year �o
direct the Spider attack. Though his statistics last
season were not the best (he completed just over 45
percent of his passes), he does have an excellent
knack for what Coach Jim Tait want to do
oflensively.
Defensively, the Spiders must replace six
starters, most importantly All-America safety Jeff
Nixon.
Junior linebacker Larry Braun and defensive back
Reuben Turner return to lead the o u .
defenders. Richmond.
NORTH TEXAS STATE
The Mean Green limshed 9-2 List season and
return 16 starters from �tfeni ,h��ld be another
success!ul year in 1979.
North Texas is so good, in fart, that they have
been included in several preseason Xop 20 lists and
See schedule on d. 21
t'
ouse
Coffeeh
Auditions
Sept. 21 & 22
Contact the Student
Union office for details
Watch for
outdoor jams!
Committee members
There will be a meeting on
Thurs Sept. 6 at 4:30
in the Student Union
committee office.
li'
THIS IS
Student
Appre
ciapora
Week
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
All ECU Students Are Invited! Come Celebrate With Us
And Get scial Discounts and Speciallu Prirorl MKnrtf;hr
All This Week! We've Got 'em On Everything YouNed.
Student ID Cards Required.
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE ASSOCIATION, INC.
IWlffnirrlffi i'Thh flngTHw HifT h uMi iiwhihi
o
"The woi
This is tl
that is, th
coach.
And intei
he tries to
Pirate basket
Intense
players
no room for
ScK
may well be
play all year
New heal
assistant unl
return of tai
Dallas was
ago when In
The qua
senior Jordi
hi? passes
total offe:
The ofiel
starters were
The Meai
excellent se(
David MornJ
This group
interception;
place honor?
North TeJ
has a 19-3
mark is thej
two-year pel
super-powersl
Oklahoma dul
Indian t
quite a job
year ago haj
to be filled t
Most not
Tom Rozantz,
Odor, also
game expenei
One stronl
running back
gained 648 yl
group of retui
Defensively
starters. One
an all-star cai
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28 August 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 21
e
?
i

LE
idise
td.
�, INC.
Odom making changes
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
"The word is intensity
This is the law according to Odom. Dave Odom,
that is, the new East Carolina head basketball
coach.
And intense is the approach that he is taking as
he tries to turn around the fortunes of a weak
Pirate basketball program.
Intense is also the way Odom will have his
players approach each and every game. "There is
no room for the weak noted Odom with authority.
Schedule
Cont'd from p. 20
may well be the best team that East Carolina W'H
play all year.
New head coach Jerry Moore, a former Nebraska
assistant under Tom Osborne, is blessed with the
return of tailback Bernard Jackson. The junior from
Dallas was the nation's sixth leading rusher a year
ago when he piled up 1,453 yards on the ground.
The quarterback position is aptly manned by
senior Jordan Case, who completed 58.7 percent of
hi? passes in 1978. He ranked 23rd nationally in
total offense.
The offensive line appears set as only two
starters were lost to graduation.
The Mean Green defense is spearheaded by an
excellent secondary which returns Marty Morrison,
David Morris, Richard Ross and Danny Whitaker.
This group was largely responsible for State's 28
interceptions, a figure that shared national first
place honors with Penn State.
North Texas State, though quite non-publicized,
has a 19-3 record over the past two seasons. This
mark is the fifth best in the country over the
two-year period. The Mean Green trail only
super-powers Penn State, Alabama, Michigan and
Oklahoma during that time period.
WILLIAM AND MARY
Indian Head coach Jim Root and his staff have
quite a job ahead. A total of 15 starters from a
year ago have graduated, leaving gapping hole
to be filled throughout the year .
Most noteworthy of the graduates is quarterback
Tom Rozantz, a four-year starter. His backup, Kevin
Odor, also departed leaving no quarterbacks with
game experience on the William and Mary roster.
One strong point for the Indians could be the
running back situation. Fullback Alvis Lang, who
gained 648 yards last season, heads an impressive
group of returnees.
Defensively, the Indians return a mere two
: starters. One of the two is linebacker Steve Shull,
an all-star candidate.
Odom has been a very busy man since he was
chosen for the East Carolina post this past March
23.
Other than recruiting, one of the first pieces of
business that Odom set out to take care of wa.8 the
situation of academics. When Odom arrived at ECU,
five of the nine returning Pirate lettermen were
academically ineligible for the 1979-80 season.
These players had, for the most part, taken a
nonchalant attitude, to say the least, toward
academics. They attended very few classes and
therefore had very little success within the courses.
Odom took immediate action as he tried to get
across to the players how important it was for them
to enter summer school and do well. It was of vital
importance not only to the individual players but to
the team as well.
Well, summer school has ended and Odom's first
dealing with a crisis ended with a booming success.
All five players did quite well in summer school
and will be eligible lor play when basketball season
rolls around.
"We are tremendously pleased in the change of
the attitudes of our players regarding academics
said Odom. "We've spent much time working in
this area and will continue to work hard. 1 want all
the players to move towards graduation. I'd like to
se them all leave with a diploma
While Odom was solving the problem of his
ineligible players, another problem crept up on him.
During the summer, the East Carolina basketball
program was placed on probation for one year by
the NCAA because of accused violations during the
recruitment of sophomore center Al Tyson.
Odom, ever the optimist, looks at the probation
in positive manner. "The thing I hate about being
on probation is that we are ineligible for
post-season tournaments. I'm sorry for our seniors
in that respect. But the way we will look at the
probation is that we want to be so good that it will
be the NCAA's loss that they will be unable to
invite us
The ex-Wake Forest assistant noted that he was
pleased with the efforts put forth by University
otticials in the basketball program's behalf during
the NCAA investigations. "I feel like everything
that could have been done was done he said.
An area that Odom will look for improvement in
his first year as head man of teh Pirates is in home
atttendence. "We need to fill up Minges Coliseum
for every home game he said.
"Student attendence is the atmosphere, the
degree of excitement staged by the fans. From the
students is where the atmosphere must originate
To the avid basketball fan, Odom would appear
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Ex-athletes
take to booth
Dave Odom
to be very organized in his quest to bring
supremacy to the Pirate roundball program. And
organized he is.
Organization has been the name of the game
with Odom throughout his coaching career. How
else could he have moved from a high school coach
in Durham to head coach at a major University in
four short years?
As for his sudden rise, Odom simply stated that
it was a matter of being ready.
"I've been very fortunate to meet many, many
people who have given me some great opportunities.
The key thing in life is so much in seeing an
opportunity when it arises and being prepared for
it. So many don't prepare. I've been lucky enough
to have been ready
"Lucky enough to have been ready he says.
The same can be said for the East Carolina
basketball program when hearing of the availability
of a man named Odom.
By
FRED ROTHENBERG
AP Sports Writer
CBS has a football
player and a tennis
player doing its U.S.
Open tennis telecasts,
but did you know that
the football player once
was tennis champion?
Pat Summerall, the
former place-kicker for
the New York Giants
and now the unflap-
pable voice on CBS'
football, golf and tennis
broadcasts, was Florida's
state tennis champion
on 1947. And that's no
slouchy tennis area, ei-
ther. People like Chris
Evert and Brian Gott-
fried also grew up
among orange groves
and tennis courts.
But if Summerall
knows so much about
tennis, why does he
have to ask his broad-
casting sidekick, Tony
Trabert, all those
questions?
"He knows the an-
swers but he just wants
me to pursue the topic
more said Trabert.
"Pat's the play-by-play
man and I'm supposed
to be the expert. He
figures it would mean
more coming from me.
As a result, some
people write in and just
call him a boob. But
they just don't under-
stand
"Pat plays the
straight man. He does
that on purpose. If his
ego were such that he
didn't want me to look
very good, he could
make that happen. But
he's not worried about
such things. You'll ne-
ver hear us zing one
another. We're both
there to talk about
tennis
Summerall and Tra-
bert, the American Da-
vis Cup captain who
won singles titles at
Wimbledon and Forest
Hills 24 years ago, are
a perfect doubles team.
Their style is relaxed
with an emphasis on
explaining techniques
and strategies on the
court. They don't tram-
ple over the action.
They let the tennis do
the talking.
"If a producer says,
'We need more about
the individual and less
about the match I
don't mind that. But I
draw the line. If I know
a player is married and
running around with
some dame, 1 won't
mention it. But if a
guy's wife is expecting
and he's been calling
home all the time and
it's affecting his con-
centration, then I'll say
so
And you won't get
any juicy bits from the
world of mixed doubles
from Summerall, either
"If I was told to do
more gossip, I'd tell
them to get somebody
else to do it he said.
The duo will be to-
gether for the seventh
successive year when
CBS begins 27 hours of
live coverage and high-
lights starting tonight
and ending Sunday,
Sept. 9.
Summerall and Tra-
bert are not from the
kiss-and-tell school of
broadcasting.
"I feel my basic job
is to analyze what's
going on said Trabert.
"I'm not up there to
gossip, although we do
try to drop in some
information to better
explain who the players
are.
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�MART CORNER OF GREENVILLE AND ARLINGTON BLVD.
I
i





