Fountainhead, April 26, 1979






Circulation 10,000
Carolina University
North
Vol. 55, No. 144-
26 April 1979
Tempers flare.
Draft renewal debated
TO ALL OF ou who made it�
CONGRATILATIONS!
Marc Barnes appointed
as new editor by Board
By CHARLENE CARTER
Staff Writer
Last Thursday evening, a small
group of variouslyOpinionated persons
met for an informal discussion
concerning the possibility of renewel
of the military draft. The featured
speaker was Mr. Bill Sholar, who
opened the meeting with a brief
statement of why he was opposed to
the draft, and then opened the floor
for questions and discussion.
In his opening remarks, Bill
Shnlar explained that he served in
Army Intelligence for eight and a
half years. He helped plan strategy
for attacks and counter-attacks,
usually against the Russians.
Part of his job was instructing pilots
in safety procedures when they were
in danger of being shot down by
enemy planes.
Bv KRE WENDT
Staff W riter
: a meeting of the
Media Board held Wed-
nesday, April 25, the
da) student representa-
tive to Media Board
and the rs for the
summer editions, and
next year's Fountain-
head were named.
rhe da) student
representative will lie
Patricia Morn
1 he summer editor
for Fountainhead
will lie Luke Whisnant,
the present editor of
the Rebel, and a News
Editor at Fountain-
rhe editor for
Fountainhead for next
year will be Marc
Barnes. Barnes is
presently News Editor
o t Fountainhead,
and served as editor
during the suspension
oi Doug White, present
editor of the paper.
In a meeting of the
Board held on April 24,
several decisions were
made concerning the
photo lab, and the
Rebel.
The Rebel asked for
and received an appro-
priation to develop an
edition to be called
"The Best of the
Rebel Whisnant and
his staff will be devel-
oping the volume during
the summer, though as
yet there is no definite
publishing date.
The Photo Lab re-
ceived its appropriation
to do it remodeling
work during the sum-
mer. The Lab had
asked for funds to
remodel the Lab so that
it could accommodate
more than one person
at a time comfortably.
The BUCCANEER
alo aked lor an ap-
propriation to have
printed 2,000 more
Buccaneers than the
had anticipated. Craig
Sahli, editor of the Buc
pointed out that he
expects more of a
response lor the Buc
than had been pre-
viously anticipated.
Ii the Buc does not
print the extra editions
during their regular
printing, and it proves
necessarv to have the
price
books
for
re-
cause a
nearlv
books, the
having the
printed will
difference of
14,000 because of added
set-up and color
change
At this meeting, the
Board also named a
new Chairperson. Eva
Pitt man was named
Chairperson for the
1979-1980 school year.
This is the last issue
of FOUNTAINHEAD
for the semester.
FOUNTAINHEAD
will reappear weekly
on Wednesdays
beginning May 23
His job gave him access to
classified top secret documents, from
which he discovered that the training
he was giving to pilots was
ineffective for life-saving.
When he confronted his superiors
with this information, they informed
him that the pilots were not
classified to receive the information
necessary for survival, but that they
had to be instructed in some type of
recourse, even if it was ineffective -
in order to "reassure" them.
This encounter led Sholar into
deep consideration of what he
considered to be right and wrong,
after six months of difficult soul-
searching, he declared himself to be
a conscientious objector. He received
a discharge from the Army on these
grounds, and shortly therafter began
to attend Quaker meetings in Chapel
Hill. At one of the meetings, he
learned that the directorship of
Fayetteville Quaker House was
opened; he applied, and got the job.
One of the main purposes of
Quaker House is the counseling of
military persons who are having
trouble in the military. Almost all of
the persons counselled have not been
informed by the military of their
existing rights in their various areas
of disstisfaction. Sholar spoke of one
case, which involved a young man
who had become severely mentally ill
and was having black-outs, but he
could not get a discharge, even with
a psychiatrifs approval, because his
superior officer did not "believe" in
psychiatrists.
Sholar said that he is opposed to
the draft because he believes that
the number of people presentlv in
the Amed Forces is adequate, and
that in the event of any threat to the
United States or Eastern Europe, the
situation would become a nuclear war
within a matter of a couple of days,
and there would be no need for large
numbers of draftees, who would be
trained as infantry men. He cited
that opinion of experts who confirm
this. He believes that the Army want
the draft so that it can stage
"another Vietnam in third-world
countries -uch as Africa. In fact he
was told this by an aide of Senator
Moragan, who is proposing one of
the draft renewal bills now pending
in Congress.
Scholar spoke briefly about the six
bills which are pending. The bill that
main people believe has the best
chance for passage is H.R. 23,
introduced on Januarv 15 by Rep.
Charles E. Bennett, D-Fl. This bill
would require commencement of
registration of young men by October
1, 1979; the Selective Service would
no longer lie a civilian operation, but
would become part of the Defense
Department; also, the Privacy act
would be amended to permit the
draft agency to obtain registration
data from schools and government
agencies.
The Joints Chiefs of Staff support
a bill introduced b Rep. G.
"Sonny" Montgomery, D-MS, on
February 8. This bill calls for the
registration of men and women at
age 18. The bill mandates the
induction of up to 200,000 men into
the Reserves each year.
H.R. 2078. introduced by Rep.
Charles Wilson. D-TX, calls for
induction of men for training and
service in the rmed forces during the
period of Julv 1, 1979 to June 30,
1981.
H.R. 2500, introduced by Rep.
iSe DRAFT, p.
Cult recruiters infiltrating campuses
"you, chiid is in coLge or ,n high "SJftJ ST ML � B �f ZTLZ kTSLTr T" 1 �
chances are good that sometime this year, he or become so .rapped bv mind control Techn Sues iZ " found T. h � e "ganiaa.ions
she will be approached by a cult recruiter today they really no longer have the free will To break leader" that in tV T�'� "
asserted a survey article on cults in the current out " a e tne tree will to break -�"� that in case oi what they consider to be
(May) issue of LADIES' HOME JOURNAL blasphemy by outsiders, they should try lo kill those
. Cult researcher Flo Conway asserted, "Almost all Dr. Margaret Thjaler Singer, a noted authority Ew taLLSZ " " �"
One of the largest and most
n the U.S. today uses almost
7 groups who are recruiting on campus don't on cults, stated
�-��. ft 2SLX "ZXZ -theeani �T
Hon. They have centers on or near i��t a�, hold a gun to vm.r hA a u generally
to your head and threaten to execute
Hon. 'They have centers on or near just about
every campus in every state of the union claims
Ms. Conway, who spent four years investigating
cults for a book. "They present themselves as a
campus social club. People are drawn into the
that
,�v n0t necessary because social and
psychological persuasion techniques are far more
effective, the University of California psychTat y
professor said.
FOUNTAINHEAD
review
By MARC B A RISES
News Editor
This is a reflective time for all of us here in the
office. We are saying goodbye to each other, and
goodbye to FOUNTAINHEAD, a confusing,
frustrating, but ever present source of entertain-
ment, headaches and potential ulcers to us all.
It has been a hard year of having to say here at
the news desk too late at night, having to eat a
gourmet dinner out of a paper bag. and having to
answer to over 10,000 different opinions about how
this business should be operated. We have received
nagging phone calls late at night, self doubts in our
own minds in the wee hours of the half awake
mornings.
We have endured the suspicious stares of
roommates who do not understand, and we have
heard from our parents-who want to know the
are really black eyed beans.
-Marc Barnes-News editor, asistant news editor, have my rear end
former acting editor, reporter, etc, etc. Marc has Terry Herndon-Assistant Ad Manager Terry looks
held so many jobs on the paper, he's thinking of like he just walked off of a billboard advertisement
opening his own employment service. A proponent of Winston cigarettes. Never gets ruffled
of Mike Cross. A supporter of Jimmy Buffett for Jane Wells-chief ad artist. Usually don't see Jane. I
president She is invisable, creeps in to do her job, and then "
-Luke Whisnant-Luke is so laid back and relaxed, she leaves.
we have to keep poking him to make sure he's Paul Lincke-advertising salesman. "What do vou
awake. Rebel editor, and the sanest one in the mean we can't run a sideways ad from Universal
i rr n t , Th.ngamajig? That's the only way we can get it to
-Jeff Rollins-Trends editor. "Hey, great, man, we've fit"
got three concerts nextweek-we won't have to dig Mary Storey-typesetter. Looks like the bad little girl
up a book review on Saturday Night Fever. A Yankee transplant, she
-v5am Kogers-bports editor. A wild and crazy guy. �s an advocate of a new dance class, Disco 1500
Makes John Belushi's charactor in Animal House Sue Hufford-typesetter. A mother figure to us all
look like a cross between Pat Boone and Billy Sue is continually telling us, correctly, that our
grammar is not never too good
In the article, Dr. Singer urged that cults be
legally mandated to fully describe their identity and
the nature of their activities before approching
schools or communities.
The psychiatrist asserted in the Journal: "The
whole question of the first amendment and what it
does and doesn't protect bears closer examination a
the result oi the cults. Manv of our most
prominent legal philosophers are already beginning
to take a look at the issues involved and are
considering what are the legal rights of families
within our society.
"If unethical cults are permitted to proliferate
unchecked Dr. Singer stated, "More families
could be threatened and we would have more
people accepting totalistic and totalitarian methods
of group living without being aware of exactly what
they are involved in
-Richy Smith, Assistant News Editor. A great Deidre Delahunty-proofreader. Dee, as she
is
girl-the guy who marries her will be extremely lovingly called, keeps us all
reason why tneir son ran a suspicious story about happy until he finds out that in terms of cooking, generally allows very few mistakes:0 Ret bye her
bouncing checks. Our relative and friends back she finds it difficult to boil water. (Just kidding Sue Johnson-proof reader A proponent of Art
home pretend to understand what we do down here, Rich-you still haven't invited me over to supper). Music and Drama. A fan of the Phillies and �
and veteran newsmen from this area grin and stifle Karen Wendt-Assistant News Editor A space cadet Yankee to the end
a laugh sometimes when they look at our efforts. "Earth to Karen, come in Karen. . Cannot stand Cindy Caveness-proofreader. Usually can be found
We do it because we want to do it. We good, high winds, trees, and birds who swoop down on hiding in the morgue, reading back copies of The
or bad, experienced or not, are journalists. We plan her. A fan of James Thurber. national enquierer and Grit
to make our living in this newspaper work someday. -Mike Rogers-Assistant News Editor. A moose twit. -Sue Lamm-cartoonist. Always comes in with a great
But you, the reader, do not even know who we Wrote the famous story about how much a certain cartoon. Husband graduated from UNC There also
are. I am going to remedy that, because whether administration official like his job. He liked his job. will be a little Lamm in their house very soon'
you want me to or not I m going to tell you. He hked his job. He liked his. . . -Ricki Gliarmis-former News Editor. Ricki was
-Doug White, editor, Doug is the youthful member Barry Clayton-Assistant Trends Editor Barry is given continually taking time off to go watch Luch Tnd
of the staff, and he is given to pointing out to drawing the infamous Mears cartoons for the Desi reruns with her sorority
countless style errors-he has the patience of Job Editorial page, and swooping down on windmills -Catherine Mercer-secretary. Our den mother
hundJL COmeS l� e-t7 l thC thrCe o Tis Ku"g Fu SUff- confidante, friend, advisor and No. 1 telephone
Hundredth time in one night that the way you write Bill Jones-Assistant Trends Editor. The quietest, answer. She is usually referred to in the office as
three hundredth is 300th. most studious one in the office-quite unlike the rest "Catherine Mercer Speaking'
-ateve Bachner-production manager. Steve is a film of us here. Well ther vnn h.u. r�-� � l-
fr�oU j �l r .l i l t ru i �t �� � - ' inere y�u nave it- fcvery cotton pickin one
freak, and the next winner of the John Travolta -Charles Chandler-Assistant Sports Editor. Charlie of us-crazy as hell, but we loved every minute o
look alike contest used to be quiet, but he isn't any more, "what do it. We joke when we say it, but FOUNTAINHEAr i
obert Swann-Robert has spent the last three hours you mean sports is the last 6he out again tonight! I really is "long hours, low pay and great comoanv �"ii��
arguing with someone over whether black eyed peas got Warren at 5 in the morning he's going to Have a great summer and A KID!VAP m
through school?
progress? Or just another free ride
t
" 49m49�0 00 � mvm. $00? wmm �� mm
� tltliSlliiliitJVii.mnntmiJM





