Fountainhead, April 24, 1979






Circulation 10,000
East Carolina University
North
Vol. 55, No. 113-
24 April 1979
Brewer upholds Lowe's appeal
Melvin's board decision stands
! V
lOl(, WHITE. REINSTATED FOl NTAINHEAD
��(
iitor.
Suspension reversed
Editor reinstated
�11 KE W HISNANT News Editor
Tli. rul FriEC! imas laChancellor Brewer over-le Media Board and reinstated
FOl NTAINHEAD Editor
Doug White. The Board
suspended w hite on
March 27 pending an
investigation of charges
mismanagement and
irganization.
Several members of
the B�ard would not
i ommenl oa the
decision. Acting Media
Board Chairperson Hal
-1 t said that the
was "the result
a conference between
Chancellor Brewer and
the university's legal
attorneys, which led to
a strong suggestion
from the Chancellor to
reinstate Mr. White
Chancellor Brewer
alo declined to com-
ment on the reinstate-
ment.
A story in Friday's
News and Observer said
w rule had been talking
with lawyers from the
North Carolina Civil
Libcrtie- Union about a
lawsuit against the uni-
veristv.
ings are over, where
the defendant is not
allowed to hear witnes-
ses against him or to
cross-examine them? I
never received anything
in writing until three
weeks, after I was
illegally suspended-can
you imagine that?"
white was originally
suspended without pay,
but the Chancellor
restored his salary when
he ordered White
reinstated. The Media
Board appointed Marc-
Barnes, News Editor, as
Acting Editor during
White's suspension.
By LUKE WHISINANT
News Editor
In an appeal decision on the review board case
O'Geary vs. Lowe, ECU Chancellor Dr. Thomas
Brewer ruled last Friday that Ricky Lowe is the new
SGA treasurer.
At the same time, Brewer upheld the board's
ruling on Sune vs. Melvin, thus confirming Libby
Lefler as SGA president.
Lowe and Lefler were sworn in as treasurer and
president respectively at last night's meeting.
Both the SGA constitution and the ECU Judical
Handbook name the Chancellor as the final authority
on all appeal cases, according to SGA Attorney
General Kieran Shanahan.
Dr. Brewer cordially declined to comment on his
decision.
According to Shanahan, Brewer handled the
appeal "in a very professional way The Chancellor
interviewed the Attorney General, Melvin and Lowe,
and Howard Newell, chairman of the review board
in a series of tape-recorded sessions. "He and Drs.
Prewit and Stevens spent many hours in deliberation
on this case said Shanahan. "Their decision
shows that the judicial system we have does work
The ballot count on March 28 showed Melvin
wining the presidential race over Lefler and Lowe
decisively defeating O'Geary for treasurer.
But before Lowe and Melvin were sworn in,
charges of campaign violations were brought against
themby Student Union President Charles Sune
against Melvin, and by treasury candidate Steve
O'Geary against Lowe.
The two cases were heard before the SGA
review board on April 9. In that ruling, the board
disqualified both Melvin and Lowe due to charges
concerning the publication of "The Alternative
Press" (see Fountainhead April 10).
Both Lowe and Melvin appealed to Chancellor
Brewer.
There were no transcripts made of the review-
board meeting. Brewer requested that a tape made
by Fountainhead reporters covering the trial be
turned over to his office so that he would be able
to study the case. Acting; Editor Marc Barnes
considered the tape barely audible, and said that it
would be "totally useless for the Chancellor's
purposes However, the tape was later made
available to the administration.
Brewer announced his decision last Friday.
According to Shanahan, the Chancellor considered
tlaevidence in Sune vs. Melvin adequate to uphold
the board's disqualification of Brett Melvin as
presidetit. The O'Geary vs. Lowe case, however �-
another matter.
Charges of campaign violations must be filed
within 24 hours of the announcement of election
winners, according to SGA General Election Rules.
Of the three charges brought against Lowe, the
two pertaining to the Alternative Press were filed
after the deadline, and thus were invalid in the
Chancellor's opinion. Although the board found
Lowe guilty on the "Alternative Press" charges, he
was acquitted on third charge.
"Dr. Brewer fell that since Lowe was found
�e wa- acquitted on a
innocent of the only charge filed before the
deadline, lie should overturn the review board's
ruling
'This decision doesn't saj that he (Lowe) wasn't
quilty Shanahan continue. "hi mv opinion, he
was. But the guilts charges were filed after the
deadline, ami therefore h�
proceedural technicality.
I would like to complement and commend
Chancellor Brewer. Dr. Stevens, and Dr. Prewit
their many hours spent on reviewing this matter.
They handled it in a very professional manner, and
their decision indicates thai our judicial system
work Shanahan said.
In the meantime. Brett Melvin has petitioned the
Board of Trustees to "reverse and over-ride" his
disqualification and order his reinstatement
Poll shows student apathy
By MIKE ROGERS
Staff Writer
Last Thursday, 28
ECl students were
given a poll to test
their knowledge of
campus activities.
The students were
selected, at random, to
answer nine questions
about the campus. Marc
Barnes, acting editor of
FOL NTAINHEAD,
also took the poll to
show how easy it was.
When asked who the
SGA president was, two
biology majors though)
Tommv Joe Pavne was
still in office. One
ECU alumni day planned
"It's good to be
back. I think the
Chancellor made the
only possible decision
he could have made. I
hope the Media Board
has learned from the
experience and that
they will never again
tr to tell anv media on
this campus what or
what not to publish
White commented.
"Their kangaroo
investigation has been
exposed for what it
was White continued.
"What sort of investi-
gation is it when no
formal charges are
brought against some-
one until the proceed-
ECU News Bureau
Campus tours, a
luncheon meeting, class
reunions and social
gatherings are planned
at East Carolina Uni-
versity for ECU's 1979
Alumni Day Saturday ,
May 5.
The event precedes
the annual Commence-
ment ceremony, sched-
uled for Friday , May
11.
According to Donald
Leggett, director of the
ECU Office of Alumni
Affairs, Alumni Day
will begin at 9:30 a.m.
with registration of
returning alumni in
Mendenhall Student
Center. At 10 a.m
guided bus tours of the
campus will begin,
leaving from the Stu-
dent Center.
At 12:3; p.m the
annual alumni uncheon
and association meeting
will be held at
Greenville Golf and
Country Club, featuring
an address by Dr.
Thomas Brewer, ECU
Chancellor.
Class reunions will
take place between 2:30
p.m. and 4:15 p.m.
