Fountainhead, July 12, 1979






Circulation 4,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
Vol
12
55 No. 4T
0 '
12 July 1979
I
Parking plans threaten campus trees
ByJANE BIDDl.X
Stafl Vi riter
l lie formation meet-
ing ol tlit- FCl Save
flif Trees Committee
was held Monday night.
I lie commitlee is
i omposed ol 2 I con-
. i i ncd students, faculty
members and citizens of
i - reenv illf.
Dr. Barney Kant- ol
tlif Km ironmental
Health Dept. ol KCl
led the discussion which
Km used on v hat has
been dune to date
i nnccrmug the trees.
Kane told the group
thai he lirsl learned ol
(in1 plan in i ut down
ti. lree to allow lor the
paving ul lour parking
lots u hen Kobbie
I ugwell ol the Green-
ville Utilities Dept.
contacted him last
Wednesday alit)ul the
universil) doing an
unaesthetic thing,
which" Kane added
wu an embarrassment
to ni department since
we knew nothing about
the plan
Kane was able to
get a set t�l the plans
from Rivers & Associ-
ates Inc the engineer-
ing company who was
granted the contract to
lo the construction,
how ing t he t rees
uvolved on the spec-
lied lots and was dated
pnl 10.
One ol the parking
lots is located next to
blrwin Hall and involves
approximate!) W trees
itself. The lot now
accomodales up t 55
vehicles ami th plans
show the loi will have
spaces for ol) compact
car alter construction
an addition ol only live
spaces.
A second lot is the
huge lot located parallel
to Ninth Street behind
Mcudciihall and Jovner
Library. Another lot is
on the corner of Ninth
and Cotanche Streets,
which when completed
will constitute (00 feet
ol black top from
Mendenhall to Cotanche
Street. The lourth and
last lot is on James
Street between Seventh
ami Kighlli Streets.
Kane contacted Cliff
Moore, who is in
charge ol Campus
Planning, who told him
il was already too late
to do anv thing. but
Kane persisted because,
as Kane put it, "as
long as the trees are
standing we still have
tune VV hen Kane
contacted Dr. Brewer,
the promise of saving
IT ol l he 07 trees, if
possible, was made.
However, the committee
hopes to save even
more ol these 100 year
old trees by proposing
alternative solutions but
feels it must first half
the proceedings to
insure that the trees
are sale.
The Save the frees
Committee formed a
subcommittee . ol six
persons representing a
varied group lo go to
Brewer with the call for
a morilorium and with
several specific consi-
derations. The subcom-
mittee members are:
Chairperson�Pal Carton,
ol the Sierra Club and
the tacultv; Sharon
Heath, President ol the
Faculty member sues
Bv LYNN BK R
Editor
Dr. Harvey J. Hewett, of the Business
Administration tacultv, recently initiated a civil
a.tion against ten different corporations, lor a total
ol twenty million dollars in damages.
Dr. Hewett, while an oficer in the I nited States
Navy, was exposed to asbestos and asbestos related
niai r iai which were "mined, manufactured,
imported, converted, compounded and or
; l Hit defendants He maintains that this
! vposure. which look place in the states ol Virginia,
fexas, 5 Carolina, California and Hawaii,
dii' u proximatel) caused him to develop an
ss known ami designated as mesolthelioma and
asbestos related disease
corporations named in the civil action are:
Johus-Manv ille Sales Corporation; Eagle-Picher
Industries, Inc Owens-Corning Fiberglass Corp
Bay bestos- Manhattan, Int Celotex Corporation,
I narco Industries, Inc Pittsburgh Corning Corpora,
lion, U.K. Porter Co. Inc Amatex Corporation,
Int and Owens-Illinois, Inc.
lht action further states that the corporations
railed t� advise" Dr. Hewett of "the dangerous
Pending Board approval
characteristics ol their asbestos and asbestos related
insulation products.
The disease which Dr. Hewett has contracted,
mesothelioma, is caused bv the inhalation of
asbestos dust and results in subsequent formation tit
tumor ol mesolheiial lining surfaces in the lungs,
and is classified as an "Occupational Lung
Disease Hewett claims that he has "suffered and
sustained verv serious injuries to his person
retpjiring medical treatment .great pain, nervous-
ness ami mental anguish and has incurred large
doctor, hospital and drug hills.
Dr. Hewett ha- stated that he believes his
injuries ami illnesses "are permanent in nature
and that his expected life span has been greatly
shortened i
The case has been filed in Federal Court in New-
Bern, North Carolina and complaint papers have
been served to the various companies by Talt &
fait ol Greenville, attorneys for Hewett. A
representative ol the firm told Fountainhead that the
average case in federal court takes about two years.
Hewett ha- made provisions, using videotape, lor
his testimony lo be given in this manner in the
event that his death occur prior to a court date
being set, so that his heirs may collect on the
action.
Photo Lab policies proposed
Bv 1tNN BKVAR
Editor
A special sub-
committee ol the Media
Board, designed lo
studv the necessity tor
reorganization ol the
KCl Photo Lab, met
Monday afternoon.
Members ul the com-
mittee are Charles
Sune, Student Union
President; Tricia Morris,
f)av StudentKepresentative
and Mike Smith, Inter-
Iratcrnily Council
President. Also present
at the meeting were
representatives ol the
Fountainhead, Bucca-
neer, ami Photo Lab.
There was a briet
review ol the problems
publications have had
with Photo Lab in the
past. Communication
was found to be the
biggest problem be-
tween the Lab and
Fountainhead, and the n
eed for quantity photo-
graphs was the major
problem with Buccaneer.
Acting Photo Lab
Head Photographer John
Grogan and former
Head Photographer Pete
Podeszwa explained that
renovations to the Lab,
August 21 will enable
more photographers to
work at the same time.
This was agreed to be
a move lor facilitating
work lor Buccaneer,
which reported satis-
laction with past Photo
Lab work.
A profit) sal lor
complete reorganization,
made bv Sune, was
suspended pending a
trial period lor operation
ol the Photo Lab with
the following provisions:
1. A two-month trial
period will be put into
operation beginning with
registration day, lall
semester during which
the Photo Lab and other
media will try lo im-
plement solutions and
I unction on terms
acceptable to all con-
cerned.
2. Each publication
using the Photo Lab
will designate one per-
son on the stall lo be
responsible lor all
dealings with the Photo
Lab.
3. A line item will
be included in publi-
cation budgets of
Fountainhead and Buc-
caneer lor free-lance
photography, lo be paid
live dollars per pub-
lished photograph.
It was also sug-
gested that the Pholo
Lab be advised ol
complaints as problems
occur, and be invited to
stall meetings of ihe
publications as neces-
sary. The operation of
the Photo Lab is subject
to review at the end ol
October, when the trial
period is up.
Correction
On page 3 ol
fountainhead s July 5
issue, we printed a
series ol quotes relating
to freedom and
Independence Day.
Unwittingly, the quote
Freedom's just another
word lor notliiif left to
lose" was attributed to
u incorrect source.
rt ailer
I !ianks to
corrective correspon-
dence, we would noiw
like to iiilorm our
readers that Ivhile Kris
K i i-iol lerson did use
the quote in
Me and
McCee" it
originally said
Lnislein long
his son
Bobby
was
by Albert
belore
Krislollerson was born.
lo
be completed by