HES
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 26 April 1979
Openings NAACP
Student l nion is
appl
he tv o Has
on the
Direct i
I" udents
working on
D� sk,
v udent
Ri i m 23
All
nust re turn
K appa Ipha Psi will
be having a Dance
rhon for the N t I1
pril 26 at Wright
uditorium ti om 8 p. in
u n! ti 8 a in It v ou are
interested in a m ipa
ting in a v orthwhile
i ause, please call (.h
William- or John
Dunlapp 758 7896 oi
W ayne Hank- 752 91
r h e r e nn 111 1 e prizes
lificates awarded to
contestants.
Dance
Jobs
L�
ised
. Mm

-Mi. 1 lern N Jan
isses will th ECl
i
. �: n .
r&

Ex
Inter-

M
�M
Be


1 per sure
structors will he
toa h I"
ning-level workshops in
( : a tt - during Kail
Semester at the Mende-
nhail .st ude iit Cei
enter. 1 x,
rsons m tin
w ing areas w ill In-
needed : jevvelrv.
woodworking,
silkscreen, printmak
weav ing. en, ig,
basketry.
Interested persons
m a I an.i
Mendei
Student Center
o6l 1.
ECGC
I - w i n
ECl or call
F as! Carol i
- e r i 11
1008 B Dii k
v � - - , i; i j 11
51 I
menibi
hers
I I I
1 u -� Ma 1
r i (.1
arh
-
I
HSICS ill Sexu
it) In:
in
Hill will be
lit lor discussion.
ECGC will continue
i er the
summer on an abr
�! basis. Plans for
se meeting will be
d at a later
te
Classifieds
K i �-� asaki for
2 new tires
758 0962
Fl RMTl RE for sale:
h and hair
752-7197 or 752
2629, ask for Doug.
FOR SALE Pion.
v t)5 i rei eiv er, perlei i
$175. I
2 1524.
Contest
I 11e St udi i I nion is
I oi t new
1 H V a ii I to
I he eon test, jusl
k up a form .it the
i a t i o n Desk, M . n
ihall Student Center,
Room 231, M (� 11111 � 11
lenl Center.
S50 Pi i. will be
id, p rson
ihe Logo
led. Vou
� I i, . Mav
Winners
i't I was
mil prize winner
Mendenhall siu
I'm -
nl whieh
SGA-SBP BUG
1 hi S(. presently has
Sludenl Run iii Power
Cards av ailable t�
students. These provide
a disi iiiiiii at The Tree
House, rhe Bicycle
Shop, Pel Kingdom and
Headstrong Boutique �!v
Clothing. These cards
were inch out lasl Near
but do net expire until
December 1979.
The BUC staff needs
topics of the 1973 and
1975 BUCCANEEI for
their files. If you have
extras, please call 757-
6501 weekday afternoons
Who's Who
All recipients of
Who's Who are asked
to go by Dean of
Student Affairs office
and pick up their
certificates.
Crafts
The Mendenhall
Crafts Center will be
open dur.ng summer
school from lpm until
5p.m Tues. through
Thursday beginning
May 22.
Celebration
The ECl -
Language Club '
sponsor a It I
It - Over Nig
Elbo Rooi 2
from ' �
9:30 i-
I
pril 20
ti u
the
-lit in
R
10
ii.I
il ti
Pa
th
! e
K . 111
Ill I
III
isl
tie