Scheduled for re-
union are the classes of
1914, 1919, 1924, 1929
(Golden Anniversary
Reunion), 1934, 1939,
1941, 1949, 1954 (Silver
Anniversary Reunion)
and 1959. '
Reunion chairpersons
are:
1929 (normal) - Ruth
Blanchard Garner of
Greenville and 1929
(AB) - Irene Kahn
Miiler of Greensboro,
1934 - George Wilker-
son of Greenville, 1939
- William Whitehurst of
Greenville, 1944
Hiram Mayo of New
Bern, 1949 - Enid
Petteway White of
Greenville, 1954 - Royce
Jordan of Vanceboro,
and 1959 - Coy Harris
of McLean, Va.
Dr. and Mrs.
Brewer will honor visi-
ting alumni with a
reception at the newly
renovated and redecora-
ted Chancellor's Resi-
dence on Fifth St. at
4:45 p.m.
An evening cocktail
party, to begin at 7:30
p.m. in the Western
Room of the Greenvillle
Moose Lodge, will
conclude scheduled
Alumni Day events.
Further information
about Alumni Day plans
is available from the
ECU Alumni Office,
757-6072.
freshmen music
thought it was
Melvin, and four
dents thought it
Charlie Sherrod.
twelve said Libbv
Lefler.
w lien asked who the
FOUNTAINHEAD editor
was, 20 students did
not know, two thought
it was Marc Barnes,
ami four thought it was
Doug White. One fresh-
man biology major
thought it was Robert
Swaim, and another
freshman biology major
thought it was David
Gartwrighl . Barni's said
thai White has been
reinstated as editor.
When asked what
the Student Union did,
most students who
ventured a guess,
answered correctly, and
five did not know. One
soph more computer
science major said the
SU helped the SGA
make decisions, and one
sophomore psychology
majormajor -aid the SI d
Brettnothing.
stu-The results were
wassimilar when th- -
Onlvstudents were
what the SGA did.
Most answered correc-
tly. five did not know
One sophomore business
major answered that the
SGA fought the faculty
for student's ,arf.
Four students tho
the SGA did not do
much of anything,
including Barnes who
added, "They confuse
the II out �!
newspaper men.
Vim� asked
the last
whal
major concert
on campus was, 21
students replied that it
was Molly Hacthett
and or The Outlaws
One freshman musk
major thought it was
the ECU Orchestra, and
an undeclared freshman
thought it was Barefoot
on the Mall Barnes
said that Mike Cross
was the last major
concert.
When
ECl s quarterl
students
know, 11 -aid Leander
and one fresh-
man political
major - . Lam
Greene.
w hen asked w ho the
new basketball coach
s, did n �
One freshman -aid
� �a- Cillman. OnU
-aid it was Odom. Oi
shman political - ie-
nee major said, "I'm
nt -ure. but I think h -
last name -tart- with
iv -
w hen asl
thought the Buccaneer
wa- coming out m
year. t hre� students
were undecided, -even-
teen -aid ve - i
said no. One freshman
Spanish major said, "no
maybe and hiv
senior sociology major
did not know what the
St- vpvthv p.
ECU students participate
Dance contest semi-finals held Saturday
What's Inside . � �
The Pirates downed the Liberty Baptist Flames 6-5 .
. . see p. 10.
The 1979 REBEL is reviewed and is said to
"exhibit finesse among its other qualities . . .
see p. 6.
FOLNTAlNHEADs exclusive interview with U.S.
Sen. Jesse Helms reveals the Senator's views on
the HEW-UNC controversy . . . see p. 5.
By KAREN WENDT
Assistant News PMt�or
The semi-finals of
the second annual Sat-
urday Night Fever
Dance Contest were
held Saturday April 21,
at the Elbo Room
Disco.
The contest was well
received, with capacity
crowds on all 12 nights
of the contest.
"Last year was a
great success, and this
year was even more of
a success said Brent
Heiser, spokesman for
the Elbo Room.
Of the five finalist
couples, four are from
ECU. They are Rob
Reinhart and Lynn
Hobley, Jim Rhodes and
Brenda Darden, Bill
Shipley and Rhonda
Griffin, and Lee
Huggins and Glenda
McCall. The other
finalist couple is Stan
Ridgely and Hunter
Lamm from Atlantic
Christian College, in
Wilson.
The contest is being
sponsored by the Elbo
Room, WOOW,
Proctors, the Snooty
Fox, the Villa Roma,
Shirley's Cut and Style,
The Pipeline, Apple
Records and Creative
T-Shirts.
The semi-finalists
were the winners of the
weekly dance contest.
and all competed in the
competition Saturday
night.
"I think
some of the
dancers on
Coast said
Heiser.
The grand
we have
best
the East
Brent
prize for
the contest is either
SI, 000 in scholarships
or 5500 in cash.
Second prize is two
SI 00 gift certificates
from the Snoot v Fox
and Proctor's.
Third prize is 5100
in albums from Apple
?e
Records.
Fourth prize will 1
S5n in cash.
All of these prizes
are in addition to the
weekly prizes that were
awarded in the contest.
S50 in cash, two cut
and styles, dinner for
!wo. wine and T-shirts,
The linal- are
expected to have a
capacity crow I, - it
vou are planning to
attend, vou'd better p
there earlv. The finals
arc evpei ted to begin at
10 o'clock on Saturdav,
Vpril 28.
BOB REINHART Nl) Lynn Hobley show the
winning form they used to make it to the finals in
the Second Annual Elbo Room Saturdav Night Fever
contest. They were among five
get a shot at winning $1,4
scholarships.
finalists, who each
in cash, or $500
t
1
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m m m �-� �





Dance
Student choreo-
grapher's class project
will be presented in the
Studio theatre at the
III Drama Building on
Mon April 21) ami
I'u. pril 21 The
performance will begin
ii H 15 c m. and last
approximately one and a
ball hi-
nds u orkshop is
presented ! ECl
Drama Majors and
Dane Majors as a final
project lor the Choreo-
iph Class, the
1 ostumes lor Stage
' the Stage
I ighting (!lass. Die
is nulled.
Dance
I be 1 m ision ol
Continuing Education of
bCl - pleased to
announce summer dance
issi beginning Mon
. and Tues Mav
ning Ballet:
Ionda ti ednesdav .
p.m. Intermediate
ruesda &
I . o
. O Mil .
Jazz Exer-
M la) and ed-
8-9 p.m. Inter-
jazz: Tuesday
' p.m.
Modi
and
p.m.
ite Modern
M m la AUti
p.m.
M
M nda and
Ved lay, 7-8 p.m
T'niin Class: Bc-
"i" Jazz Exercise
ind Thursday.
.Ml.