Student Planning Asso-
ciation (SPAN); Bobbie
lugwell, ol the Creen-
ville Utilities Commiss-
ion; Sam Arnetl, repre-
senting concerned citi-
zens; Margie McDade
representing concerned
students; and a repre
senlative ol the Foun-
tainhead and represent-
ing concerned Creeks.
I he subcommittee is
scheduled to meet with
Brewer Thursday after-
noon to discuss the
major concerns and
elicits on drainage,
wiltlhle, energy con-
sumption, aesthetics and
the costs involved in
the construction.
Interested persons
may contact: Sharon
Heath: Home: 753-4644
oil ice: 752-1137 ext.
loy) or Pal Carton:
home: 730-0203 olfiee:
757-0901 or any member
ol tin' subcommittee.
Il present plans are carried through, scenes like thi-
may 1m- rare on campus.
what's iNsidc
New bus schedule p. 3
Joan Baez releases a new hit p.5
ECU Basketball on probation p.
Professor of sociology
publishes fifth book
ECL NWs Bureau
Cohabitation, single parenthood, homosexual
relationships, communal life - are these bizarre
deviations from the standard American family?
Many would agree, but tins alternative
life-styles are not so uncommon as they once were
and are therefore worth studying in college-level
course- in family life, -ay an Fast Carolina
University professor.
Dr. David Knox, professor of sociology, discusses
various types ol family structures in a new textbook.
hxploring Marriage and the Family, recently
published by Scott, Foreman and Co.
A feature ol knox's 580-page, 19-chapter text is
its comparison and contrast between modern
American family life and ihe families of other
nations ami ethnic groups.
Using examples til cultures in Asia ami Africa,
Knox� shows that no family roles, sex practices or
marriage customs can be said to be standard.
In some plates, -exual intercourse with a brother
or sister, sexual activity among children, having
more than one wile or husband, encouragement of
dominance in women ami submissiveness in men,
engaging in intercourse only once in several years,
and other practices not part of the Western
traidition are regarded as natural, Knox savs.
Mutual love is not always the basis lor
successlul marriage; Knox's chapter on "Pairing
Oil" cites several reasons for marriages to occur.
These include arrangements by parents or a
respected matchmaker for economic and social
reasons or "sororate" or "levirate" arrangements
(marriage to a dead spouse's sister or brother).
In the U.S. mate selection criteria have changed
radically since colonial times, Knox writes. Many
wives were once chiefly rated for "domestic
aptitude" (spinning, cooking, etc.) and husbands
for their ability to provide economically.
While now most Americans regard themselves as
completely free to marry whom they choose, there
are pressures and trends which more or less limit
mate selection, the book says.
Sociological research shows that because of social
approval and prior conditioning, most Americans
choose only mates from their own economic,
educational, ethnic, religious and racial groups,
avoiding marriage to cousins and other blood
relatives. The chances are overwhelmingly in la
ol selecting someone who live- nearby, who is about
one's own age ami who i- similarly attractive or
unaliiat live.
Ihe Kno hook analyzes uon-tradilional tannin
group marriages, cohabiting couple single parents,
dual-career married couple homosexual partners
and married adults who choose to remain
child-lit r.
Having children is com m onlv spoken ol a-
having a lamilv, a term Knox give- lip servio
thus heading his chapter on parenthood Bui
parenthood is put in it- proper perspective as onlv
one stage in marriage and in lite
"I nlike the marriage relationship, tin
parent-child relationship move- toward separation,
Knox says.
Since Ide expectancies are higher than ever
hefon . children will he with their parent- onlv 0
percent ol the parents live and alter they reach
adulthood and leave, parent- will generally be with
their children, and possibly grandchildren, only
during iRvasional v i-ii
Parents who want lo make the most ol thai W
percent and raise a child who is well-developed
eii.otioiiallv and mentally a- well a- physically art
itften interested in practical ap roaches to
child-rearing.
The Knox book give- details about the recent
child development theories ol Cc-ell. Piaget,
Skinner. Cordon ami n � - explaining how parents
can use these approaches and pointing out their
weaknesses,
hxploring Marriage and the Family concludes
wiih two chapters on the concerns ol the
lltiddle-agcd and the elderly: retirement, grand-
parenthood, lo ol spouse through divorce or death
and "December" marriage.
hile I lie basic structure ol the family varies
throughout the world ami from gem-ration to
generation, its function ol providing love and care
remains constant, says Knox.
We can buy lunch at a restaurant and pay a
counselor to listen to our problems, but neither the
waitress nor the counselor really cares about us to
the point ol earning a living lo help support us,
providing us a place to live, or helping us prepare
lor the luture
The book is Dr. Knox s fiflh. In addition to
teaching ami research, he is a practicing marriage
counselor and a clinical member of the American
Association ol Marriage and Familv Therapv.
t

� �'
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: . - -�-��� - �� ��
��






(
? '
VOICES & OPINIONS X�
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 12 July 1979
Keeping Skylab in perspective
For days the airways have
resounded with warnings of approach-
ing doom. Individual cities and the
ral government set up civil
fens plans, air-routes in Skylab's
patf ere closed, Lloyds sold Skylab
insi e (needless, as anyone holding
insurance was already covered along
th their possessions).
It is true that Skylab posed some
sonal threat (about one chance in
: a tnliion that you would be hit,
in 150 that anyone would be hit,
1 one in 40 that there would be
kind of property damage).
The odds were very low.
Still, the recent furor created by
b's falling may have caused
� us to question the worth
space program. Now that the
is over, we can look a bit more
objectively at our position in regard to
ice technology.
Many of the commonplace items
it most of us use daily are a direct
of NASA's research and
ment program. For example,
. itches, hand-held calculators,
:rowave cooking devices employ
f micro-computers designed
under NASA contract for
� spacecraft, satellites, and
probes.
you enjoy the movie
Some of the most
special effects were made
ugh the use of wieldy,
o-computers developed by
Same with Star Wars and
use
� SA
A lien
.$��
communicative advances
igh the use of satellites
far among the most beneficial
SA's developments. Long
telephone calls are almost
. ely handled through satellites,
fitt : with various types of
monitor weather and aid us
g our crops from disease,
Light an insect populations.
Navigational satellites, although not
totally indispensable. provide vital
mation to sea-going vessels,
ocean travel simpler and
To say nothing of the cable
television that you enjoy only because
your local cable TV relay processes
TV impulses bounced off satellites.
Well, every process has its
misapplication.
Solar power�the energy hope of
the future� stands at the (relatively)
advanced state that it presently enjoys
because of NASA research (please
note that there was no nuclear power
plant aboard Skylab as was the case
with the 'Soviet satellite that crashed
in northern Canada).
Several years back, a gathering of
200 scientists, physicists and engin-
eers at Stanford hashed out a
workable plan for orbital solar-energy
power plants. They asserted that all
the technology necessary to build and
operate these solar power stations
was presently available. What that
means, in a nutshell, is that we could
start assembling the systems today, if
we wanted safe, pollution-free, cheap
power in the near future.
The initial outlay for such a
project is estimated to be about $100
billion.
That sounds like a lot of money.
But we spend that and more each
year for Arab oil, of which, as we all
know, there is just enough left to
finish poisoning the air before it runs
out, leaving us in the lurch.
But these orbital power plants
would pay for themselves with cheap
power in a very few years.
thereafter, all that power would,
�for all intents and purposes, be fne.
This is merely wishful thinking,
you must understand. The plan
makes far too much sense to ever get
Congressional support.
It's not that anyone is trying to
make those who worked so hard to
prepare for a disaster that never came
look like fools. They aren't. They
are thoughtful, concerned, responsible
people who wanted there to be a plan
of action in the event that a disaster
in the shape of Skylab struck. But
all along, the odds were by far
against it. , B
B.C.
UppiTY WOMEN
G.C. Carter
! "
he
remembering selectively
those thing- that make
us smile later on. A
lortuuate tendency,
without doubt.
Fountainhead
EDITOR
Lynn Beyar
COPT EDITOR NEWS EDITOR
Barry Clayton Lisa Drew
TRENDS EDITOR 8P0RTS EDITOR
Jeff Rollins Jimmy Dupree
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Steve Barium
AD DIRECTOR
Robert Swaim
FOUNTAINHEAD .s the student newspaper of
East Carolina University sponsored by the Media
Board ol ECU and ts distributed each Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic year (weekly during
ihe summer)
Ednoriai opinions are those of the Editorial Board
and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the
university or the Media Board
Our offices are located on the second floor of the
Publications Center (Old South Building) Our mailing
lddress is Old South Building. ECU Greenville
27834
Our phone numbers are 7S7-63C6. 6367. and
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annually Subscription requests should be addressed
10 the Circulation Manager
I
From one woman's
point ol view, the sha-
dow), oppressive past is
lighted by the memory
ol a high school home
economics teacher. It
mav seem ironic that a
feminist should have
loud memories ol one
who was (and, 1 hope,
still is) engaged in
upgrading what is, 1 am
sure, the oldest pro-
lession lor women, no
matter what some men
may say to the con-
Irarv.
4
Her name was Vir-
ginia, and although 1
never addressed her
that way, that is how I
remember her. Clarity
and precision was the
name ol the game lor
her, and she wouldn't
settle lor less from us.
(Jut ol a class ol
thrily young women, in
discussions ranging from
cooking, sewing, psy-
chology and politics, to
mixed marriage, religion
and child-rearing, I ne-
ver heard her stereotype
anyone or any subject.
Such clear and fair
thinking was hardly in
vogue back then, par-
ticularly in our town.
Thai the comfort
ol understanding should
come Irom one so (pre-
sumably) "opposite" in
point ol view, is, in
retrospect, an enigma
which adds increasingly
perspective as the years
go by.
For 1 remember her
olten, strange as it may
seem. And I think that
the main reason why 1
remember her is that
she was not afraid �
to think, to see, to
decide lor herself. She
encouraged her students
to be open-minded. (In
the particular high
school 1 attended, this
was definitely the ex-
ception to the status
quo).
But Virginia was one ol
those timeless people
whose standards are not
rooted in the whimsey
ol public opinion.
1 remember her
most because she saw
through thr anger and
confusion ol a radical
young woman (who had
Nil to even hear the
word "feminist"), and
she was not afraid or
ashamed to say, in
died, "I rjec you; I
rccogiii.e you as some-
one
SKYLA3 15 FALUMG '
SKYMB 15 FALLING
AMER.CAN JOURNAL
David
Armstrong
Joan Baez, Vietnam and Human Rights
fights are never so bitter as when they involve
old friends. A case in point is the luror among
veterans ol the antiwar movement over the accuracy
and propriety ol a newspaper ad harshly critical ol
Vietnam lor alleged human rights violations. The
lull-page ad, published recently in five major
newspapers, was placed by singer Joan Bae. and
signed by a itumhfi ol liberal luminaries, including
Daniel Berngan, l.rsui Chavez, Allen Ginsberg and
If. Stone.
I In it 'Open Letter to the Socialist Republic ol
Vietnam changes that Vietnam's four-year-old
� t-oluiiouar (government holds 150,1)00 to 200,000
political prisohots in jaifs and re-education camps,
when man) are starved, tortured and held
incommunicado, alter being arrested without
warning.
Ihe ad has angered some antiwar veterans, such
as Jam- Fonda, Tom Hayden, Daniel Ellsberg and
lawyer William Kunsller, all of whom refused to
sign it. Along with activist organizations like the
Southeast Asia Resource Center, thev question
iLuw. s sources ol information the wisdom of
publicly criticizing Vietnam, feeling that the ail
plays into the hands ol conservatives here.
fur the most part, the mass media have played
tin split as a celebrity cat fight. "Joan and Jane
Have Com- to War" trumpeted my local newspaper.
But there's more to it that that, much more.
I lie conflict shows, once again, tvii.il .i li agile
alliance the antiwar movement was. Composed oi
pacilist, disenchanted Johnson-Humphrey liberals,
smiahsts, libertarians, Middle Americans frustrated
by high taxes and military stalemate, students
learlul ol the dralt and apolitical hippies turned off
by the wars bad vibes, dislike of the war was all
that The Movement (as it was then known) had in
common. "Alter Vietnam, what?" was a question
that American peace demonstrators could afford to
avoid answering. ,
Ihe Vietnamese couldn't. For them, tomorrow
came today, in attempting to rebuild their shatered
country, thev are making choices that force difficult
philosophical questions to the surface: What is
Ircedotn? What kind of society do we want
For Joan Baez and her supporters, freedom is a
pacifist, libertarian society in which umlltcl i
resolved by moral witnessing and rational discus
-ion. But to the Vietnamese socialists who fought
the French, the Japanese, the French again, the
Americans and American-installed regimes to throw
oil generations ol oppression, pacifism was not a
rational choice.
eiiher, apparently, is libcrtahaiiism V-
i-tj. Vietnam - new governors believi
no aui hcnlit basis lor pohtu al lil
ecwiiomit equality, lo achieve this, tin
about expropriating the wealth ol the
middle i lasx -
Not urpriingly, the upper and midd
swollen iv ilh profit ami am:
Vietnam - years as an Yineriean iln-nt -
"ant Inn wealth expropriated. So thev - - - -
'� trading m the black market. �om
�'�'� hv i i . toul" to it outside
government responds bv restraining then
Vietnamese government lias
and id. ne. , i ,o that. j j.� ,ini .
Iced p. pi, whose homes wen
u h� i ihi physically and ps
a1"1 � n 'he ecology the rhemn al pois
1,11 ,H� Ai that the saboiag.
idelogues win values wtre form
dog-eal-dog days ol the recenl past, ami
rebuilding Vietnam would he virtuallv ,�ip.
IIm. doesn t &xv Vietnam, or anv ,
"8hl l" arbitrarily arrest or torlure
Ke-edueat,o should never be a euphem.M.i
abuse. Ihe questions in m lmil(i ar �
Vietnam has political prison.
and how they are treated - -
7"l rt-mu1 �� allow an internal
ul u1 � �� mspve. (Vietnam
ami ducalioii centers" strikes ,�,
reasonable ,��. prtn � h(.v
�' server, ure sen, evervwhe
led, including our onn ex
liaez has hern railed inunv i.
�'d - turncoat and Cl V ageni
ll �ll� -nee railed her then
"� � �'�' �" inu.hsm has
J'Hisistent sunn 2U year. �ea,l �
I �- has ma.lvth nv
ii. i
limitations.
net i
X" �,l,h1 idealist, Ju j
dramatically dillerent world than u V,eian
i rilieies. h, h i- , i,i �
4 "rsl to sHak .mi �:
,H' Uli � �r�mg. Bu, Ullll ,��
responsibility ,� umierstan.l that her vi-
gmnl bla.fs in.in liriifhi ,
V1 ,vl ����� m th, -
Vliuii t.n .
� H I
1 wonder what she is
doing now, what she is
thinking of, dreaming
til. I wonder if she
remembers me. 1 think
I'll write to her.
I am sure that Freud
lell he was standing on
Ihe edge of time, cal-
ling out in echoes
through the eons of
history, when he asked
his famous question:
"What does a woman
want
He, and many others
(other men, that is)
have considered it lo be
a perfectly valid quest-
ion, a perpetual my-
stery.
The question, of
course, implies that wo-
man is some type of
"other" creature" to be
analyzed. dissected,
studied (by men). That
Freud never found the
answer to. his question,
and that many men still
remain perplexed by it,
is not surprising � for
�-
llu" simple reason that
there are none so blind
as those who will not
see.
Freud defined people
in relation to their
sexual function and
sexual desires, which,
historically, was certain-
ly no new classilication
lor women. Ul course,
as the sciences of
psychoanalysis and psy-
chology expanded, it
was discovered that
other things were re-
quired to define a man,
such as a concept of
self and self-esteem,
which, although thev
cannot be divorced from
sex, certainly go much
further than just sex.
But somehow, along the
way, women got left
back in the sex-circum-
scribed definition. And
to many people's way
of thinking, this is still
where woman belongs
� defined primarily by
biology, by reproductive
function.
I
i hev assume
,ha� f.icon.pas
,Im' �� �l woman's
sell
According t,i
,l,is �� �! thinking, a
Ionian's utmost sell-ac-
tualization onurs r
production.
r��r purposes u Utj.
vantage, certain clas
humans laXt. o(
lu �hroug,uu,
designated Inn-
i spheres ol hehavmr
'7 u,htr human,
�"in, thev Uve ra-
�Hwl�e�i, are not ua,
L" inselves. � t.arK
Viili i i, a.
slaves u. i. Intel .
manly t.v lv
io wori hard and
ldu etensivev �
i.e !h mi is4.
lially deiini a. ,m
iii.iU. Num, tons m
� rat i.�nalial hoi-
uert espousf.j to ,ii
Jiuis, it tat I ihal it
was more iatlxantagftHis
l� regard the blavs a-
If, r l�t ins, siiut.
-nth a spli, u- ,x
eiut ttinhl it, n, j�M
ions,�U, n, 1t
Correction
On page 3 y
rountumhead s JUN 5
issue, we printed' a
series ol quotes relating
to freedi.m anti
Independence Day.
tiiwHt.ngj, lhe quoUi
rreedom's just another
jvord lor nothm" hit to
'ose" was attributed to
in incorrect source.
I hanks
eorreetivt
deiuv
J rt aler s
vtirrespon-
�xe w,�uhl noiw
M' nilorm our
rea.lers that while Kris
Kristuiu-rsou did use
Itte quote i� his mm
Mc and Bobbv
McCee H-s
uriginaliy aid by AJm
tmsteiu long U-tore
Kristollersun was born.
��"�.� v- � ' �" �� w m.ifcsstv -t�





Nursing and Med Schools
receive federal grants
Vws Editor
V � s Medical an,
�' �iiiiK
moots liaxo
rt'ceivcd fund-
,rom s�-vcrjil federal
l"�'gram.
s Pu"l" Health
1 �' la wcek Pa
Ihi' amount ol
vl :l Depart-
V ' Ml'l'l School
X oril�l� J.L.lallu
P�ychi.ir,
(�annum. the gran,
� ol nccesaii)
�' used to
lt" leaching (
Ul
students. The
Ul" extend for
three t-ar with the
option to renew each
year. Within the grant
arc lour lellowhips that
U" he awarded to
medical students fur
work in the field .luring
'heir freshman or
sophomore years. Dr.
Mathis says that tlu-
stipend ,�aj g0 iowar(j
anything from service to
research, as long a, it
is a working and Iraring
experience lor the
Mudenl
In the School ol
Nursing, a total of
$101,955 has been
awarded lor the con-
tinuation ol ivvu pro-
grams in mental health
nursing.
The U.S. Public
Health Service has
awarded $128,142 that
will continue to support
ECU's graduate pro-
gram in community
health nursing. The
luntls arc intended lor
the curriculum leading
10 the Master ol
Science in Nursing
degree with an emptia-
Mn on mental health.
I he second grant,
totaling i3J,H13, come,
11 oin I lie National
Institute ol Mental
Health, ami will lund
continuing education
workshops in psychia-
I in menial lieallli nur
nig which tCL regular
I) oilers to practicing
ivuislered nurses.
Housing cancellation
deadline announced
Dan K. Woolen, Director ol Housing at ECU
has announced that the deadline lor cancellation ol
housing contracts lor Fall Semester ll7(' has been
i vteuded.
Students who are eligible and who would like to
move I it Mil residence hall thi tall may cancel their
contracts and receive room deposit refunds up until
ugusl 17. rather than June I .
I he extension ol Ihi deadline i due to the
mi reasing demand lor residence hall housing.
Persons interested in cancelling their housing
iracls should contact the Housing Office, al
(�15U or 757-6039 or eome by the office in
A : liuihillli
WOMEN
continued from p.2;
-e miei-
iual" to
So mvth
j
litional
thinking, a
d lined p r i -
�1 to n
iclion.
a a
idition-
have been
breeding
i �� my th ol
r i l v was
until
vears
had in
Irom the
� lhat is. it
disproved b)
kes.
are still inanv
ivho believe that
m i- "less" than
nan Such people are
still, to be won-
ing, a- Freud did:
W hat d �es a w i man
for such people,
iho i annul understand
win a woman mught
uol leel lullilled spend-
ing her lite hitched be-
Iween the stove ami the
cradle, the simple an-
s w er:
In be tree � to
be herself will be just
as perplexing as the
question.
I lie idea ol a real
and true adventure e
erv da ol hie seems to
entail a lot ol not
stopping and thinking.
I" v c been Irving it
lately.
1 r mg not lo be
hesitant lo just let it
iv, bul who I am (as
opposed to the idea ol
being a woman . the
reason w hv it s scarv is
because lots ol times
I v e lound ml Iiovn
liberated 1 in not.
1 lure i- a v erv del-
icate balance between
ling the How go and
taking tune to consider.
I he balance is the place
where our "values" lie.
Our values are then
sharpened hv repeated
balance between letting
the How go and taking
time lo consider, and
on it goes
Values, paradoxically,
olliciate in the inno-
cence ol spirit and
require vears ol tem-
pering to reach ma-
luritv.
Values not con-
ceived in a free mind,
will lake on the char-
acter ol what is op-
pressing the mind.
I" be Iree. I must
examine wh) I think
whal I think md why 1
hold the values I hold.
nd lo be Iree I must
lei my thoughts (low
Her.
W heii the Oriental
cull tin i onceiv ed the
perleclly balanced vm-
yang, n was a blessing
lor all humanity.
W onian Man. Per-
lecilv balanced. No
f
dominance No "in-
adequacy .
I his surely can be
conceived bv the West-
ern culture as well, and
birlhed in social pro-
gress.
Lntil women do
not have to "stop and
think and make sure
they are "being wo-
men instead of en-
jovmg the adventurouse
tree How ol being
women and the re-
sponsibility lor consi-
deration and balance of
thought which comes
with being a truly Iree
mdiv ldual
r
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
Book Sale
held by
The Friends
of ECU
Library
iiJUi
m-2f .u 1m.
Wednesday, July 18
10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
in front of Joyner Library
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
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i
PLKPLfc SCHEDULE
7:3UM)
Pluee
Speight
University Cond.
Kastbrook
Kiver Blull
Kings How
V illage Greene
Memorial Gym
Meudenhall
Speight
University Cond.
Kastbrook
Kiver Blull
Kings Row
V dliage Greene
Memorial Gym
.Meudenhall
Departs
t)u hall hour
20 till hour
23 till hour si
21 111! hour k
Id till hour -7
15 nil hour
10 till hour
i nil hour
On the hour
o alter hour
i alter hour
l) alter hour
Ij alter hour
Id alter hour
20 alter hour
2.) alter hour
NEW
BUS
BEDULE
COLD SCHEDULE
7 MS.Mi
rlaee
lUlh and College Hi!
College Hill
Mingi-s
Allied Health
Greenville Square
Pill Plaa
Uakmoiil
Meudenhall
lOlh and College fill
College 11,11
MlllgCs
Ml.ed Health
Greenville Square
Pill Plaa
Oakmou!
Meudenhall
Departs
2- alter hour
J alter hour
On hail hour
27 till hour
25 till hour
21 till hour
21 nil hour
Id till hour
.) till hour
1 nil hour
On the hour
J alter hour
5 alter hour
0 alter hour
lJ alter hour
1 t alter hour
12 July 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 3
Transit authority
buses replaced
V, ELLEN KISHM KN
SGA Communications Secretarv
KCl s Student Government President Brett
Melviti announced last rhursday thai for the
remainder ol secuud session the Transit System will
!i- operating two van- oil loan Irorn the Athletic
Department ralhei than the three large bus used
prev iou-Iv .
�' lu" luelelhcut van- will travel the
same routes with the stnae schedules used bv the
Purple and Gold buses, bul the Brown route will be
deleted until I he opening ol Kail Semester. Melvin
-aid thai the reason lor this is that the Brown bus
ha- been carrying no mure than live or -u
eaeh dav.
Melvin explained that the lar - averaj
lu" u llir" lie- per gallon. Tht- van- will gi
over leu miles .�r gallon o fuel.
'di I hi energy , risis, Governor H
ask. d ihe people ol North Carolina I
fuel consumption. With the use ol vans i
can conliiiue to grant services which the stu
'��� paid lor, and at a reduced ost, -aid M
Melvm -aid thai Athleti. Director Bill (
ol gnat help in acquiring the use ol the van- H
i'1, � � a gI example nl th u
ih�- Vthlein Depart men l working t g
benefit ol the students a- a whole'
CHAPTER
X
Presents
JANICE
Wed. July 25
Advance
tickets
$5
$7 at the door
Of available)
FoinnlDQ
dbcobbbi "frrnm
SXy&lXA.A its MBMBJ3
10th Street 758-8550
SOUP
SCHEDULE
Noit.
Tues.
Wed.
Thura
Fri.
Sat.
Sun.
Clam Chowder & Vej. Beef
Cream of Chicken & Beef X
Clam Chowder & Vegetable
Beef doodle & French Onioi
Tomato & Chicken doodle
French Onion & Veg. Beef
Chicken UToodle & Tomato
NOW AVAILABLE
at the
Students Supply Store
FOR
ONLY $12.50
(sug. retail $14.95)
The 15" high 4i�JJJ4r4 fi4iHJi is your ideal
carry-all container for picnics-fishing-camping
gifts-sports events, or anything you do outdoors.
Tight insulation for hot or cold foods and
beverages. Holds 18 (12oz.) canned beverages.
STURDY-UNBREAKABLE-COMFORTABLE
COLORFUL-SUPERIOR INSULATION
EAST CAROLINA'S PARTY CENTER"
ExcltlnaNlte Life Seven Nites a week
During Orientation; Join Us For:
SUN OUR ALWAYS FAMOUS LADIES NITE LADIES
AND ORIENTATION STUDENTS FREE AND
BRING YOUR NICKELS
MON OUR'WELCOME TO ECU' PARTY FOR
nr INCOMING FRESHMEN-PRIZES-GIFTS AND
QIVEAWAYS-DON'T MISS ITI
TUES CRAZY TUESDAY.DIFFERENT EVENTS AND
SPECIALS EACH WEEK� COME GET
� SURPRISEDI
WED GENT S NITE-ALL MEN ADMITTED FREE
� AND BRING YOUR NICKELS
THURSCOLLEGE STUDENTS ADMITTED VtPRICE
mm.wm ID AND M,NQ rowr NICKELS 9-11
FRI END OF WEEK PARTY,9-11
547 LOCALS NITE� 25 CENTS BUYS A LOT
FR0M9-11-C0ME PARTY WITH THE
PEOPLE FROM GREEN VILLE
FRIDAY'S
1890
Seafood
Special Features
Sunday-Couples Night: 2 devious
seafood platters of Shrimp, Oysters, Fish.
Cola Slaw, French Fries and our Famous Hush
Puppies.
Only $7.99 for 2
Monday-Shrimp-A-Roo: Adenaous
entre' of Calabash Style Shrimp with French
Fries, Cole Slaw and Hush Puppies
All For Only $3.75
Tuesday-Fish FryiAii me Fr.ed F.sh
(Trout or Perch) you can eat with French Fries.
Slaw, and Hush Puppies No takOOUt
Only $2.29
Wednesday-Fried Oysters:Gotoen
Brown Filed Oysters with French Pries. Cole
Slaw and Hush Puppies
Only $3.75
Thursday-Family Night: Great
Specials on Shrimp. Oysters Trout Cr �erch.
No Takeout
Shrimp
$4.50
Trout Or Perch$2.29
Oysters $4.50
Flounder$3.25
Seafood Platter$4.95
no reorder oh crabs or scallops
All You Can Eat1
ti
k't
FRIED CHICKEN
ALL YOU CAN EAT 2.75
HOURS
5:00-10:00 Men. - Thurs.
5:00 - 10:30 Fri.&Saf.
t
f