w
Kc
&
How to find
a summer job.
Talk to Manpower.
We've got summer job
opportunities foi temporary
workers. In factones. ware
houses, stores indoors
and outdoors.
Work as much as vou
want. Or as little. It's up
to vou.
there s a Manpower office
almost anywhere you're
spending the summer. Stop
in and we'll plan a job
sc hedule foi you.
QMANPCWER'
I
'
EXCLUSIVELY
COLLEGE STUDENTS
Working with over 5300 students each
summer. THE SOUTHWESTERN
COMPANY will be at LCU.
Saturday interviewing for their summer
work program. Involves meeting people,
travel, and good savings. Students saved
an average of over $2900 last summer.
An interview at 9:45 a. m. Saturday
will be in Room 102-C of the
Brewster building.
"Stroh's . . . Stroh's
For the real beer lover.
ier,
ami
1 me tor
thinking il ut.
Have it itdoors
portraits
Pete Podeszwa, also
ures in black
weddings
pes "I gr 11 u p
K U SAKI WK), 1976
hopper, extended
ks, raised handlebars.
$100. 752-4978.
FOR SALE Singer
Caramate II slide pro-
jector v i assette,
remote mich case. All
new. Any time, 752 -
3850.
STEREO consultant is
here at ECL to help
you build the stereo
system of your dreams.
Bring quality sound to
your home or car at low
prices, all types of hifi
eqpt. available. Michael,
752-2601.
FOR SALE: Single bed
in good condition, low
price. Call 752-0829.
ibrlS
THkihK FEMALE
ROOMMATES NEEDED
for summer. Live in an
ir Conditioned, furn-
ished apart men t v it li
swimming pool, tennis
court & cable IV all
lor only $61.00 plus l3
utilities. Call Michelle
ai 758-6051 alter 5.
ROOMS FOR RENT: 2
room- in house opening
up, one Mun 1, the
other June 1. Unfurn-
ished. Summer only. $40
plus ' 3 utilities. Call
Randy 752-9207.
LOOKING tor roommate
male, by May 1.
Highland Trailer Park.
752-0859, ask lor Toon
or Wvnn, or call Over-
ton's Supermarket and
ask for Tony.
2 FEMALE ROOM
MATES NEEDED, 1 for
both summer sessions, 1
for 2nd summer session.
$66.63 per mo. plus � 3
utilities. Oakmont Sq.
Call 752-8953 or 752-
8618.
II M l.l 1KH SEM M E
rad. student
1- undergrad.
� mid-May.
Pi ; � ite unturn. room ,
I 3 util &
bill, 2 blocks
1111 pus with
-1 reened in Ironl porch.
2810.
II M l 1. ROOMM TE
W NTED share 2
1 pi at illage
G reeti ! "i I irsl and
und -ession summer
K) 1 nl and
utilities Call 752
I after 7:00 P.M.
J FEMALE ROOM
MATES NEEDED to
share bedrm. at F.a-t
brook il- lor
-u 111 inei $5 � � ' l per mo.
plus util. It interested
call 752-0351 alter 5
p.m.
2 BEDRM. apt. availa-
ble Ma) I or 15. Air
1 ond E. First St.
$185 mo. 758-4158
NEED 2 females to
har large 3 B.R.
duplex starting May 1 -
rent 1- $55 mo. plus
1 3 util. Call 758-7532
anytime, a-k tor Jill.
Male roommate needed
for -dare 2 B.R. apt. at
King- Row for summer.
Furnished. Split rent,
$210 mo. plus 12
utilities. Call 758-5338
after 10 p.m.
SI BLE S1NC a 2 B.R.
apt furnished, 1 2
block from campus tor
-11 III in er. SI 35 111 o.
758 8297 after I p.m.
2 B.R. fully furnished
.1 ji t . available lor
summer. Rent $210 plus
util. Call 758-5338 after
10 p.m.
Fl M 1.1 HOI SEMATE
needed br 1-t session
summer school tur-
ni-hcil room, 2 block-
from campus - $100 lor
tic ntire session plus
1 I util. �5i telephone
bill. Call 758-2810.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
needed to -hare 3 B.R.
apt. at Eastbrook lor
-11111 iner and or tall.1 5
mo. plus 1 3 util. Call
Rhona 752-8460 or come
b 910 Clement.
FEMALE ROOM-
M TK(- needed, sum-
mer session. Furnished.
King- Rons AptS. .52-
0865.
2 B.R. duplex lor rent
lor summer and pos-
sibly next Near. $130
mo. 752 3623.
MALE ROOMMATE
needed May. 1 thru
August. Eastbrook
Apts. Full) furnished
with extra bed. $65 mo.
plus 1 3 util. Call
758-6833 anytime.
FEMALE roommate
needed: nice apt. Rent
and utilities $92.50 mo.
total. Call 752-1715,
leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED to share lg.
2-bedrm. apt. 4 blocks
from campus. 1'2 rent
and util. not to exceed
$120 month. Need your
own bedrm. furniture.
Available May 12th thru
summer. Call 752-8711
& ask for Cyndi.
FOR RENT: 1 B.R.
apt close to campus,
swimming pool May 5
thru fall semester. $150
mo. plus util 752-6627.
ROOM FOR RENT:
within walking distance
of ECU. $50 mo util.
included. Call Lee at
752-1839.
WANT: 1 or 2 res-
ponsible girls to
sublease furnished 1
B.R. apt. at Tar River
E states for summer.
Call 752-1928.
MALE roommate
needed to share 3 B.R.
duplex. Rent $67. Call
758-1714.
FOR RENT: Private
room in nice big house
3 blocks from campus,
$70 mo. plus 16 util
kitchen privileges. Call
758-3545.
1 B.R. Apt. for
sublease this summer.
Furnished or unfurn-
ished at Village Green
Apts. $165 mo. Call
752-0451.
1 B.R. house, kitchen,
living room, den
optional 5th BR. Ex-
cellent neighborhood.
Right off Elm St. 15
min. walk from campus.
756-9758.
NEED SOMEONE TO
ASSUME LEASE on 2
bedrom. apt. at East-
brook. Lease expires in
Aug. with option to
renew. Swimming pool,
air cond university bus
service available. Call
758.1187 and ask for
Jeff.
FEMALE roommate
needed to share 1
B.R. p close to
campus. Available May
9, $75 plus 12 electric.
758-7980 ask for Emilie.
ROOMMATE needed to
share 3 B.R. Eastbrook
Apt. Rent $70 plus util.
752-4570.
FOR RENT: Wanted - 1
or 2 studious females to
share 2 B.R. apt River
Bluff beginning May 1,
rent & util. shared,
furnished. 758-8529.
WANTED roommate to
share 2 B.R. furn. apt.
for summer mos. 12
rent & util. Call 758
0903.
SUBLET apt. at
Langston Park this
summer. Nice 2 B.R.
for $210 mo. Call
758-4317.
txrsona�
l DEN
NOW TAKING APPLI
CATIONS FOR Dr
LIVERY HELP. Apply
in person at Chanelos.
$1 an hour. Must have
own car. 758-7100.
OUTDOOR wilderness
trips Eastern N.C. 7-10
days. Canoe, sailing &
cycling. Info vsrite
Robin Hulberl. Rt. 5.
Box 161, Washington,
NC 27889 or call
1-975-2150.
P.T evening work in
public relations. Locking
for personable, reliable
woman over age 21,
unmarried, and 5'7 or
taller. Send resume for
interview. Professional
Consultants, P.O. Bo
658, Goldsboro, NC
27530.
CHOREOGRAPHIC
assistant needed for
ROck and Roll band
Call Dan 752-1715.
SUMMER JOBS - High
Pay, good experience.
Come find out if you
are qualified. Brewster
C101, 5 p.m. and 7:30
p.m. tonight.
HELP WANTED: Night
clerk needed at
SeahawkMotel, Atlantic
Beach, NC 726-1116
Mr. Gilligan.
Ill;
mil �
Gla

Mardei I'D ,
Chapel H
mm ro Bl
paid ! 1' r - � :
appliatu c
Mil-
up. U
Nl- I D PI CK
in town,
beg Max
752 08 J al
ask : � .
or Overt
v 11" : .
and .1 -k foi 1 min
lost (5)
LOST: 1 pr perscnpti
sunglasses in bla -
case Return to Bob
oodside in Mathema
tics Dept 01 .all ?
p m
5167 after
REWARD
LOST: Irish setter
named Blake, osj
Sunday between K U I
St. an.i ECU, call "
5899
r