Ballet and jazz will
b M id
Modern
' in I dance
tught b Jan
tsses will
: in the ECl
Building Dance
i d ii . ourse meets
�' week (op 1X
ending June 13
� 1 I; the tee for
urse i- $20 per
Registration is
linn so please
irly tn insure
in . For
ilor� uUiori w ntr:
I en i- t lasses
"I Continuing
! "mi . Erwin
Building, ECl or call
.57-6 13.
Testing
The ECU Testing
(.enter is participating
in a reseach project
with the Psychological
Corporation. The project
will develop norms on a
new version of the
Miller Analogies Test
(MAT). Candidates eli-
gible to participate in
this -tudv include
graduate students and
seniors at ECU. Parti-
cipants will be admini-
stered two forms of the
Miller Analogies Test
within a two hour time
period. There will be no
charge for the partici-
pants to take the test
nor will there be a
charge to send the first
three scores to other
schools. Candidates
interested in participa-
ting in the stud should
contact John Childers,
Director of Testing, in
the Testing Center.
Room 105, Speight
Building, or call 757-
6811. The dates and
times for this special
administration are :
Fn. p,il 27-9:30 a.m
1 1:30 a.m. SP-104
Wed. Ma) 2�7 p.m.
9:30 p.mSP-104
This project might
I an excellent opj ortu-
nitv lor seniors planning
lo attend graduate'
schools to have their
graduate admissions test
administered tree. The
M 1 scores arc valid
lor live ears.
DAT
I he Dental Aptitude
rest will be offered at
ECU ii Sat. April 28.
Application blanks are
be completed and
iled to Division of
Eductional Measure-
ments, American Dental
Association, 211 East
Chicago ve Chicago.
Illinois 60011 to arrive
� April 2. These
applications are also
available at the Testing
Center, Room 105.
Speight Building. ECU.
Who's Who
Ml recipients of
W ho s &ho are asked
go b) Dean of
Student Affairs office
and mk up their
certificates.
Wisdom
Come and participate
in a discussion of the
wisdom that God has
granted. Everyone is
welcome on Tues. at
8:30 p.m. in Brewster
D-308 (Sponsored by
Students for Christ ).
Celebration
The ECU Sign
Language Club " will
sponsor a "Thank God
It's Over Night "at the
Elbo Room on April 26
from 6:00 p.m. until
9:30 p.m.
There will be free
beer while it last - as
well as a drawing for
35 door prizes, tickets
are available from club
members or from
Brew ster A-1 14 or
A-115 lor 50 cents, or
at the door for 75
cents. There will also
be "I Love You" sign
language T Shirts
on sale at the Elbo
Room.
NTE
There will be a
special administration of
the National Teacher
Examination on Sat
Mav 12 at ECL.
Candidates interested
in registering for this
special test date needs
to contact or come by
the Testing Center.
ECl . Speight Building,
Room-105 (telephone
� 5 i -681 1lor special
registration materials.
Please bear in mind
that the present State
policy on the issuance
" a 'temporary permit
lor one year for those
not having met NTE
score requirements does
not extend beyond June
30. Anyone to be
certified with a certi-
ficate effective Julv 1,
must already possess an
NTE score meeting the
minimum score require-
ments.
Please note that a
special charge of $5
must be paid by each
individual taking the
May 12 exams. A
person taking one test
will pay $18 and a
person taking two tests
will pay $31. Completed
registration forms must
be returned to Mr. J.
Arthur Taylor, State
Department of Public
Instruction, Raleigh,
NC. by April 20, to
ensure admittance to
the May examination
centers.
Classifieds
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 24 April 1979
Seminar
SGA-SBP
Dr. Francis T. Jones,
Department of Chemis-
try, Stevens Institute of
Technology, Castle Point
Station, Hoboken, New
Jersey, will present a
seminar on Ion-Molecule
Reaeions of Small Mol-
ecules, April 20 at 2
p.m. in Room 201
Flanagan Building. Re-
freshments will be
served in the conference-
room.
Crafts
The Mendenhall
('rafts Center will be
open during summer
school from lp.m. until
5p.m Tues. through
Thursday beginning
May 22. Memberships
are now being accepted.
I he SCA presently has
Student Buviug Power
Cards available to
students. These provide
a discount al The Tree
House, The Bicycle
Shop, Pel Kingdom and
Headstrong Boutique &
Clothing. These cards
were given out last vear
but do not expire until
December 1979.
these cards can be
picked up in the SCA
Office (Mendenhall 228)
between 8:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m.
Jobs
Buc
The- BUC staff needs
copies of the 1973 and
1975 BUCCANEER lor
their files. It you have
extras, please Call 757-
6501 weekday afternoons
Instructors will be
needed to teach begin-
ning-level workshops in
Crafts during Fall
Semester at the Mende-
nhall Student Center
(.raits Center. Exper-
ienced persons in the
following areas will be
needed: jewelry, rera-
mics, woodworking,
silkscreen, printmaking,
weaving, enameling,
and basketry.
Interested persons
may contact Tana
Nobles at Mendenhall
Student Center at 757-
6611.
ART & CAMERA
526 8. Contaneke St.
Downtown
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136
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PLAZA CAMERA
I Do You Wear
GLASSES ?
Here's an effective new eye-exercise program that can
produce astonishing results in a very short time. . .
The Bettervision Eye Clinic is
now offering a program of eve-
exercises that can safety correct
most cases of poor eyesight -so
that glasses or contact lenses
are no longer needed. Originally
developed by Dr. William H. Bates
of the New York Eye Hospital, this
method has been widely used by the
Armed Forces, schools clinics, and
thousands of private individuals, for
the treatment of:
� nearsightedness
� farsightedness
� astigmatism
� middle-age sight
For many years it was thought that
poor eyesight was just bad luck, or
something you inherit from vour parents
Scientists now know that most eyesight
problems are caused by accumulated
stress and tension �which squeeze the
eyeball out of shape, and affect the
muscles that do the focusing. The result
is the eye cannot form a clear imageand
the world appears to be blurry. In people
over 40. the natural aging process is also
an important factor.
No matter what
your eyesight problem
the Bates Method can help you.
This is a health care program.
and will benefit
everyone who follows it �
children, adults, and seniors.
It is important to understand that
glasses do not cure a visual problem.
They are simply a compensating device
-hke crutches. In fact, glasses usually
make the condition worse Because they
make the eyes weak and lazv. a minor
problem often develops into a"lifetime of
wearing glasses
The Bates Method corrects poor
eyesight by strengthening the eye-
muscles and relaxing the eyeball. You'do
simple easy exercises that increase vour
focusing power, eliminate evestrainand
bring your eyesight back to normal
Because the Bates Method deals with
the basic cause of your eVeMeMt
problem, you can expect to see a definite
improvement in as little as 1 or 2 weeks.