Page 24 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 28 August 1979
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The East Carolinian
inian 1 �
features
Tueeday, August 28, 1979, page 25
Greenville, N.C.
Greenville Buying Club
Co-op fights inflation
The new resident hawk of the ECU campus is wreaking
resident squirrels.
havoc with
(Photo by Richard Green)
Hawk
B RICHARD'GREEN
Assistant
Features Editor
A parrot to go along
with the Pirate might
be more appropriate but
we will just have to
make do with what we
have.
What we have is a
very large hawk, type
unknown, that is feast-
ing on the squirrel pop-
seen
ulation of this campus.
Our new campus re-
gular (or maybe he is
just passing through)
was spotted last Thurs-
day moring having
brunch in the new-
parking lot next to the
Publications Building.
Disturbed b) the
prowd �� (gender un-
known, use masculine
here
� no offense, ladies)
attracted, he attempted
to finish his meal in a
tree between the library
and Mendenhall.
But the crowd fol-
lowed and he finally
flew out of sight, meal,
in claw and seeming
somewhat annoyed.
1 mean, can't a guy
eat in peace?
With inflation rising every day more and more
people are interested in joining a food co-op. In
Greenville the local version of this system is known
as the Community Buying Club, Inc.
The non-profit buying club was organized in 1974
to provide the members an opportunity to work
together in a cooperative spirit to enjoy the benefits
of purchasing products in quantity.
Members can purchase items for their wholesale
cost plus a five percent mark-up and sales tax. The
membership cost is $10 plus a $5 deposit, and $5
for each year thereafter.
The Greenville co-op, which is open every
Wednesday from 4-6:30 p.m. for grocery shopping,
is now located on Dickinson Avenue, across from
Home Furniture and Western Auto.
The co-op offers food prices which are
considerably lower than those in most grocery
stores, although a few items, such as dog food and
tuna fish, are priced higher than store prices, since
the co-op cannot buy them in bulk.
The Greenville co-op is an incorporated
organization, with an official constitution, a board of
officials elected by the members, and committee
chairmen appointed by the board. The board
consists of a coordinator, Jane Arnett; an assistant
coordinator, Scott Luce; a secretary, Eleanor
Webber; and a treasurer, Susan Benton.
The various committees form the backbone of the
co-op, and each member is asked to contribute two
hours a month on one of these committees in
exchange for the cheaper prices.
Tin distribution committee is responsible for
putting out the regular foods, and the orders
committee is responsible for ordering those foods.
The natural foods committee fulfills both of these
duties for the store's natural foods supply.
A committee for communications takes care of
publishir a newsletter and contacting various
groups to solicit new members, while a finance
committee runs the cash register and posts the
books. (The co-op keeps track of how much money
individual family units spend, and any profit which
is make is turned back to them by percentage,
depending on how much each unit has spent.)
The co-op has an active current membership of
about 170 family units. A family unit in the co-op
is defined as a group of up to four individuals
living in the same household. In a dormitory this
would be applicable to roommates.
The coordinator, Jane Arnett, is very proud of
the fact that the co-op membership reflects a good
cross-section of Greenville citizens.
"We have people who are on welfare, we have
people who are doctors, we've got every race that
is represented in Greenville as part of the
membership; we've got all age groups. It's a very
helerogenous group, where it is just good
friendshipand I like that. There are no social
classes at all
One group which the co-op is trying to draw in
is the senior citizens, who receive a special
membership discount. There are currently about 20
members who are senior citizens, and Arnett feels
that an increased number would be a two-way
benefit.
"First, I think we can help them because they'll
save money on a very tight budget she explained.
"And secondly, people who are retired are not
passe they are very much with it today, and we
could use their services
Mutual cooperation is the basis of the
organization, for it is built on the principle that
people feel that they have more time than money to
spare. "And said Arnett, "we think we promote
honesty, fellowship this type of thing. We have
meetings and dinners, where everybody brings a
covered dish. It's not communal, yet it's a very
friendly, helping situation
New Raleigh city ordinance
Dog owners must scoop
By RICHARD GREEN The carriage owners any arguments on that I mean, who wants U
Department change
The former Trends
section of Fountainhead
is now the Features
section of The East
Carolinian. But more
than the name has
changed.
Like the former
Trends section, Features
will include book,
movie, and album
reviews. But these will
make up only about 20
percent of the total
section as compared to
the 70 percent they
occupied in Trends. We
will be offering fewer
review?, and many more
interviews.
Features will contain
articles covering a wide
variety of interests, as
shown by this lirst
issue. Our main objec-
tive is to provide the
reader with accurate
information in an
entertaining manner.
W e want to be "in
touch" with you, the
students ol ECU.
So, if you have anv
interests vou feel merit
coverage by the student
newspaper, please let
us know. We are
anxious to write about
clubs individuals, ideas.
We would like to carry
student penned poetry
and car'oons.
If you are interested
in writing for Features
or think you have a
good idea for a story,
let us know. We're in
the Publications Center
directly across from the
librarv.
By RICHARD GREEN
Assistant Features
Editor
With the new
"scoop" ordiance, life
in Raleigh for pet
owners could become
less enjoyable, if not
more expensive. If the
police see your dog
relieving himself in
public and you fail to
scoop it, you could face
a $50 fine or 30 days in
jail.
It reminds me of the
infamous "diaper law"
in Charleston, S.C
when carriage horses
were required to wear
special diapers in order
to keep the street of
the historic city "poop
free
The carnage owners
finally decided to clean
up the accidents
themselves and the
ordinance was repealed.
Of course horse poop
presents a much larger
arguments on that
statement, but they
could get an argument
from the pet owners
who will now have to
sport a little bucket and
Tony Lopez: An interview with
Greenville's 'world class' fighter
By WILLIAM JONES
Features Editor
Tony Lopez moved to Greenville in 1976, after
being stationed at Camp Lejune while in the Marine
Corps. Already a black belt, he along with Bili
McDonald, began helping instruct the ECU Martial
Arts Club. A 'year and a half ago, Tony opened his
own karate school on Washington St.
If you go by, you'll have to keep an eye out not
to miss it. There is no garish neon sign for
advertisement, no rosy promises of instant
invulnerability in three cheap lessons. In fact, Lopez
Karate Studio might most accurately be described
as adequate.
Inside, a workout area, small by most karate
school standards, with weights, stretch machine, and
a heavy punching bag will be found; along with one
of the U.S few truly "world class" full contact
karate fighters.
Tony began competing in 'professional' or 'full
contact' karate soon after he made Greenville his
home. He has had fights in places as widespread as
France , against the European champion (which he
won), and Japan, against the Japanese kickboxing
champion (which he lost amidst much controversy).
Tony's latest fight on July 28, at the International
Hilton, in Atlanta, was televised. He lost in a close
decision to Richard Jackson.
In the last few years, full contact karate has
begun to gain considerable attention. The CBS
Sports Spectacular, on which Tony has appeared,
along with NBC weekend sports programs, have
shown 'knock-out' karate fights with increasing
I spoke with Tony Lopez, and his friend Don
Brown, whom Tony is training for full contact.
Some interesting insights into this infant sport of
knock-out Karate, and one of Greenville's most
colorful personalities, were gained.
We spoke first in the Washington St. studio, and
later over a tall glass of lemonade at The Crows
Nest.
EC: What is your current standing in professional
karate?
problem than dog poop,
but the Raleigh legis-
lators consider their
problem of paramount
importance. In fact they
said the ordinace was
"as important as
anything the council
does
They may not get
shovel when walking the
dog. Or walk your dog
and just hope he
doesn't have to go.
Even if he decides to
lei it loose he has to be
caught in the act to be
charged with the
offense.
I mean, who wants to
carry a bucketful of
poop around in public?
There are special seo-
opers that I have seen
people use in New York
City, but people in New
York seem to be
incapable of embaras-
sment.
And what about the
police officers? They
have to keep an eye out
for pooches who can't
hold it and owners that
won't scoop it.
The job would not
be as hazardous as
some other police work,
unless the dog
happened to be a
Doberman or a Great
Dane. Even if the
offender was a poodle
the job still stinks.
But the burden
ultimately lies with the
pet owner who must be
lucky, or have a well-
trained pet, or carry a
scooper or just not walk
the dog.
Or you could use
diapers.
Sign
Language
Offered
By RICHARD GREEN
Assistant Features
Editor
Three new cour-
ses will be offered this
semester in American
Sin language by the
Department of Speech,
Language, and Auditory
Pathology and the Pro-
gram for Hearing Im-
paired Students.
These courses are
not in the University
Catalogue, but may be
of interest to students,
staff or faculty.v
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
SLAP 3001-Intro-
duci ion to American
Sign Language (3 credit
houis). An introduction
to American Sign Lan-
guage (ASL) with be-
ginning level ASL voca-
bulary as used by deaf
adults.
The course will em-
phasize the basic struc-
ture of ASL and the
development of expres-
sive signing skills. Pre-
sent educational sign
language systems (ie.
SEE, Signed English,
International Signs) will
be introduced to the
student and their prac-
tical applications dis-
cussed.
This course will also
be offered without
credit and interested
persons from the gen-
eral public are welcome.
SLAP 3002-Intermediate
American Sign Language
(.3 credit hours). An
intermediate ' level
course designed for
students who have com-
pleted the introductory
course in the series.
Intermediate ASL
will lead to intermediate
and advanced expressive
sign language skills
with an introduction to
ASL Idioms and English
Idioms expressed in
ASL. Reverse sign
language skills will be
emphasized with the
use of deaf resource
persons, live and
video-taped materials,
and other related
materials.
FALL SEMESTER
SLAP 3001 (sec-
tion 1) 3:30-5:00 T-TH
Brewster B-203
SLAP 3001 (section)
3:30-5:00 T-TH Brewster
B-204
SLAP 3001 (non-
credit) 6:00-7:30 T-TH B
Brewster D-103
SLAP 3002 (, section
1) TBA-TBA Brewster
B-205
An organizations'
meeting will be held
August 30 at 3:00 p.m.
in Brewster B-205. The
first class begins Sep-
tember 4.
fony Lopez
Super Ughtwieght Division. (Photo by Richard Green)
i
i
please turn to page 27
The police department of Highsville recently cheeked on their modest crop. "The
yield this year was quite disappointing, but the quality was excellent. We hope for a
richer harvest next year a police spokesman said.
)
i
o� ��
.fc 4-





Page 26 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 28 AuquH 1979
"Amity ville Horror"
brings down house
i fj
L
The marquee at the Pitt Theatre remains intact as
an eerie reminder of what could have been a real
hurrur. Photo bv Richard Green)
By RICHARD GREEN
Assistant Features
Editor
The Amityville Hor
iror was playing in
Greenville at the Pitt
Theatre, 515 Evans St
until August 12 when
the 45-year old building
was gutted by fire.
The fire began
around 11 p.m. as a
theatre full of movie-
goers watched the
highly controversial
horror flick.
Tax department rec-
ords estimate the loss
at 850,000.
The people in the
building made an
orderly escape through
the side exits avoiding
the front of the building
where the fire started.
No one was injured.
It is doubtful that
those who attended the
Horror that night
expected the scare they
got, and many thought
it an eerie coincidence.
The fire started in
the concession storage
room as a result of
faulty wiring, according
to Fire Chief Jenness
Allen. He said that five
engines and one snorkel
truck, a special water
unit, arrived at the fire
and it was under
control by 3 a.m.
The two adjoining
buildings, Hooker &
Buchanan, Inc. and
Beik-Tyler, sustained
only minor water
damage.
But the Pitt Theatre
"horror" was only the
beginning of a series of
fires that week. Just
three days later on
Wednesday, August 15,
fire swept through
Sherlocks Restaurant at
118 Fast Fifth St the
same block as the Pitt
Theatre.
Again the coinciden-
ces heightened the
imaginations of super-
stitious types. But Chief
Allen said the cause of
the fire was spontan-
eous combustion in a
pile of oily rags near
the kitchen.
Preliminary estimates
of the damage are
40,000 to $60,000 for
the building and equip-
ment. No one was
injured.
The Sherlock's Res-
taurant building was
formerly the city hall
and fire department
until it was purchased
by W.S. Corbitt around
1937, according to W.S.
Corbitt, Jr. The private
dining room adjacent to
the kitchen was the
original city jail from
1900 to 1936. Both the
kitchen and dining room
were totally destroyed
by the fire.
As Chief Allen said,
"Fires come like ban-
anas in bunches for
only three days later a
fire broke out at
Langston Park Apart-
ments destroying eight
apartments.
Allen said the fire
started on a secondfloor
balcony from a charcoal
grill. Wind whipped the
hot coals into a blaze
which spread up the
wall to the attic, he
said.
As in the other fires
no one was hurt, but
the eight-unit building ,
valued at about $66,000,
was totally destroyed.
There have been no
big fires for some time
because people have
been careful and fire
inspectors have done a
good job, but- Chief
Allen said the lack of
any big fires breeds
carelessness.
itcheirs Hair Styling
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lope;
Lopez: Vt
contender
division, vh
EC: How i
And, how
Lopez: Pro
or 1975.
Anderson,
Professional
As far
It has sevH
and tfeej h
not going
them are jt
EC: You
legitimate I
Lopez: & el
But, the
karate areni
professional
that the fij
the fighter;
making got
Broun: Al!
all the fui
amount ol
in Atlanta,
of money
bars all a!
had $12 ri
ring-side.
All tin
uhile the
The hac
them a- I
real big qj
might no!
pocketbool
EC: Hov
paid?
Lopez: Th
a fight: tl
recognitioi
make an)
stat
Some
someone
with Chu
profess
;rins) tk
� �� 1
the
con
fAretl
Are tighter
they beingl
Lopez: Th(
by uie re
get mom
the indiia
EC Ho
karate od
Lopez: &
as far a-
financially,
As far
sport; like
to offer I
to watch.
You're
normal at
dancer or
throw kicl
moving,
legs as a
EC: Wh.
ten vear;
y
Fi
t