� ���'�'���
� - 40 0 10 0
T m 3
�m �
�m -�
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W W
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Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 12 July 1979
North Carolina's largest
and newest Country &
Western and Country
Rock n' Roll night club
PROUDLY PRESENTS:
"
i
v
,
A
Thursday Night, All Ladies Free
with AMBUSH
Friday The New Knothole Review
"Country with a kick"
Saturday "The Chasers"

c

�a
- -
44 Ya'll better
be there"
jStarting Tuesday July 17th
we will open from 3.7 for
your convenience. Free
snacks, TV, Juke Box.
�?
zz
?
Ja
fc
i iityi �
r:

G
5 5

1
4i
-L

s
� fr.J
M
m x
1
s
WEB
I
iaral� ;�
MP
u
B
ijfp
�IS�.
:�
'MM
v
��.
L
�f.

t-
a A)
Located on Highway
264 East, one mile
past Hastings Ford,
on the right.
"m
&
$

� . �
v
jfc
.
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� Don't lay around the house
come on out
t
- �
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�-
K �





TRENDS
12 July 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
4 new book comes
out on James Dean

By JKFK ROLLINS
Trends Editor
l) Stuck has jum released a new book on
'��r.ant Uities actor, James Dean, Called
James ileun Revisited.
Af a restless ghost, James Dean continues to
���"��' l- l hough he died nearly twentv-five years
ago ir enigmatic star of Kast of Men. Rebel
Without a Cause. and Gian sUj boiaea ,he
�li-n and lorment of adolescence an image
tal � sudden, violent death fixed forever in the
publH mind.
j'hotographer Dennis Stock met Dean in
Hollywood in 1954 and began to photograph him.
Mils i- Stock's own memory of when he met the
star and where.
I he Sunset Strip in the fifties (I doubt if it has
changed much) was the battlefield for those who
needed to conquer Hollywood. In this two-mile area
"I nightclubs, restaurants, strip joints, and agents'
Hices, the struggle lor recognition was fought.
Starlets directors, producers, and actors elbowed
-�iir another lor the space of two brief lines in the
Iradi gossip columns
I!n establishments on the strip thriyed on the
anxiety o the lame-seekers, catering to the illusion
"I success; the prices were high, the facades ornate.
W ailing at the foot ol the strip for their turn were
contestant iyh,i hved in the romantic hotels and
ttagea oi the bygone twenties. The coffees hops,
diners, and itrugslores were commandeered by the
los ail Incut and served as social center for the
New ork Crowd. It was in this surreal, intense
atmosphere thai I met James Dean for the first
lime.
We both awoke to the moment of our
introduction. There was nothing terribly imposing
about this bespectacled young man. At first, his
responses tu my briel inquiries and observations
r� monosyllabic. But as the wine tlowed more
abundantly, so did our conversation. Relaxed, Jimmy
asked about dillerenl aspects of photographic
liniques, and I happily obliged as best I could
hollowing the actor on his return to his
hometown in Indiana to New ork City, and hack to
dully wood, Stock recorded unforgettable views of
tin young actor in his professional and his private
Ills.
nol only is Stock an exceptionally able
photographer, he is also a confident, talented writer
Stock says that in East of Eden, as young Call, who
struggles to communicate with an intransigent father
he loves, Dean expressed hues and shadings of
adolescence that had probably never been seen
belore. Dean led us masterfully through his plight
ol alienation and innocence. Capitalizing on the
hunts of the adolescent's ability to articulate, Dean
used his body to the utmost. His expressions were
exceptionally graphic. Literally at the edge of my
seal throughout the screening, I mentally pho-
tographed his rich variety of powerful gestures
In short, James Dean, a figure which not only
represents rebellious adolescence, but also the
indescernable spirit of the fifties, is an artist who
did work that will endure. In James Dean Revisited
Stock reveals the environments that affected and
shaped the unique character of James Byron Dean.
lhe actor and the photographer went to
rairmount, Indiana. Stock describes their trip to
Dean s hometown, "For Jimmy it was going home.
But it was also the realization that the meteoric rise
lo lame that had already begun that night in Santa
Monica had cut him off forever from his small-town
Midwestern origins, and that he could never really
go home again. Still, in those bitter-cold, late winter
days, as Jimmy and 1 roamed the town and farm
fields ol Kairmount, visiting family and friends, I
came to know, or at least to glimpse, the real
James Dean.
lhe Kairmount pictures show Dean in his home
ambience ol grassroots Middle-America. There are
shots ol Charlie and Emma, Dean's foster-parents,
ol Dean standing on ice, of Dean plaving with his
young cousin, Markie, and (how fifties) of Dean in
lhe motorcycle shop where he bought his first
mot ore) cle.
James W hitcomb Kilev was the poet of the
lioosier, and Dean loved to read from his work.
Ihcre s a photograph of Dean with a Collected
Works by R.ley ,n his hand. I lure are several shots
-I Dean with the larm animals which he took care
I when he was still living on the farm. There is a
-hot ol Dean in his long johns.
Contrasted with the photographs which have a
rural Mid-west as hack-drop for Dean's profile are
the shots which have New York as the setting.
I here his presence seems to have intensified, to
have become harder, as if the hard surfaces ol the
l�) pressed him lo become hard himself. There are
11
James Dean and friend in Fairmount
pictures ol him in the barber-shop, out on the
street, passed out in a bar, playing bongos (which
was a hobby ol his), in his apartment, in dance
via and jusl out with friends.
JaiiK-s llian K�- i-iut ctoueti with a section on
iht: actor's experience- in Hollywood Some ol lhe
old movie posters are reprinted along with a tew
excellent -nil- Ir basil of hdeu. Rebel Without
.au-e. ami (danl. along with reprint- ol soon
the contemporary reviewers reactions.
Ilu- photographs m this book give u- an intimate
iM.itraii �.t Jaim - Drjii, ilu r.al nun behind itae
lingering legend. For the Dean aficionado, his I
will l.e ah excellent addition.
Palmer cuts a new album
By JKHRHi JOSKPH
Mall W riter
Robert Palmer is probably best known for
exually suggestive album cover- and for his more
songs like "Come Over" and "Every Kinda
Dn his album covers he is usually engaged
in iin mischievous activity with an attractive
kvoinan, and his music often reflects this
Irivolousiicss. We la heard from him in 1978 when
released the album "Double Fun on which the
lul- were recorded. He also had a fairlv
slul album in 1976, called "Some People Can
Do What I hey Like His music is usually
characterized by abundant keyboard work, springy
melodies, and a clear, steady beat.
Un hi- new album "Secrets Palmer abandons
the promiscuous cover, but much of the levity of
the mu-ic remain He attempts a variety of musical
�lyles, ranging Irom Jamaican-like reggae to driving,
almost punki-h rock. Some of these compositions are
successlul, others are not.
I he album opens with a song written by John
Moon Martin called "Bad Case of Loving You" that
i- n innocent ol a late 60's upbeat rocker. Kenny
Ma.ur supplies some nice guitar work near the end
ol the cut. "Too Cood To Be True" is a Palmer
composition, one ol the ones that hints at reggae.
I here i- a lairly nice beat, a funky, staccato rhythm
ihat recurs on many songs of the album. The lyrics
are typical ol Palmer - "She knows what to say
She know- what to do Every move she make- she
make- ju-l lor vou.
Vxi Palmer oiler- us his version of Todd
Rungreu's "Can We Still Be Friends?" which, oddly
enough, is almost identical to Kungren version,
lhe cul add- freshness lo the album, but Palmer
supplies no interpretation ol his own to the song.
III. redeeming cut ol side one i- "Mean Old
w��rld, a song written by Andy Fraser and
particularly suited to Palmer- voice. Here, also.
Jack Wahluiau and Steve Bobbins present some of
their -kdllul keyboard work that is the outstanding
Icalurc ol iuo-t ol Palmer's music. Winding out
Side I are "In Walk- Love Again a muffled,
somewhat ambiguous cu and "Love Slop a rock
