Fountainhead, June 14, 1979






Circulation 4,000
East Carolina University
, North Carolina
Vol. 55 No. M
14 June 1979
Vf

Melvin to revamp
ECU transit system
.jmm-mA� � ; �-
One el' the "fleet" of S(,V transit buses. N& hat will
happen to the system?
H Robert M. Swaim
Advertising Manager
SGA President Brett Melvin said in an interview
yesterday thai the SGA Transii system is being
re amped.
Melvin said thai there will be two transit
managers, one to handle administrative work and
another to supervise the operations of tin- buses.
The transit system, according to Melvin, had an
$82,000 budget this year. Melvin cited this as one
ol the reasons for having inn managers.
Melvin said thai the system had become too
large lr one person to handle ail of the
responsibiiil ies.
Melvin has appointed a committee to write an
operations manual for the transit system. The
committee i composed ol both transii managers,
the SGA vice-president, and another student will be
selected at large, and a facultj member will be
added, probabh from the School of Business.
ccoi ling tu Meh in
outline has ; �
revised from �� u �
M Kin-
pure basing two mini buses -imilai
the city
replace
used on route-
Possibility of purchasing it an
Melvin al-
pun basil g i .
some
ami could
are lew rid -
Melvin -aid
with all ol
M. Kij
Will
Whisnant resigns, Beyar appointed new editor
Bevar. .i 21-var-old
MI hei.duca-
tio : from Nanuet,
.Mheld -eera!
-on thenew s-
-all, incuding
-1 rendsEditor
. ��- Editor-
: .w r-in-chiel ol
highschnews-
iper tortwo year
Bevaris also ice-
ol theEC I
f h e r a p jClub,
: ar -treasurerol
MMusic E.lucatorsof
h Crolina,and
English prof
co-edits book
e
re a u
.
book co-edited by
Keats Sparrow of
�CI Department of
ha- won a
hook award.
THE PRACTICAL
CRAFT READINGS
FOR BUSINESS AND
HNICAL WRITERS.
b) Sparrow and
H. Cunningham
M irehead State
English fac-
1979
Excellent e
Carolina-Pied-
Chapters of the
onal Societ) for
a) communi-
book was pub-
i last year b)
n Mifflin of
Spam �w -Cun-
�iarn book, the first
ess, i ompile and
annotate the leading
practical and theoretical
bibliography in technical
communication, was
cited as a major
pioneering work ol
s holarship in the held
ol technical writing and
nmunication theory
Sparrow has taught
technical writing courses
at ECU and at the
I niversit) ol Kentuck)
and has written articles
on v nting and ictorian
poetr) tor several pro-
fessional journal
He has been co-
editor ol the journal
TEACHING ENGLISH
IN THE TWO-YEAR
COLLEGE, president of
the N.C. irginia Col-
lege English Association
and a member of tin-
National Council of
feachers ol English
Committee on Technical
and Scientific NX nting.
Inside:
Fountainhead's annual lampoon
issue was regularly scheduled for
April 1. However, due to the
suspension or former Editor Doug
W hite, it was postponed. This
issue, known as The F ckhead,
appears jn today 's issue, for your
I summer reading pleasure.
(See insert).
former editor Luke W hi-iiaut
-tatt recording secretar)
of MENC.
I believe Fountain-
head needs someone
with authority, exper-
ience, energ) and im-
agination. I've got plen-
ty of all ol these
qualities, and I intend
i apph them to a h-
ieving and maintaining
a qualit) publication
said Bevar.
NX hisnant, w ho has
held various publication
jobs over the last three
years, said he would
prefer not to comment
on tl ation.
21-year r i .
r was a p

t.
Ihe Biard passed a
ial unmend
put in the
5
I nioti rle-
Sune. know-
ledged W fusnanCs three
: rk vah rhe
Rebel, B
. nhead.
In other Board
business, th�
Fountainh i