�mMNMMrfbnwMNM





LOPEZ
I
95
Lopez: Well, right now I'm ranked number two
contender in my weight class, the super-lightweight
division, which is 135 lb. maximum.
EC: How long has professional karate been around.
And, how is it organized?
Lopez: Professional karate started back around 1974
or 1975. It was started by a guy named Mike
Anderson, along with Don Kwai. They founded the
Professional Karate Association.
As far as how it's organized now, it's really not.
It has several people trying to work and organize it
and they have several 'organizations' which are just
not going anywhere, really. The people running
them are just using the fighters.
EC: You don't feel that full contact karate is a
legitimate sport now?
Lopez: Well, 1 feel that the fighters are legitimate.
But, the people that are 'banking' full contact
karate aren't, at least the majority aren't. And until
protessional karate has a commission, has something
that the fighters can fall back on and be protected
the lighters are not going to go anywhere, as far as
making good money is concerned.
Broun: All the promoters and the people that hold
all the full contact bouts draw in a tremendous
amount of money. Say, for instance, the last fight
in Atlanta, the Superfights, that drew huge amounts
of mone) due to the concessions. They had open
bars all around the arena for the spectators. They
had $12 ring-side tickets and quite a few people at
ring-side.
All the promoters are making the big money
while the fighters are still fighting for a pittance.
They have no group, no organization to take care of
them as lighters, as Tony said. The fighter gets a
real big name but makes no money. The promoter
might not become famous, but he has the big
pocketbook.
EC: How much money are knock-out fighters being
paid?
Lopez: The average fighter probably makes $200-400
a fight; the average fighter. Now, a fighter that has
recognition, that has been fighting for awhile, can
make anywhere from $500 to $2000 here in the
state.
Some might get more, when 1 say some, I mean
someone like Bill Wallace (who recently costarred
with Chuck Norris in a motion picture dealing with
professional karate). And there's a reason for that.
grins) But, I'm not going to comment on that.
is concerned?
Lopez: Maybe if professional karate were handled
by people who are interested in helping the
lighters I could see a future in it.
If the spectators also would put forth effort and
not just sit by because its a new sport and hasn't
been around as long as other sports. People should
go out and watch. I believe if someone goes out to
see a full contact fight, they will fall in love with
the sport. There's just so much to watch for, it's
such an active sport.
The main thing is the promoters. If the
promoters work toward promoting fights and fighters
in a constructive way rather than trying to keep all
the money lor themselves, there's a future for it. If
not, there won't be. A lot of promoters just want to
make a quick buck.
EC: Do you think that full contact karate could ever
lake the place of boxing?
Lopez: I don't know if it could take the place of
boxing, but I think it could become as popular. If
on one channel there was a full contact fight and
on the other there was a boxing match, it might
depend on who was fighting. A lot of people would
follow the quality of the fighter and not just the
sport itself.
EC: Just from watching the fights that have been
on television, it seems that the quality of the full
contact fighters has improved quite a bit.
Lopez: Yes. The reason is, more of the fighters
have been taking pride in the way they look (in the
ring) and in mechanics. Before, everybody was
lighting in the old traditional light contact or point
method. Now everybody is shaping up and accepting
this new style of fighting (a combination of boxing
and karate techniques).
fX:You saw your last fight on television. Did you
think the announcers were partial to one fighter or
the other?
Lopez: 1 do. The reason is like I said earlier. As far
as that light is concerned, the guy who manages
the guy I fought was the promoter and he was also
the announcer.
EC: Joe Corlev?
Lopez: Right. So you could tell his favoritism toward
his lighter.
EC: What percentage of all the people who practice
karate get into lull contact karate?
Lopez: ProbabK only 5 or less.
'X: Do vou have another fight soon?
28 August 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 2
the fighters are legitimate. But,
the people that are banking full
contact karate arn't
EC: Are there other questionable things going on?
Are fighters simply not getting paid enough or are
they being 'shafted by promoters in other ways?
Lopez: The main thing is they are being 'shafted'
by the promoters. The promoters are just trying to
get money in their own pocket. They're not taking
the individual fighters into consideration.
EC: How do you feel about the state of full contact
karate today?
Lopez: Well, I'm not content with the state it's in
as far as the way the fighters are being treated
financially.
As far as the sport itself, I think it's a great
sport; like boxing is a great sport. Karate has more
to offer to the spectators. The spectators have more
to watch.
You're working with athletes that are not just
normal athletes but are a mixture of a fighter and a
dancer or acrobat. It's not just anyone who can
throw kicks and be able to hit someone as they are
moving. A karate fighter must be able to control his
legs as a gymnast is able to control his body.
EC: What do you see coming in the next five to
ten vears as far as the future of professional karate
Lopez: No, not right now. I have fights lined up,
but I'm not going to take them until I work a little
harder on my lighting. I want to get someone to
train me. I've never had a trainer, I've always
trained myself.
EC: Will 'ou have to leave Greenville to find a
trainer?
Lopez: Yes.
EC: How long will vou stay in a competitive status
in full contact?
Lopez: Probably no more than two more years.
EC: I understand that you're a very accomplished
dancer (disco and popular dance). For instance
you'll be in the finals of the disco 'Dance-off in
Atlantic Beach next weekend. Do you feel dancing
improves your fighting or vice versa?
Lopez: (smiles) Yes. They complement each other.
They both are involved with being able to move in
a certain rythm. They both require a sense of
timing.
please turn to page 31,
col. 1
Monkey
Business
ATASCADERO, CA
(AP) � Deputies kil-
led a 120-pound chimp-
anzee that had escaped
from a zoo after several
attempts to tranquilize
and trap the animal
failed, a sheriffs
spokesman said.
"It became apparent
the animal was a threat
to people said San
Luis Obispo County
sheriffs Sgt. Dan Okel.
Investigators said some-
one cut a three-foot
hole in the chimp's
cage at the Charles
Paddock Zoo last week,
releasing the animal.
The chimp chased a
deputy about a quarter
of a mile, climbed onto
a sheriffs patrol car
and pounded on the
hood and windows.
No
Monkey
Business
ASHEBORO
(AP)-Ramar, the North
Carolina Zoo's gorilla on
breeding loan to the
Philadelphia Zoo, is still
in "a state of sexual
suspended animation
That's the word from
Richard Simons,
public-information assis-
tant for the Philadelphia
Zoo. Simons says
Ramar, a 12-year-old
lowland gorilla is show-
ing no sexual interests
or initiative.
"There's still a little
bit of hope says
Simons, adding that
Ramar might have
mated once with one of
his two gorilla com-
panions.
But Simons said
pregnaflcy r�fc��
conducted on the
females, Samantha and
Haloki, and the tests
proved negative.
The 350-pound
Ramar was placed with
two female gorillas in
April 1978. The loan
arrangement called for
Philadelphia to get the
first of Ramar's
off-spring, North
Carolina the second.
MAKE THE CAMPUS
your phone before EMmd A mtA la
Friday, August 31 st, you can save yourself a trip.
Now thru Friday, Carolina Telephone representatives will be
taking your orders at three campus locations: the Book Store
Lobby, Clement Dorm Lobby and Tyler Dorm Lobby.
In addition, by ordering your phone now, you'll beat the crowd
and get early installation.
And finally, your early order ensures that your
number will be included in the ECU
Telephone Directory
for 7980.
,??, lB So make the
connection. Order
your phone today.
fflQQ Carolina Telephone
UMTED TELEPHONE SYSTEM
J
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re-
quired to be readily available for sale
at or below the advertised price in
each A�rP Store, except as specifi
cally noted in this md.
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT SEPT. 1 AT A4P IN UfWIIVHW, N.C
Welcome Back East Carolina
Pirates
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN-FED
4�
ROAST
BONE IN
CHUCK STEAKS
bB. $1.19
BONE IN
A&P Delicatessen
Bucket of Delicious
Fri6d 8 Pece bucket
Chicken $2�9
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN
GRAIN FED BEEF
SHOULDER ROAST
ROUND BONE A LB. 9mmFULLY COOKED! LB. '98 7
Ann Page Vi lowfat
Milk
$-4 49 Gal. Jug
ARMOUR STAR
BONELESS HAM
Fried Chicken
Limit one with this coupon r h oka 4 59
and additional $7.50 order t ' K "
coupon good thru Sat Sept. 1
REGULAR OR DIET
WHITE OR ASSORTED
SHASTA COLA CHARMIN TISSUE
OR � ORANGE � GRAPE
� LEMON LIME
� GINGER
ALE
12 OZ.
CANS
N.C. GROWN FANCY
RED OR GOLDEN DELICIOUS
JAEFA
ROLL
PKG.
APPLES
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
I
St
f
yP .
�3TMr�5Tr-rr'j4pv r ��Si
sesmt
mm





Page 28 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 28 August 1979
Rob Reinharl & Lynn Holby during the 1979 Elbo Room Saturday Night
' i. est
Pilgrimage to the
"downtown circuit"
l nlortunateh,
tht
Bj RICH Hi GREEN
� Editor
�es, it's I a II a
�re we find
abidii in
it U t'
here all
r. Freshmen ami
students will
. : the
this real-
in the rest ol us
pilgrimage to
eu-
'� � : ing to
along
an
to their lik-
I - is to coz
� - � � i yeryone
hang-out
� adilv
gu-
the
id lalk-
oms.
atmosphere pre
ol
I i W 11 11
! Iff .1 Mill
hi have missed
full East Fourth
Vtti . the
. ir in Green-
X features
1 o s I ever)
i schedule
be obtained at var-
es around
rhe tti( has two
a dance area, a
game room and a video
the rear.
Walking down the
hill tanche toward
Street we see tht'
Elbo R �ur left.
I I Room is a re-
i entl) remodeled dis o
with a modes! lighting
mirrored walls,
a game room and a
small bar.
rhe stainless steel
dance floor ir- new and
small, with little elbow
room on a crowded
night. The sound sys-
tem leave nothing to
be desired.
disco
vails m the men s
bathroom with dim, red
light- ami black walls.
Combined with the lack
ol useful illumination,
water on the tloor could
i ause an accident.
Back on Cotanche
we take a lelt on Fiith
and arrive at the JolK
Roger, a disco ol a
diflerenl color. alkmg
through the mirrored,
strobe-lit entrance tun-
nel one can get dizzy,
but once inside you
know some work went
into this place.
Mirrored walls, a
nice lighting system and
a fine sound system
surround the roped-off
dance floor. The tloor
itsell i- a checkerboard
design with flashing
patterns. Fur a break in
the heat there are tele-
vision and game room
I hough the men-
room is only tair, the
ladies room wins the
award for cleanliness
and comfort. Obvioush
the management wants
to keep the ladie-
happ) to insure a happ
clientele ol both sexes.
Hanging a right out
t he door we cross
Cotanche to the Tree
House, a pleasant com-
bination bar-restaurant.
I he 1 ree House was
expanded ami now has
two sections of double-
decker booths.
Along with a small
but well-stocked salad
bar. the Tree House
serves sandwiches and
Italian specialties. Thej
also dish out some tat
sounds in the way ol
live entertainment and
some fine recorded mu-
sic.
Nexl door to the
1 i ee House is the
Sunset, a -mall and
cozj place with some
nice artwork displayed
on the wall A game
room, a television and a
wide variety ol tunes
complete the entertain-
ment .
The coziness and
entertainment continue
in the broomcloset-sized
bathrooms wallpapered
with various forms of
comedy and art.
A lew doors down
have trouble finding the
entrance it is down the
little alley. Undergoing
remodeling at the wri-
ting of tin- article, the
Hal" should be open
bv registration day, ac-
cording to the owner.
Addition- It) the.
rathskeller include a
stage lor live entertain-
ment, a kitchen that
w ill be sen ing gourmet
burger- in the near
future, ami of course,
new bathroom One
word ol caution � if
you are tall, watch oul
tor low-hanging ratter
Let - pause tor a
-hort breather � ma-
king the rounds can be
rough. Bv this time ol
night the traffic on the
streets and sidewalks is
getting heavy, that is if
it - the weekend (which
include- Thursday).
Please be careful
while you are out and
about. The Greenville
Nightclub Association
(GNA) and the City of
Greenville are concerned
lor the safety oi we
parly-ers. Mick together,
ladie- preferably with
men (they will lie glad
to oblige).
What's that we
hear? Sounds like beach
music, and it is coming
from a bar across the
Chapter X.
the old, sandy
all week long,
lor disco on
Wednesday, Chapter X
now has two bars to
serve those with a taste
for the past today.
Bv this time we can
jut roll down the hill
to Pantana Bob's and
street,
Play mg
sounds
excepl
be somebody,
can remember
name
Pantana's
if we
our
is a
hot place � really hot.
I hey have tried to rein-
ed) the situation by
installing a wind tunnel
in the rear.
Pantana Bob's can
get wild during rugby
season, with wild par-
tie- and unmentionable
acts oi craziness. They
have a good sound
system with a variety of
music (sorry, kids � no
disco).
It you come from a
large city, Greenville
mav seem disappointing.
But give it a chance.
There are lots of good
people to meet and
good times to be had.
For you old-timers, well
� you already know
that.
Mayor sends shirts
cleaners
to
NEWPORT, NC
(AP)-Newport Mayor
Darryl Garner believes
anyone wearing obscene
T-shirts and patches
should change clothes
or leave town.
Garner has proposed
"The Town With OLd
Fashioned Courtesy"
establish a dress code
prohibiting "lewd and
obscene T-shirts and
patches" from being
worn within the town
limits.
The mayor, of the
V

small coastal town said
he thought of the code
when he saw a patch
on the rear of a boy's
jeans containing a pro-
lane remark and ges-
ture. The boy was with
a girl who had a patch
on the rear of her jeans
referring, in off-color
language, to a part of
her anatomy.
"My wife and your
mother should not have
to be subjected to these
obscenities. I was em-
barrassed Garner
said.
But the mayor
doesn't belive sending
offenders to jail is the
answer. He said offend-
ers should change
clothes or leave town.
Town Attorney
Nelson Taylor, at
Garner's request, is
looking into the legality
ol a town dress code.
But, Taylor said he
"wouldn't dare com-
ment on it" until he's
finished studying the
matter.
I
Texas Instruments
Texas Instruments
electronic slide-rule calculator
Tl-30
Sug. Retail
$21.95
TI-5025 ?
prnte v� �.
Dawson's
Price
$14.57
Texas Instruments
handheld electronic cdoJatex
with display and printer
TI-5025
Sug. Retail $79.95
Dawson's Price
$64.94
vw
Texas Instruments
Sug. powerful business calculator
Retail with progrommobility
$70.00 TH�mBPM
Dawson's Price
$54.57
Texas Instruments
printsecurity cradle
PC-100
Sug. Retail $199.95
Dawson's Price
$155.95
t
Texas Instruments
Programmable Do
ouy. rtb4dil $124.95
uciMoon s Price
$97.77
OFFER EXPIRES
1
P3
z
o
a.
o
MM SPECIAL OFFER M
Texas Instruments
Slimline Business Analyst -11
financial calculator
uuith statistics and
new Constant lTlemory' feature.
Sug. Retail $45.00
Dawson's Price
1979
Save 5 On The
Texas Instruments
In This Ad. Present
This Coupon & We
Will Deduct 5
From The Price.
� J.D. DAWSON CO.
COUPON
wmm
$35
Texas Instruments
Pf ogrommobJe J)V
Sug. Retail $299.95
Dawson's Price
$224
See The Complete Line Of
Texas Instruments
Calculators. AH Are Priced
Below Retail. Save Now
For Back To School
Quantities limited, No special orders or Rain cheeks
J.D. DAWSON CO
Catalog Showroom
2818 E. IQth St. Greenville, N.C.