� flilW' -i.1 � S 26 April 1979 FQUNTAlNHEAD Page 3
nere s more than one way to give foiood ?
B RICHY SMITH
Assistant Mews Editor
Th
altern-
ere is an
ative method of giving
blood besides the
regular Tidewater Red
Cross bloodmobile visits.
It's (ailed a pheresis
machine, and through
tne efforts of the Jaycee
Chapters, there is one
located at the Tar Ri
Sub center of th!
Hdewater Red Cro
Blood Program
GreenviHe.
Pheresis
tver
ss
in
v ord
is a greek
meaning "to
separate it" and that is
exact!) what this
machine does, according
Richard Carney,
adm inistrator for the
center. "Pheresis is a
highh sophisticated
hnique of drawing
from a person
into a machine rather
to a container
The machine has the
capability of harvesting
only the needed parts
of the blood, said
Carney. "We've been
able for years to do this
process in the lab from
eon tamers
About a year and a
half ago the state
organization of Jaycees
was contacted to see if
they would help in a
campaign to raise
SI 7,000 to purchase the
pheresis machine,
Came) said. The
Kinston chapter was the
first to make a donation
ol $1000 and in turn
was the iirst to supply
the donor on the
machine. More blood
has been donated since
then, from local Jaycees
and from other
businesses, he added.
The process takes a
little longer than the
regular Red Cross
donations and should
not be compared to it,
he said.
The process does not
weaken a person be-
cause only the needed
part of the blood is
extracted and the rest
is returned to the
donor, Carney said.
The machine divides
the blood into four
components, but only
three of those compo-
nents are used a great
deal,he said. "They are
the red blood cells the
white blood cells and
platelets
Platelets help in the
clotting factors of a
patient, and without
platelets the blood
jive every NEWBORN
the advantage
MARCH
OF DIMES
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us
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u.
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When ordering any
two large pizzas.
For delivery
s
or take-out only
THE
VILLA ROMA
us
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X
u.
7581042
offer expires April 30,1979
FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE
For the first tfme fn years,
the genius of The Beach Boys
comes to Light.
Th� Beach Boys are five of the most
talented musical minds of our time �all
in one group.
And now here's the most solid evidence
in years of their special brilliance.
"L.A. (Light Albumt" includes Brian
and Mike's "Here Comes the Night" in a
tour-de-force version. It's got Brian and
C arts much written about I but never
before released) "Good Timin Plus Al's
"Lady Lynda Mike's "Sumahama"
Dennis "Baby Blue" and "Love Surrounds
Me And some of Carl's absolutely best
songs ever: "Full Sail" "Angel Come
Home" (sung by Dennis) and "Coin'
South
All of it is co-produced byGrammy winner
(and former Beach Boy) Bruce Johnston.
This is The Beach Boys album everyone's
been waiting for. You'll be turning
people on to "L.A. (Light Album)" for
months to come.
The Beach Boys "L.A.
(Light Album)On Caribou
Records and Tapes.
would
clot, he
not be
said.
able to
The machine can
also be used therapeu-
tieally.
In the case of a
person having a plasma
disorder, the machine
can extract it and infuse
the person with another
type of plasma, Carney
said.
Research
machine was
the American
on the
started by
Cancer
pressuring
this service
us
to
get
Institute a few years
back when they were
given a grant from IBM
to do research, he said.
"We serve twenty-eight
counties in Eastern
North Carolina and
Virginia and the medical
communities have been
Donors for the
machine are screened
and their blood is
tissue-typed by the ECU
School of Medicine
Pathology Department.
"They have the means
to do this sophisticated
work and we have been
working jointly on this
serv ice, Carney said .
















A classic. v
y This
O weekend's I









What is Eckanka,
free flick.




by MARC BARNES
News Editor
a group
a "way of
lowers,
foil
Eckankar,
which offers
life" to its
rather than a religious
experience, held a meeting
Monday which explained
in part the purposes
and philosopohy of the
group.
Fifth initiate Kathv
Webb led the group
discussion, which was
intended to explain
exactly what Eckankar
is, and what its fol-
lowers believe.
"Everything is based
on your own personal
experience Webb
said. She added,
"People need to believe
in themselves and in
their own perception of
reality�this session is
just to bring attention
to Eckankar
The followers of
Eckankar believe in
cominugHi n between
themseivCT and' their
leaders. This commun-
ication comes as a
result of a high-pitched,
almost musical sound
heard in the middle
ear.
According to Webb.
the communication and
soul travel, which is
movement to a higher
.state ol reality, is basic
to a believer of
Eckankar.
Ekankar is lifted as a
cult in this month's Ladies
Hume Journal.
he
v hen asked ol
reaction when she was
informed that Eckankar
had been identified as a
cult, Webb said thai it
was untrue.
don .
about
ol
think that people
know anything
it il they say
W ebb stated.
persuasive aspects
cull are bot
???????c
TOO LATE ?
maybe not!
SUMMER WORK
Average student can expect to a save
$3100 for summer. Are you average?
Interviews Thursday and Friday,
April 26 and 27 at 9:55, 1:35, 5:15
Please be on time!
Available at your Favorite Record Store.
� - . . .
�� m 4 - - � �

I I
f �� 9 Ji





m
?�0� 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 26 April 1979
J
FOUNTAINHEAD
vs. the Media Board
The basic conflict between FOUN-
TAINHEAD and the Media Board is
the issue of who controls the contents
of this newspaper. As journalists, of
course, we steadfastly contend that
the only control, outside of legal
sanctions concerning libel and obscen-
ity, on a newspaper's content rests
with the staff of the paper, usually
the editor. The Media Board, not
surprisingly, claims that they, as
publishers, have the same say-so over
content as Katherine Graham has over
the Washington Post.
FOUNTAINHEAD's internal struc-
ture is such that one person cannot
unilaterally set editorial policy.
FOUNTAINHEAD's Editorial Board,
consisting of the seven highest
ranking staff members, has the power
of veto over the editor.
The Media Board's argument,
heavily influenced by Chancellor
Brewer's autocratic opinions about
campus media, is flawed by the
obvious fact that they are not a
private property owner, as Katherine
Graham is. They are a government
agency in the sense that they are
charged with the responsibility of
appropriating state funds and oversee-
ing how they are handled, and no
government agency can ever be
allowed to have any voice in what a
newspaper is allowed to print, nor can
they be allowed to tell a paper what
to print.
The latter point mentioned is
where the conflict has arisen, al-
though there were intimations of it
earlier when Dr. James Tucker, dean
of Student Affairs, informed us that
we would not be allowed to print
liquor advertisements since it was
contrary to an "unwritten" university
policy. In other words, they were
reprehensible to him. FOUNTAIN-
HEAD has and will continue to
publish ads for liquor or any other
product as we, and we alone, see fit.
In an April 20 story about
FOUNTAINHEAD Editor Doug
White's suspension, in the News and
Observer, a statement attributed to
former Acting Chairperson of the
Media Board Hal Sharpe said "the
content of individual editorials and
news stories in the newspaper had
little bearing on the suspension. But

Fountainhead
Serving the ECU community (or over 50 years
I
EDITOR
DOUG WHITE
PRODUCTION MANAGER ADVERTISING MANAGER
STEVE BACHNERROBERT M. SWAIM
NEWS EDITORSAssistant Advertising
MARC BARNESManager
LUKE WHISNANT
Tarry Harndon
Assistant News EditorsAdvertising Salesman
Richy SmithPaul Unoka
Karto Wsocti
Chief Ad Artist
TRENDS EDITORJana Watts
JEFF ROLLINSProofreaders
Assistant Trends EditorsOaidra Oatahunty
Barry ClaytonSua Johnson
Bill JenaCindy Cavanaaa
SPORTS EDITORTypesetters
SAM ROGERSSua Huftord
Mary Storay
Assistant Sports EditorCartoonists
Charta ChandlarSua Lamm
ftwry Clayton
FOUNTAINHEAD ia ttw atudartt tuwianii of
EM Carolina Umvarafty aponawad by tha "Madia
Board ot ECU and la dratributad aach Twaadav and
Thuraday during tha aoadamicyear (waafciy during
tha aummar).
Editorial opinion, ara thoaa of 9m EdNoriaf
Board and do not mnaaaarlli ranaet Mm ortrHawa of
tha unrvaraity or the MatSa Boao.
Our ornoaa ara located on�w aaeond Hear of
tha PubWoauona Cantar (OkJ 1outti BuMdtng) Our
matting addraaa ia: 0W ftMttt BuikMng. ECU.
Qra�nf�a, N.C 27SM.
Our phono numbaia ara:75743BB. M67, and
C30B Subauliitlum an $10�niHully, fltvmni 96
annually. Subaorintlon raquaatiahoutd ba addriaaad
to tha CtrcMtaMan Managar
the general news coverage provided
by the campus newspaper did enter
into the board's decision This is a
blatant infringement on the first
amendment rights of both the editor
and the newspaper.
The primary purpose of the Medic
Board is to supervise the fiscal affairs
of a medium and select the best
candidate based on his qualifications
as a journalist, or photographer, or
broadcaster, as the case may be.
Attempts to forbid staff members
from expressing their opinions in
Forum the illegal suspension of an
editor, and other infringements or
attempted infringements on the rights
of free speech and a free press are
only the more flagrant examples.
There have been and there still are
very subtle attempts on several fronts
at slowly eroding the editorial
independence of this newspaper. One
member of the Media Board went so
far as to privately suggest, in all
seriousness, to a staff member that a
member of the board look over each
edition of the paper and apporve it
before it is sent to the printers.
There can be no greater insult to
a journalist than for someone to have
the audacity to suggest that someone
approve, and thus accept or reject,
anything in the newspaper. The
paper would lose any respect it has
among its peers, and would recall the
days of the first newspapers published
in colonial America, which were
required to bear the stamp "Pub-
lished by Authority Not surprising-
ly, these papers were seldom if ever
critical of the government.
The concept of a media board is a
valuable, yes, even practical one, but
the board is hampered by a
constitution riddled with loopholes and
major omissions, along with the
frightening views of Dr. Tucker,
Associate Dean of Student Affairs
Rudolph Alexander, and Chancellor
Brewer.
FOUNTAINHEAD is dedicated to
defending its constitutional rights as
well as it can, but the odds are
stacked against us. If we are to
maintain our editorial integrity, we
must stand our ground. It may cost
us a few editors, we may end up in
federal court, but anything is better
than losing these precious rights.
Forum
�ndj
Phi Sigma Pi
replies to letter
To Fountainhead
In reference to this
past Tuesday's letter to
the Editor concerning
Phi Sigma Pi National
Fraternity's sexual prac-
tices, as senior brothers
of this organization, feel
we can confirm the
notion that (at least)
many of our brothers
are indeed sexual de-
generates.
This pledge activity
was intended to
"arouse" interest in our
organization and destroy
the myth that all we do
ia study. It ia evident
m�ny girls enjoyed the
event, which was dis-
played through cheers
and applause. This
pledge activity has been
traditional for our or-
ganization, but if the
fraternity had any idea
that there were so
many practicing voyeurs
in White Dorm we
would certainly have
moved our pledges to a
more secluded spot.
We deny the alle-
gation that our pledges
were chanting "Phi
Sigma Pi Brothers do it
best (Though this
may be true.) Our
brothers were actually
saying (at 10 a.m.)
"get up girls, it's time
for sex
Reed Warren
Mike Morse
Concerned Brothers
Necessary media revisions
The Media Board is modeled after
the Student Union Board of Directors,
but the constitutions of the two
organizations are quite different. The
Student Union constitution provides
safeguards for the president which
could easily be adapted to the Media
Board and make the decision-making
process and the balance of power
between the Media Board and the
media much more equitable.
Just as the Student Union presi-
dent is an ex-officio member of the
Student Union Board of Directors
without a vote, so should the heads
of the various media be voteless
members of the Media Board. What
harm can there be in adding
powerless members to the board?
There can, however, be great
benefit with these media heads sitting
on the board. It would be impossible
to hold secret meetings to discuss a
medium, as has happened in the past,
without that medium head knowing
about them. They could also freely
lend their expertise in board discus-
sions, just as a voting member can.
The procedure for amending the
constitution should also be revised.
Some scheme should be devised
giving media heads some voice in
ratifying amendments to the Media
Board constitution. Not necessarily a
controlling voice, but they should be
able to have some say-so in ratifying
an amendment.
These changes will weaken the
power of the present board only
slightly, if at all; they will still have
the upper hand. They will merely
give the media heads a more active
role in conducting their affairs.
Uppity Women
JaV
Everything women do is political
of Phi Sigma Pi