.
NX EC
M
New editor l.vnn Bevar
What's Inside
Ft).
Lilliam
I ime
iieiimann release
p.5
Scoundrel
Photograph) and the Old West p.5
Laurie Sikes new Lad Pirate
p.
ECUgrad gets Sierra Leone
Peace Corps assignment
Barr) Mitsch of
Riverside, NJ. a 1978
environmental health
graduate of the ECU
School ol Allied Health
and Social Professions,
i- in Sierra Leone as a
Peace Corp volunteer.
Mitsch is stationed
in the African nation's
capital city ol Freetown.
as an instructor in
Sierra Leone National
School ol Hygiene.
The school offers a
three-year program
which trains public-
health inspectors to
work in various rural
areas and village- as
well a- professional
nurses who w - to
learn more about water-
supplies and other ei-
ironmental health con
cm
tter completing a
training period in Phila-M- P�
delphia last scar -
Mitsch was sent to anV
up-count r village in1VISTA
Sierra Leone tor ang 11
intensive five-week .�
orientation sessionPii(��
which involved language�
and cross-cultural train-
Faulty sound system cuts
Correction
Last week's si 1 rust - N i
'resident" and the accompanying
V. -I.
mistal
named Libb Lefler as the candi I
"The lternative Pre ually, Lefler was
mentioned in the publication. 1 tie Alternative P
attacked presidential candidate Mik dkins N . �
President Charlie Sherrod, and ireasun
Steve O'Geary. Fountainbead regrets tl
apologizes tor anv inconienien
Cross concert short
By Luke Whisnant
Editor
Hundreds of students were disappointed last
Sunday evening when the Mike Cross concert was
cut short due to a problem with the P.A. system.
The system began distorting during Cross' rendition
ol Tear This Building Down first losing the
-tage left speakers and finally giving out altogether.
Cross appeared reluctant to leave the stage,
veiling to his booing audience, "I can't sing loud
enough for everyone to hear me. Fm sorry
"I think it was Mike's 'Bionic Drummer' that
blew out the speakers said one amused member
ol the audience. Cross' Bionic Drummer routine was
a series of slow-motion rimshots accompanied by a
-brill electronic noise in a parodv of TV's Six
Million Dollar Man series.
"I can't believe it said another fan. "This is
just too typical-you go to watch a movie in
Mendenhall, and the film breaks. You go to a
concert, and the sound system explodes
It was not the first time that ECU concerts have
suffered from sound system woes. B.B. King was
plagued by an on-again, off-again P.A. during his
1977 appearance. Several outdoor concerts have
been interrupted when spectators have tripped over
the sound system power lines. And musician
Michael Murphy, booked for February, 1976,
alleged!) cancelled his concert because of inadequa-
cies in the ECU sound system.
According to Charles Sune, Student Union
Chairman, the Cross concert blew out the P.As
high-frequency drivers. "We're repairing them
now Sune said. "It will probably cost a couple of
hundred dollars
The Altec 87-500-8 system was first purchased in
April of 1972 and has been used extensively since
then.
Sune says there is no chance of getting a new
system anytime in the near future. "We simply
can't afford to buy one he said. "The Student
Union budget has gone for eight years with no
increase, and the cost of inflation has increased
every ear
"We have to replace a lot of other equipment
this year Sune continued. Although the Student
Union is probably the one organization on campus
which has the most direct effect on student life,
they only receive $5.25 of the eighty-odd student
activity fee.
GuitaristFiddler Mike Cross as he appeared on the
Mall Sunday night.
f
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VOICES & OPINIONS XjX
2 FOUNTAINHEAD 14 June 1979
Lampoon apologetics
It is very likely that this editorial
will not be taken seriously, since it
appears in the same issue as out
annual Lampoon. (See center insert).
In fact, it is likely that nothing isn
this issue will be taken seriously
except the Lampoon. This fact occured
to us, during the planning of this
special issue, and we decided to go
ahead with the combined issue of
Fountainhead and its not-so-stuffy
sister regardless of credibility prob-
lems. Consider the Lampoon isert as
our summer gift to you � the faithful
reader.
The Lampoon may also seem
rather cowardly in that light of the
present editor's resignation. It may
look as if the editor is assembling one
last parting shot against ECU'S
administration, politicos, publications,
and faculty and then leaving town as
the irate letters begin pouring in. Be
assured that this is not the case. The
enclosed issue has been planned for
weeks and the present editor's
resignation is in good faith. Only the
timing is suspect.
Some of us desparately hope that
this special issue will be considered
obscene. For anyone willing to take
us to court, please refer to Koppel v.
Levine, Bazarr v. Fortune, or Anton-
elli v. Hammond.
One of our staff members was
asked her opinion of the Lampoon
material as she was setting type
yesterday. "It seems kind of pointless
to me she said. Naturally we would
prefer to think of this slightly
irreverent effort as prodding the
university into action on some
matters, or at least lauding its
inaction in others. Although parody is
the lowest form of humor, it often
points out flaws ain the system we
live by, and naturally the most
idealistic of us hope that this will be
the case with our efforts. Others of
us feel that merely calling attention to
some of the low spots of the past
year with a little low comedy is a
worthwhile exercise. Probably even
more of us simply look forward to the
Lampoon issue as one of the best
things about working at Fountainhead.
And there is a more subtle
purpose in our efforts: if you have
watched the editorial page this
summer, you've noticed the dearth of
letters to the editor. No newspaper
enjoys existing in a vaccum, and we
expect to be rewarded with at least a
few letters for next week.
So please find enclosed the belated
1979 Fountainhead Lampoon � an-
other sorry, sleezy collection of
character assassinations, immature hu-
mor, absurd photos, and provoking
obscenities � all protected by the
First Amendment � for your summer
reading enjoyment.
�L.W.
Crosswinds
Jim Barnes
Fillers: interesting trivia
How many smells
can a dog smell? What
size shoes did Bob
Hope wear? What is
the origin of the dif-
ferent suits represented
on playing cards? When
did Marie Antoinette
marry? Ferdinand Ma-
gellan die?
In case you are
looking for the common
link between these
questions, I'll save you
the trouble. They all
come from fillers, those
tidbits of facts which
dot the pages of larger
newspapers. Running
from one to several
lines, the items are
used to fill awkward
gaps in a page of a
newspaper, hence the
term filler. (Comedian
Bob Hope wears size 13
shoes.)
I suppose that there
are folks out there who
make their living with
1,2,6 or 7-line fillers,
digging though old
newspapers, almanacs
and research sources to
bring us these essential
bits of data (The first
U.S. air mail was flown
from Washington to
New York in 1918.)
Fountainhead
EDITOR
Luke Whlsnam
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Steve Bacnner
AD MANAGER
Robert swaim
NEWS EDITORS
Jim Barnes
Lynn Beyar
TRENDS EDITOR
Jeff Rollins
SPORTS EDITOR
Jimmy Dupree
FOUNTAINHEAD is the s.utfant nawapapar of
East Carolina Um.ars.ly sponaorad by Iha Madia
Board ot ECU and it diatribuiad aach Tuaaday and
Thuraday during tha acadamic yaar (waatly during
Ifta sum mar)
Editorial opinion! ara thoaa ot tha Editorial Board
and do not nooasaarily rofiact tha opinions ot tha
untvartity or tha Madia Board
Our oltioat ara locatad on tha toond floor of tha
Publication Cantor (Old South Building). Our mailing
KJd.tss is Old South Building. ECU. Groanilia
N.C 27B34.
Our phono number at: 7S7-83M. B3B7. and
6309 Subscription ara StO annually, alumni Si
annually Subscription raquast should ba trtrtraiaad
io tha Circulation Manager
Although fillers are
based, I suppose, on
the theory that a small
fact is better than an
empty sapce, some fil-
lers are actually mini-
news stories, often with
implications that the
filler just does not have
time nor room to con-
sider. (When a truck
loaded with champagne
and wine crashed near
Sydnwy, Australia re-
cently, dogs came from
miles around to lap up
the liquor flowing
through the streets,
says driver Colin Ben-
nett.)
How in the world do
you figure that dogs
from miles around even
knew that there was
champagne in the road?
(While humans can sit-
inguish only a few
thousand odors, odgs
can osrt out as many as
half a million, according
to the National Geogra-
phic Society.)
At times, fillers act
as little probes, spark-
ing off a memory or
response for an indi-
vidual or cause which
has somehow slipped
back a bit in the mind.
(Singer Pete Seeger was
blacklisted from U.S.
network television for 17
years because of his
political beliefs.)
In touch with the
times, though perhaps
buried among the ads,
fillers also offer back-
ground information on
events of the day, such
as Sen. S.I. Hayakawa's
recent comments that
gas should be raised to
a couple of dollars a
gallon, which the poor
couldn't afford. But
that's alright, according
to Hayakawa: the poor
don't work, so why do
they need to drive?
(Marie Antoinette mar-
ried Louis XVI, then
Dauphin of France, in
1770.)
Mostly, though, the
filler offers the briefest
in moments of digres-
sion. (The greatest pop-
ulation growth in the
United Stated came be-
tween 1880 and 1920.
More than 21 million
Europeans entered the
country during that
time.) Fillers sometimes
appear in pairs, when
the layout has large
gaps to fill. If the
fillers are on the same
topic, it amounts to a
veritable wealth of
facts. (By 1910, there
were twice as many Ir-
ish in New York City as
in Dublin and more
Italians ther than in
Naples, according to the
National Geographic So-
ciety.)
Some fillers carry
information for a life-
time of use. (The four
suits in playing cards
originally represented
four classes: hearts
were the clergy; spades
the military; diamonds
the merchants, and
clubs the peasantry.)
Other fillers will give
you useful trivia ammo.
(Ferdinand Magellan,
the Portuguese naviga-
tor, was killed in 1521
by natives in the Phil-
ippines.)
Fillers are no big
deal. They are, well,
fillers. But they do offer
some interesting diver-
sion in the day's read-
ing, and some of them
will stay with you. And
also remember that the
newspaper finds them
quite handy for filling
in empty spaces. (Hol-
land is famous for
tulips � but, according
to annual sales figures,
the nastion's top blooms
are roses, followed by
freesias. Tulipos are in
third place.)
svri� 3AKi
A
American Journal
Still want to see a UFO?
B David Armstrong
Special to Fountainhead
I used to think I
wanted to see a UFO,
- aiaybe even greet one.
ou know, exchange
Cosmic homilies with the
crew, find out where
they're from and casu-
ally inquire what they're
doing in the neighbor-
hood. But now, with
reports of long-term
personality changes and
bizarre religious cults
surrounding UFO sight-
ings, I'm not so eager
to follow Richard Drey-
fuss aboard the Mothe
Ship.
Jacques Valiee's new
book, Messengers of
Deception: LFO Con-
tacts and Cults (And
Or Press), does nothing
to dispell my unease.
And if anyone if quali-
fied to hold forth on
unidentified flying ob-
jects, it is Vallee. He is
the author of six books
on UFOs and was the
model for the "La-
combe" character
played by Francois Tru-
ffaut in Close Encoun-
ters of the Third Kind.
A French-born astro-
physicist and computer
scientist, Vallee has
been studying those
strange lights in the sky
most of his adult life.
After 18 years on the
job, he is no longer
primarily concerned
with where UFOs come
from, but with their
effects on society, ef-
fects he is increasingly
coming to fear.
UFOs, says Vallee,
are real. But they're
not from outer space.
There have been too
many seemingly reliable
sightings -fijfc thai, and
the nearest stars with
planets similar to our
own are just too far
away for an easy com-
mute.
Valiee's novel sug-
gestion is that UFOs
originate just down the
block, concocted by
earthlings who use them
as fantastic instruments
of social control. If his
modest proposal is no
easier to verify than the
outer space theory, it is
at least as entertaining.
Vallee is a good
storyteller. Sandwiched
between the theoretical
sections that open and
close Messengers of
Deception are accounts
of what Vallee aptly
calls "high strange-
ness" � his own close
encounters with UFO
"contactees" and cult-
ists who populate a
planetary underground
of true believers.
There's the tall
blond stranger of the
Pyrennes who initiates a
hotel manager into the
higher mysteries and
always pays his debts
with gold. The octagen-
arian celibates in the
California hills who
crank out books and
pamphlets to keep alive
The Word of a world ol
religion inspired by wise
space travelers. The
mysterious "Major
Murphy a retired U.S.
intelligence officer who
acts as Valiee's Deep
Throat, proferring in-
sights and hot tips.
Do these people ac-
tually exist? I don't
know. Vallee says they
do and they're fascin-
ating gallery of char-
acters. They are not, by
and large, nice guys.
V allee has isolated
the philosophical under-
pinnings of what we
may call UFOlosophy,
and they're disturbingly
similar to those of
certain Aryan mystics
who proposed their own
new world order some
40 years ago. Belief in
a master race and
higher intelligence are
fundamental, as is the
rejection of science and
rational thought for bot-
tomless faith in charis-
matic deliverers. Read-
ing this book, you get
the feeling that this
stairway to heaven mav
be just anoter road to
Jonestown.
If the UFO phenom-
enon is only an act for
public consumption, it's
a good one. Who is
behind this psychic
sleight-of-hand and " how
do they do it?
"Several human
groups could be man-
ipulating the public's
interest in UFOs" Val-
lee writes. "They could
try to achieve this by
deliberate use of confu-
sion techniques, b
planting fake UFO evi
dence, by amplifying
contactee mythologv.
and b) systematical!)
discouraging scienl
inquir into the nature
of I'FO- �� Vallee.
prodded bv "Major
Murphy' speculates
that several circles in
out oi government
steeped in parapsycriol-
og research begun in
wartime German) could
be behind it all.
Vallee believes tha;
at leat some of the
people who claim t
have had close encoun-
ters, with UFOs h
had them. None
them, however, have
physicall) boarded an
actual spacecraft. In
-lead, the have been
manipulated with hallu-
cinogenic drugs, post
hypnotic suggestions
and other means ot
mind ocntrol into ber
lieveing that the)
met creatures from
other worlds, creatui
who have given them
precious secrets and
instilled in them a :
acticai sense of purpos
"The logi of condi-
tioning uses absurditv
and confusion to achieve
its. goal while hiding
mechanisms Val
says.
UFOs, then, tar from
bearing the light
higher civilizations, ma)
be part of an earth)
program to pull u
deeper into the heart
darkness. Vallee dot-
prove his ambit
theorv hands-down but
lollowing his thoug
"� this new book gtc
a close-up look at a
challenging and original
mu.d.
The ci-toon below wo. originolly intended lo oppeor in the Crie.
?,ifhtohePckeadD"��"���'�-
XL CaiA a�ntW