tune with some nice background harmonies.
Side ! oilers an even cr diversity ol i-ieal
-lyles, beginning with "Jealous a frantic, pun I -
i ihal -ound- like a rapid pulse pm to mu-ic,
induing only about three choi Is I udcr Suspicion"
was written by Dennis Linde and Man Rush
�hi- ' I h�ueh lo the album. The melodv
�" ' '���pan. I'� iner - intonation induce- an
ati.a -1 � listening In - ;
xv�" '� � A inh i lul" i- a chaotic rambl
ol has, guitar, and keyboard aixlt is ol little va
lo lhe album.
I ni�h the cul YV hat's It lak lial Comer
reveals hi- I a lent a- a soi r and le
Ieihauei ion- nature emerg igh hi- Ivr -
hi a lametil over love ihal i- i v u d ol a Palmer
( IM p.�,
Baez releases a new hit, Honest Lullaby
llll i, oli I.iii U � " mn O l I�l I11 1 . � .1 ii . .
By PAT MIM,fcs
Stall Writer
llt i an extended period in seclusion, Joan Baez
has once again returned to the headlines, this time
lor -parking discussion which is creating a division
within lhe intellectual left, much to the delight of
lhe media serwees. For her empassioned plea for
human right- ol those in "re-education camps" in
i in Socialist Republic of Vietnam, she has been
accused ol being a "traitor" to the Vietnamese
k pie.
Which Vietnamese she queries. Amidst the
luror ol this scenario, Joan has released her first
studio album since the splendid "Diamonds and
Rust "Honest Lullaby" is Joan's 21 album, is
perhaps her lineal recorded endeavor and evidence
o her spiritual and musical growth. Joan Baez is a
woman ol remarkable integrity. She has refused to
compromise her social and political commitments;
-he has risen like the phoenix from the flame- of
lUtense criticism to produce sheer musical joy. 0
Bob Dylan
Joan Baez is one ol the most beautitul aq�l
inspiring women ol our times. She is an ageless
wonder, standing alone a- the most influential
woman of our generation. A bastion of the 60's (she
brought us Bob Dylan and was ai lhe heart of the
civil rights and anti-war movements), she became a
national symbol of protest, and the idolization she
had first experienced turned to hatred and
contempt. Throughout all, her commitment to human
right- (long belore it became fashionable) has
endured "the slings and arrows of outrageous
fortune With her current endeavors for satiation
oi her consuming desire for justice, she has once
again pro
yen that her heart is in the right place.
Approaching 40, Joan's place in the social and
pol.tical movements is only equalled by her stature
in modern musical history. Having her genes.s m
I960 with "Joan Baez, an album ot traditional lolk
music, she has stuck lo her musical standards and
compromised only slightly.
Her lolk and protest songs fueled the spirits that
provided the elements of change that eventually
brought respect for the attitudes of youth.
Musical messages
Her voice is so pure anu oeautitul it could
shatter glass, and is most appealing when applied
to moving lyrical ballads. Her guitar work is
evidence of long years of being the melodic basis
lor musical messages. Long hidden and overlooked,
Joan - talent for musical and lyrical composition is
another of the sparkling facets of this wonderfully
complex talent.
Lnlike her mentor, Bob Dylan, Joan's career has
continued to climb and "Honesl Lullaby" proves lo
In- the apex ol her remarkable journey into pathos.
Side one is a collection of tunes from such
iiniuinenl songwriters as Jackson Browne, Vincent
ford, and Jauis Ian. Joan's intense emotional
affection lor these compositions can best be judged
through the love and sincerity with which her
adaptations come across.
Side Iwo is an assemblage of works that are
largely original compositions and strongly personal.
It took Joan 10 years to develop the courage and
self-confidence to record some of her own
compositions; but like a vintage wine, it took time
lo develop, and her skills are stunning. "Honest
Lullaby produced by her pianist, Barry Beckett, is
dedicated in memory of John L. Wasserman, a
gorgeous spirit" who provided love and direction
for Juan throughout their relationship. "Honest
Lullaby" proves to be the paramount of her
recording endeavors, a timely work to testify to the
strength of her career.
The premier side of "Honest Lullaby" begins
with "Let Your Love Flow a song popularized by
the Bellamy Brothers. An inspirational little ditty
proclaiming the exposition of love, Joan Baez brings
a new valor and sincerity lo these well-worn lyrics.
Joan s superior vocal talenl is manifested in the
Vincent Ford ballad, "No Woman, No Cry The
song, popularized by Bob Marie) and the Waiters,
maintains its Reggae origins but possesses an
American twist. It is not so dominated by the
rhythm section as usual in Reggae, but is propelled
by Joan's powerful voice. Hopefully, an awareness
ol the beauty of Reggae can be brought about
through popular recordings such as this.
Janis Ian provides us with the next song in
which Joan brings us her adaptation. "Light a
Light featuring sublime lyrical poetry, is a
reference to the loneliness one feels when he or she
is stranded lar from home and his or her lover.
"The Song at the End of the Movie" that follows is
a wonderfully composed and arranged tune. This
Pierce Petlis work compares the break-up of a
couple to the denoumeiit of a feature film. The
strange interplay between guitar, stings, and Charlie
McCoy's harmonica blends
haunting melodv.
Side two begins with three ballads, each wn
by Joan. flic lu-l is the tide cut, "Honest
Lullaby "Hone-i Lullaby" is a truly intimate
-oug. resembling much lhe solt-cxpositorv stvh
lhe unique capai ily ol inu-u
idiosy in i a-ic
-ouls. Joan -
Jam- Ian ihal Icalurc
lo soothe when the
existence -Irani- our
compositional skill- are showcased m
duiarilv touching lili which encompass
ot human
lyrical and
tin- extraor-
- ! he ir! ue-
ail
paiu-
ohscure j
o a careless
vi-ual imagery i- perplexing and
a lemale psyche lor mrrci i
into
marvelouslv
B
Jackson Browne
Perl.
eriiaps the most forceful tune on the album is
lhe last sting on Side one, Jackson Browne's
"Before the Deluge "Belore the Deluge" is the
theme song of the national anti-nuclear movement in
which a flicker of the fury which propelled the 60's
movements still resides. A major task of journalists
should be an ellort to remain apolitical, but when
corporate rape of the earth and complete disregard
lor the present ami future welfare of the individual
is involved, it becomes impossible to swallow one's
beliels. A big lump forms in my throat and a tear
comes to my eye when I hear "Belore the Deluge
Joan s version resembles Jackson's in it's almost
identical percussion sets, and the electric guitars are
perhaps the strongest Joan has yet used. This song
epitomizes the strength of Joan's commitment to her
various causes, each equally integral lo the struggle
lor human rights.
ol boili inu-u and motherhood.
Vlu liael loliows, and i
complex ballad. bemoaning lhe
loe. Il- lyrical am'
perhap- requires
mil i pre! at ion.
for a-ha i nillmui a doubt, the line-l
i ompo-iioii I the album. It leal tires remarkable
atoti-tir guilar ami vocal work, and i- performed
entirely by Joan, even lo ibe hack-vocals. It stands
"i" as a remarkable acconidishiuenl, lor it-
indictment ol th political working- thai can brin
aboui !h menial maelstrom in the individual ami
produce a tragedy -uch a- the Indocausl down on
lhe cornel. Joan return- to (lie routs ol her
. ompaioii. the -imen- care lor the welfare of her
lellow man. ihal live- be in lhe heart of a good
l.hn-lian people.
uch i- Joan Bae. When, all about her. people
lo -igln ol ihcir goal when befuddled by lhe
complexity and conlu-ioii ol our times a -ingle voice
lor compas-ion and juslne lor all people,
conceptual and ideological
by m usual con temporaries
who sacrifice tin .r musical -tandards lor material
wealth, Joan clings to what joy there i-
Perhaps I am a character Irom an .F. Housman
poem who has been bom too late a senlimentid
hippie who cani lorget the 00s. Bui Joan Baez is
noi. bhe continue- 11ti�i virtue in just causes and
her career continue- to climb to new peaks. To
borrow a phra-e, it is jusi that she is "Forever
V oung.
cries mil
regardless ol ttu
differences surrounded
t
t
- - mi �m.mm





Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 12 July 1979
t
Dean is subject of book
� oiilmut �l Irom pJ
11 � In sings, I've known you all these years
nil iill ou . irhaul m letters They don't
in i our li-ars but when I'm dead vou'll know
:i" heller. I hi- i the liglil theme combined with
ihe �ring) iiu-lod) that i characteristic of Palmer's
hei work. Ke me in her To Remember" finishes out
'he alhum v 11 li .in appealing melodj and some more
iiall keyboard work. Throughout the alhum Donv
iui supplies the brat with some precision
drumming, olteii ueeumpatiied b tfie jumpy guitar
ol Ki� 1111 M.iur that create that reggae-like
! I I V I I I I I .
iii-
tome
Irom
problems with the album
l'almer� perlurining heavy, last-paced rock songs
l,lal '� �� "I his character. He dors much
holler with the subtler, slower-paced tunes like
Mean Old World" in which the guitar and
keyboards have a chance to make an impact. He
also has a hue voice but unfortunately he doesn't
Ul ii ver) strenuous!) with this latest collection of
Miig.s. Nevertheless, the album has some very
Mrong points and rerta.nlv warrants listening to"
railhlul Palmer fans ma) decide that the wide
range ol songs should be considered a plus because
"I I he attempt al diversity.
Talent Auditions
Saturday, July 14th 10 a.m.
Monday, July 16th, 7 p.m.
for Cystic Fibrosis Telethon
August 10 & 11 Channel 12,
Sponsored by the New Bern Jayeees
For further information call 633 5092
. .
To free the mind's
wildest beasts"
Take a walk on the
wild side and write
for Trends
Drop by the Fountainhead
office or call 757-6366
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k 1 1





t
SPORTS
12 July 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
NCAA committee rules
Basketball program faces year of probation
B JIVIvn lHPKhK
Spurts Editor
linn
Odom
again, KCl hrale basketball coach Dave
' minded of ih�- bizarre histor) of the
l�gaiii which lie inherited on Friday, March 23
Viler a
1 escai rli into
norough review ol tho Lniversitv's
allegations involving recruitment under
,or w�eh Urr Gillman, the .NCAA announced
lucsdav thai the basketball squad will In- on
probation lor a period ol one vear.
Vn investigation was begun in l�78 following
sprints ul violations during the intense recruitment
�' 'I VI Tyson. The NCAA Infractions
LlUl!u'1' "led Ihat the violations involved a "Mar
plavcr.
I win allegedl) participated in team workouts,
u a pair of basketball -hoes Iron, a Mall
meiiibei ami was secluded in a motel, preventing
other interested recruiters from bring able to
l�'��acl him. All ol these actions arc illegal under
NCAA rules.
1 ll,rl die terms of the probation, ECU's
basketball team will be banned from any post
'�ii tournament play. The terms also prohibit the
8u� - Irom
appearing in any NCAA controlled
television broadcasts.
I he terms do noi present local television stations
Iroui broadcasting the games, not an) network- set
up b) ail) team on the KCl schedule from
televising games.
I he I hidings ol violations in the case related to
llu' recruitment ol one outstanding basketball
player, said Alan Wright, chairman ol the NCAA
lulraclioiis Committee. "In this regard, one of the
(Hidings involved the arrangement of false evidence
bv a principle in the case
hi.I Athletic Director Bill Cam stated in a news
lr lhal I he internal investigation committee
appointed bv the chancellor of Las! Carolina
I mversit) conducted a thorough stud) of the
allegations made against the I nivoritv basketball
Dave Odom
program and concluded that no subslancial basis
existed lor the allegations.
Despite the adverse findings of the Infractions
Committee, the I niversit) still believes the report is
i urrecl.
kCl ill nol appeal the rulings ol the NCAA
Committee on Infractions, and will abide by these
rulings'
Odom continued lo be optimistic, though about
Ihe luture of Pirate basketball, pointing out the
positive aspects ol the report.
b doesn l have auv effect at all on the
recruiting we did this vear or any next year he
com men ted. It was not a- harsh as some thought
H might be.
I in totally satisfied with the efforts ol the
ollicials m charge ol our part of tin- investigation. 1
know thai the) did everything possible lo completely
exonerate us.
"Chancellor Brewer, Bill Cam, Dr. Clinton
Prevvitl and our lawyer, Dr. David Stevens, all
explored ever) avenue and defended our position
well
When I was interviewed for the position of
head basketball coach at Ka-t Carolina, I was made
loiall) aware ul ihe facts and the possibility of a
probation being imposed bv the NCAA Odom
Muled.
I didn i go into this with mv eyes closed.
Um' positive thing is thai Al Tyson will be
' ili i" Pla) lor us next year he slated
posilively. He i un important part of our plan
h"M uas ,i greal deal ol question as to whether
VI kvould be stripped ol his eligibility.
I agree with ihe I mversit) lhal nothing lurther
could be gained on our part bv an appeal.
Lvcrvthiug lhal could be .lone has been done.
We have lo work so we can achieve as much
as possible wilh our schedule nexl vear ami then
look lo the lulure.
1 am confident lhal ihe players and the
"�rsii) lamilv will join with he coaching .Mali in
" ' Wishing uui goals so thai we can reach our
�u-niial in ihe coming vear within this limitation
Center of controversy?
sports sidEliqriTs
Jimmy DuPree
mmmmm
�" f
Valentine signs
ECU hosts first
Sports Media Seminar
Blue Devils rebuild team
after dismal season
Nol onl) have- the statistical accolades befallen
KCl - 1978 Independence Bowl Champion loot hall
-quad, but also the prolessional teams have begun
lo gobble up lhal team's departed talent.
I lie uio-i recent Pirate lo join the pros was
Mead) defensive end Zack Valentine.
mine signed with the Piltsburg Steelers tor a
reported 52t0,OUO over his firs! three years ol play.
hn Steelers reportedly will mojte Valentine to
ihe linebacker slot, where the second round draft
me will be lested lor his spot on the roster.
Valentine joins live other alumni ol the Pat Dve
program who have- already inked prolessional
i onlra I
Uuuilillg back Eddie Hicks signed with the New
Vork Cianls several days ago.
fern G alia her, a standout split end for the past
loui seasons vmII play this vear with the Ottowa
Koughriders ol the Canadian Football League.
r red Chavis and Cerald Hall signed as free
agents with the Oakland Raiders, where they hope
In continue their history as tenacious defensive
maiiistavs.
KCl Sports Information Director, Wall Atkins
reports thai opportunity still awaits persons
micre.Med in participating in ihe first-ever Sports
Media Seminar being conducted through hi- office
Jul) i 2U.
Ihe lwent)-plus registered thus lar tor the
wc-ek - Icsltvilies range m age- from 15-49, Atkins
rcpoi is.
K in olicr will have the oportunit) to listen to
professionals m the -ports media held, as well as
interview local collegiates and professional athlete
bmitli Barrier, executive sports editor lor the
Greensboro Dailv News, will conduct a seminar lor
the Innliliiig reporters Sundav evening.
Also slated lo -peak are Universit) ol Maryland
blD Jack Zane, Mar) Garber ol the V inston-Salem
Journal, as well a- Woody Peele, Sport- Editor of
Ihe Creenvillc Dailv Reflector and one of the top
looiball statisticians in the country.
Ihe Seminar Mall include- Marquette SID Beisv
lijalobok, U NC- Wilmington SID John Justus and
Miilord Herald sports editor R.V. Might.
beiuiuar attendants will travel to Kinston to
interview the- Kinston Eagle a (das- A minor
league baseball learn affiliated with the Toronto
blue Javs.
Persons interested in participating in ihe seminar
are to contact Walt Atkins, KCl. Sports Information
Dim i lot al 757-0-191 .
Intramural
Roundup
Baseball briefs
Parker Uavis, Ihe ace of the Pirates pitching
stall this spring recently signed with the Boston
Bed .o ol the American League.
Davis, who was 5-4 lor Coach Monte Little's
liitai scjuad, has been assigned to the Red Sox
Class A minor league team in Elmira, New York.
New baseball coach Hal Baird announced
recently ihe signing of lour players to grants-in-aid
lor the 1980 season.
John krol, formerly of Winston-Salem and now
cd Si. Louis, signed, even though he was chosen by
the Cardinals in the June Major League draft. His
lather, Jack Krol, is currently an assistant coach for
the Cards.
Also signed were Mike Williams of Greenville,
kellv Robinette of Prince George, Virginia, and
Mien KJIedge of Hampton, Virginia.
Named outstanding athlete al Rose High School,
Williams will vie for a position as one of Baird's
star g righthanders when practice begins.
Robinette earned all-district honors twice and
was chosen for the Virginia High School all-star
game.
Bv BOB FOX
Ass. Dir. ol lnlramurals
I he 2nd Summer
Session Intramural Pro-
gram started Monday
evening, Julv 9. In
Softball the Roumltrip-
pers rounded out lour
home run tiiree triples
and tfiree doubles en-
route to a 1 1-0 victory
over Liugreen. Lvnn
Barber was the leading
hitler lor the Round-
irippers, with a home-
run, a tripple, and a
ingle.
In other games of
the evening, Murderer's
Row began defense of
lheir 1st Session soltball
title b) downing the All
American White Boys
2-1. Sallenger and Ste-
vens led Murderer's
Row, each connecting
lour home runs.
I EN MS
1 lie Tennis schedule
also began Monday Julv
9. The favorite in the
lourne) ha been tab-
bed as Charlie Brown-
low. The lirsi round of
plav puts Bcdtert Barn-
Inll against Rubv Lowe.
Competition is expected
lo be verv intense lor
I he next lour weeks of
plav.
.t-ont BASKETBALL
Competition in 3-on-3
Basketball was schedul-
ed lo begin this week,
but the entrv deadline
has been extended to
Friday, July 13, at 5
p.m. Play begins next
week on Tuesday, July
17.
B) ILEN Ml IIWII)
Stall w riter
Lasl vear. Duke's
ret urd w a- lour w ins
and seveu losses. Fhev
arc not expecled lo
improve much un lhal
this season.
Ihe Bine Devils
hav e a in iv coach, but
besides lhal ihe '79
-quad uill probabl) be
v �� i v similar lo lasl
season
New mentor, Red
w ilsou, had manv suc-
i esslul teams al Elon
College, but he will be
haul pressed lu make a
winner out ol Duke in
one1 vear.
Loss ol quarterback
VIike Dunn cast- a -ha-
dow ol doubt on an
olleiie thai was virtuallv
some line ball carrier
relui mug.
S uior Greg Rhcti
(.j- II. 1.5) and sopho-
more Bobbv Brower
(ol I. loU) should share
Ihe i ailback position.
Between them, ihev
gamed 72 )ards last
season.
Expected lo till ihe
lullback slol will be
semoi el Conel (6-1,
� and sophomore
r. . Martin 10-2, 225).
I he ir com In ued total
vardagc in .b' was 513
yards.
Probabl) most plea-
sant lo Coach VV ilson is
I lie return ol running-
back Slanlc) Broadie.
Broadie, a 6-3, 225 lb.
speedster, started in
(0-1, IBUj will be- he
Hanker. V lnle playing
in only -eveu game -
�a.M vear. Lewis
-naiched 2U catches lor
o yards.
Ihe Blue Devils
have lliree returnees in
i he olleiisive line.
I hey are Kevin Kellv
((� 22U, Sr.) al center
Bob Riordan (6-3, 225.
i .) al guard. and
ia Kie c oil Hamilton
((- I. 235, Sr.). Stepping
in lo iill ihe vacated
positions are sophomore
(�ieg Baiiiborger (-
2 Hi) al guard and junioi
Bubba Dovveil (6-3, 2l0)
al one ol the lac kle
spots.
Duke- suffered heav
losses in its delen-ive
rank I he Dc-v il- have
. .
s
i i � i �.
v
u
lb
MAI W I IK k,
I (Mi�
prepare for opener vs. Duke
non-existent last vear.
Senior Slaulev Driskell
(5 -10, 170) is expecled
lo lead Ihe attack this
veaf.
lu .8, as a backup
lo Dunn, Driskell com-
pleted 10 cd 00 passes
lor 581 yards.
As gloom v as the
olleiisive picture ap-
pears, there are some
bright spots. Duke has
77, but sal oul the '78
season. In "77 he ear-
ned the ball lor 579
yards and six touch-
downs, while averaging
live vards per carrv.
At the etld positions
will be tight end Joel
Ratten (0-7, 235, Sr.)
and Cedric Jones (6-1,
115, So.) at split, end.
Senior Derrick Lewis
onlv three slarlcrs re-
luming this vear. The
secondary appears to he
ihe defense s slrongoM
asei wilh George Gaw-
dun (0-0, 100) and
Dennis iabrou (5-0,
I .5), and 78 Marlers
eon in back.
Joining them in the
defensive backtield will