By CHARLENE CARTER
Staff Writer
That the American people are apathetic about
politics is hardly news to anyone anymore, except
maybe the seventh-graders who come bursting out
of civics class with enthusiasm for our system in
which everyone can participate-and who have yet to
learn that it's going to be difficult to find anyone to
? talk to about it.
It takes time for change to become visible in a
political system representing over 200 million
people. Have we watched so much TV that solutions
that aren't "instant" take up too much of our time
now? Maybe we are being too easy on ourselves.
But one thing is certain-political apathy is very
beneficial to the powers that be, and very deadly to
the people they supposedly represent.
Many people say that they don't want to get
involved with politics. "It's too dirty "Too
crooked "It doesn't do any good "Not getting
involved is my form of protest these are phrases
that are heard a lot these days. There's no doubt
about the "dirty" and "crooked" part, and "it
doesn't do any good" has an element of truth in it
many times.
But (to paraphrase Pontiuis Pilate), "not getting
involved is my form of protestthat's the one the
crooked politicians like the most. Everyone who
takes this stand is essentially giving the bad guys
free reign to do whatever they damn well please.
And anyone who won't get involved has no right to
complain about anything.
y What many of us Americans fail to realize, is
that everything which affect8 . arge numDCr 0f our
people is political, even if it has never been
mentioned in the Congress. The very air we breathe
is a political issue today-the issue of whether a few
win be allowed to contaminate everyone's air for
their own profit.
The fact that there are still many women today
-no feel that there are many simple things which
Le "Cetnen"th0nr 'T'1" do � � very poht.cai
hT'a g thefe ,S "� ,aw on le book,
that a woman cannot open the door if there � .
man to do i, for her, cannot change a Ha, "re and
�" T T tT� ,here is a �"ge number of
people who believe that thev are t� �a
helpless and -hat they have �& t�f
stage is set for opportune ,0 step in and trv ,o
manipulate and .nfiuence these people 7 ��
This is a highly political situation (Do .
remember when "nigger'used ' �. ou
place?" It wasn't tha, "long ago and harT
considered it to be a politicaHsle '
Those who would like to CM .
.heir pl.ee use ,he rgu .haTThU
pohtical issue . i. . person se'S �, '
prime example of the milii.rv j �"� s ls "
known as "divide and Jnue " Whefe .T' "C"C
umty, .here is no strength 'herC ls no
ik� :� sex discrimination,
I va
each woman TJST'LTS: ,hen
and powerless. Which is �?- . lustration,
that their aims have , ?x d,scri�na
merely "social" ,ssues n�P" ' ��, but
�a. 1 lssue, or personal"
Wh�t.Wani!hem �V tUUw.yfinC WUh thC Pe�P,e
has poli
�t ease to
rvtl w"v way.
M.yhe'ever7w:ra.nddn" tf 'mP���ons.
TTrLt" ��� �� a
Reigh dem.nslr.te on "
whteh she would coJZ
� �" � �k, large or ,LV"l "����
�dered t. b � " "�' ���� was formerl.
�o be a political aetion Bu everV ,7�U'd
takes on a 8�, �. ?er? �'��� �
cons
uunsiaerea to be anm-A� . '
��� � HtW�Pr fo' �e�.
The task may be an -��� �
may be speaking up" a?� ���. or it
bottle of wine at Lnlr panTTS' JV
are important, �d 8ince T- � of the thia8
T
���
C t � r�;��� - ��
SKafeatMfc � jt.