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1





14 June 1979 FOUNTAINHEAO Page 3
Questions Ann Landers wouldn't touch
By Larry Popelka
HH-iaI to Fountaiiihead
Jim Petersen doesn't lock much like AnnLanders.
a�"mg m a small cubicle 14 Hours above the hustle
ami bustle ot Chicago's Michigan Avenue, he wears
leans, a leather jacket and a pair of thiek,
wire-rimmed glasses while wiggling his bare feet in
a deep shag carpet.
Jim Petersen doesn't talk much like Ann
Landers, either. "I'm the rudest box �, California
he announces defiantly. "I'm the' rudest boy in
Lonneticut. And I'm the rudest boj Acapulco
I" tact, Jim Petersen doesn't even like Ann
Landers. "She usuallv sounds lik
Greek tragic chorus he av
around to be a bitch
let Petersen is quicklv becoming America's new
version ot the 60-year-old answer lady.
Each month he receives more than 500 letters
Irom people with problem He responds to subjects
Ann wouldn't dream of discussing. And hi- monthly
column in Playboy magazine read and digested
b) millions of young adult
Petersen is the Playboy Advisor, the person most
Playboy readers turn to when the) have a problem,
who writes gets a personal reply and �
a straight answer,
� tereo equipment or
slit' belongs in a
sharply. "She's
r
Ev ervom
unlike those who write Ann
whether the question is abou
sex in an elevator.
Recently 1 visited
Building office, a smal
photo- ot nudes, ami a
a- handcuffs and chain
- 1 arrived, Petersen, a 30-year-old bachelor
who ha- been the advisor lor six vears, was
shuttling through a -tack of letter Content with a
pile on his lap. he began taking inventory of the
day's mail, which included:
etersen in his Playboy,
room cluttered with book
-orts ol "equipment such
� A letter Irom a voung wine connoisseur.
Question: What the best place to -tore red
(Answer: The Cellar).
wine?
� A letter from a man having an affair with a
woman married to a gay. Question: The woman is
pregnant and wants an abortion. Who should pay?
(Answer: This was a toughie. Petersen decided to
survey the staff.)
� A letter from a man on the West Coast
complaining that a bondage lady named "Mistress
Micki" had suddenly disappeared. Question: Can
you find Mistress Micki and her sensational
motorized cross? (Answer: No. "I thought about
asking the editors to let me go out looking for
her Petersen explained. "But then someone
reminded me how she would probably show her
gratitude once 1 found her
There were other letters, too. People wanting to
know about cures for baldness, the dangers of
herpes and ways for dealing with impotence.
"I do things that Ann Landers is not around to
do Petersen told me. "She doesn't always help
people because she's too busy preaching. I believe
in straight information. My philosophy as far as sex
goes i- anything is all right as long as it doesn't
hurt someone. And very few things actually do
Petersen seems to enjoy talking about sex. "I
know as much about sex as anyone in America
he boasts. " Sometimes even doctors call me up for
advice. 1 know more about sex than they do
Petersen gets his information from reading
regualr medical publication and current studies. He
is on a number of mailing lists, and almost all new
scientific research information is sent to his office.
"We also have unofficial test bedrooms
Petersen told me. "at least in spirit. If anyone on
the stall does anything new, 1 hear about it. I
guess I'm ort of like Santa Claus. I hear about
everything here
Sometimes he hears about things twice. He
directed me to a hand-scrawled letter pinned to the
wall � what he called his letter of the month.
"Dear Playboy Advisor its female writer
began. "I have always wanted to make it on an
airplane She went on to describe how she finallv
" Take The Money
And Run'
is nuttiness
triumphant
�:�:�;�:�:�:�:�:�:�:�:�:�:�:�:���'
xx:xi
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�.�9 �.�.�.�.�.�.�.�.�.�X-XCWW?
.5i�,v.v.
�;��:�:�:
PALOMAR PICTURES INTERNATIONAL PRESENTS
WOODY ALLENS
TAKE THE MONEY AND RUN
starring
WOODY ALLEN JANET MARGOLIN
A JACK ROLLINS AND CHARLES H. JOFFE Production
WOOY ALLEN and MICKEY ROSE CHARLES H. JOFFE SIDNEY GLAZIER MttGROSSBEW
MARV�7HAklSCH WOOoTalLEN COLOR moaocas�m coSSSft mc
Monday night 9 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
Sponsored by the Student
Union Films Committee
did "Make it" with two handsome strangers
sitting next to her. Her question: Is what I did
legal? (Answer: No.)
"When I read it for the first time it sounded
familiar Petersen recalled. The reason was that
the two handsome strangers were Playboy
photographers who had told him the same story a
few weeks earlier.
ABORTIONS UP TO 12TH
WEEK OF PREGNANCY
$150.22
?� pregnancy test, birth control and
problem pregnancy counseling For
further information call 832-0535 (toll-
free number 800-221-2568) between
9AM-5PM weekdays
Raleigh Women's Health
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917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N.C. 27603
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� a





Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 14 June 1979
Disposal of
discussed in
chemicals
article
B Franceine Perr
ECl News Bureau
GREENVILLE - In
thousands of school
laboratories across the
nation, excess quantities
ol poisonous, corrosive
or flammable chemicals
remain on shelves be-
cause no one knows
how to dispose of them
properl).
I u problem is
discussed in an article
in the Ma iue of
I'HK SCIENCE rEACH-
ER l� Dr. Charles
Coble of the ECU
science education facult)
and Dr. Paul B. Houn-
shell of UNC-Chapel
Hill.
I fie chemicals maj
be carcinogenic (cancer-
causing) such as ili-
methylamine and asbes-
or simpl) danger-
ous to use, such as
issium chlorate
noted Coble.
Man of the ub-
stances required for
simple classroom science
experiments constitute a
ious threat to life
I the environment,
even in small quantities.
take- onl) a
small amount oi arsenic,
tor example, to kill
n an animal as large
a- a human, and onl) a
amount of a
gen is required
ause cancer the
mshell-Coble report
es.
Just a important
umulative impact
�' little here and a
���
i-
l:
e er
ition
oh dis
pound
school
ided
-�
in
to
22
�eience
�f
ol the rea-
hanuni chloride at
time, more
� would tie
ur environ-
the estimated,
teach-
equipped to
dangerous
i - salely, a tact
arned
heii ow ii personal
rice.
I he offered to
an eastern North
m disposal ol
: - some of
which were unidentified
� roded
system
ei ess
in
con-
After each school
supply room has been
searched and cleared of
extra items, Hounshell
and Coble had enough
cardboard cartons of
unwanted chemicals to
fill the bed of a pickup
truck, which they drove
to a nearby landfill.
However, the land
Jill attendant and a
visiting representative
from the Environmental
Protection Agenc
checked the contents of
the boxes and refused
to allow the authors to
leave their load there-
man) of the chemicals
were on the "illegal to
dump" list.
Hounshell and Coble
pursued the matter
through local and state
officials, receiving sym-
pathy but no help.
There were no
Mate guidelines or even
suggestions to schools
on how to dispose of
chemicals. There was a
list of chemical landfills
where we could dispose
"I some of the chem-
icals, but none was in
ur tate said Coble.
Proper disposal
methods are various and
cumbersome, they dis-
covered. Some materials
can be diluted or neu-
tralized and poured into
a sewer system, but
others require complex
and expensive treat-
ment, as outlined in the
now out-of-print LAB-
ORATORY WASTE DIS-
POSAL MANUAL. Some
must be carefully pack-
aged in special drums
and shipped to an
approved disposal site.
"The easiest method
would have been to
'disguise' these chemi-
cals among other trash
or to dig a hole on the
si hool grounds and
cover them up.
"But neither solution
would have been edu
cationally sound, envi-
ronmentally acceptable,
or legal
Some members of
Congress and EPA of-
ficials are aware of the
problem, the article
says. Yet there are still
no clear-cut guidelines
tor educators.
Hassle-Free