i
i
LifegUi
44 �
1
M
oi '�ur sun
ami sun
surfers
fai es and
'antn !
takn g
ut i asional
that is m
mam
P
nature
guard
portrayed i
in tl
stroi
gtlU'
W . -
Gillil
guar -

EC H
an
1 gu
EC I)

nexl
Ei
1 ba

di
Er
a pr
EC �
j

H - iug
shape. W e
first aid and
Its l
EC: Ho
guy I hat j
va- coming I
out o the wa
Ern
lad on d
but tii
couldr
an
little i
halt i 1
first a
big i j
wandered
miles s I
EC D
to be educate
the I
M -
currents X �
for tht
without
at ail. But,
smarter. v i
their child)
That at I
Then ll tl
ha
S
lit 75 or i(
onl ha
a:
;v instructl
EC: re
sumnv
anda i
i N
W i 've had a I
EC: (lou
fern a
Vanda: 1
natural lo me.
Should
labor � a w�
anytime duriij
things.
It you're
attention the
concern.
Should �
don't panic!
bv vae aclu)
will NOT be
power oi tht
breakers To
outgoing
contour), simp
of the rip's ;
further than 51
It ou bt
indcrtoYN. v
I nderh �
being pushed
This, returning
and will not
li coastal
ense and otJ
cat; be as a:
beautiful.





Lifeguard lament
28 August 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 29
8
f
d
" I'm tired of being out
in the sun"
By WILLIAM JONES
Features Editor
Most of us probably spend at least a few days
of our summer vacation recreating in the surf, sand
and sun of the North Carolina beaches. While
surlers etch a poetry of maneuvers on the wave
.faces and pier and surf fishermen wet lines in
'anticipation, the majority of beachgoers seem
content to spend much of their leisure time just
taking a load off, basking in the sun and taking an
occasional cooling dip in the ocean. It is this group
that is most familiar with what is an institution on
main beaches - the lifeguard .
? The life guard's job requires, above all, a sense
Pi responsibility. Swimmers of widely varying
Megrees oi proficiency often unfamiliar with the
nature ol ocean currents put their lives in the life
guard s hands.
1 he lifeguard stereotype was accurately
portrayed in the film Lifeguard released several
vear ago. But, this strong, stern macho type has,
in the last dozen or so years, been joined by many
strong, stern females.
This reporter talked to two Carteret County life
guards about their jobs. Ernie Aguayo is a senior at
West Carteret High School and guards at the "main
beach, off the boardwalk in Atlantic Beach. Vanda
Cillikin i a senior at East Carteret High School and
guani at Fort Macon State Park, a few miles east
of Atlantic Beach.
EC: How long have you been a lifeguard?
Ernie: Jut this summer.
Vanda: Last summer I worked here for about
two weeks, and this summer 1 started last Monday.
I guard the last few weeks of the summer, usually.
EC: Do you plan on doing it again?
Vanda: Um-hum. Hopefully. I want to do it
next summer the whole summer.
Ernie: Em planning on it, maybe next year.
That'll be it probably.
EC: hat" the most difficult thing about being
a lifeguard
Vanda: Totin' the chair back.
Ernie: Staving alert. 'Cause this year has been
a pretty slack year and we haven't had very many
people get in trouble, so sometimes you daydream.
EC: What kind of training do you have to have
to be a liteguard ?
Ernie: V e have special training from the
wrestling coach (West Carteret's Gordy Patrick).
He's taught us CPR and we run everyday to stay in
shape. We have swimming drills. He's taught us
first aid and everything we need to know.
Vanda: Advanced life saving and water safety.
It's Red Cross training.
EC: How many lives have you saved this year?
Vanda. None. Last summer there was a little
guy that got stuck on the sand bar when the tide
wa- coming in. He was there with his nose sticking
out of tin- water (chuckles) so 1 brought him in.
Ernie: About three. A little boy chasing a
frisbie got caught in a rip current. Another was a
lad on drugs. She was just in two feet of water
but the waves were going over her face and she
couldn't get out so 1 pulled her out. Today we had
an accident, we don't know what happened but this
little boj out in the water got about a two and a
hall inch laceration on his head, so we gave him
first aid until he was taken to the hospital. Another
big part of our job is helping find children who have
wandered away from their parents. They'll walk for
miles sometimes
EC: Do you feel people not from the coast need
to be educated about the dangers of swimming in
the ocean before swimming in it?
Most people are ignorant of how to deal with
currents. We've had people come down to the ocean
for the first time and they'll just jump right in
without thinking; they don't know anything about it
at all. But, this year they seem to be a little
smarter. Something I've noticed parents doing for
their children is getting these little life preservers.
That at least will keep their heads above water.
Then it the current does take a child out, all we
have to do is swim after them. They won't drown.
So far it's been a good year. Last year they had
about 75 or 100 people pulled out. This year we've
onlv had 23. This year we've had no one drown.
Vanda: They should have some kind of water
safety instruction. At least a basic swimming course.
EC: Are you looking forward to the end of the
summer?
Vanda: Yes. I'm tired of being out in the sun.
Ernie. Not really. It's been a pretty good year.
We've had a lot. of fun out here.
EC: How do you feel a lifeguard and being
female?
Vanda: I don't feel out of place at all. It feels
natural to me.
Should you be visiting the coast this coming
labor day weekend or swimming in the ocean
anytime during the year, remember these few
things.
If you're swimming on a protected beach, pay
attention the lifeguards. Your safety is their only
concern.
Should you get caught in a rip tide or undertow,
don't panic! Rip tides and undertows are generated
bv wave action and contrary to popular belief you
will NOT be carried "out to sea by them The
power of these currents dissapates beyond the
breakers. To return to shore when in a np tide (an
outgoing current resulting from concave beach
conLrf, simply swim parallel to the shore until out
of the rip's influence. You may have to swim no
further than 50 feet or so.
II vou begin to feel drawn seaward by an
undertow� �E toward shore o. e � -
Undertow ,s caused by fe return to -e. f water
beine uushed ashore in the form of breaking waves.
l7.Kl water flows along the bottom.
and will not affect a swimmer on the sur �
If coastal visitors will but use a mue
sense and .bey life guards' recllon8' " "
can be as safe a place for aquatic recreation as it H
beautiful.
i
H&k-
B.F.Goodrich
Car Care Service
WELCOME BACK ECU
For Your Automotive &
Tire Needs Call 756-5244
AUTO SERVICE SPECIALS
SErWlC
:
HEEbu-r

c

OK
OUP00V
id
sagjrt
TUNE-UP
"&fr
All size
tires
available
��"�?
�X"� die
fcnii
WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS
ilFGoodrich
STIRE CENTER
SALES SERVICE
mMfiL
l� LIMA ML
Coggins Car Care
756-5244
taUL-IMMI
Take one last look at the beach because we'll soon
be back to work, our tans will fade and winter will
br upon us. (Phot() by Rjchard Green)
TAKE THE BITE OUT OF BA( K TO SCHOOL
"PICK-A-PAIR"
OF PANTS
ASSORTED STYLES
POLY-GAB AND
COTTON BLENDS
VALUES TO $16.98
NOW $9.90
"SWEATER- UP"
LARGE GROUP
�CARDIGANS
�CREW-NECKS
�V-NECKS
$14.98 VALUES
NOW $9.90
"COWL-NECK
SWEATERS
ASSORTED SOLIDS
�j
$11.98 VALUES
NOW $6.90
SHETLAND WOOL
CABLE
CREW-NECK SWEATERS
ASSORTED COLORS
$14.98 VALUES
NOW $7.90
SPECIAL
GROUP
FALL
FASHIONS
REDUCED
25






Pag 30 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 28 August 1979
No other banking machine offers you
a broader range of banking services than
Wachovia TeHer n. Vet no other banking
machine is as easy to use.
The reason? A special viewing screen
actually shows you what to do every step
of the way. It shows you how to deposit or
withdraw money from your savings and
checking accounts. It shows you how to
transfer money from one account to another,
make loan payments, check account
balances, or simply get some cash.
Wachovia Teller II is open for business
24 hours a day, seven days a week. Which
means that now you can bank any time
that suits your convenience. And there's
absolutely no charge for the service. All it
takes is a Wachovia checking account and
a Wachovia Banking Card. If you're pres-
ently banking at Wachovia you probably
already have your card. Why not use it
this week?
Member FD I C
Wachovia
Bank&Trust
Try Teller n in Greenville at the Wachovia Pitt Plaza Office, Highway 264 Bypass.
I
Real
there
By RICHARD GREE!
Assistant Feature-?
Editor
Consider the follow-
ing situations:
You are ieehng er
depressed and wonder-
ing vhy you are in
school. You're having
trouble sleeping.
Peer pressure to
jjarty has adversely
affected your grades
and you are constantly
worried about cla �
Your roommate has
a serious drug probiem
and you want to help.
LOPEZ
EC. When I was watchim
television, several people
who have met you, were
the change that
personality. You are
exceptionally gentile per-
almost like an animal.
you h
what you
Lopez: I look at mys
When I'm in the ring. I'd
I believe that whene
have to rbe' what you'
brick, vou have to lav
mason. If you're writing
it with the delicacy of a
ring, you have to do whi
that's to fight. You har
You can't think ot i
fighting.If you think
concentrating on fighting,
fighting, and you fight m
That's Tony Lopez;
With the ability to teach
by means of a side-kick,
a loving parent. Or. in
become everything hi:
Hurricano, implies a violei
Ou
� brake
� tire re
We also
We
� CITADEL
MASTER
�ALLEN bll
�CAI
� IKU
�MARAPI
IF YOU
ORJI
ONE,
� i ��
4
i
I