p r i r r t
ECGC hold
Sund,
Vs Editor
Th East Carolina
Uav Community is
holding a "Fun Ra1Ser"
tKJt .SuUDda at Green-
viUe s Paddock Club
The event will feature a
fref keg, good ' food,
and ,ve entertainment
according to ECGC '
pokesman Michael Lee
and everyone is wel-
ome.
According to Lee,
JOBe) from the Fun
a.ser will be used to
��) off some of the
expenses the organiza-
tion incurred setting up
lhe�r peer counseling
services for students
with sexual-related pro-
blems.
The counselingservice
scheduled to begin
first summer session.
The program will begin
with three student
counselors, with plans
to add several student
workers after they
s 'fun-raiser'
to raise money
so
"Gav
complete a training
session. Lee al
mentioned that a
Hotline" was a possi-
MttJJ for the program in
the future.
Lee emphasized that
the service was not a
homosexual recruiting
scheme as it has
been called by some
critics. Students who
may benefit from
homosexual peer coun-
seling are referred to
the service by the ECU
Counseling Center after
careful consideration of
the person's needs.
"This is the first
peer counseling program
jn this campus said
Lee. "Peer counseling
is becoming an impor-
tant part of many
college counseling ser-
vices.
Lee said that dorm
hall advisors, who may
be considered "peers
of dorm residents, are
not professionally trai-
ned.
The counselors for
the ECGC service
attended a weekend
training sesion on peer
counseling last March
and have attended
several follow-up ses-
sions to assure that
they will handle their
cases in a professional
manner.
Costs of the training
sessions are the major
expenses the organiza-
tion hopes to pay off
with the money from
the Fun Raiser.
Admission to thel
event will be $1 at the
door for Paddock Clubl
members, and $2 foi
guests. The Paddocl
Club is located at
1008-B Dickenson Aven-
ue.
26 April 1978 FOUNTAtyHFin Pi
�t-T ADfil 197fl POUNTAINHFAD P
all survey results surprising
H� L 4ULV W'VlMIVr
Report says U.S. going to pot
By KAREN WENDT
Assistant News Editor
The results of the
Student Union poll on
concerts has been
completed, and the
results were, to say the
least surprising.
The most popular
type of music to
students on campus is
easy rock. Country rock
was in second place,
with jazz a close third.
In fourth was soul,
fifth, hard rock and
finially last place coutry.
In the question
concerning what type of
artists students would
like on campus, Billy
Joel was an easy first.
George Benson came in
second place, with
Charlie Daniels in for
the third spot. Natalie
Cole heralded fourth
place in the poll, Ted
Nugent in fifth, and
Willie Nelson came in
last place among jECU
students.
H KAREN WENDT
Vssistant News Editor
The use of Mari-
juana has risen sharply
in the I ,S. according to
the Seventh Annual
Report on Marijuana
and Health.
The report tate
that three out ol five
young adults have tried
marijuana. The) estima-
te million
Had tried
asl once.
36 million who had
tried the drug, and 15
million who had smoked
within a month during
the (76 survey.
oun
gsters and
young adults do not
consider the drug
addictive , while three
�ui "I five people in
��c over 26 age bracket
consider it habit-
forming.
ted that
meri
marijua
and
used
with in
ur c.
rhis
rise from
million had
east once
miith ot the
a dramatic
ie tigures of
SSjSmSbbmi�
One of the most
surprising results of the
poll was that students
prefer to have concerts
on weekends. This was
found surprising becau-
se, as Randy Sessons,
chairman of the major
attractions committee
put it, "This is basic-
ally a suitcase campus
Friday was voted the
day most students
would like to have a
concert. Saturday was
chosen as the second
most preferable day,
with Thursday coming
in third, Wednesday
was voted into fourth
place, Sunday for fifth,
Tuesday in sixth and
Mondays were the most
unliked days.
"Our relationship
with booking agencies is
such that we don't
make requests for
particular artists said
Sessoms. "We must
choose from offers that
agencies afford us. The
results of the survey
will help select the
shows which will get
the best response on
campus. If we have
offers for easy rock
artist and a jazz artist,
we will know that we
are more apt to recoup
our expenses by going
with the easy rock
artist
An estimated 750
students took the poll,
which Sessoms felt was
a good turnout.
rr� A l?Ti , . , stipulation that such a suspension can
OKA I continued from p. 1 take place only once a year.for the
- purpose of revising or instituting new
procedures.
William Nichols, DAI, on February
28, requires: an automatic method of Sholar expects that the vote on
registering persons through an the draft bills will come before the
automated system, using school and end of Mav. He urged the persons at
other records; the registration and the meeting to consider the fact that
induction of men and women; the only a minute percentage of the
use of census information for money which is spent for arms in the
registraion. many believe that this United States is spent toward
bill is the one most likely to receive peaceful negotiation of differences
the eventual support of the President.
Other bills call for Civilian Service voic wVrr' 'T , g�l ht and
for those who do not join the hm"elf hke ' n "
�is. a iu � r mmse" l,ke a true Quaker. He never
military, and prohibit suspension of r�kfrl hiu j
,� , � . raised "is voice and was never rude
draft ,registration by the President to anyone, although some people
for more than ninety days, with the were very rude towards him
ICE CREAM
Saturday & Sunday
April 28 and 29
Ouoify � Competitive Prices e Service
Jtnw trmnltf f tttf B furs (rt(;(i7 If T Tt�
No ' i,o .
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EAR N OVE R 650 A MONTH
RIGHT THROUGH YOUR
SENIOR YEAR.
If you're a junior or senior
majoring in sciences like
math, physics or engineering,
the Navy has a program you
should know about.
It's called the Nuclear
Propulsion Officer Candidate-
Collegiate Program
(NUPOC-C for short) and if
you qualify, you can earn as
much as $650 a month right
through your senior year.
Then after 16 weeks of
Officer Candidate School,
you'll get an additional year
of advanced technical
education. This would cost
thousands in a civilian school,
but in the Navy, we pay you.
It isn't easy. There are
fewer than 400 openings and
only one of every six
applicants will be selected.
But if you make it, you'll
have unequaled hands-on
responsibility, a $24,000
salary in four years, and gilt-
edged qualifications for jobs
both in the Navy and out.
Ask your placement
officer to set up an interview
with a Navy representative
when he visits the campus,
or contact your Navy
representative at 800-841-8000,
or send in the coupon. The
NUPOC-C Program. Not
only can it help you complete
college. It can be the start of
an exciting career.
ALL YOU
CAN EAT
Thursday Night Family Special
TROUT OR PERCH$1.99
FLOUNDER $3.2$
SHRIMP$4.5o
OYSTERS$4.s�
SEAFOOD PLATTER$4.95
Shrimp, Oysters, Flounder,
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IftAA reorder on Crabs
ICWfU or Scallops.
foafAAsi Atl diners served
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rfjgJJ and Hush Puppies.
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WESTERN
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B704
NAVY OPPORTUNITY
INFORMATION CENTER
P.O. Box 2(XX. Pelham Manor. NY 10803
Yes. I'd like more information on
the NUPOC-C Program (0).
Name.
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offer expires Mayg 197ft
H m r m "
�m a