Problems of any kind on your trip abroad
can be a big hassle And who needs it?
Traveling abroad is not as simple as it may
seem There's a lot more to it than just buying
a ticket, grabbing your passport and taking off
to parts unknown A successful trip requires
advance preparation That's why the U.S. De-
partment of State has prepared a booklet,
Your Trip Abroad " Single copies are free and
filled with facts and tips like these:
Dtart your planning and prepara
lions early Passports visas shots etc
are easier to get off season which
neans the months November throuah
vtarcri
r n your itinerary carefully to
the extent possible leave a detailed
schedule with friends and or relatives
in the U S
I � learn at least the rudiments
Df the local language More often than
not foreigners are flattered that you
tried to learn their language
Familiarize yourself with the basic
laws of the countries you are visiting
particularly on currency customs traffic
anc narcotics regulations
Don t get involved in drugs under
any circumstances Remember when
you travel abroad you are subject to the
la f we country you are visiting if
you are arrested the U S Government
cannot provide your bail or in any way
get you out of jail
Beware of articles that say drug
laws are more lenient and laxly enforced
in foreign countries Drug laws abroad
tend to be more severe than in the U S
with mandatory prison sentences com-
mon for possession of even the smallest
amounts of marijuana or narcotics Most
countries stringently enforce their
drug laws
Don! play Good Samaritan and
bring home packages for strangers
There is always the chance they may
contain drugs
I hose planning to spend a month
or so in any particular city should visit
the nearest American Embassy or Con-
sulate to record their presence and
leave information on where they are
staying
Plan your trip well including the
clothes and finances you will need
Make certain your regular medical
accident and auto insurance policies
cover you while abroad You may also
wish to consider trip insurance tor
yourself and your belongings
Don t carry large amounts of cash
Travelers checks in U S dollars or
foreign currency are preferable And you
can use some credit cards worldwide
Become familiar with U S Cus-
toms regulations If you plan on taking
foreign-made personal articles (watches
cameras etc with you consider getting
a certificate of registration from the
Customs Office nearest you This cer-
tificate will speed up your entry when
you return
Buy round trip tickets as far in
advance as possible Even though you
have a return ticket reconfirm your
reservations at least 72 hours before
departure If your name does not appear
on the reservations list you may find
yourself stranded
I f you find yourself in trouble
abroad contact the nearest American
Embassy or Consulate Although Con-
sular Officers cannot do the work of
travel agencies banks the local police
or serve as translators or intervene in
private commercial disputes, they are
there to advise and help you. especially
if you are in serious trouble of any kind
For more information, drop this
coupon in the mail today'
L
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L,
Send to
Correspondence Management Division
Bureau of Public Affairs
U S Department of State
Washington. DC 20520
Pimm send me t copy of "YOUR TRIP ABROAD"
Name
Please Print
Address
City
State
Zip
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
as
mav
How can a school's
excess supply of haz-
ardous chemicals be
dealt with?
The authors advise
schools to join together
and share expenses of
commercial chemical
disposal, to seek the aid
ol local colleges and
universities as well
industries who
,lax' proper disposal
resources, or to ask
chemical supply houses
lor suggestions.
Meanwhile, teachers
with no other alter-
natives may do what
Drs. Hounshell and
Coble didpack the
chemicals away, taking
care to separate the
incompatible and the
strongly reactive, in
heavy cardboard or
wood boxes and store
them in a locked, safe,
dry and ventilated
place.
'W hen we were few
in number before in-
dustrialization and lie-
lore the age of tech-
nology, we did not have
such problems. But we
have them now, and
the) must be solved,
tor we will continue to
increase m numbers and
to rely on the 'marvels'
ol technolog)
Jim Petersen
continued from p.3
While such tales sound made up or rare at best
Petersen swears that they are all real. "I made up
a question one month that I thought needed to be
asked he said. "But later that month a letter
asking the same question came in, and it asked it
better. I haven't made up any since then. You can't
invent a letter that's stranger than the truth
But it there's anybody who could, it's probably
Petersen. Last summer in an attempt to gain
publicity, he arid Playboy sent out a press release
to several news outlets sayding that he was sick of
his job and thinking of quitting.
"Finally some guy from the Associated Press
came out and asked me if I was really quitting
Peterson said. I - said, 'That's news to me. But
sometimes they have a funny way of telling people
these things around here
With the reporter in need of a story to show his
editor, Petersen went on to talk about how he
thought jogging was replacing sex as an American
pasttime.
"Everybody's out there running a TV-minute
mile Petersen moaned. "My girlfriend does it.
She does II) miles a day. And while she's done it,
I've gone six weeks without sex. You don't feel like
sex alter running
His story was picked up by dozens of
newspapers around the country, but today he still
says his motive for publicity � the thought of
quilling at the age of 30 � was valid.
I've thought about quitting ever since my first
year here he said. "I'd rather be a rock V roil
musician. I have a tape of some songs I wrote and
recorded, and I'm getting better
But the thought of giving up his job as the new
generation's advice king is hard to accept. Besides,
I here are too main Iringe benefits to being the
Play boy adv isor.
"I manage to tuck up my life at regular
intervals he told me. "But whenever I have a
problem I get ver) excited because it gives me a
chance to find out a new piece of information.
rhat's why it's such a great job. It pavs me to
have fun
im Landers should have so much fun.
ECU students receive spring
academic honors
semester
A total of 3,149 ECU
students earned places
on the university's of-
ficial honors lists for
the semester, compared
to 3,086 for the fall
semester.
Students earning
academic honors at ECU
during tl"
mester repr
the state
states am
ol Colum
ol
27
tnet
three
Spring
ml �'
s" too counties,
the Dis-
bia 'i1
hree foreign countm
making the Dean's List
ri 11 j -s t earn a solid B
plUS average with no
it below (. I fi�
Honor Koll includes
students vith i B
average and bo grade
below C.
Most
honors
Take
the first
step
and get pai
by the inch.
FOUNTAINHEAD needs an
experienced news writer
Call 757-6366 today.
CAUTION
You may lose money it you r ss THE
SHOE GALLERY'S buy on pair at
full price get the second pair V2 off
coupon sale You must bring
coupon with you.
THE SHOE GALLERY
720 Atlantic At Dickinson
10-7 P M Mon -Sat.
'Must Ba At Laast $10.00
Sale ends June 21
FRIDAYS
1890
Seafood
Special Features
Sunday-Couples Night: 2 delicious
seafood platters of Shrimp, Oysters, Fish,
Cole Slaw, French Fries and our Famous Hush
Puppies.
Only $7.99 for 2
Monday-Shrimp-A-Roo: a delicious
enfre" of Calabash Style Shrimp with French
Fries, Cole Slaw and Hush Puppies.
All For Only $3.50
TueSday-Fish FryiAII the Fried Fish
(Trout or Perch) you can eat with French Fries.
Slaw, and Hush Puppies No takeout
0ny $2.29
Wednesday-Fried OystersiGoiden
Brown Fried Oysters with French Fries, Cole
Slaw and Hush Puppies
Only $3.75
Ltl!I,Sdacy;Fami,y Nj9ht: Great
Specials on Shrimp, Oysters TTout Or Perch,
No Takeout
Shrimp $4.50
Trout Or Perch r - 29
Oysters$4.5C
Flounder$4.50
Seafood Platter$4795
no reorder oh crabs or scallops
"All You Can Eat"
ERfED CHICKEN
ALL YOU CAN EAT $2.75
HOURS
5:00-10:00 Uun. - Thurs.
5:00 - 10:3o Fri.&sat.
On Even Strvet
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$
64
95 save
up to $20
On sale arc our men's
traditional Siladium K rings JM(j
selected women's 10-karat
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made individually for you.
You get your
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draraRVED
Large Selection of Gold Hlngs A vailabL
June
Date 18-22 Place Student Supply Store Lobby
Deposit required. Ask about Master Charge or Visa 'Savrngs vary sightly from style to style
3 days only!
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
Wright Building
t
V