Even if you have worn glasses all vour
life-things will become clearer ' and
clearer, and you will have flashes of good
vision as you go through the program,
these flashes become longer and more
frequent gradually blending into
permanent better sightat which point
the exercises are no longer necessary
We usually find that people whose
eyesight is not too bad can return to
20 20 vision in about a month. Even if
your eyesight is really poor, within 2
to 3 months you should be able to put
away your glasses, once and for all. Read
these case histories:
Aldous Huxley Nobel Author
"My vision was getting steadily M
even with greatly strengthened glass�
To my dismay I realized I was g
bbnd. On the advice of my Doctor I
decided to try the Bates Method
was an immediate improvement Al
only 2 months I was able to read
without glasses Better still, tr
which had covered part of one eye
over 16 years was beginning tocleai
J
Rev. Frederick A Milos. M S
By following the simple exeroe
in this program. 1 have compie
recovered my vision Now I can read '
long periods without my gia�
Ron Moore�Technician
"I originally went to the Clinic to c-
some equipment -and ended up I
their eve-exercise program I an
sighted, and have worn gla
yrs In just 3 weeks after star:
the program, my eyesight has airea
improved to the point where I can now
drive, do business, and watch T
without my glasses'
eitrinsic muscle
Sn extrinsic muscles
control the shape md
mwement o the eyeball
This program has been �pecialh
designed for the individual to exen
at home Written in simple non-techn.
language, it gives you all the guidance
you need to regain natural healthy :sion
in just : i hour a day illustrated booklet.
complete step-by-step instruction- :
special charts and dispiavs to
you make rapid progress The p:
is fully guaranteed and there s noth
more to buy
By following this program. you uill
soon be able to see clearly without
glasses It's up to vou. Ordering
Bates Method can be one of the b-
decisions you ever made So do it now
before you get sidetracked and torget
till out the order coupon, attach vour
check for $9.95 plus SI for postage a-
handling, and mail it to us today'
If you have any questions regarding
this program, please call us at
(415) 763-6699 Our qualified
operator will be glad to help you
The Bates Method can mark a turning point in yourTife-
better eyesight without glasses or contact lenses The
Proa� guaranteed. Try it for 30 days, and if you re
not fully satisfied, return it for an immediate refunl
Bettervision Eye Clinic please prist clearly
Pacific Building,
16th & Jefferson,
Oakland, CA 94612
Allow 1 to 2 weeks for delivery
CA residents must add 65C sales tai
lost
LOS1 : I pr. perscription
sunglasses in black �
case. Return to Bob
Iside in Mathema-
lics Dept. or call 756-
�5167 after 5 p m
REWARD.
1976 500ec Kawasaki for
sale, excellent condition.
Has carryall rack and
back rest. 2 new tires.
$800. Call 758-0962
alter 7 p.m. If you call
earlier, leave name and
no. with ans. service.
FOR SALE: single bed,
mattress and boxspring
included 135.00, living-
room chair - great
condition $15.00, and
curtains. Call 758-8575.
STEREO consultant is
here at ECU to help
you build the stereo
system ol your dreams.
Briny qualin ound to
yur home or car at low
prices, all types of hifi
eqpt. available. Michael,
752-2601.
FOB SALE: Pioneer
SX-650 receiver, perfect
condition, $175. Call
752-1524.
FOR SALE: mobile
home by Conner, 1970
model, 12'x50' extra
dean, $3500.00. 566
3253 Day, 566-4817
night.
FOR SALE: Capehart
Console Stereo. AM-FM
8-Track & Phono. Must
sell $125. Call 7524239.
FOR SALE: 1978, Male,
23 10-speed, silver,
Nomade Motobecane bi-
cycle. Call 758-4747.
FOR SALE: Ampeg B25
Bass Amp. with speaker
cabinet. $300 or best
offer. Call 756-8587.
FURNITURE for sale:
Couch and chair $40.
Call 752-7497 or 752-
2629, ask for Doug.
traonc�
REQUEST PLEASE; last
Tuesday evening, April
17, a rising ECU soph,
student nurse came by
my house (107 S. Jarvis
St.) tried on, and took
home with her my
uniform. I trust she will
come by my house and
pay me.
WANT TO BUY: Cash
paid for used furniture,
appliances, and other
misc. items. Will pick
up. 752-1445.
NEED PLACE to stay,
in town, near school,
beginning May 1. Call
752-0859 after 5 p.m
ask for Wynn or Tony
or call Overton's
Supermarket during day
and ask for Tony.
STUDENT needs
housing around May 20
and into the fall. Pref-
erably near campus with
students or family.
Cla.lh exchange child
care or yard work for
rent. Write Vicki
Marder PO BX 486
Chapel Hill, N 27514.
torrent �
WANTED MAY 1:
Someone to sublease
new, modern, clean, air
cond. 2 bedrm. apt.
Located in Langston PK
Apts. off Meade St.
May take up new lease
in Aug. if desired. Call
758-0028
2 FEMALE ROOM-
MATES NEEDED, 1 for
both summer sessions, 1
for 2nd summer session.
$66.63 per mo. plus Vi
utilities. Oakmont Sq.
Call 752-8953 or 752-
8648.
FEMALE ROOMMATF
NEEDED for 2 bedrm.
Apt. Rent $50. mo. plus
l3 mil. 210 Lewis St.
Call Susan alter 5p
758-8423.
in.
THREE FEMALE
ROOMMATES NEEDED
lor summer. Live in an
Air Conditioned, furn-
ished apartment with
swimming pool, tennis
court & cable T.Y all
for only $61.00 plu '3
utilities. Call Michelle
at 758-6051 alter 5.
ROOMS FOR RENT: 2
rooms in house opening
up, one May 1, the
other June f. Unfurn-
ished. Summer only. $40
plus t3 utilities Call
Randy 752-9207.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share 2
bedrom apt. at Village
Green for first and
second session summer
school. $85.00 rent and
12 utilities. Call 752-
1813 after 7:00 P.M
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED to share lg.
-bedrm. apt. T blocks
from campus. 12 rent
and util. not to exceed
SI20 month. Need vour
own bedrm. furniture.
Available May 12th thru
summer. Call 752-8711
& ask lor Cyndi.
2 FEMALE ROOM-
MATES NEEDED: to
hare bedrm. at East-
brook Apts. for
summer. $57.50 per mo.
fdus util. If interested
call 752-0354 after 5
p.m.