you
than
ing
creen
step
isitor
nd
(WtO
another,
Int
Isiness
Which
me
re's
.All it
ntand
pres-
ably
it
28 Augutt 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 31
via
&Trust
Real Crisus Center is
there to help -24 hours
S3 RICHARD GREEN
Assistant Features
Editor
Consider the follow-
ing situations:
You are feeling very
depressed and wonder-
ing why you are in
school. You're having
trouble sleeping.
Peer pressure to
part) has adversely
affected your grades
ami ou are constantly
worried about classes.
1 our roommate has
a serious drug problem
and nu want to help.
You think that you
might be pregnant and
don't know what to do.
You have been raped
and need anonymous
assistance.
Hopefully these
things will never hap-
pen to anyone, but
inevitably you may find
yourself in a situation
that you cannot handle
alone.
In Greenville it is
good to know that there
is alwa someone
willing to listen and
help at the Real Crisis
Center, 1117 South
Ean St. Their 24-hour
LOPEZ
EC: When I was watching your last fight on
television, several people in the group I was with,
who have met you, were very much taken aback at
the change that seemed to occur in your
personality. You are, in normal life, an
exceptionally gentile person. In the ring, you seem
almost like an animal.
you have to 'be9
what you 9re doing
Lopez. 1 look at myself a? a Dr. Jekyll Mr. Hyde.
s hen I'm in the ring, I'm Mr. Hyde.
1 believe that whenever you do anything, you
have to 'be1 what you're doing. If you're laying
brick, you have to lav it with the delicacy of a
mason, Il you're writing a book, you have to write
it with the delicacy of a writer. When you're in the
ring, vou have to do what you're there to do, and
that's to tight. You have to be a total warrior.
You can't think of winning, you have to think of
lighting.If you think of winning, you're not
concentrating on fighting. But if you concentrate on
fighting, and you fight well, you'll win.
That" Tony Lopez; a multi-faceted personality.
V ith the ability to teach a youngster self-confidence
by mean- of a side-kick, with all the gentleness of
a loving parent. Or, in the full contact ring, to
become everything his fighting nick-name, El
Hurricano, implies a violent, unstoppable force.
hotline (758-HELP) and
walk-in center are free to
the public, though often
neglected.
Many people do not
seek help because of
the social stigma
attached, but the longer
one waits, the worse a
problem can become.
So if there is a
place to go or to call
for help 24 hours a day
that is free, that is
staffed with well-trained
counselors (most are
students) and that is
completely confidential,
why not give them a
chance to help you help
yourself.
ll you have con-
sidered visiting the
campus infirmary or
counseling services but
have hesitated because
those visits go on your
record, REAL is the
answer.
In the past the
number of contacts with
HEAL begins to rise in
the fall, peaking in
February and gradually
decreasing toward sum-
mer. This year the
number of contacts
reached an all-time high
in March and has
remained near that
level. This could mean
that more people are
willing to use the
services or that there is
an increase in personal
crises. Whatever the
reason, REAL needs
volunteers.
ll vou are interested
m becoming a volun-
teer, call or go by
HEAL or get involved
with the center's
campus organization,
Student Volunteers for
HEAL (SYFR). The
process of becoming a
working volunteer takes
two to three months,
but it is necessary to
insure top quality
counselors.
Only about 30
percent of the appli-
cants become volunteers
because many find that
they do not have the
time, or they have the
wrong attitude toward
counseling or they have
simply joined for
self-help. The people
who make it are truly
devoted to what they
do, the kind of people
you want to talk to
when you really need it.
The training course
is offered four times a
year and is co-spon-
sered by Pitt Technical
Institute.
As a volunteer a
minimum of 12 hours
on the job is required
each month. REAL is
very flexible and can
arrange hours to suit
schedules. Leaves of
absence during exams
and breaks are allowed,
though some retraining
may be required upon
return.
So, if you need help
or think that you want
to help others, don't
hesitate. REAL is for
real.
Wanted
Features
writers
call
757-6366
tolk�
university arcad
green vllle,
752-521
Our Shop offers a complete
and professional
BIKE REPAIR SERVICE:
� brake adjustment � chain cleaning
tire repair � straighten wheels
We also provide a complete overhaul service
We carry the best in bike parts and
� CITADEL and accessories SUNTOUR darailliara
MASTER lock and cablas
�ALLEN blka racks
� CANNODALE book bags
�ESQE book carrlara
� KU apaadomatars
MARAPLAST watar bottlaa
IF YOU'RE INTERESTED IN A NEW BIKE,
OR JUST WANT TO FIX UP YOUR OLD
one STOP BY MIKES' BIKE SHOP
� MICHELAN tlraa
�DIA-COMPE brakaa
�WONDER Hgnta
�MPI and QANT glofai
�SILCApumpa
�CAMPAQNALO hubs
Waoufva (biU lAtcM
now open
connie
Uniquely Beautiful
Fashion World
For the College Girl
shoes
Now, o world of fashion footwear you'll love -
full of styles to fit every mood, from sexy
dressing to funtime casuals. Our store and
salespeople are as terrific as our merchan-
dise, so stop by soon to unearth a new, won-
derful way to find your favorite footwear.
Most styles �
xvommie 't eavtemcL a co4ueU mdcome fa
The Traffic Light!
A Contemporary Clothing Store
WELCOMES BACK
Come and see
Marianna, Pam, Deb, andMary
V
Pitt Plaza Highway 864- Greenville
open 10:00 9:00 756 8320
WEDNESD A Y SATCRDA Y PRE LABOR DA Y 50 OFF SALE
Bring in this coupon and get 50 of f on all niens
and ladies jeans (Levi, Male. Organically Grown,
and Wrangler) and all mens and ladies Dee Cee painter
pants and overalls
The Traffic Light
PITT PLAZA





Page 32 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 28 Augurt 1979
i
Mcndenhall Student Center houses many student oriented activities.
Activities run rampant
at Mendenhall Center
rV hero could a stu-
dent spend a whole day
and not be bored (un-
lesa he has no inter-
ests)?
The Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, located on
the west end of cam-
pus, adjacent to Joyner
Library, has facilities
and activities to get
even the most bla?e
student involved.
For instance, there
are billiard;?, bowling,
card and chess game.
a large screen T , a
music listening center,
magazines and ne
papers, free movies,
pinball machines, art
exhibits, a coffeehouse,
crafts center, table ten-
nis and other recre-
ational, entertainment,
and cultural activities.
There are meeting
rooms available by re-
servation in the center
tor university recognized
organizations, and there
i- a student bank. An
information center and
ticket sales booth for
university events is also
located in the center.
And, perhaps most
important for famished
center patrons, there is
a Snack B on the
main level.
AH of these activities
and more illustrate wh
Although Mendenhall
i a student center, it is
also for use bv the fac-
ulty. stall and alumni.
Suggestions are wel-
come, says Rudolph Al-
exander, Associate Dean
of Student Activities.
Among the suggestions
received and acted upon
lasl year were ones for
a pencil sharpener in
the lobby area and for
disco dance classes to
be held in the center.
The center has service
charges for some acti-
vities but these are
used to defray their
costs, Alexander said.
Dinner theatres and
madrigal dinners are
very popular activities
held in the center.
s'
There will be a dinner
theatre production of
"Marriage Round" by
the Alpha Omega Play-
er a professional com-
pany, October 3-7.
Madrigal dinners, under
the direction of Dr.
Charles Moore, director
ol the choral music de-
partment ot the School
ot Music, are scheduled
tor December 4-8.
An improvement
planned at the student
center i- the purchase
ot a commercial quality
16mm movie projector
tor ue with films. It is
hoped that the projector
can be obtained bv the
end of fall semester,
Alexander said.
The student center
ha- a budget of about
halt a million dollars,
Alexander said, which is
u-ed specifically for
activities under the dir-
ection of the center and
the building and staff
itslef.
the student center de-
serves its name. It's a
three-level building
which houses facilities
and activities which en-
rich student life.
For example, in ad-
dition to films, the cen-
ter's theatre is also the
stage for visiting lec-
turers and touring dra-
maiic productions.
The facilties for re-
creational games are
used for classes in
activities and recrea-
tional tournaments.
The Crafts Center,
which is used for craft
classes, contains a pho-
tography lab, ceramics
area, jewelrymetals ar-
ea, textiles area, and a
general crafts area, all
for student use.
Information services
in the center include a
rides-riders board, stu-
dent locator service, and
bulletin boards.
Student organizations
have offices in the
building � the Student
Government Association
and the Student Union.
r-
C
Every Delight
s
-1
v

High Appetites
PIPE DREAMS
218-D University Arcade
752-4811
From the basics to the unusual- We have
the largest selection of paraphernalia in
Eastern North Carolina
WELCOME STUDENTS!
Join us in Name the Caterpillar Contest.
Win our Pipe Dreams bong. Just fill out the
orm below and bring it by our shop. Judges
final decision given on September 13th.
NAMJ
IADDRESS
PHONE NO
NAMEFOR
CATERPILLAR
WHAT LOOKS GOOD . . . FEELS BETTER . . AND WEARS BEST?
. , � SHOES THAT MAKE LIFE JUST
A LITTLE BIT EASIER. PROVE IT TO YOURSELF. STOP BY TODAY.
PC
Shoemakers to America
044
i
V
Burgundy
$30.00
Tan Buck $40.00
w-

k



W&KR
Brown
Navy
$38.00
Also see our styles from Famolare, TImberland, Candle, Frye ,
Etienne Algner, Bare Traps, S.R.O Clogs, and Pappagallo.
Sport shoes from
Nike, Adidas, Tretorn, Puma.
h
Downtown
Pitt Plaza
FLOYD G. ROBINSON'S
JEWELERS
Exclusive Dealer For





28 August 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 33
tson
i
FOODS
FOR
THOUGHT
Trout Almondine. Veal Parmesan.
Smothered Chicken with Cornbread
Dressing. Golden Fried Shrimp.
Food so good it'll go to your head thats
what we serve at S&S Cafeterias. Come
feast on over 100 delicious dishes,
homemade each day from famous
"scratch" recipes. And best of all, its a feast
you can afford.
If you find it hard to study on an empty
stomach, get a taste of our "foods for
thought Come home to S&S Cafeterias.
Where America Comes Home To Eat.
Carolina East Mall, Greenville
Continuous serving Monday � Sunday 11 am-8 pm (8:30 pm Friday
and Saturday)
Full line of Redken products
A11 phases of Coloring,
Cutting, and Body Wave
Open Monday thru Friday by appointment only
II ill
Phone 758-7570
SEPTEMBER
TAL OF THETOWN.
Volleyball & Horse shoes Tournament 1st prixe-2
cases Poors open at 3:00
Social Hour every Tues. thru Frl. featuring
Harry & Larry 3-7
Blue Grass Night.
Hank Williams Jr. wBitl Lyerly
reserve seats available)
AMBUSH
AMBUSH
AMBUSH & PANAMA RED starts AT 7
(V-ball & H-shoes) 3:00
Blue Crass Night, STEEL DRIVIN BAND
Ladles lX price
EARNEST TUBS w Bill Lyerly
(reserve seats available)
BILL LYERLY
BILL LYERLY
TALK OF THE TOWN & TUMBLEWEED Starts
at 7 (V-ball & H-shoes) 3:00
TUMBLEWEED
PANAMA RED & HARRY & LARRY Ladles 1a price
TUMBLEWEED, Ladles FREE
Melissa Lewis and the Country Magic Cloggers
NEW KNOTHOLE REVIEW
SNUFF Pig Pickin, 7:00
MOE BANDY wBILL Lyerly
CHARLIE ALBERTSON
CHARLIE ALBERTSON
PANAMA RED & MEW GROUND starts at 7
(V-ball & H-shoes) 3�o�
T
T
"� Mjtiwm&.mfrim
I Ma � �
�. f m
IM� � �-�'��- .