TRENDS
14 June 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
New book
shows fotos
from the
Old West
B Jff Rollins
Trend Kditor
w illiani and KartMi Current say in the
introduction to (heir newly released" book that
Photograph) and' the Old West is intended to
convey as clearly as possible how people learned to
use a camera ami became camera-wise in an
individual way how tools and materials affected
photographic seeing; and what a few of the many
earl) photographers hoped to express.
But this collection of photographs from the Old
Wct i al-o a moving photographic documentary on
ihe entire early Western American experience, j
these pictures record what the West indeed was
really like.
I ties record the untouched grandeur of the
landscape, the primitive (b) our standards) mode of
by the pioneer and the gentle parts of
too, like a peaceful Indian camp to tepees.
tograph shows a family standing out on
the Wains beside an organ with the caption reading,
I h- iuiuily did not want to the folks to sec the
sod :i u�e but they did want to prove that they
d an organ
her photograph is of Wild Bill Cody himself
ling in front ot two tepees with a group of
in chiefs and U.S. officials. There is a
less picture ol cowboys around a chuckwagon at
meal time and also a group of photographs taken
���

3fc
Steve Young hanged at Laramie by vigilantes in 1896
� lived
W esl
tin. ;�
ol Ceronimo mby Camillus S. Fly. It is a uniquely
moving experience for the twentieth century viewer
to see how these people of a previous civilization
actually lived and dressed.
In most of the landscapes presented in the book
the individual is presented as small and
insignificant, usually a tiny figure or group of
figures in the foreground, against the overwhelming
breadth of a Rocky Mountain side, or of the wide
Central Plains.
Ihe train, an invention so important to the
development of the West, is generally presented in
an heroic way. It is looked at by most of the
photographers represented in the book as man's
answer to the nearly untameable vastness of the
continent.
As Karen Current says in the text to
Photography and the West, "Photography and the
W est came ol age in post-Civil War America.
Photography moved from the studio to the field,
and the West emerged as a vast, rich resource for
scientific and scenic exploration
"Both offered a new frontier to master, and
each exerted an immense magnetism on the
war weary American mind. For the scientist the
est presented a vast laboratory where new data
could be gathered and old questions, superficially
formulated, answered; to the photographer the West
loomed as a great visual unknown.
"Together the scientist and the photographer
shared the pioneer experience, and for the first time
in history the exploration and discovery of a new
land were witnessed and . recorded with the
camera
This collection of photographs of the West is
unique, for it has been selected from the viewpoint
of William R. Current, who is himself a
photographer and artist. This book was conceived
and organized by him as a series of one-man
shows, to convey as nearly as possible what a few
ol the many early photographer- hoped to express
in their work. '
Current has contributed greatl) to our under-
standing of fiow people learned to use a camera as
well as to the realization of the impact and
importance of the visual document.
Currant has stood where many of these earl
image-makers stood and ha- evaluated the
photographs from several viewpoint The chosen
works exist on all level as do work- of prose or
paintings, and the) are open I to a wide range of
interpretation, from that of the merely documentary
to the most voluptuously expressionistic. That is
the marvelous ambiguity -and beauty -of this bonk.
As Currant point- out, photograph) manifested
the same frontier appeal as the West. Both
seemed to be within the reach of anyone, and the
common man felt sure that he could conquer both,
given a little practice and the exercise t his
ingenuity. Photography was a new frontier
A Childhood, The Grab are new books
By Renee Dixon
Staff Reporter
On an afternoon in
1956. Harry Crews
made a discovery that
triggered the writing of
his autobiography. Fresh
out of the Marines,
Crews was hungry to
know about the man
who fathered him and
died not long after.
Crew Uncle Alton took
him to porches and
stores in Bacon County,
Georgia to hear men
tell stories about his
father, men who knew
his father with the
intimacy reserved for
those who are born,
grow up, live and work
in the same stretch of
land, men who were of
a place that identified
them, and a land that
sustained them.
Crews realized at
that time that he'd lost
the opportunity to ex-
perience that special
intimacy, and that he
was of that Georgia
county only because it
was the place he came
from, a place in his
memory. Crews says it
was then that he knew.
"I would someday have
to write about it all,
but not in the conven-
ient and comfortable
metaphors of fiction
only the use of I, lovely
the terrifying word,
would get me to the
place I needed to go
A Childhood is the
biography of that place.
Crews tells his story
with the simplicity and
credibility of any of the
storytellers who talked
about his father on that
afternoon in 1956.
Sometimes people call it
talent, a natural rhythm
that people who grow
up with storytellers just
absorb. But Crews
illustrates an equal
amount of skill in his
control of that un-
affected voice and his
selection of incidents
included in the book.
Growing up the son of
a Georgia sharecropper
meant hardship even if
times were good. But
Crews had a little
larger slice of hard luck
than the average. When
he was five, he battled
a disease or fever that
left his heels drawn up
tightly to his buttocks,
his legs useless and
painful. Not long after
recovering the use of
his legs, Crews was
flung into a pot of
boiling water while
Hellman releases Scoundrel Time
By Dawne E. Bost
Staff Reporter
Lillian Hellman's book Seoundrel Time is not a
new release; the copyright dates 1976, but it is a
book that has gone virtually undiscovered by the
maes ot students trodding around the average
university campus today. This w unfortunate since
Scoundrel Time is of value not only to those of us
who have run eagerly through the pages of her
earlier booksAn Unfinished Woman and
Pentimento (from which the story for the motion
picture, Julia, was taken), but also to anyone who
i- concerned with truth and feeling.
Scoundrel Time is Lillian Hellman's personal
account of the hysterical era in America's history in
which the House Committee on Un-American
Activities (which boasted among its members a
voung Richard Nixon), and the panel led by Senator
Joseph McCarthy were allowed to search out and
persecute Americans on the basis of presumed
communist activities. Hellman writes almost
exclusively of the repercussions felt only by herself
and friends in the world of the arts, thus creating
what she labels as "my own history of the time
In the introduction by Garry Wills, we are told
just what time it was. Wills presents the factors
leading up to the ultimate "witch-hunt" beginning
with the formation of the HUAC in 1938 (ten years
before what is generally known as McCarthyism
swept the country). He offers an explanation that
differs from Lillian Hellman's conclusion about how
such a period could pass through our lives. Hellman
explains the purge as an attempt at political
opportunism by . . cheap baddies who, hearing a
few bars of popular notes made them into an opera
of public disorder, staged and sung, as much of the
congressional record shows, in the wards of an
insane asylum
Wills believes Hellman's "moral world" of
"personal loves and hates" cannot let her recognize
what he sees as the sincere general hatred of the
"Redhunters" which allowed them to have
"considered themselves saviors of the country from
a diabolical plot
Which explanation may be correct is debatable,
the actuality of a fanatical anti-communist
bandwagon and the trouble it caused is what Lillian
Hellman quickly creates as her focal point. In 1951
the "bandwagon" made a pronounced run through
her life when in June ot that year writer Dashiell
Hammet, Hellman's companion for many years, was
sent to jail for withholding information wanted by
the government.
A year later Lillian Hellman was supoenaed by
the House Committee on Un-American Activities, a
move which placed her under the threat of jail
unless she complied to their wishes, which was of
course impossible. The HUAC wanted names,
information would incriminate people other than
herself. In the first few pages of Scoundrel Time
one comes to know Lillian Hellman as a woman of
an integrity that would not allow her to "aid" in
the persecution of people she believed had simply
exercised their right to free thought and expression.
Throughout the book one feels not a sense of
anger but of disappointment. The story is told by a
woman who lost many of the things most dear to
her, both mentally and spiritually, from her
determination not to "cut my conscience to fit this
year's fashions But the tone is not bitter; simply
resigned to the reality of her experiences.
This is no historical account of the McCarthy
years and their consequences. Rather, it is a study
of humanity in a time of great confusion told with
style by a remarkable woman.
Gershwin concert highlights Spoleto
CHARLESTON, SC - An
all-Gershwin concert and
spectacular fireworks
display highlight the
Finale of Spoleto Fest-
ival U.S.A. at Middleton
Place plantation on
Sunday, June 10. Cli-
maxing the 17-day
Festival, the concert will
be conducted by Mu-
sical Director Christopher
Keene and feature the
Spoleto Festival Orche-
stra and soloists Jeffrey
Swann, Esther Hinds,
and Benjamin Mat-
thews.
The program will
begin with "The Cuban
which was
Entitled
when it
in 1932 at
New York's Lewisohn
Stadium during the first
Overture
originally
"Rhumba1
premiered
all-Gershwin concert.
The composer changed
the name because (he
wrote), "When people
read 'Rhumba they
expect 'The Peanut
Vendor' or a like piece
of music. 'Cuban 0-
verture' gives a more
just idea of the char-
acter and intent of the
music Gershwin wrote
"The Cubn Overture"
in three weeks' time
after a holiday in Cuba
where he had become
fascinated with the rhy-
thms of Cuban dances
and with native per-
cussion instruments.
The program con-
tinues with the "Piano
Concerto in F, for Piano
and Orchestra written
by Gershwin in 1925.
One year after his
tremendously successful
"Rhapsody in Blue"
(written when the com-
poser was only 26 years
old), the "piano Con-
certo in F" was com-
missioned to be written
for Walter Damrosch
and the New York
Symphony Society. At
the premier on De-
cember 3, 1925, Gersh-
win played the piano
solo, which Jeffrey
Swann will perform at
Spoleto. Reactions were
mixed, as some critics
found the work too
reminiscent of Dubussy.
But, like so many
other Gershwin works,
the Piano Concerto grew
in popularity and is now
considered a major
twentieth century piece.
See Finale p.6
playing "pop-the-whip"
at a hog killing.
Those experiences
have enough impact to
interest a reader on
their own, but to draw
the same reader in-
volvement throughout
the book speaks of the
writer's craft. And
Harry Crews knows that
craft. Emotionalism i?
for another breed of
writer.
Crews wrote about
more than the hard-
ships. Napping in the
mornings under a huge
oak tree in his front
yard next to his dog
Sam, sleepwalking,
learning about God and
girls all in the same
night, and playing with
Waillalee Bookatee are
a few of the beautiful
and or funny tales he
includes in the book.
Crews ends A
Childhood with the
acknowledgement that
he has left that way of
life. He no longer
depends on that land
for his livelihood. But A
Childhood is still the
biography of a place,
even if it is only the
place in Harry Crew's
mind and memory that
he can never lose or
leave completely behind.
The Grab
The Grab is a
Luskin family tradition.
Maria Katzenbach's first
novel is about three
daughters who gather at
their mother's home
after her death to
divide the possessions
that remain after the
few provisions of the
will. Using the room
inventories as a guide,
the daughters explore
the house, rediscovering
the past and re-eval-
uating their present
lives.
Barbara, the oldest,
is named after her
mother and best em-
bodies the Luskin
"code" in her non-non-
sense ability to take
over, organize "the
rab and see it to the
finish. Sadie. the
youngest, ha- the most
trouble accepting the
tact that her mother is
dead, and she clings to
her mother- posses-
sions tor reasurance.
Louisa. the middle
daughter, is a psychia-
trist and is contempla-
ting a divorce. Louisa's
place "i- to know and
to hate knowing"
secrets of the past and
present and one e-
peeially important secret
about her mother.
Circular
From the opening
paragraph. The Grab is
unified by circular
themes and their com-
pletion, and the concept
of ongoing life that
circles imply. "The
Mother gives to each
daughter a part ot her
namea part of her
face" and "a part o
her mind" and watches
that "part" grow into
three separate names,
laces, and minds. The
daughters become a
unit again at "the
Mother's" death. Thev
journey through the
rooms of a house and
the places far back in
their minds that have
made them what thev
are. The Grab ends
the resolution of
woman's journev
scene of reunion
her husband, a
symbol of her return to
the present.
with
each
in a
with
Katzenbach takes an
ambitious plunge into
the psychology of
women in this novel.
Her skillful exploration
of the minds of three
individuals torn between
identities as sisters,
wives, mothers, and
daughters, leaves no
doubt of this young
author's perception and
talent.