NEED SOMEONE TO
ASSUME LEASE on 2
bedrom. apt. at East-
brook. Lease expires in
Aug. with option to
renew. Swimming pool,
air cond university bus
service available. ' Call
758.1187 and ask for
Jeff.
APT.FOR RENT: 1
B.R furnished, $135
mo. Avail. May 8. Ideal
for 2 people. 752-0112.
LOOKING for room 1
male, by Ma .
Highland Trailer Park
752-0859. asj for T()in
�r tt Miu. or call Over-
ton Supermarket ami
ask lor Ton.
FEMALE HOUSEMATE
needed - grad. student
or studiou undergrad.
Available mid-May.
Private unfurn. room,
S75 mo 1 3 util &
telephone bill, 2 blocks
from campus with
screened in front porch
Call 758-2840.
NEED 2 females to
hare large 3 B.R.
duplex starting May 1 .
rent is $55 mo. ' pus
1 3 util. Call 758-7532
anytime, ask for Jill.
FEMALE HOUSEMATE
needed for 1st session
summer school - fur.
nkhed room, 2 blocks
from campus - $100 for
the entire session plus
1 3 util. & telephone
bill. Call 758-2840.
I1 BEDRM apt.
ble Mav 1 or 15 x
id K. K
I85 mo. 758-41
TWO ROOMMATES
nee,led 1 uirt. ; g r
house $90 mo. plus I 1
mil. 5 nun. from iam
pu. Call 752 SJ35.
NEEDED: 1 or 2 (pre!
-) roommates) tor
summer to -hare
lownhouse api ,n
Universit) Condomm-
�oms. Api. lullv
furnished with AC,
dishwasher On ECU
rte. No lease or
deposit, apt. w, be
�P� lor fall. Spbt all
costs, rent for $185
mo. Call Steve at 758
039 any time.
I

v v z i , �2.
� f
� v ���





24 April 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 3
Greek Forum
� RICKI (iUARMIS
Naff riter
TJ�is �s the last
oreek Forum of the
year. Than you lor all
jne participation, but
l�'t - shoot for 100
percent participation
amon8 he fraternities
and sororities next vt�ar.
rh- week's forum willi
elude a wrap-up of
tins year's activitu s.
Announcements:
P' Kappa Phi had a
successful year in
aspects. Throughout
year the) inducted
pledges. The Pi
kaps sponsored a
eessful Halloween
Part) tr the entire
' iimpus as well as their
'ual Pi Kappa Phi
Field Da) tor all the
1 k�. rhe) also had a
properous Little Sister
strong alumni
- contributed to
a successful home-
ring and Founder's
Formal.
Pi Kaps recentl)
elections and Riek
W ilburn is the nev
sident. Bob Wylie
elected as the
mistrative vice-
sident and Jim
dor the rush vice-
- ; nt. Mike Tim-
was elected
Bruce Mullis,
Keith Da is,
lbert Walker,
in; and Bill
dodge trainer,
il the list of
ers.
nave been
atari renovating
Pi kap house.
rvele now bedrooms
be added. Constr-
vvill begin this
-tun uiir
a Edmonds wa
ted as the IFC
itive v in president.
Pi Kap- are looking
to next ear
� "iild like to wish
a nice sum-
Delta Zeta fall
tss VNould like
thank everyone who
their happy
ri Thursda) .
� DZ's also had a
market tor a money
projei I arul the
i- a tremen-
cess.
The DZ's would also
to wish everyone
i luck on theii
exams.
The Alpha Phi's
have welcomed live
dodges through spring
rush. They make up the
Beta Alpha pledge class
and have done a good
job this semester.
Last week, the Alpha
Phi's had two major
activities. On Wednes-
day, they had a social
with the Phi Taus.
Thursda), the senior
banquet was held.
lhis week. the
Alpha Phis are looking
forward to Friday ami
their Spring Cocktail
partv .
The Alpha Phis hope
everyone has an enjoy-
able summer and good
luck on exams.
The Sigma Sigma
Sigmas held a very
successful 81 Founder's
Day last Thursday.
On Thursday, April
2U the Sipnas will have
their Senior Send-on.
Seniors will be honored
at this party.
Alpha Omicron Pi
would like to congratu-
late their two new
pledges and sisters. The
first annual swim-a-thon
tor arthritis was a great
success and the Alpha
i Deltas were the
winners of the trophv
for raising the most
monov .
Again, so long for
the summer. Have a
good one and come
hack in August readv to
till the Greek Forum
with lots of news!
APRIL EYEGLASS SPECIAL
Remember your eyeglass and contact
lens prescription is yours!
FIRST QUALITv PRESCRIPTION
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10 Discount
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I
The Marines Are Coming!
f
Platoon
Leaders
Class
Officers
Candidate
Class
Air
Ground Law
THE PLATOON LEADERS CLASS PROGRAM (PLC) OFFERS A COMMISSION AS A 2ND
I IFtlTENANT IN THE U. S. MARINE CORPS AFTER GRADUATION FROM COLLEGE.
FRESHMEN THROUGH GRADUATES INCLUDING LAW STUDENTS ARE ELIGIBLE TO JOIN.
HERE ARE A FEW OF THE PROGRAM FEATURES AVAILABLE TO EN WHO CAN QUALIFY:
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Option to drop from program up to graduation from college.
ma MR TOOK FLORENCE WILL BE AT THE BOOK STORE THE 24th, 25th and 26th OF
APRIL 1979 TO INTERVIEW THOSE INTERESTED. "COME AS YOU ARE. NO RESUME
REQUIRED
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CALL MAJOR FLORENCE'S OFFICE COLLECT AT
755-4174.
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Cheese, Hot
Grecian
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SHONEYS
Located beside
the Ramada Inn,
264 By-pass.
WITH
SALAD
$299
The Student Union Coffeehouse Committee
presents
The Last Clog'
(The final Tuesday Afternoon Patio Jam)
TODAY
from 3-5 p.m. at Mendenhall
The jam is open to all musicians who wish to play
Come Join
The
WILDand
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FOR THE
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EVER
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435
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NEXT DOOR TO TARHEEL TOYOTA
SALE START SAT. APRIL 21
t
?
t
� �
mm
T





4 It's t
�j�gto regulate the regulators'
&en. Jesse Helms interviewed
24 April 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD P�e 5
FH A
B ROBERT M. SWAIM
XdinK Manager
Helms: 'Well T V T
South would ffladlv l?lnkfmost People from the
"� wise man T fy with cousin Tom- A
and some of the rLg�V Vheory abou Jefferson
Have you ev? em: they had time to
'� the things wi
er stopped to consider that
one
"�������. � Tihini ,M,j;ford h'oday is ,ha
or seven , l"�"K. ivivselt, 1 have up to six
�� .v ,h; rivvrr,a dasiweek for
the toran i ' had four meetings a dav of
all of thTs �uff TK CUltUre' and trymg t0 hand,e
think h�. eS "� t,me to think- And 1
" that may be the difference between the
ot he judgements of Thomas Jefferson's
out time" qUalV �f S�me �f lhe Judgements of
Jefferson said one time that government is
-I which governs least. Is that your philosophy?