Page 34 THE EAST CAROLINIAN o auqum i��
WELCOME BACK
STUDENTS
Tues Wed. & Thurs. Night
SPECIALS
SHRIMPS4.75
OYSTERS$4.75
FLOUNDERS3.SO
TROUTSZ.95
PERCH$2.95
ALL YOU CAN EAT
Meal includes French Fries, Cole Slaw,
Hushpuppies, and iced Tea.
No take-outs please
FRIMTS
1890
Seafood
OPEN FOR
LUNCH
Daily (Except Sat.)
11:30 - 2:30
HOURS
Mon. � Thurs.
5:00-10:00
Fri. & Sat.
5:00-10:30
S. Evans St,
Rick's Guitar
Shop says,
Welcome Back
Students!
We have a complete line of Guitars, Banjos,
Amplifiers, Strings, and Accessories.
Need your guitar repaired?
We have a complete repair shop!
Sign up for guitar lessons now!
P.A. System rentals for those
Back-to-School and Rush Parties!
Guitar rentals and music books!
We also rent Carl Knilling violins!
Rick's Guitar Shop
207 East 5th Street
(next to Newby's)
752-2509
Bro
Perf
Symj
Perioi
the Chicag)
Orchestra
concert at
summer h
orchestra,
Carolina Li
ult) tromb
Brouhard.
Brousar
for Jame
firsl chair
the Chicag
in th
forrnari
Gilbert u
operetl
Th.
condin '
Ailers
loists Jar.
Walker
ing as
Chicago 5j
ru
Lo
LOS
�r Cla
who 1 .
a -
'T 1
ing for l
appear in
lamed ma-
portray
"Vi
1 wanted
thinga pol
cowbo)
called in
Tuesda).
au-e I
cowboy
But la
Superior
Jerry Pacht
barred M
making pul
anct s a
Rang Tl
Ijox C7jaix�txjlex with Ji�tinction.
cf�k fox
LYYl
ML
co-ov&nex
cRoffUx of XEZnutfU
cHalx Ue�icfnex�
602 �. 10tk
Jxainea try
WoxCd C&amfilon cJfaLxitijCut
On Women x and dvzn � Cut�
iPexms and jSoaijUjaJz� available
CaLL lot crrfifioLntniEnt-
758- 0880 Mon. - 9tt.
Ltftin ujatdinq distance of camfiUA

AISSffiry
N0
CELEBRATE
Scr,
cO
$r���� AN� M'NERAl S m
�pexall
VITAMIN
(Thiamine)
SO mg
100 Tablets
REG 1.87
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100 mg.
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with Calcium Gluconat
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100 Copills
REG 1 69
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T?eXall TREOFER
jpexa
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325 mg
Ferrous Sulfote
100s
REG 2 13
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.V 3!7�
911Dickenson Ave. 6th St.& Memorial Drive
752-7105 758-4104
r
1





OS,
6
6
ZINC
r
Broussard
Performs in
Symphony
Performing with
the Chicago symphony
Orchestra in a recent
concert at Ravinia Park,
summer home of the
orchestra, was East
Carolina University fac-
ulty trombonist George
Broussard.
Broussard substituted
tor James Gilbertsen,
tirt chair trombonist of
the Chicago Symphony,
in the orchestra's per-
formance of music from
Gilbert and Sullivan
cpcrettas.
The program was
conducted by Franz
Alters and featured so-
loist? Janice Hall, John
Walker and James Bill-
ings as well as the
Chicago Symphony Cho-
ra
128 August 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 35
Glee
Club
open
George Broussard performed with
Symphony Orchestra in Ravinia Park.
the Chicago
A student of Frank
Crissafulli at North-
Western University,
Broussard was in Chi-
cago to present a doc-
toral chamber recital.
During past terms of
residence in the Chicago
area, Broussard has
been a member of the
Arlington Heights
Symphony Orchestra,
the Park Ridge Fine
Arts Symphony i.nd
various jazzdance
bands led by Roger
Pemberton and the late
Ralph Marterie.
Do you enjoy sing-
ing? If so, you should
look into becoming in-
volved with the Men's
or Women's Glee Club.
Membership in the
Glee Clubs is open to
all interested persons.
Previous experience
singing in choral groups
may be helpful.
To find out if the
Glee Club is the place
for you, stop by
Fletcher music building.
Talk with Dr. Rohnda
Fleming or Mr. Ed
Glenn on Monday or
Tuesday, Aug. 27 and
28, between 10 a.m.
and 2 p.m or during
the class meeting times,
Monday, Wednesday and
Friday from 12 till 1, in
rooms 105B and 10
Lone Ranger fights to ride again
LOS ANGELES (AP)-
Actor Clayton Moore,
who battled for justice
a television's "Lone
Ranger now is fight-
ing for the right to
appear in public as the
famed masked man he
portrayed.
"When I was a kid,
1 wanted to be two
things-a policeman or a
cowboy' the actor re-
called in an interview
Tuesday. "1 was lucky
because I got to be a
cowboy
But last week,
Superior Court Judge
Jerry Pacht temporarily
barred Moore from
making public appear-
ances as "The Lone
Ranger The company
that owns the rights to
the character claims
Moore is too old.
Clayton refuses to re-
veal his age, but he
has been reported to be
between 65 and 70.
"Believe me said
the man who made the
mysterious champion of
justice famous, "1 am
quite hurt
Moore, who ap-
peared in 168 television
episodes of the famous
cowboy series, wants to
wear the mask in
appearances at shopping
centers and fairs as
"Clayton Moore who
portrayed the Lone
Ranger
The injunction was
sought by Lone Ranger
Television Inc a sub-
sidiary of Wrather
Corp which bought all
rights to the Lone
Ranger character for $3
million in 1954.
The company claims
the public could confuse
Moore with a new
masked man who is
making appearances to
promote a multi-
million-dollar Lone
Ranger movie being
filmed by Lone Ranger
Television.
Wrather said Moore
"no longer is an appro-
priate physical repre-
sentative of the trim
19th century Western
hero
'They don't want
two Lone Rangers out
on tour said Moore,
who with Jay Silver-
heels as his Indian
sidekick, Tonto, tri-
umphed over scores of
Old West desperados.
"But I am the original
Lone Ranger on tele-
vision. I portrayed the
Lone Ranger for 30
years
Pacht has scheduled
an Aug. 30 hearing to
decide whether to make
the injunction per-
manent and until then,
Moore said, "I was
given permission to go
out as 'Clayton Moore
who portrayed the Lone
Ranger' and wear a
mask
Restaurant
521 Cotanche St.
Greenville, N.C.
Located conveniently across
from the girl's high risedorms
in the Georgetown Shoppes.
Specializing In
Bar-B-Q Beef Tips
Also Featurfng-
Sandwiches
Italian Fare
Pizza
Salads
Beer and Wine License
FOR TAKE OUT-758-2929
Greenville Hardware
Your
JhuZlaSw
HARDWARE STORE
Greenville Hardware Greenville Square
(next door to Arby's)
Weekdays 8:30-9:00 Saturdays 8:00-6:00
JhtuVaSuiA
,��0��I wot -
TOOL
VALUE
OF THE MONTH
Full line
of
extension
cords.
$1.29
Hnwnfs
DISH PAN
Attractive. Stylish. Colorful!
MECHANIC�
While
Supplies
Last
now
LABEL MAKER
� With 3 Rolls
(38-ln x 6-Ft) Tape
Self-stick plastic tape
identifies school supplies,
tools, etc. Rotate dial,
squeeze trigger to print
name, address. 500145
QUANTITIES LIMITED
Master

4
W
$1.99
72-OUNCE
COVERED PITCHER
Large handled pitcher with
three position cover. Pour,
strain, and close. Dishwasher
. $4.29
10 Off on
All Kitchen
Gadgets with
E.C.U.ID
safe.
L-50
TOWEL HOLDER
Unbreakable hinges. Installs
easily. Comes in assorted
colors. H-11
Welcome to E.C.UM!
Bring us your problems-weMI try to solve them for you.
We also carry Single and Double Burner Hotplates.
T

:
:
i
!
I
i
STUDENT
LUNCH SPECIALS
Monday Chopped Steak, Baked Potato,
Texas Toast
99
1.59
99
1.59
99�
139
2.25
Tuesday- Chef Salad and Baked Potato
Wednesday- Steerburger
Thursday- Soup and Salad
Friday- Chopped Steak, Baked Potato,
Texas Toast
Saturday- Steerburger, Baked Potato,
Texas Toast'
Sunday- 6 oz. Sirloin, Texas Toast
Baked Potato
11:00 a.m 3:00 p.m.
3005 E. loth Street
. OSSer effective
through Sept. 30,1979
JOIN US
AT THE STEER!
T
T





jos,
6
Dicatcium
Posphat�
6
INC
f
Broussard
Performs in
Symphony
Performing with
the Chicago symphony
Orchestra in a recent
concert at Ravinia Park,
summer home of the
orchestra, was East
Carolina University fac-
ulty trombonist George
Broussard.
Broussard substituted
tor James (Gilbertsen,
tirt chair trombonist of
the Chicago Symphony,
in the orchestra's per-
formance of music from
Gilbert and Sullivan
operettas.
The program was
conducted by Franz
Alters and featured so-
loists Janice Hall, John
walker and James Bill-
ings as well as the
Chicago Symphony Cho-
ru.
128 August 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Pege 35
Glee
Club
open
George Broussard performed with the Chicago
Symphony Orchestra in Ravinia Park.
A student of Frank
Crissafulli at North-
Western University,
Broussard was in Chi-
cago to present a doc-
toral chamber recital.
During past terms of
residence in the Chicago
area, Broussard has
been a member of the
Arlington Heights
Symphony Orchestra,
the Park Ridge Fine
Arts Symphony and
various jazzdance
bands led by Roger
Pemberton and the late
Ralph Marterie.
Do you enjoy sing-
ing? If so, you should
look into becoming in-
volved with the Men's
or Women's Glee Club.
Membership in the
Glee Clubs is open to
all interested persons.
Previous experience
singing in choral groups
may be helpful.
To find out if the
Glee Club is the place
for you, stop by
Fletcher music building.
Talk with Dr. Rohnda
Fleming or Mr. Ed
Glenn on Monday or
Tuesday, Aug. 27 and
28, between 10 a.m.
and 2 p.m or during
the class meeting times,
Monday, Wednesday and
Friday from 12 till 1, in
rooms 105B and 10
Lone Ranger fights to ride again
LOS ANGELES (AP)-
Actor Clayton Moore,
who battled for justice
as television's "Lone
Ranger now is fight-
ing for the right to
appear in public as the
tamed masked man he
portrayed.
"When I was a kid,
1 wanted to be two
things-a policeman or a
cowboy the actor re-
called in an interview
Tuesday. "I was lucky
because I got to be a
cowboy
But last week,
Superior Court Judge
Jerry Pacht temporarily
barred Moore from
making public appear-
ances as "The Lone
Ranger The company
that owns the rights to
the character claims
Moore is too old.
Clayton refuses to re-
veal his age, but he
has been reported to be
between 65 and 70.
"Believe me said
the man who made the
mysterious champion of
justice famous, "I am
quite hurt
Moore, who ap-
peared in 168 television
episodes of the famous
cowboy series, wants tc
wear the mask in
appearances at shopping
centers and fairs as
"Clayton Moore who
portrayed the Lone
Ranger
The injunction was
sought by Lone Ranger
Television Inc a sub-
sidiary of Wrather
Corp which bought all
rights to the Lone
Ranger character for $3
million in 1954.
The company claims
the public could confuse
Moore with a new
masked man who is
making appearances to
promote a multi-
million-dollar Lone
Ranger movie being
filmed by Lone Ranger
Television.
Wrather said Moore
"no longer is an appro-
priate physical repre-
sentative of the trim
19th century Western
hero
'They don't want
two Lone Rangers out
on tour said Moore,
who with Jay Silver-
heels as his Indian
sidekick, Tonto, tri-
umphed over scores of
Old West desperados.
"But I am the original
Lone Ranger on tele-
vision. I portrayed the
Lone Ranger for 30
years
Pacht has scheduled
an Aug. 30 hearing to
decide whether to make
the injunction per-
manent and until then,
Moore said, "I was
given permission to go
out as 'Clayton Moore
who portrayed the Lone
Ranger' and wear a
mask
Restaurant
521 Cotanche St.
Greenville, N.C.
Located conveniently across
from the girl's high rise dorms
in the Georgetown Shoppes.
Specializing In
Bar-B-Q Beef Tips
Also Featuring-
Sandwiches
Italian Fare
Pizza
Salads
Beer and Wine License
FOR TAKE OUT-758-2929
Greenville Hardware
Your
7nmVa�u�
HARDWARE STORE �
Greenville Hardware Greenville Square
(next door to Arby 9s)
Weekdays 8:30-9:00 Saturdays 8:00-6:00
TOOL
VALUE
OF THE HONIII
btafe
Full line
of
extension
cords.
Mast
er
M�i
L
iC
CHAIN
AND
LOCK
IT
$1.29
Brows
MECHANIC g i
While
Supplies
Last a
now
LABEL MAKER
� With 3 Roils
(38-in. x 6-ft.) Tape
Self-stick plastic tape
identifies school supplies,
tools, etc. Rotate dial,
squeeze trigger to print
name, address. 500145
QUANTITIES LIMITED
DISH PAN
Attractive. Stylish. Colorful I
L-147
istoAiHuIc
$1.99
$4.29
10 Off on
All Kitchen
Gadgets with
E.C.U.ID
72-OUNCE
COVERED PITCHER
Large handled pitcher with
three position cover. Pour,
strain, and close. Dishwasher
89
safe.
L-50
TOWEL HOLDER
Unbreakable hinges. Installs
easily. Comes in assorted
colors. H-11
Welcome to E.CUM!
Bring us your problems-we'll try to solve them for you.
We also carry Single and Double Burner Hotplates.
�(srmy
:
STUDENT
LUNCH SPECIALS
Monday Chopped Steak Baked Potato.
Texas Toast
99
1.59
99
1.S9
99
139
2.2S
Tuesday- Chef Salad and Baked Potato
Wednesday- Steerburger
Thursday- Soup and Salad
Friday- Chopped Steak, Baked Potato,
Texas Toast
Saturday- Steerburger, Baked Potato,
Texas Toast
Sunday- 6 oz. Sirloin, Texas Toast
Baked Potato
11:00 a.m 3:00 p.m.
300s E. 10th Street
Offer effective
through Sept. 30,1979
JOIN US
AT THE STEER!
T
55
T