- - - 0 �
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V





Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 14 June 1979
Firefox is is a fine study of the espionage thriller
Ba Barry Clayton
. Trends Editor
Today Carter is in
Vienna, and the SALT
11 talk are the subject
of much debate. The
Cold War rages on, and
it seems that the best
either side can agree
upon i- to restrict the
growth of nuclear stock-
piles and delivery sys-
tems b) a still un-
satisfactory percentage.
The arms rave may
slow down because of
SALT 11 � but what
happens in Vienna will
not stop it. It is
something we will have
to learn to live with �
if indeed we can �
until some future time
when the powers-that-be
come around to the
fundamental truth that
people everywhere are
pretty much alike.
But the Cold War
continues like some sort
of grim game in which
the players garner in-
dividual advantages
whenever they can as if
in eager anticipation of
the game's violent and
awesome culmination.
It is a game that is
won, curiously, not on
the game-board itself,
but in the laboratory.
For it is there that the
fantastic weapons we
play with are born.
But every once in a
great while points are
gathered on the board
� and without violence.
Several years ago, a
Russian pilot broke from
the rest of his formation
and raced his mint new
Foxbat 25 fighter into
Japanese airspace, out-
flying Soviet pursuers
and slipping past Jap-
anese fighters. He
landed his craft at a
commercial airport in
Japan, turned over the
Foxbat to the Good
Guys (us) in return for
political asylum. It led
to many jokes for us
Westerners while the
Soviets mostly just
stomped around and
said alot of really awful
things about Japanese-
American relations.
We were still laugh-
ing when one of our
super-secret Y-16 fi-
ghters rolled of the
deck of its carrier. Not
many laughs there �
Soviet trawlers were
circling the spot almost
before the plane hit the
water.
Someone once said,
"Military secrets are
the most fleeting of
all He couldn't have
missed the mark by
much.
This is the subject
of a very well received
novel by Craig Thomas:
Firefox. Firefox is the
NATO euphemism
the Soviets' new ad-
dition to its Cold War
arsenal the Mig 31 �
surely so named for its
airspeed, for it moves
like a fox set aflame.
Cruising speed: 4000
mph!
But that is not the
most impressive of the
Firelox's talents which
include a weapons sys-
tem controlled by the
pilot's very thought-im-
The
pulses. ne technology
needed for NATO to
duplicate the Firefox is
not in NATO's posse-
sion, not is it likely to
be for the next ten to
fifteen wars. And no
Soviet pilot is going to
get the chance to spirit
one away.
The obvious answer
� steal one.
Firefox is a fine
studv in the art of the
espionage thriller. The
building and conveyance
of the .story from the
beginning of the joint
CIA British Intelligence
project to substitute
Cant, America's fines!
lighter pilot, for the
Soviet pilot slated to
run the final test flight
of the Foxbat. to Cant's
clandestine trek across
the Soviet Union, to the
genre. But Foxfire does
� stop there: ther m a
profound human story
d, well, and one god-
awful amount ol re
search. A sense ol
realc-ni � particular!)
the Foxfire cockpit �
in
lervade-
th
novel
tie
eventual
plan
the
theft of
; is absolute!)
finest sense
01
the
in
the
There"
about
good
thi- i
no doubt
it; it you enjoy a
adventure yarn.
your book.
or
Games is a fad of the Sixties
Socail
mechanic
-everal
thi
By A. Choma
Staff Writer
Psychiatry, the study of the mental
s of social intercourse, has delivered down
�ooks attempting to explain the sources of
interplay. The books range
from the nihilistic
The Greening of America to the condesending Your
Erroneous Zones. The prototype, if not the best of
these works is (iames People Play by Eric Berne.
Berne's introduction of a new, simpler vocabulary-
tor contemporary social dynamics was an intellecutal
fad item of the Sixties. The major intrigue in the
work lav in the use of popular examples and easily
discernible symbols.
It is to this form that most works of this genre
ascribe. The validity of Games is directly related to
the observational, rather than the experimental
ghl of the author. The books are theories,
rendered to generalization and made palpable.
In theory and dialogue Games is perhaps the most
complex but that complexity of structure belies a
weak premise. 1 do not find Games to be incisively
accurate.
There are games in the various strata of culture.
The games are plaved in various social situations
deputing arguements, conversations reflecting frus-
tration and violent gestures. The resultant social
reaction and the parts of the structure (the people
and situation) are labeled and the entire scenerio is
titled a game the likes of: "See What You Made
Me Do" "Blemish" "Look How Hasrd I've Tried"
"Let's You and Him Fight the latter being a
sexual game.
Berne lowers the principles to their common
denominator and explains the dynamics in terms of
"mutual satisfaction quotients" measured in
"strokes The games become more complex as the
FINALE
continued from p.5
Jeffrey Swann ap-
pear- regualrly in recital
and with orchestras
throughout the United
States and Europe. His
orchestrs engagements
have included the Na-
tional Sympho i v and
orchestra- ol ciieinatti,
Baltimore, Pittsburgh,
Dallas, Syracuse and
Indianapolis, among
others.
The Spoleto Festival
all-Gershwin concert will
eonclude with Esther
Hinds and Benjamin
Matthews joining the
Orchestra for excerpts
from Gershwin's famous
opera "Porgy and
Be Ms. Hinds ap-
peared in last year's
Festival in the pro-
duction of "The Egg"
and as a soloist in the
"Glagolitic Mass" at
the Janacek Celebration.
She has also sung with
the Metropolitan Opera,
the New York City
Opera and major opera
companies and orche-
stra- throughout the
world.
A member of the
New York City Opera,
Benjamin Matthews has
performed roles ranging
from Mephistopheles in
Gounod's "Faust" to
Porgy in "Porgy and
Bess He has been a
soloist with numerous
orchestras including the
New York Philharmonic
Chicago Symphony, and
Detroit Symphony.
Gershwin completed
"Porgy and Bess" in
1935, in collaboration
with DuBose Heyward
and Ira Gershwin. The
opera was first per-
formed in Boston on
September 30, 1935.
Since then, "Porgey
and Bess" has been
performed throughout
the world, including an
acclaimed production
during Charleston's Tri-
centennial in 1970. The
opera was beased on
the play "Porgy" by
Dorothy and DuBose
Heyward. Gershwin
Came to Charleston
during the summer of
1934 to learn more
about the setting and
the music of the Gullah
Negroes. He wrote
much of the opera that
summer.
The initial reaction,
to "Porgy and Bess"
was mized, and it was
not until two vears later
� 11937 - that the
opera was properly
honored with awards
and subsequent revivals
which achieved both
praise and popularity.
1937 was also the year
of the composer's
death, at the age of 39.
, For the Finale's
finale, the Festival con-
tinues its tradition of a
spectacular fireworks
display. Created once
again by the Zambelli
Fireworks Manufacuring
Company, the display
will include such Zam-
belli favorites as the
Zambelli Ground Daz-
zler, the Zambelli Color
Shower and the Zam-
belli Sparktacular. The
Zambelli firm is re-
nowned for the displays
it created during the
Bicentennial and the
Inaguration of President
Carter.
The Spoleto Fest-
ival's final concert is
made possible in part
by a generous donation
from General Dynamics.
The fireworks display is
made possible by the
King Street Garden and
Gun Club.
Although the concert
will begin at 8:30 p.m
outdoor activities �
part of Piccolo Spoleto
� will start at noon.
Tickets for the Fin-
ale are available at the
Festival Box Office in
Gaillard Municipal Aud-
itorium. For complete
information about Festi-
val events, contact
Spoleto Tickets, P.O.
Box 704, Charleston, SC
29402 (803) 577-7863.
issues and the intelligence of the participants
become more expansive. It is to be accepted that
the more intelligent the mind the more complex the
game but that is an elitist philosophy that ignores
motive. The premise of this work, the watermark by
which it must be adjudged is a diluted extention of
the "you give what you get" axiom.
The strength of this book is the accuracy of the
observations taken within the context of his theory.
If one looks for games, they seem apparent and the
outcomes almost mathematical. It is there because
one sees it however, it is not inherent.
Where motive is recognized it is a gesture ol
weakness, a move made out of need. Berne views
man as a vulnerable creature in a matrix that
personality has created. He personalizes his case
examples to the point of humor, but does not allow
them dignity.
The game "look How Hard I've Tried"
epitomizes the shallow applications of Berne's
theories. It is played on the levels of false attmpts
at reconcilliation, working until collapse or suicide.
These translate into efforts to receive attention in a
pattern of martyrism. These games vary in intensity
but all preclude man as a victim of his own
frustration. This preclusion initiates the game motiff
as false behavior garnering a desirable "surface"
reaction (the attention).
The theory fits the three pre-supposed structures
but they, and the book tell nothing about the
situation athat could not be discerned. The book
merely explains the interplay in the context of
Berne's vocabulary. It is a semantic rehashing of
surface observations.
Games is a well-referenced, intelligently crafted
work explaining a shortsighted theory of social
dynamicsIt is an ornate frame around a painting
empty of light. It says more about the mind and
emphasis of the author, that about humanity.
Avant-gardists,
Popular Culture
watchers and
Renaissance
Sign
.HP
VCodan
people are
needed to write
for Trends
Sherlock
Restaurant
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i