I ' ��"
� if gj
� f (f � ' e .
�m � r � � �� �





I�
?
f0� 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 26
Chris Farren answers
music
Bv JEFF ROLLINS
Trends Editor
Chris Farren, an English major and senior at
East Carolina, has been one of the most active and
consistently entertaining performers that Greenville
ha seen in a long time. Tuesday nights he
generally packs the downtown bistro where he sings
and plays guitar and electric piano, in fact, for his
tans and many others Tuesday night has become
the traditional night to hear Farren play.
Last Tuesday night this reporter spoke with
Chris during several of his breaks. He is friendly
and quick to smile. His curly blond hair shines in
the orange lights of the night club. Flushed from
singing, Chris sits down at the table with a cup of
hot tea (which he says is good for his throat).
His last number was one that was real jazzy,
that involved a lot of scat-singing. He visibly
jumped up and down as he sat at the piano striking
the up-beat chords, which prompted me to ask him.
rH Chris, you have a lot of energy when you
play, where do you get it?
ci Most ot the energy that I have on stage comes
from the fact that I just love to sing, and I'd rather
be doing that than just about anything else I can
think ol. Specifically, it comes from seeing someone
in the audience that you want to perform for and
other times when I perform my own songs there's
energy from within that comes from doing my own
material.
r H Speaking of your own material, how would
you describe what your songs are like, as to themes
or major ideas.
CF Unfortunately, I write mostly about love and
while it is the most universally over-worked theme
it is -till the most inspirational. I try to break away
from writing about love and write just about the
things around me thatt affect me, but the majority
n tunes are about love-lost, love-gained, love in
limbo.
r H How would you classify you songs as to
genre
CF There's very little distinction anymore in
music I think. The lines between different' kinds of
music are just too blurred, with all the cross-overs
that have occured in the past decade. But my
are basically acoustical, they have an
accoustical jazz flavor and for some reason there's a
lot ot latin influence in my songs but don't ask me
where it comes from, I have no latin heritage at all.
ith that Farren got up to do another set,
which included a song by Dan Fogelbert, The
Eagle "Lying Eyes" and a terrific rendition of
Van Morrison's classic, "Moondance" among other
songs.
FH hen did you start to write your own songs
and ha- your style changed since then?
CF I began writing seriously in high school and
surprisingly enough the songs written are not
drasticalT) different from the ones 1 wrote last
week. Perhaps a bit more mature, perhaps a bit
more musically sophisticated, but mv old songs
don t stick out from my new ones. When I play
my oW songs, one I wrote six years ago, one I
wrote three years ago and I wrote recently there's
not that much difference. My style of playing has
changed a lot more than my style of writing.
FH How has your style of playing changed?
CF M influences have always been extremely
divere. In high school in a period of one year I
played in three different bands, one a country rock
band, one a strictly blue-grass band and one a jazz
quarter. So when I started to sing solo there had
been a lot of music in my background that had
affected me. Just like everyone's musical taste has
changed over the past five years so has mine. And
I play what I like at the present time which
dictates the way I perform the songs.
When I was a Freshman I was singing a James
Taylor song Id try to sing it as James Taylor
would, whereas three years later and I sing that
same James Taylor song it might be with a totally
different flavor.
FH A flavor that is more of your own making?
CF I certainly hope so.
FH I think that shows a level of maturity in a
singer, when the singer begins to interpret a song
in his own way, rather than trying to copy the
original artist's style.
CF You can learn a lot from the original but I
gave up trying to be a great guitarist or a great
piano player or a great singer a long time ago
because there are too many people that are better
than me. It is my hope that my musical strengh
lies in my writing and creativity.
FH So then you think you'll continue to write?
CF God, I hope so, yeah.
Fh You mentioned that you had a lot of music
m your background, what are some of your
strongest musical influences, both in what you
write and how you perform.
CF Everything goes through stages. Four years
ago I wanted to act, sing, look and plav like Kenny
Loggins but then the influences started' to mesh. I
listened to a lot of Jose Feliciano and Kenny
Rankin. Michael Franks has affected me some. And
most recently Al Jarreau and Michael McDonald.
And many others, Todd Rundgren, the soft Rodd
Rundgren. A lot of my piano-songs are affected by
him (Rundgren( but my guitar songs aren't.
FH Your tast in music tends toward the soft
rock and jazz genres. Do you find that audience
responce to this kind of music is as good as their
responce to harder rock?
CF Sure, but only if it's the right kind of
audience.
FH Do you find any differences in ther
audiences you've performed in front of?-
Chris Farren
CF Yeah.
FH tor instance.
CF The audience totally dictates the mood.
Unless you decide your just doing to be oblivious to
it, which you can't do. If you're good enough you
can put the audience in the mood you want but
sometimes that's impossible. It all depends on how
much they want to listen and how much they want
to do whatever else they are doing in the bar or
club.
FH When did you begin to Play?
CF You have to specify. PIay what as a soloist,
or an instrument?
FH I guess what I'm asking is when did you
first get into the making of music?
CF I began playing piano when I was four years
old and took for nine years. I gave up the piano
when I was thirteen to play the guitar because at
that age going home to practice the piano just
didn't cut it with my friends while playing guitar
was "real cool I never took guitar lessons but
just learned for myself, everywhere I saw someone
playing guitar I watched really closely and I found
out that you could learn a lot that way. Even from
people who weren't as good as you. I played
numerous other instruments through junior high and
high school and performed in a lot of different
bands.
FH When did you realize that you wanted to
play solo?
CF At college I didn't have much other choice.
Because there were too many other things going on.
Bands take a lot of time and I'm selfish with my
time and also selfish as a musician. I mean like I
like being able to dictate exactly how the song is
going to sound and trying to do that in a band is
unfair.
FH How much do you generally practice a song
before you perform it?
CF Usually not very long. If it's a song I like I
learn it quickly. If it's a song I havr to learn
for one reason or another I learn it slowly.
FH How much of your repertoire do you choose
for yourself and how much for your audience
CF Ideally, I'd like to play all for myself and
hope the audience will enjoy it too, but there are
certain songs that a soloist invariably must learn to
play to please the audience whether he likes it or
not. If you play a song that vou don't like it's
usually obvious, it's hard to cover.
FH Do you compose on the piano or guitar or in
you head or how?
CR Well, most of my songs have been composed
on the guitar but recently I've tried to re-aquaint
myself with the piano. And am trying to write more
at the piano now.
FH What known bands have you performed
with:
CF I've opened for the Firesign Theatre, Andy
Pratt and the Sanford Townsend Band and a few
other semi-known recording groups but those were i
m big places and my style is definately better in
smaller places. College doesn't give much time to
play which leaves you only the summers to perform
lull-time.
FH Why do you like smaller places better?
CF I'm a soloist and I can only make so much
noise, somuch music with one guitar and one voice
Seems to be easier to fill a small room with that
music than a larger place.
Chris took a sip of his tea and got up to do
another set. His voice is a breathv baritone-alto.
Watching him perform,the audience semed to sense
some of the energy he was emitting from the stage
Several times, after a difficult cadenza on the
Yamaha piano or a particularly funkv passage of
scat-singing, the audience interrupted his
performance with applause and shouts.
wamHtoDh� OU HaVe an 3dvice for stude" -ho
want to become entertainers?
CF fc ell, I thiak someone needs to g,ve me
some advice before I sttftghanag k out. , �
to sing and I guess if s6mr ��es to sing thev
should sing. g �
FH Chris, what are your plans for the future a
lar as your music goes? '
CF That's something everyone, and most
�mportantly my mother, would like to know and
even more than her, me. I think she wants me to
be a lawyer or something but I figure as long as I
can sing and make a living at ,t and enjoy h I'm
going to do that for awhile. J "
FH Which is most important to vou, singing or
making money at singing? "8,ng or
CF I wish you hadn't asked that. I know I'm
"uTdnS't !� SaUSts-g-g � -ost important but I
I dWn PY " rtm gUit3r �r a Yahama P.a i
I didn t make money. p � "
FH What is it 'about making music that is ��
important to you? w so
CF I guess just like anv art-form it mat
-if find 'JLrS&Z nX.To 'ha' �,h"S
jtt�r?; aft y
from ECU among
features three ' fi
By LLKE WHISNANT
News Editor
Th,s year's second issue of Tar River Poetry
available next week from the Student Supply Store
and area bookstores, features work by nationally
known poets, writers from as far away as
Montana -and three ECU students.
Randy Stalls, a graduate student in the ECU
writing program, draws the imagery and subject
matter of his poem "Peaches" from the background
of the rural south. Stalls' laid-back, free verse
rambling could have benefited from a more careful
employment of enjambment and some punctuation
for clarity 8 sake, but the relationship between the
narrator and his grandfather is drawn nicely "A
salt-and-pepper granddaddy and his knockneed
grandson journey to the farmers' market to buy
peaches "for parch-lipped Negroswho rose from
peanut-stack fieldsin a dry September dusk The
fourth paragraph bears quoting-the boy and the old
man connive to unload bad peaches on their tennant
farmers:
Under an umbrella elm
in a Penecostal churchyard
we sorted peaches
in pine-strip-and-chicken-wire
bushels placing the biggest
on top and hiding the bruised, but saying:
"There may be a few overripe ones in the lot
smiling at one another from the comers
of our eyes.
But when the grandfather dies, he is carried off in
the long draped hearsebed. . .
as the Negroes who owed on time
stood by saying:
"We was gwan settle up wid Mista Ernest next
oat day.
seeing one another from the corners
of their mouth.
Senior English major Jo Ellen Rivenbark's poem
Harvest also draws from the rural southern
experience. The narrator remembers watching her
father p.loting his combine through a soybean field,
Once he seemed to fall
when he jumped
from the harvester
into the crewcut Field:
first to his knees and then
with arms outstretched
on his face.
It would have been
a momentous death
but he rose quickly
running to the car
with a dove
he had caught in the spell
of his huge headlight.
He made us watch
as he pulled off the head
and wrapped the stump
with a white paper towel.
I can still see the opened belly-
that tight wad of soybeans
Daddy spills from its body
night after night after night.
Both "Harvest" and Rivenbark's love poem
Hanging out Clothes" are built of tight, imagistic,
beautifully understated lines. Both poems indicate a
mature command of rhythm that many of
Rivenbark's contemporaries would do well to
acquire.
Sue Aydelette's peotry needs no introduction to
readers familiar with ECU's literary scene. Her work
speaks-firmly, fully-for itself.
To My Successor, Upon Relinquishing My Job as
As Vegetable Cutter:
THE SECRETS:
There are white roses
in the center of each red cabbage.
The smallest petals are the shape
of finely veined shells
But cut them last.
They bleed invisibly
on your blades and your board.
They will 8Uin the dead white eggs
blue, and show blood-red
on the sharp yellow lemons.
I am leaving the shiney percussion
of knives ,n straight rows of silence.
I am leaving this apron

the green watery color of cucumbers.
I will lock the doors
And walk through my breath
into a morning where already
up the hill, lines of girls
ZZlE yaWning and brac,n themselves
into their daytime postures,
walk, watching each other.
The slick red ski-jacket
and the blue wool blazer in front.
The tap and sigh behind.
Florescence and laughter
will fill the warm halls with us
sifting white paper and secrets.
National Book Award finalist Sam H.�
read his work on the ECU campus two ve. ' Wh�
comnbuted three poems to this issue of TV0'
All center on a familiar theme to Huo J? inr-
poet's relationship with his young "n �
contemporary American poets, H.xo nrok.k? SU
the most steady voicecalmness whui'd "
sure, r evenly-p. poetry with no Jft
review TJrtotveT anTru, " �
jee e publication of t LZC� '
Such a� addition could onlyncreasZ "�
pX�1 " repUUtion of Ectr X
ifei fez; sAsr .
Potry copyright 1979 by East CbJ"
t