Page 36 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 28 August 1979
F ALL YOU WANT IS STEREO,
THERE ARE MANY PLACES TO GO-
BUT IF YOU WANT SOMETHING
KENT AND BETTERlisten to BOSE
at
HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH
WE SPECIALIZE IN BOSE AND SONY
BECAUSE�
�We feel they represent the best dollar value
�We can offer faster ,more professional IN STORE service
-It uncomplicates your dicision making
�They are recognized world wide for quality
�These 2 companies are not sacrificing quality
control to win some mythical mytnical
race to be No. l
�These two companies are noted for
research and developement
BUT MOSTLY BECAUSE
After being here for 11 years
(longer than anyone specializing
in hi-fi) and after selling most
other brands, we honestly believe
BOSE and SONY are better and give
more service free pleasure to our
customers
IT COST NO MORE TO HAVE BOSE
COMPARE
THANK YOU
JIM
BRONSON
GEORGE
Find out why this little moped is such a great companion.
Come in, hop on a Tomos and take a free test ride.
Check out the unique Tomos Kickstart. The 2-speed
automatic transmission.
Enjoy the comfort of a soft, padded seat and independent
wheel suspension. And economy of up to 150 miles
per gallon.
Tomos carries a warranty of 3 months or 3,000 miles.
And we'll back it up with one of the finest service
programs around.
Tomos. You'll never know how much fun it is to own
one, until you try it yourself.
SOLVE THE OA8
CRUNCH
AND
THE PARKING
TOMOS. The greatest sidekick since Tbnto.
HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH INC.
40I EVANS ST.
i
i
f
1
i
I





Supplement to the Fountain Head
THE STUDENTS GUIDE TO SAVINGS
I
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available
for sale in each Kroger Sav-on, except as specifically noted in th� i
ad. H we do run out of an advertised item we will offer you your
I choice of a comparable item when available, reflecting the same
savings or a raincheck which will entitle you to purchase the adver-
tised item at the advertised price within 30 days.
Little Debbie Snack Cakes
Chips and Snacks
Bagged Nuts and
Sauces & Gravy Mixes
30 IIS0LD
roiMdfflL " COST
HAMS
CHEESE
BALLS j
DAIRY A EGGS (YEAST)
0 0 0 0
in
i
QJ
ttl
D0O0000�
LI LU
BREADS ft ROLLS
0 0�
8
LJ
i coamesmmoamis
y.
�Z-
VITAMINS FIRST AID
DEODORJ MTS
2) 0 0 0 0 � �
�;
�I
n
m
0 000 00000000
DELICATESSEN RESTAURANT
I
u
m
��
III
IN STORE
BAKERY
u
�00� 0 00� �
ENTRANCE

ENTRANCE

FOOD, DRUG, GEN.
MOSE. STORES
1 Prices Effective
Wed Aug. 29
Thru Sat, Sept 1,1979
LOB IV
cmARcrrcs
OGAMS
TOCACCO
JEWELRY
MAGAZINES
OJ1
r- � m
" o
NONE SOLD
"1
DEALERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
MON
THRU
SAT
OPEN SUNDAY
9 AM TO 9 PM
600 Greenville BlvdGreenville
Phone 756-7031
Pg iff





0&&
CHECK CASHING
manyi
l up
6.188
to
out.
m. For
Card
�rrt of
O � W
Items throughout the Store
Oil
SOLD
AT
HHIW'1
OUN
ONLY.11
OMlY.191.
ohly.231.
OHLY.261.
om.302
ONLY.302
ONLY.453
OHIY.505
omm
id rmca
OOM
o" .75
� .94
on" 1.13
011.50
oihvI.88
oh" 2.29
COMPABBD T5L5?Z-
BRAND AT KBOOE
� AV-OH.
Pg 20.F.K.Q.
(omPHB
f'f
y






DYMO
Mr. Click
LABEL MAKER
Kids can make colorful
vinyl labels for
notebooks, lunch kits,
gym bags.
t
DYMO CORDLESS
rue Pointer
ENCIL SHARPENER
Batteries not included.
$
T
"CHARACTER"
School
Bag
EachA66
MEAD
Construction
Paper
Pk.
97
SCHOOLOFFICE
Paperback
Dictionary
77
0
WEBSTER'S
Harbound
Dictionary
77
$i
MEAD BLUE
Canvas
Binder
$-133
MEAD
Slicker
Binder
77
MEAD RAINBOW
Olympic
Portfolio
0.5 MM PENTEL
Pro-Am
Pencil
$-49
SCHOOL TOOLS
Stencil
Book
$144
1
27
,
MEAD
Fashion
Binder
$-97
MEAD RAINBOW
Olympic
Themebook
47
Thermos
Bottle
$199
EXTENDS TO 12 INCHES
Pencil
Compass
COLORFUL
School
Box
29
0
29

6-INCH
Protractor
Ruler
19
0
MEAD 9" X 12"
Scribble
Pad
57

6" PLASTIC OR 12"
Wooden
Ruler
9
0
MEAD-
Trapper
Portfolio
19
0
BARRY PORTFOLIO
Mead
Classifier
66
MEAD ALL-IN-ONE
Class-
Mate
$199
i
MEAD
Laminated
Portfolios
Pg 3D.F.K.G.





,i
SAVE
S 40�.
0 on
HUNDREDS OF PANTRY STAPLES
DRINK AID
Lemonade Mix
46.5-OZ.
15-Qt.
Cannister
AVONDALE 1ft M -f a
Fruit CocktailH 45
KBOOER K. 10C
Potted Meat JT
KROGER �. 4 "? 0
12-ox
47
Kroger Sugar 99
Tomato Paste�
GRANULATED
PLAIN OR lOOtZED 4QC
Kroger Saltf lov
j? s159
KROGER
Instant Tea
EMBASSY
Ground Coffee
KROGER
3-U.
Jar
1-Lb $-189
Grape Juice � 00
17-oz.
Can
AVONDALE
Whole Kernel Corn .
KROGER
Toasteeos Cereal
KROGER
Steak Sauce
��OGER M �7(Ja
Bar-B-Q SauceM 0
240
84�
49c
Sot
58
KROGER
Tomato Juice ��
ZANYZOO j TfQ
Freezer Pops � 3
KUOOat-M OK. OR WATER 6vftt CO0
Chunk Light Tuna , Ql
Fish Steaks �
43
KROGER
Pork & Beans
16-Oz.
Can
t3
COST CUTTER
So SauceBB.� 2351
9-INCH
FOAM PLASTIC
Hefty Plates
50-Ct
Pkg
NEW
UPTON
Ice Tea MixIS?$1"
STOKELY 17-ot
45c
Honey Pod Peasr
WHOLE KERNEL L
Stokely Gold Corn. '&43
17-ox.
Can
JUST
MouccoJ
STOKELY
Sliced Beets US-l8g3Sc
$-49
309
3P109
3$1
Vegetable Oil ft?0,
PET
Evaporated Milk
TeTuags�2MM7�
Upton Tea MixS&219$1M IJ
i�� oc 37
HALVES SLICES
Stokey Peaches
29-Oz
Can
SB,�"

WAS 79�
&'
'
Bl
Pf. 4f





,r
SOOPER COST CUTTERS
V W VLjW iMJ I F�R SOME SOOPER COST CUTTERS NO OTHER
W W M BRANDS ARE STOCKED
HERE ARE JUST A FEW OF THE HUNDREDS OF EVERYDAY SOOPER COST CUTTER PRICE
A LARGER LIST IS AVAILABLE AT THE STORE
4
&
Sin tt320
KR00ER ie-o O O C
Italian Dressingm. oo
COUNTRY OVEN Q ,��. $-
Marshmallow Pies�� �
COUNTRY OVEN m r f a
Pretzel SticksS 39c
EMBASSY
y&Tea Bags
100-Ct.
tox
FLEECE 14Kcl fi
Paper Napkins� hw
SOLO aw CAt
Foam Cups� H
HOME PRIDE jS-Ft Q9$
Aluminum Foil "�" wu
missy 12K,t QOO
Fabric Softener � 00
Taco Shells bok �I3
$-109
42-oz. 1
Cm
AVONOALE
Vegetable Shortening
ChilTWith Beans 'Sf 49�
HOME PRIDE 100.700
White Paper Plates
pug.
ao-ct $1 39
Pkfl.
�4-0.
HOME PRIDE
Trash Bags
BRIGHT
Laundry Detergent
PERSONAL SIZE M CQ0
Ivory Soap K a
STEEL WOOL CC(
S.O.S. Soap Pads 00
BONUS PHY
1 as43e y 1
LOOK
T
STOKELY
Fruit Cocktail
STOKELY
Applesauce.
GREEN GIANT
Niblets Corn
IN JUICE, DEL MONTE
JUST
Ineouccol
JUST
IrspuoepI
I
JUST
RCDUCCOl
Pineapple Ls�y 283c3r 1
STOKELY
Cut Green Beans
CHUNK LIGHT
Star-Klst Tuna
O
SA.Si.VBEOUCEO
TEMPOBABH-J � KS
IN
IN
PRICE
4 OBJ
iStar-Kist
TUNA I
WAS 89
WAS � NOW
DOW
Oven Cleaner
TRIGGER SPRAY
Windex
PIZZA, BACOR CHEES
SOUR CREAM � ONWN
Cm
L
JUST
OMON,
�UY
16-Oz.
Cans
WAS48'
CLOROX
Bleach
WAS NOW
Keebler Shindigsc
JUST
Jug OO
27951
HEAVY DUTY (80-OFF LABEL lPUCSD
Wisk Liquid Detergent
Dove Detergent. .I"0!
LUX
Soap
JUST
REDUCED
te 35'
99
PAPER
Northern Napkins
NORTHS"?
;vri
i?50-Ct
WAS M.05
Pg 5F





FREEZER REEF SALE
U. S. D. A. CHOICE "HEAVY" WESTERN BEEF
WHOLE 160-175 LB. AVG. WT.
Beef Fore-
Quarter
$109
Lb.
U. S. D. A. CHOICE "HEAW'WESTERN
La AVG. WT.
WHOLE 150-175 LB.
Beef Hind
Quarter
Lb.
fU. S. D. A. CHCKCE "HEAVY" WESTERN I
I WHOLE 12-16 LB. AVG. WT. - BONELESS
Top Strip
Loin
CHOICE "HEAVY" WESTERN BEEF
-16 LB. AVG. WT. - BONELESS
$
Sirloin
Lb.
IU. 8. D. A. CHC E "HEAV
'Bar
Tenderloin u.
Pg�.r
COST Cl
CHUB PAK OR STORE PAK
Ground
Beef
$fl58
Lb.
A FINE BLEND OF BEEF AND
SOYA PROTEIN COMBINED INTO
SOYA PROTEIN COMBINED INTO � U
JCroger Pro Patty Mixu, �
$118
ff
QUARTER PORK LOIN CUT INTO
Pork
Chops
Lb.
SERVE 'I
Wei
$048
2
USD. A CHOICE "HEAVY"
WESTERN BEEF BONELESS BOTTOM
Round Steak
U.S.D.A. CHOICE "HEAVY"
WESTERN BEEF BONELESS EYE OF (Alfl
Round Roastu, 3
U.S.DA CHOICE "HEAVY" WESTERN BEEF TOTAL WT. 4
BONELESS ($3.47 LB.) SHI O88
& Id
WHOLE OR BUTT HALF
Lamb Legs�
WHOLE LAMB
Shoulder Roast
Lb.
8-oz. A
Wl. SIM
LBS. OR MORE � BONELESS ($3.47 L
Top Sirloin Steak Q
TTL WT. 4 LBS. OR V
Steak S4 22 Lb lOwfstoaS 0
Lb.
MORE-BONELESS
TTL. WT. 5 LBS. OR MORE
BONELESS
nxfis"
SirloinTip Steak ($2 78 l
WHOLE FRESH PICNIC STYLE
FRESH VEAL
Round Steak Cutlets .
CENTER CUT RIB
Pork Chops
COUNTRY STYLE
Spare Ribs�
$029
$-159
$C99
$-188
$-138
COUNTRY C
Ham I
GWALTNEY
Boned
SWIFTS HC
Canne
FRESH BOS
PorkS
3- TO 5-LB.
Spare