SPORTS
14 June 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
Laurie Sikes j oins Lady Pirates
Laurie Sikes
SpORTS
sideliqhTS
Jimmy DuPree
-W IMMr K IMl'KON K
vimmer Kevin Meisel, who had
i in a freak tram accident.
bv Duke Universit) Medical Center
athlete i- reportedl) improving
les to be in good -pint
- undergone -km graphs at the Medical
the tissue that was damaged in
M)Hl I BM.IH1.I. CMP
P llege basketball players ranging in
I 7 have invaded the campus uf East
r-it t" participate in the first annual
Basketball Camp, this week.
girls, mostl) (rum eastern North
i irning the ha-ic skills ol the sport
��. -� � ol college and professional players
the camps are either too rigid and the
have tun or they're too loosely
ami thev don't loarn anything said
k we've had a nice blond -o that the girls
and learn -ho added.
UMKOII IIChR
n the firsl managerial change of the 1979 Major
Baseball season, the Detroil Tigers
ced Tuesda) the firing of skipper Les Moss
the subsequent hiring ol veteran manager
Sparkv Anderson.
In an announcement released Tuesday, the
former Cincinatti Reds helmsman expressed satis-
faction with his new post.
In a statement he made recently during a
national!) televised game featuring the Reds,
Anderson stated that although he had not offers to
date, he did expect to return to manager a Major
League club in the future.
NEEDED:
MINIFIED LIKE SAVERS TO LIFEGJJAM AT
thi. Ml SWIMMING PM)I. ANYONE 1N-
ilsTKl) CONTACT NANC1 M1ZE AT EXT. 6387
lERhSIhU ll' ' ' npnri. at 204
OR COME m THE I1 OFFICE AT M
MEMORIAL
By Jimm DuPree
Sports Editor
After tvo successful years at Peace Junior
College in Raleigh, Marietta, Georgia native Laurie
Sikes joins the ECU Lady Pirate basketball squad
tor the 1979-80 season lor her first taste of major
college competition.
The christening for the 5'8" point guard will
come against such formidable opposition as the
I niversit) of South Carolina, North Carolina State
I niversit and national champion Old Dominion
I niversitv.
But. according to the liestv blonde, "I'd rather
play against the better teams.
But, according to the Iiest) blonde. "I'd rather
pla) against the better team Great teams that
have all the superstars aren't always going to win if
the) can't get along as a team.
1 feel like I'm more read) lor this now than it
I had come here two wars ago1
Coach Cath) Andruzzi is naturall) pleased to
have the former All-Region Junior College A1AW.
1 m pleased with her attitude and enthusiasm
Andruzzi commented. "She fast and she's a
pressure ballplayer.
"You have to have a point guard with
enthusiam. She conn to us with a couple of years
experience; that helps a lot
Sikes brings to the Lady Pirates an added flare
al the point guard position which last year's squad
lacked.
"Thev lik the la-t break she said. "That's
what I've been used to playing since high school
The rising junior's talents and experience are not
limited to the hardwood court designed for
basketball.
W hile at Peace, sin- competed on the women's
tennis team, playing in the number six flight her
freshman vear.
"I enjoyed being on the (tennis) team, Sikes
commented. My second vear thev recruited the
number one girl from Georgia and the number one
girl from North Carolina (Elizabeth Tolson from
nearby New Bern), so 1 didn't get to plav as often.
"I plan to only pla) basketball here at ECU. I
want to work on my shooting; Coach Andruzzi has
helped me a lot with that.
T feel like I handle the ball and pass well, but
she says 1 need to look tor the shot more
1 he unselfish dribbler indeed handle- the ball
well. At times she produces around-the-back passes
ami bet ween-the-leg dribble- reflective ol
Dominion All-Amerii an Nanc) Leiberman.
A councelor this week at the Cathy ndruzzi
Basketball Camp here at EC! . Sikes -�. � tl
benefit- from the counseling sessions a- m
the campers.
I stand back and listen and often 1 thinl
thing- I can change in order to improve
Ihrough her association with the 'amp. S
has had an opportunity to meet vith most
veteran Ladv Pirate- and the incoming freshmen
T didn't know at first if I wanted to g
school closer to home she says hesitantly, "
alter meeting the girl- here I think I will
erv we
Thev've
all been so encouraging
trvm t� make me feel like a part ol the
I II -tart from the beginning and I kn a 1 �
to work extra hard to place on the team.
'I ju-t want to work well with ihi
win she added. "We're going to hav
vear. "
Blood, sweat
and cheers at last
season's rugbv
match
Ruff, tuff 6n ready
for rugby
Intramural action in review
Bv Allen McDavid
Staff Writer
& ith the coming ol
Fall, most sports fans
turn their interests
toward football. But for
the 41 members ol East
Carolina's Rugbv Club
team, football is not the
only sport around.
Interest in rugby at
ECU is growing, but
due to the relatively
little exposure it has
received, there have
been disappoionting
spectator turnouts.
Since rugbv at ECU
is a club sport, much of
the money it takes to
support the team comes
from the players' own
por?ketsL. however, they
do receive $1,000 from
the school. Even with
the financial burden,
the team managed to
plav some games in the
Bahamas and Miami
over Spring break.
The team plays its
home games behind the
Allied Health building.
Opponents come mainly
from North Carolina,
but there are several
teams from outside the
state included on the
schedule.
North Carolina has
16 club teams at
present; some city clubs
and some college clubs.
Most of the major
colleges in North Caro-
lina have teams but
onlv tour are composed
entire!) ol students:
ECl , I NC-Greensboro,
Belmont Abbe) , and
Davidson.
According to ECU
club member George
Baity, "Of these four
teams, ECU is bv far
the best
Thev are a good
team, good enough in
tact, to walk way with
the tropohy lor the best
club team on campus
last year.
Rugbv is somewhat
similar to football. In a
game there are 30
mean on the field at
the same time, which
produces quite a bit of
action (there are varia-
tions, such as 7 men
teams). The game is
divided into two 40-
minute halves with a
short hall time.
As far as protection
is concerned, the play-
ers literally have none.
This causes most people
to regard rugby as an
extremely dangerous
pastime; however, club
members say that the
majority of injuries are
minor.
ECU's rugby team is
now preparing for their
fall season and hope-
fully with stronger sup
port from the students,
it should be another
successful year.
SOFTBALL ACTION
bv Lee Sellers
It you happen to ride by the IM Softball fields
at Minges and see a couple of "Bronx Zoo"
animal some "Blue Swine or a group of
"Murderer's Row" victims Don't get excited!
Thev are just some of the IM teams participating in
plav this session.
If there had been enough teams, three leagues
would have been set up, (Co-Rec, Men's and
omen's) but since onlv eight teams signed up,
thev were all put into one league.
Five of the teams are all male, two teams have
a couple of females, and the other is almost an
all-female showing.
Since there are onlv eight teams and one week
left of plav, the season will be run in a round-robin
type situation (All teams play each other 6nce.( At
the end of the season, the top four teams will play
in a single elimination tournament.
The semi-finals are scheduled for Monday, June
1H at 5:00 and 6:00; and the finals are scheduled
for Wednesday, June 20 at 5:00 p.m.
Softball Standings as of June 6:
winlose
Roundtrippers40
Murderer's Row21
Heart Break Kids21
Bronx Zoo22
All-American White Boys22
Blue Swine13
Sultans of Swingi3
Fletcher13
R4QIET SPORTS
The racquet sports tournaments are in the
second week of competition.
The tenrtis league was divided into three groups
so each player would have more matches to play.
Each player has the responsibility to set up his or
her match within the scheduled time designated by
the Intramural office and then report the score.
Up to this point, Richard Strong 2-0, Bobby
Little 1-0, and Billy Helton 2-0 are the tennis
singles' leaders.
After the round-robin tournament is over, the
Intramural office will select the top two players with
the best win-lost record from each group.
BASKETBALL
Intramural sports' 3-on-3 basketball playoffs
started this pat Thursdav with -even team- opei
the final round- ol the tournament.
K ith the top ranked Scott Do Loop- getting the
first round bye, the Roundballers slipped hv
D.J. - in three close games.
The Seeker also a lop-five team, beat Just
Dandy by one point in the third game as the
Heartbreak Kids, led bv Ian McKeithen. down
hot shooting Cool Breezers.
The final dav ol action. Tuesdav. the H'
Kids out-shot the Roundballers in three well played
game
Scott Do Loops proved too much tor the smaller
Seekers as they took two quick games to advance to
the duals with the Heartbreak Kid Led throughout
the game by the strong inside play ol Clifl Vv illiams
and Fred Chavis, the Do Loops heat the Heal
Kitls to claim the championship
This summers' top players include Ian M
Keithen, Leonardo Bowens, Fred Chavis, (
Williams, Hank ylie. Ken Murphv and Brian
McDaniels.
IT'S NOW OR NEVER TO SIGN UP FOR THESE
EVENTS:
THE GREAT CANOE RACE
Don't miss out on this big event scheduled tor
Wednesday, June 20, at 2 p.m. on the Tar River. A
three-mile course has been -elected and canoe- will
be available on a limited basis. There will be four
classifications (Canoe-1 person, 2 person; Raft-1
person, 2 person) with T-shirts being awarded to
the top finishers ol each classification.
Sign up in the Intramural office by Thursdav.
June 14.
Don't miss your chance to make a big splash!
BACKGAMMON
Make your move now and sign up for the
backgammon competition. Entry deadline is Fri
June 15. Plav begins Mon June 18.
CO-REC BACKiARD OLLEBALI
Entry deadline has been extended to Fri June
15 bv 5 p.m. Pla) begins Tues June 19 on the
outside courts bv College Hill. Get a team up and
come join in the fun!
Intramural Office is in 204 Memorial Gym, 757-637.
i
jf � � "
� , ;