? �
i






Church music to be
presentedMarch 6
26 April 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
By JEFF ROLLINS
Trends Editor
Marshall Foster
senior organ maJor ' at
tast Carolina, is pre.
anting � program en-
mled Music in Christ
Church ' at the Christ
tpiscops Church in
New Bern on Sun May
6 at 5:00 p.m. The
program will include
choral and organ pieces
b composers from the
Baroque to the present.
The first part of the
program will include
JS. Bach's Prelude and
Fugue in G. This work
i- probably a product of
the composer's Weimar
period where, in 1703,
he became violinist in
the orchestra of a
brother of the Duke of
Saxe-Weimar. The short
prelude is constructed
ol a single motif of four
notes, with a pause for
a long pedal solo. The
fugue with its surfeit of
sequences goes on
unswervingly spinning
it course, semi-gravelv,
semi-facetiously, without
ever distancing itself
m the opening
theme. It gives expres-
an unconcerned
ol music-making
'�rtuj enough to
draw the listener along
with it.
Following the Bach
will be a -cries oi three
lets b) the contemp-
ir co in pose rs .
Maurice Durufle, Heinze
vs rner Zimmermann
and Jean Berger. The
parl of the pro-
gram will be concluded
b) Handel's
Orgelkonzerte in F. The
ral section following
last movement of
the concerto comes from
a copj of the com-
er - manuscript, pro-
i b the British
Library in London. The
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realization of it is by
Peter Ward. It is one
that is rarely heard in
performance.
After a 10-minute
intermission the
ensemble will perform
portions of Leonard
Bernstein's "Mass" and
a multimedia theatre
piece for singers,
players and dancers.
The text is from the
liturgy of the Roman
mass with additional
texts by Stephen
Schwartz and Leonard
Bernstein. This piece
was created for the
opening of the John F.
Kennedy Center for the
Performing Arts in
Washington, D.C. in
1971.
The program is
sponsored by Christ
Episcopal Church,
Garber United
Methodist Church, The
Craven Community Arts
Council with partial
funding from the Grass
Roots Arts Council, a
federal agencv.
Marshall Foster is
the producer and
musical director for the
program. He is a senior
organ major at ECU
from Wilmington, N.C.
His past study ha been
with Nancy McAllister
(violin) and with Dr.
John Mueller (organ) at
the North Carolina
School of the Arts in
Winston-Salem. He is a
former member of the
I N'C-W Community
Orchestra and has par-
ticipated in organ
master classes with
Arthur Poister. He is
presently a student of
Dr. Robert Irvvin and
Organist-Director of
Music at Garber Church
in New Bern.
Antonia Beh is doing
the choregraphy for the
presentation. She is
currentlv artist-in-
resident at Beaufort
County Technical Insti-
tute in Washington,
N.C.
She is continuing her
professional training and
performance in New
York City.
Douglas Newell,
tenor, is a native of
Roxboro, and is
presently a student of
Gladys White at ECU.
His performance history
includes several lead
roles with the Person
County Players and
various appearances
with productions in the
School of Music at
ECU.
Susan Owen,
soprano, is a junior at
ECU majoring in vocal
pedagogy and per-
formance. She studies
voice with Gladys White
and has performed with
various groups such as
Opera Theatre and the
ECU Choir. She is a
native of Salisbury and
is the daughter of Ms.
Mildred Huff.
Dianne H. Pickett,
contralto, is a native of
Charlotte and has per-
formed with the
Charlotte Music Thea-
tre, the Charlotte Orato-
rio Society and the ECU
Opera Theatre, the ECU
Symphony Orchestra
and the Greenville
Community Chorus. She
is a member of the
Actor's Equity Associa-
tion and the Metro-
politan Opera Guild.
Jeffrey Krantz, bari-
tone, is a resident of
Winterville and came to
ECL to Mudy voice with
Gladys White. After
graduation (cum laude)
with a Bachelor's De-
gree in vocal pedagogy,
he travelled to Vienna,
Austria, where he has
studied under Otto
Edelmann for six
months.
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AThe first ten people to come in and say "Drop your books and hit the beach"
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Men's and ladies shirts, t-shirts, jeans, khakis and cords now as low as $6.00 Reg $25.00
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Sotton, Thompson named Athletes of the Year
heodore Sutton
Simply Sports
Sam Rogers
.
h .1
H NX d NCAA
� merit
this
point
i is with
no revenue
i n d I'm
manner
Office
N ! NINHK l) with plenty ol
ti( - team this
the masses
11 there was a world class
- team, someone on our
�'d sf time to write a feature story
� � �
find gymnastics -tone in the Datlv
New - and Observ er or the
x ah" "� ! matter either, unless a
� '� ' lampionship.
East Carolii mnastii - team is tar
fron
' " a ing m mbers ol the gymnastn -
ri a publi letter oi apologj to Mr
V ' lf l-vri" Hurdle, two people at Fast Carolina
� I harder lor the athletic department
than an member ol the gymnastics team.
I can assure you it I don't see one very soon
much as a sentence in the
the
1 oneerning
F01 NTAINHEAD
gy mnastii - team .
And that s not a threat, that a promise
women s
By II KI KS II M) I It
ssistant SMrts I ditor
.Mil ton and worm
have l,e, n
MM M IM1I l M
i
wh n
I1
i
')
� i �
-
�II with an average ol 12.3 pulls per game She
ranked tenth nationallv in this categorv
Shi now has the top two single-season point
l in -II history She is surelv to rank
: ' !um three in tin- category alter her senior
� i on.
I hompson - total ol 1685 career points stands
lh list ol I.ads Pirate scorers. Barring a
. she w ill hold nearly all major si hool
end � her careei at East I iarolin
KM M IHKAD award gives Thompson
1 ' Nthh u ol the Veai awards. She received
mg hei nior season at Bath
in all i onferem e
H � - h
11 nor
I
1 yard performance this past vi ai
i ' arei i total ol i irds. He need
.mli among th hoofs top ��
H' ' hieve tature
senior season looking
'� I a status e: performances the past
much-needed
' �ame level of

Rowie I hompnon
t





t
r
26 April 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD PW �
ECU splits with Methodist
JHK �� Kas, Carolina varsitv
UrahSUfl- Pictured L-R are head
-heerleader Dave Petrilyak. Rhonda W
LI euellvn d hams, Page Stout, Kennon Privette,
ede Ward, Dusty Darden, cO-head cheerleader
Donna Pntrhard, Tom Earnhardt and Mike Aman
MY.NAVY TORE
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SHOW YOUR CARD:
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2 After Exam Week And
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OPEN24HRS
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Sat. Nite
at 9:00
The
Roek'n Roll
sounds of
REAL
GONE
CATS
By JIMMY DuPREE
Staff Writer
The 1979 Lady Pirate Softball team closed out
their campaign Monday splitting a double-header
with Methodist College in Fayeteville.
The Bucs dropped the first contest 7-5, but
regrouped and captured the finale 5-1 behind the
powerful bat of Cindy Meekins.
In the fifth inning of the second game, second
sacker Janis Parlon reached first base on a fielder's
choice and was advanced by Maureen Buck's single.
With two out, Meekins legged out a three-run
homer to put the Pirates ahead for the distance.
Donna Eason added a homer in the sixth and Marv
Bryan Carlyle was batted in later in that inning bv
Parlon s double.
Methodist took an early 1-0 lead in the second
when Debbie DiDoIci singled and scored Lois
McPherson grounded out.
Methodist's only other scoring threat came in the
final frame when, with two out, DiDolci singled
Angela Fields singled and Reichelderfe singled to
load the bases. The comeback was silenced,
however, when McPherson grounded out to end the
game.
in the opener, Methodist jumped on ECU pitcher
Mary Bryan Carlyle early in the first inning and
established a 5-0 lead.
Lead off hitter Elaine Adams reached base on an
error, as did Sally Steele. Dee Smith singled and
ratti Weever lashed out a two run one-bagger. Liz
Chiles got to first on a fielder's choice and later
scored on DiDolci's errorred grounder.
ECU's Teresa Whitley singled in the third and
scored as shortstop Mary Powell received a
three-base error. Powell also scored when Brown
reached first base on an error.
The Pirate bats again came to life in the fifth
when jan McVeigh went to first on one of
Methodists eight errors. She was pushed across
home by Robin Faggart's single. Whitlev also
singled and scored in the rally.
The big offensive punch of the afternoon came
ini the seventh frame when freshman centerfielder
Shirley Brown smashed the Ladv Bucs first
over-the-fense homer of the season '
Brown leads ECU batters wh a .386 average.
hree home runs and 15 RBI's. Donna LaVictoire
follows with 355, followed by McVeigh .354, Powell
.353, and Whitley .351.
The squad enters the NCAIAW state tournament
Saturday against North Carolina A&T University
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Includes French Fries, Salad Bar,
Tartar Sauces & Hush Puppies.
FRIDAY'S SPECIAL!
5H0NEYS
Located beside
the Ramada Inn,
264 By-pass.
APRIL SALE,
ATHLETES'FOOT-WEAR & ACCESSORIES
RUNNING - TENNIS - BASKETBALL RACQUETBALL - SOCCER
Over 100 different
styles of footwear. PITT PLAZA
10 OFF all footwear with this couKon good through May 1st
MCOME WITH MEM
I'mgoingdowntothe
to sell my textbooks.
� NOW is the best time to sell
So if you need some money
to spend on a summertime Honey
Sell your books at the UBE
and see how happy, happy can be!
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WATCH THE TASTEBUDS (in actual commercials) ON "SATURDAY NlGHT LIVE"
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Title
Fountainhead, April 26, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 26, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.561
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57196
Preferred Citation
Cite this item
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