�-59
H38
4
COUNTRY CLUB
Ham Pat
GWALTNEY 3-4 LB. AVG. WT
$ H 7 9 HOLLY F
S048 HOLLY F
HOLLY FARMS fffi
Ham PattiesLb I Combination Pak Fryers "99q
HOLLY FARMS
Fresh Fryer Livers 99
24H MULLY f-AHWIS g f
Breast Quarter With Wing Lb09�
SWIFTS HOSTESS
Canned Ham
FRESH BOSTON BUTT
4 DRY SALT A
�$8" FatBack 78
- � COUNTRY STYLE-BULK
$1 28 fK� 00 0
tJ1fi VALLEYDALE HOT OR MILD AA
$118 Pork Sausageft 98�
HOLLY FARMS
Fryer Thighs
KROGER REGULAR OR
DELUXE VARIETY PAK
Lb.
$109
1
12-01. $179
Pkg.
B PACKAGED QQ
Pork Steak ' � Sliced Bacon 5fO
3- TO S-LB. PORK
Spare RibsL
Luncheon Meat 1
KROGER CHUNK STYLE 7 ft C
Braunschweiger 5f
$119
KROGER
Beef Weini
KROGER MEAT
12-Or$1 08
KROGER CHUNK STYLE
Bologna
KAHN'S
Smoked Sausage
FINE FOR
SEASONING�PORK NECK
BONES, PORK TAILS OR
KROGER MEAT j �p
Dinner Franks i I
$4 58
$-J78
Pork Feet
$-198
48�
KAHN'S ALL MEAT
Wieners
Lb.
KAHN'S ALL BEEF
Wieners
Lb.
SERVE N SAVE-ASSORTED
VARIETIES
Luncheon Meat. "
$i 38
KAHN S ALL MEAT
IkAHN A ALL MCA I gy g
Sliced Bologna 2S 98
KAHN S ALL MEAT 4 AR
Sliced Bologna 'S?l40
KROGER - ff
Meat Wieners 98 p
SEAFOOD
FRESSHORE
S-i 3g
Fish-N-Batter Portions1f 1
FRES-SHORE
Fish N Chipstt13�
FRESH SEAI
til
Available Friday and Saturday Only
FRESH ��
Dressed Flounder I
FRESH DRESSED C f
Vgerch Filletsu, Z
Pg ro.F





FROZEN VALUES
c
FRENCH CUT OR
REGULAR CUT
Kroger
Green Beans
LQQ,
DAIRY SPECIALS
c
WEEW
Q
Fried
Chicken
2 $�99
-Lb.
Pkg.
kPn O
&0 iV" SEALTESTOR
KMo ' A ' UGHT N UVELY
nulTlT lfel Cotta9e
Cheese J Cheese
$129
Singles
12-Oz.
Pkg
$129
J

PEPPERONI,
SAUSAGE, HAMBURGER
13-OzJ
Pkg.
KROGER CRMKLE CUT
OR REGULAR CUT
French
6188 PRICES
m
'ft
KROGER
fUE
Lowfat Milk
THROUGHOUT THE STORE
Gallon
Jug
Vf
Fries
KROGER GLAZED OR - f a
Jelly DonutsWflft 59c
REGULAR OR PINK � ftfW
Country Time Lemonade Z US 89�
8EALTE8T UGHT N UVELY
Ice Milk �
BAKED FOODS
wG�i.$i29
6 STICK
Kraft Parkay� 59C
ASSORTED FLAVORS � -
Esprit Yogurt2 &� 69
KROGER MOMESTYLE OR -
Buttermilk Biscuits 6 . 89c
KROGER
Skim
Milk
KROGER MILD
Cheddar
Cheese
Random
Weight
$189
Lb.
VVy TWW ROLLS
g OitfKBUTTERMILK TWIN ROLLS
C05 d?v FLAKE ROLLS, & COMBO
' WEEKV �OLLS, MX OR MATCH
Brown 'N Serve
Kroger
11-Oz.
Pkga.
KROGER UGHT
OR DARK
Special Formula!
Bread
SMALL
Iden Poundl
Cake
2 $f!9
12-Oz.
Stroh's Beer
12-oz.
Cans
6 $fl89
12-oz.
Cans

I

I u
Sunfry Style O
RollsL
&rown & Serve km. AQ
Biscuits� HJI
Q
'0 Rc9' �
Sl;
KROGER
Cracked
ROYAL VIKING DANISH SI 09
Cinnamon Twists �5
EN� ISH OR SOKRDOUGH
lc?5er y �
LMuffins .�- ����
Wheat Bread
16-Oz.
Loaves
:o
ST .)6ts1"
BEER
Black Ci2$l49
Label Q NR �
ROSEGAROEN A
Liebfrau- $029
milchr? fc.
GIACOBAZZI -
Lam- $"1 99
bruscoFlfth
SCHLfTZOR
Schlitz
Light Beer
12$J59
x
0
Pq 8F





s
roqer
oiii
po�
Bakery
o
PREMIUM QUALIPC V fl
SLICED TO ORDER Y" oER
Russer All-
Meat Bologna
r
EXTRA LEAN
SAVE
Off Reg
- Prie�
if
SAVE1
$1.00
Off Reg.
Price 5
� NX.
VJ SAVE
IUI D.
Off Reg.
PriC �.
�iyfN
FRESH FROM THE KITCHEN-SAVE 20
American or Mustard
Baked Virginia
Ham
$A99
Lb warn
WHITE OR YELLOW
American
Cheese
$A49
lb.
2
LETiJE
Potato SaladLb
NO
PRESERVATIVESHOMEMADE
ChocolatejgtLSiig
Fudge 17
��J FOR BACK TO SCHOOL tV VU
69 pib .f r$o4�
w w Pimento Loaf C, "is? rf u. �
y
1 K
1
PERFECT FOR SNACKTIME VVC
Fre nch iAvi 2 H 6
Onion Dip . " Lb.
SAVE
20'
OHRm.
69
LARGE AND FLUFFY
Onion Rolls
a
C)
For
FRESH FROM THE OVEW&Vt
HamburgerSr
Buns
THE KROGER DELI BAKERY
Prepare for your picnic or patio party the de-
lightfully easy way. . stop at the Kroger Deli
for fried chicken, baked ham, corned beef,
lunchmeats, beans, salads and desserts.
They'll taste so good, yet leave you more time
for family fun.
C
READY TO SERVE WHOLEX?' SpfcJ
SAVE
FUDGE ICED
Chocolate
Eclairs
For
IC
isavTL
� OH ��(.
121
CREAM OR
Jelly Filled C QQ
Do nuts . H'AJ For JJ
FRESH FROM THE OVEN
Jumbo Chocolate
Chip Cookies
19
St
2-LAYER 8" CAKE OF THE
WEEK
Chocolate Butter
Cream Cake
NEW ITEM
Lemon
Krunch Pie
f M
J MVf
fK $999
"VsN Ea. Cm
S-J59
40-
.V. . Ea
B.B.Q.
Chicken
$pf49
In-Store RESTAURANT
A DIFFERENT MENU EVERYDAY
Ea.
18-PIECE
Fried .Chicken
Dinner
FREE SMALL COKE WITH
14-Lb.
Hot Dog
$C99 Daily Plate
Lunch Special
$69
PILED HIGH ON A FRESH
0 tf&i
BQ. Beef $i 19
Sandwich ��� I
14-Fresh Pizza
and a QQC
Small Coke
Kroger Sav-0nA Whole Lot More Than Just One Store
PQ 9F





"S� 'Jh
:0 T CUTTER COUPON
fSVbor Day Special
I COW ENLARGEMENT
I zr FAA
From Your CfcUa
Favorite I 7 W
� Color Slide Or 0 m T
Color Negative each
m Limit One Coupon Per Family
jffit 1 Coupon Good Thru Sunday September 2 1979
K fSgS SUBJECT TO APPLICABLE STATE ft LOCAL TAXES
utota mom
COUPON MUST
ACCOMPANY ORDER
Kroger Savon
Wants you to meet
OarFrimuKf
Phsfmnchts
JEFFTUeWBI
r�r
H
CHARLES CAirra
ITiey are here to pjve
your thee
advice ml assistance.
When you del 756-7393
in GreenviB a
to sane flit'
COST CUTTER COUPON
Prescription
(New Or Transferred)
umnjmtmm
To
At The
Sav-On
Pharmacy
Per rex
sea. s, m �
If
ev
e
PUB MIRRORS
OR
PICTURES
� AU4MTE9 ITUI MM SUMS
� PMTTT IMMMH FOB TOW
lltHM BOOM BOffl (BOUGH
FMTOWIOU
� 1-fffCf wctubi amourt
bm $(
Choice
ASSORTED
Sporty
Bags
7om ar
7074
6990
V7S4
DUPONT REDLABEL
Dacron
Pillow
$129
Ea.
�bm
Tttlav, Snickers,
lll!?3 &keteer
BUNDFORM
TUBE CAKE PAN
G&S METAL
Bundform Pan
or 9"
Silver Skillet
NON STICK
Insulated $447
Pitcher on.y
Imens briefs
OR
en's
Shirts tf77
Pak ol 3 tlfii
JUVENILE
Long Sleeve
iSweat Shirt
$
� CNCW NICK WITH M�
�to currs and sot
to�m � CUTI NCW ot
VISA
Z&te
U127
10
6 5
� FULL FEATURE
ELECTRIC � AVAILA-
BLE IN WHITE OR
BROWN
WESTCLOX
Alarm
Clock
RC75
PANASONIC $,
CLOCK RADIO
100 Solid State circuitry. With power failure in-
dicator, 3 dynamic speaker, simulated wood-
grain cabinet.
PANASONIC
8-Track Tape Player
ACDC








Offering Cost Cutter
Savings throughout
the store
Health & Beauty Aids!
PMLUPS
Milk of Magnesia99�
Si 69
BELTLESS
Stayfree Mini Pads
��
VN�iN BLADE
�mr�tII
IN BLADE
CARTRIDGES
Schick
Super l
K8CK
OF 5
ssSi
rc
BARNES-HND
Wetting Solution
CLAIROL SHAMPOO
Herbal Essence
2$159
Box
B?$137
0
WEBi
HAIROL
Condition II
Treatment
16-Oz.
Btl
ULTRA
Ban Roll-On
CLAWWST
Hair Spray .
$137
a 97'
�99
K�
20�'OFF REG. PHCEScSi
Signal
Mouthwash
$127
18-Oz.
CLAIROL
Frost 4 Tipk�$3"
REFILL BLADES � )q
Personal TouchSi "
Pg 11F





SERVING YOU COMES FIRST IN THE
KROGER SAVON
vO
WSfl
RED, BLUE OR WHITE
Thompson
Seedless Grapes.
The Cream
Off The Crop
From All Over
Lb.
Kroger's fruit and vegetables
'buyers .re always on the go I ffj
Jfrom planting to harvest they
Imove through the growing reg-
ions that produce the most abun-
dant, high quality crops. Then
Ithey choose the finest and see
that it's rushed to your Kroger
rden at the peak of goodness
ft r.
J0�fBO27
'fcmfe
oupes,
d
5A. GOLD OR X
Salad 'pkxiKt,
Delicious
Apples
ML
Cauliflowerk 99
NEW CROP
Sweet Potatoes 29c
fresh w
Green Peppers .5 � $1
Ertiett Pears 49
GREEN TOP
Bunch Carrots 3
GREENTOP 7?
Bunch Radishes . 3
�Lb.
FRESH
o
ft
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Title
The East Carolinian, August 28, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 28, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.01
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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