Helms. U ell, he was certainly correct about
When you look at all the regulation and
fiake-work in the federal gov't, (and it's getting the
same waj in state gov't.), it's time to regulate the
egulators. 1 saw a report the other dav, and
perhaps you -aw it, that OSHA, which has been
such a venemous tormentor of small business,
investigated it- own OSHA headquarters and found
over 300 violations of their own regu!ationsso this
i- how ludicrous it gets
FH: What shaped your viewpoints?
Helm "Oh, 1 was the product of a small town,
Monroe, where the life centered first around the
h and then the schools. I came along during
depression. 1 think the values that prevailed
had an effect on most of the people of that
lei ation.
HI What are some of those values that maybe
lon'i see today?
Helms: "Well, first of all, a recognition of the
thai God plays in our lives. Now I don't want
ach to you. but this nation was founded in
name and with His grace. and we've
"en that and gotten completely away from
a matter ol fact, there is a definite effort to
Monroe was a very devout community. As I
the life there centered around the church and
' '� 's; hoth of them were successful�they
because the people loved both. Then
the times ano! because of the attitudes,
were taught personal responsibility, not looking
government to sustain us. to feed us and all the
t, but to do it ourselves. Skipper Bowles,
example, the Democratic nominee for governor
and I grew up together in Monroe. Out of
I think thrift, and a sense of personal
ibiiity, and a set ol Christian principles.
dy, certainly not me can claim to be
Christian, all you can do is try. There wa
then that think does not exist to the
.� existed then
FH: What should the role of the federal gov't
Helms: - limited a- possible. The farther that
away from the people, and therefore, away
influence ol the people, the more arrogant
ng to become. W hat bureaucrat in the Dept.
: HrW cares vhat anybody in Pitt Co. thinks? The
mil in Greenville cares, the state legislators
t county commissioners care, because the
have a wa) to get to them. But this
eless bureaucracy. arid that's not an idle cliche,
iceless bureaucracy is really accountable to
y. Thej are hooked into job security by the
ivil service, and the) do whatever they please or
nothing if the) please. Til tell you that's a bad
.ay i" run a go "t
FH: Have our political philosophies changed any
m what they were 30 years ago?
Helm 'No, they haven't changed. They have
pened, il anything. My philosophy came of of
at I was taught and the enviromen' in which I
no need
FH: What wa vour experience before coming to
V ashington?
Helms: "Oh, not very much. I can nutshell it for
i 1 started working when I was nine years old,
the two semi-weekly newspapers there in
Monroe, plu- working in the drugstore. It was the
depression time, and I had two or three jobs
nstantly. When I went off to college I got a job
rking at night at the Raleigh N&O reading proof,
and then 1 was promoted to the sports dept. When
I got out of college I went full time with the
wspaper until WWII occured, and then I went in
av for four years where I learned a little bit
about radio. When 1 came back I was city editor of
Raleigh Time Then I got into radio because I
fell that radio had a potential as a news medium.
Back then most radio stations had no more than
four five-minute newscasts a day. I first went to
work as the manager of a radio station in Roanoke
Rapids. 1 had no experience in radio was just
convinced that there was a potential for news. We
developed a news concept at Roanoke Rapids. Two
years later WRAL brought me back to Raleigh.
From there we started the old Dixie FM radio
network. FM was in its infancy, and then we
developed the tobacco radio network as a news
mechanism. In 1951, I came here (Washington,
D.C.) as administrative assistant to Senator Willis
Smith, and I stayed on after his death with Alton
Lennon. Then I went back to N.C. as executive
director of the N.C. Bankers Assn. and the editor of
its monthly magazine. I had a little part in Channel
Five getting the license to become a television
station, and subsequently I bought some stock in
the station, and we began editorializing. The audio
portion of the television editorials was carried by
the tobacco radio network and by many other
stations-we just let any station pick up the editorial
and rent it, with approval, of course. So we had
something like, oh, 70 stations throughout N.C.
carrying the editorials. Newspapers reprinted the
texts of the editorials; we had some 200 of those
around the country-most of them in N.C. but in
other states as well
FH: What has been your biggest fight since
coming to Washington?
Helms: "I guess, and there have been many,
the one that I think is most significant, the one that
is on everybody's mind, is balancing the budget,
cutting federal spending. One of the first pieces of
legislation that I introduced when I got here in
Jan. of '73 was, would you believe, a constitutional
amendment to require a federally-balanced budget I
couldn't even get it out of committee. They said
you can't do ityou can't do it, and nobody paid
much attention to it. I put it in tvo years later and
then again two years later. I put it in three times.
Constantly I've tried to whittle here and whittle
there. I remember Harry Byrd one day last year
was trying to estimate how much money he and I
had saved the taxpayers by our amendments, and
there were many of them. You know, 25 here, 50
there and a 100 there, and I think he came up with
something like 13 billion dollars. That adds up, you
know, a hundred million here and a hundred million
there. You have to do it every day, you have to do
your homework. You have to study the various
appropriations' bills because they are all padded.
Every agency pads its appropriation request. As a
matter of fact, every committee in the senate pads
its requests for funds to operate the committee. I
know of no committee of Congress or agency or
dept. of the federal gov't which would even miss a
five or ten percent cut in its spending level. That's
the point I'm making. Now we've got a $5,500 plus
billion budget this year. Just suppose that we cut
10 on the average, across the board, that would
be $50 billion, and that would balance the budget. I
contend that here is a throwaway of at least 10 in
every dept including the Defense Dept. It is the
duty of Congress to oversee the spending of the
money belonging to the taxpayer-it's just as simple
as that. You can't tell me that a gov't which was
operating on a budget of les- than 100 billion about
14 or 15 years ago can't cut 50 billion out of a 500
billion budget now 14 or 15 years later. If we don't
cut it, if we continue to do the things we've been
doing, and running the deficits we've been running,
then it is your generation that is going to have to
pay the piper�you're going to have to pay it
anyhow. I've got children about your age, and I've
got three grandchildren, and I think my generation
owes your generation better than that. I think we
ought to make do and not mortgage your future.