1979 PIRATE FOOTBALL SCHEDULE
S�ptA6STttiN � . 'Nn
S�pi Sap;Ra- S i�Tf a ; i - �K
Sapi?2a' ak t 11 MW 3�
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OC!2'f mouth a- x n�H
No.3a! PP �. - tn
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Nov24�' WILL.AM i MARY30
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P. �� �r �� m





-�� , .
1
Page 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 12 July 1979
Borg makes it four
� jiin i)i pre;
Sports Editor
?li�- 102nd all-Eng-
land Championships
riiiltii Saturda) with the
same excilemenl ami
tvvisl lor the unexpected
thai had characterized
ilif tournament for the
m-i Ivvo weeks.
lur having crushed
Vmcrican Jimrm Con-
nors in Thursday's
semifinals 6-2, (� 0-2,
defending . hampion
Bjoru Borg was ex-
(' l�'d b m .ill I.)
I'll .�!� hv Rescue
I annei ul Lunkuul
Mountain, rennessee to
ilaim In- fourth eun-
ecul i r imbledun
title.
stoie Swede
how ever,
L.iniHiiihall
launei was to make
l lie at tern nun - work
insurmountable.
I he tilth seeded
I aimer ,t j Burg 1
in the match
ta shown live
satellite in the
I nited States.
Ii took jusl under
three hour- for Borg to
ill) handcuff the
-i Vmcrican b-7,
(�-1. (), 6-3, 6- .
crowd o 15,000
a- Borg strug-
W-love in the
ist i set with games
aor of the
I anuer, w lm has
I ill) iiic
latii in
�it match point
as Borg
be
time in
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further information call 832-0535 (toll-
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917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N.C. 27603
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own town
��. .V v
Four time men s champion Bjorn Borg
I I'M
though
iK'd B��rtj-
"mi ei iee hud 11
Hi ! .
I ' - Itmrlli inateh
���nl In ml
a- I ami
errant hai kharnl into
retaining frinv to erui
tin rnal
l (hilii'l teel iicr-
voue,
eomnienteil I
had no rea- �, , �.
ii� i ihj there ia-
iirc�un mi
I in Min I uill
'�"l I u ill
"liJI'l ,( ,j
remeini � nn clian-
i Ion I think
� '� i I I i I I i I � ' . ' '
� � He ju.nl
than I
I ' I' h- lourl h
ni 11,11, j, �, n
� ll.lllljMMliJMj, �.
;�
'urning
lia�l tj
In final
Near the end ul
the mulch I had never
heen nervous in m
lit -aid Borg. "I
ulmo�. eouldn'l hold mv
racket, I w ,i - -u
11 r ' H i
Borg report- thai he
i n t -11' I - in t r tn
hreak mi hledon
i'oneculive in.itch v ic-
lor mark o .ll held
ll-l I .lil.Ill l g ml ,nj
Laver.
Navratilova capture
ion
women's chani
Jiin in iKhh
Kditor
M � Suvratiluva
Si i� .�-
'M
the
� - - - � - chain-
�� hv crushing
rt iiKM h an (diri-
I 0-1.
� . i K I a 11 -
- i over-
powered Mr. Llovd
��� strong, shJls
ii- ��; the
' ! �U ullri,
'�'nplocd h Lloyd m
I demi'nalion
I hi win as es.
all gral ii'ving to
Navratilova, as' her
mother wa- granted a
� exit ia bv
1 government
" that -he could be at
' "in t-i.c v hen her
daughter returned to
W imbledon to defend
her title.
Navratilova lalei
teamed und Vmcrican
illie Jean King
' aptui v the u on ii
doublets title over
ofland Beltx Stove
U,i VVend) Turnbull ol
Vulralia 5-7, 0-3, i, j.
Id viclorv marked
"i King hei 20th
hnbledon champion-
ul hcsling ihr uld
mark which she shared
Ull Elizabeth Ran,
who competed from
I9J 1-1931.
'ronicalK, Kan eol-
apsed and died oi a
heart attack alter
washing the Navrati-
va-Llovd finals, Friday,
il hour, before King
"�'I the neu record.
King 21) victories
include six singles, 10
doulbes, and lour mixed
doubles.
Vwteat- Joe
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Title
Fountainhead, July 12, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 12, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.569
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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