� �





Page 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 14 Jura 1979
COUPLEOFCHAMPIONS
Major League baseball roundup
By Jimmy DuPree
SM�rt Kditor
ith a third of the
I979 Major Leagut'
Baseball season com-
pleted, a look at the
standings reveals a
new-found balance a-
mong the divisions.
Each ot the pro-
fessional divisions is
lead l a team which
in the a-t has hardly
been considered a ser-
ious contender tor the
league p nnant.
The American
League's Eastern Div-
ision, which tor the past
two seasons ha- been
dominated t the New
rk ankees and the
Boston Red So, has
Baltimore Orioles rest-
ing our game ahead ot
llif Sox and five and
le-hall .games ahead
ol ! he anks.
ken Singleton led
: Mar- squad with a
weak .293 average, but
i eighth in the
�� tin- year at
7 He is second on
the list ol home run
iders with l I. behind
Boston's Fred Lnn with
16.
lite dec of the Or-
ioles pitching staff so
tar has been Dennis
Martinex, posting an
mark. He trails onlv
the anks1 Tomm)
John, who i 10-1.
In the estern Divi-
sion of the AJ, Cal-
ifornia owns the most
intertable margin at
games in front of
Kansas City Rovals.
Fireballer Nolan R-
leads all Major
League hurlers with 94
strikeouts. Lefties Frank
ranana and Dave La-
Roche provide depth
i reliability tor the
V . -
Rod Carew, who
seven bat-
- titles to the Angels
- i in search of
ining team. is lost
tor si a month as
a result of ligament
image suffered when
ging Cleveland's Du-
ane Kuiper in a recent
game.
Prior to his injury,
however, Carew was
second in the league
with a .355 average.
Outfielder Don Bay-
lor, one ot baseball's
most under-rated play-
ers, leads the Angels
and the AL with 56
runs batted in.
The Angels have not
been the only western
division team plagued
with injuries though.
After several weeks
out of the lineup, Roy
als' shortstop Fred Pa-
tek and second sacker
Frank White are ex-
pected to return to the
active list by this week-
end when Kansas City
travels to Milwaukee.
Speedster Amos Otis,
however, is hindered by
a recurring ankle injury
which has forced him to
the designated hitter
slot.
One game ahead of
Montreal in the National
League Vv et is the St.
Louis Cardinals.
Hot hitting George
Hendrick paces the
squad with a .348
average and witch-hit-
ter Garry Templet on
follow- at .338.
The Cards' pitching
staff leaves a major
question mark tor the
teams chances tor a
pennant. John Denny
and Bob' Forseh are the
onlv proven starters in
the rotation.
the keys to the success
of the Astros. In 1978,
Houston had four play-
ers with over 20 stolen
bases: Jose Cruz 37,
Enos Cabell 33, Terry
Puhl 32 and Cesar
JTJedeno 23. .
Mark Littell.
ac-
quired from Kansas City
in the trade which sent
Al Hrabosky to the
Royals prior to the 1978
season, proved not to
be the bullpen ace the
Cards had searched tor,
winning only tour of his
twelve decisions last
year.
With 1978 pennant
winning Los Angeles in
fourth place (eight
game- out), the Hou-
ston Astros have pro-
pelled themselves to the
estern Division lead
in the NL ahead of
Philadelphia and Pitts-
burgh.
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The one element
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Bob Watson had 14
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The Cincinatti Reds,
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With the hot bat of
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run hitter Ceorge Foster
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Title
Fountainhead, June 14, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 14, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.565
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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