But that's precisely what we're doing-we're
mortgaging your future, and it's not fair to you
rH. Why did you Run? What is your mission in
W ashington?
Helms: Well, I think there burns in every breast
a desire to do something for your country. The
reason I was reluctant to run is because I don't
know anybody for example, who is qualified to be
president of the U.S. I am dubious about anybody
who says, 'Oh, I am the best thing since sliced
bread I had never thought of myself in terms of
being a U.S. senator. I've always loved the senate.
I worked around here for three of four years in the
early 1950's. I am just not a politically-oriented
fellow. I don't think in terms of politics. If I did,
I'd be voting differently than I do because vou
know I cast a lot of unpopular votes. When it
began to be mentioned to me in late 1971 that I
should run for the senate. I laughed at it. I jakl
let somebod) more qualified than 1 run. ,As a job,
thi- i- not a good job because there's just too much
of it. I got up this morning at quarter to six, and
I've been hitting the ball since 7 o'clock. I've been
downtown all morning long. I had some meetings
on an international situation. I feel that if I can
help to promote the principles and philosophies in
which I believe and stand up for them, that's a
privilege, and that's the way I view it
FH: What are some of your principles?
Helms: Well, you'd find them in the Holy Bible
and in the constitution of the United States-two
finer documents were never written.
FH: In which party do you find most of your
that the Congress and the
taken the constitution out of
think there is any question
exactly what's wrong. The
FH: Do you feel
Supreme Court have
context.
Helm "I don't
about it. That is
Congress has not only allowed this to happen, but
in a sense has encouraged the courts to take over
the responsibilities which are clearly those of
Congress. So the lamentations by some are empty
to me because if the Congress would just stand up
and do its job, bite the bullet, make the tough
decisions, then the courts would not be moving in.
The Congress could have stopped all of this
harassment of the University of N.C. by HEW. I
think the Congress will this year-there is more
support for my academic freedom act which I've
just introduced and updated just a few days ago.
The Congress could have put the bridle on HEW a
long time ago, and the courts would never have
intruded into that sort of thing. There is no
question about it because the courts have moved in
because the Congress in so many instances has
abdicated its authority and its responsibilities
FH: Where do you stand with Senators
Thurmond, Tower, Eastland, Stennis, and these
people (southern conservatives).
Helms: "Each of the men you have mentioned
votes according to his own convictions and according
to our own assessment of the issue at hand. But it
turned out that our voting records were almost
identical
FH: Do you have an alliance with any of the
other senators?
Helms: "The closest that I've had i with Jim
Allen (D-Alabama) and Harry Byrd (Independent-
Virginia). We had a little committment that the
senate would not be in session one instant without
at least one of us being on the floor. Jim is gone,
now there are some other senators who to a limited
degree I have that arrangement with. I have that
arrangement because I don't want a unanimous
consent agreement to be approved by the senate
simply because there was nobody there to object. A
lot of people don't realize that a great deal of the
legislation is enacted as a result of unanimous
consent agreements on voice votes with no senators
there, but that hasn't happened in the last six
years. That's the reason we've had somewhat more
protracted debate than we used to have beacause I
will not allow a piece of legislation to be railroaded
through with no consideration, if I consider it
important enough to be discussed. I think that is
our duty; I think we ought to know what the senate
is passing. So I do have a relationship with various
senators-McClure of Idaho, Jack Schmidt of N.M
Harry Byrd-there are a number of Democrats and a
number of Republicans on a sort of informal basis
who say to each other "will you cover the floor?"
The floor is being protected for me over there right
now.
allies?
Helms: Well, I'm a Republican, but I'm a
Republican who says to my fellow Republicans, 'If
we don't stand on principle, if we don't give the
people of this country a choice, then there is no
excuse for our survival Now you had better believe
it; I've differed with Republican leaders differ
with Bill Brock right now. I differ with John Rhodes
right now who curiously made statements poo-pooing
a constitutional convention or a balanced budget.
The simple truth is that not only are they wrong,
they are Hying in the face of about 85 of the
American people who are right, whose instincts are
way ahead in terms ol judgement of the leadership
in Washington. Let's use another example: the
Panama Canal would hever have been given away if
the Republicans in the senate had stuck together.
Now we had 38 Republicans at that time, and we
had a bunch of Democrats, 8 or 10, whom we could
count on to vote against the giveaway of the
Panama Canal forever. All we needed was 41 to
keep the other side, the giveaway boys, from
getting 60 votes. But the Republicans, some of the
more liberal ones gave in and they flaked out. I
said to Republicans everywhere that we dropped out
candy because the people of this country did not
want that canal to be given away. I cannot take the
position 'my party right or wrong When my partv
is wrong in my judgement, I'm going to say it is
wrong, and I think I owe it to the people. Politically
I think, I'm obliged to be mindful of the fact that
when you get down to the arithmetic of it, it wa
the conservative Democrat- of N.C. who elected me
in '72 and who re-elected me in '78. I saw some
figure- the other day that show that I got almost
50 of the Democrat vote in N.C. in '78, and
something like 92 of the Republican vote. The
point i- that there are not enough Republicans to
elect anybody on a statewide basis. Therefore, if
you are going to have a Republican in the senate
lor any other statewide office, you've got to go
bi-parti-an. You've got to go on philosophy and deal
with the entire electorate, and I did, and I'm proud
ol it; and I'm gratified at the support that I got.
The truth i that Republicans who go around
making a profession of kicking democrats in general
are losing sight of the fact that some of the finest
citizen- in N.C. are Democrats.I'm not going to
make that mi-take because I'm mindful of the very
great people who belong to the other partv in our
�state.
STUDENT
UNION
Logo contest.
Deadline: May ix, 1979
U.S. Sen. Jesse Helms
Apathy is shown
continued from p. Ij sponsoring rnajoi
at 1 rai lions commit ere,
the film- omn
Buc wa. man
W hen asked how commitn - unpus.
many students were at The SC i the
EC! . eighteen answered Student Government
between 10-15,000. One Wociation, and its
freshman music major function 1- to -erv.
said there was 9.631 at the governing fo
Ed � a freshman the stud .
nursing major answered The L-t major
that the correct number concert .mi campu .a-
was 1 .500. while a The Outlaws with Moll,
sophomore psychology Hat tun.
major responded with The quarterback ol
3,000. Barnes said thai the rXI an,
the correct number 1- , Leandei Gi
12.V22 at last count. The , th
for those of you out new ba-l
there who have not yet Odom.
decided what the correct Tie Bucca i-
answers were to these ECI vearl
and other questions of Uii! be publisl ext
the da) . here thev are � ar.
The SGA President There are 12,176 lull
i Libb) I � Rer. time. pa
1 lie rountainhead � I lor uate and
1 Doug NX 1 ne. -tudi nt- i. . an,j
I in Student I tiion we -ii
holds man) varied the art
t unit inn such as than the 28 polli
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" �
" -






-
6
� -

"1
Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 24 April 1979
rt
This year's REBEL has 'aesthetic finesse'
B JEFF ROLLINS
Trends Editor
This year's Rebel,
edited by Luke Whis-
nant, contains art work
ol exceedingly high
merit as well as poems
and stories that deserve
to be in some of the
lop rank magazines of
the nation.
S. Phillip Miles's
Ivm Poems from
Vietnam" both bring to
the reader the terror
and physical pain of
being in war. Mile's
terse, bleak, wasteland
poems are always
uniquely disturbing.
Greg Schroder's two
stories "Wasps" and
Birdladies" are each
exquisitely written and
coneeiv ed compositions.
w asps" with its feel-
ing of terror hidden in
the familiar brings to
mind Hitchcock's 'The
Birds. Somehow, these
mere wasps, a few of
which fly into a home,
drive a mother to near
eatatonia while chasing
d��wn the wasps is
nothing but fun to the
children. The wasps
could stand for all of
nature that is outside of
man's control, the
rattlesnake under the
leaves.
Schroder's other
story, "Birdladies is
an imaginative work in
which the persona
transforms certain
middle-age and older
women into various
species of birds, com-
plete with bills and
feathers. In both his
stories, Schroder proves
lo be a writer of
surpassing promise.
Randy Stalls' poem,
"Babal Brady's Hob-
good uses strong and
pungent imagery to get
across the atmosphere
oi a southern, smoky,
sensual pool-hall. This
poem is one of the
most striking in
imagery, and assured in
language that the
magazine has to offer.
Ricky Lowe's
"(young girl, black
girl)" is written
smoothly with some
brisk imagery. It is a
brutal poem dealing
with the feelings of
degradations which all
blacks must go through
sometime, feelings
everyone can identifv
with.
Sue Aydelette had
five poems included in
this year's Rebel. There
is a wild watercolor
kind of fantasy about
her poems. They are
poems which make the
imagination empathize
with her visionm Her
images are pastel in-
teriors, reflections ol
reflections of reflections.
Kim Shipley's
"Night Moves" is a
nicely written but vapid
story about first love. It
would be a great story
for Seventeen Magazine.
The writer has definite
talent in the adolescent
to late teen market, and
it was a treat to see a
story of this type in the
Rebel this year.
Robert Jones' two
poems, "Chicken Rais-
ing Made Easy" and
"Just Balances and
Weights are both
well-wrought and con-
ceived. Either intention-
ally or coincidentally,
they both deal with
lood as metaphor for
memories of familial
love.
Diane Nelms' two
poems, "Mother's Day
1962" and "Retreat
are really not finished.
And if they were fin-
ished their ideas would
be mild and sentimental
anyway.
Sam Silva's two
poems, "Isaac's First
Funeral" and "Bloody
Sunday both contain
striking death imagery.
For instance
The poet's mouth
coughed roses
Blood red
And for the last
time
Luke Whisnant's
"The Solipsist" is an
excellently conceived
and executed story
about, believe it or not,
a solipsist who decides
to burn down the
student union, leaving
notes with quotes from
Descartes and
Nietzsche. The story
reminds one of
lonesco's "Rhinero-
ceros" in depicting the
attitudes of the
bourgeois toward an
affront to their morays.
As does his story,
Luke Whisnant's four
poems included in the
Rebel possess a certain
lastidious reticence. His
poetry speaks wise
things softly.
Jeff Rollins' "Just
Jazz" is just jazz.
Terry Davis has put
an excerpt from his
Mysterious Ways which
is a novel that tells the
story of a found journal.
This particular excerpt
has a Portugues title,
"Tristeza Hao Tern Fin,
Felicidade Sim which
means, "Sadness has
no end, happiness
does
The excerpt is made
up of three intriguing
fragments that make us
look forward to reading
the novel. Davis writes
Intaglio by Ed Midgett
concretely about places
far distant in the mind
and heart.
Tim Wright has four
poems in this year's
Rebel. Each are
standing in their
out-
Photograph by Chap Gurley included in Rebel
own
right, but the best of
which is the one that
follows: "Calibration"
When the trees
come out at night
a screech owl
scorches their
bare winter branches
with a crv
which says there is
no
clocked reality
except what is
measured
by that long, tedious
note.
"Still Running" by
David Trevino deals
with a young man,
who's just found that
he is unexpectedly a
father, who attempts to
escape that reality bv
smoking pot and phy-
sically running a far
distance. Trevino has an
assured style, and his
prose drives along with
pare and energy. At the
end of the story the girl
ha� a rather too deus
ex muchina mi-
carriage.
Karen Bianstield's
two poems, "My Father
Alter Ninety" and
"River Dream both
take u into a rustic-
world where it seems
like time has -topped.
The last two stanzas in
the poem about her
lather are too good not
to quote:
Black branches
casting spindly.
shadows
against the old shed
bespeak the
approaching cold.
But ou do not fear
it.
You have prepared
yourself well,
and now vou set
on the dead tree
stump,
calmly clasping
not gripping -
the best walking
stick,
squinting boldly into
the late afternoon
sun.
Ki
m
Shipley's
'Notes on Being Potty
Trained During the
Sixties" is a delightfully
humorous piece about
all of us who wanted to
go to Woodstock but
were too young, and ail
of us of the generation
that would, upon exiting
out high school halls,
would be singing "Up
against the wall,
motherfucker "Notes"
is an insightful com-
position about how
members of the present
college generation
reacted to tuture-shock
report- ol war fatalities
ami racial riots. One of
the most striking sec-
tions of art in this
year- Reltel i a series
oi five intaglios by Ed
Vfurgctt.
Nancy Moore.
Michael Parker, Monty
Barham, Jo Ellen
Rivcnbark and especially
Renee Dixon, with her
letter poem to her
deceased "Grandadd
all deserve more than
honorable mention for
their contributions to
the RcIm-I thi ear.
It is our fervent
hope that the Relxd.
such an important
means ul communication
for the creative element
at La-�! Carolina. can
continue to increase its
reputation of profes-
sionalism and. well,
considering the work
tin- ear -tall did,
aesthetic lino
B DENTSE DUPREE
Staff Writer
It was just about showtime. And the crowd was
ready. You could almost feel the excitement. It was
6 p.m. Friday night and everyone on
Mendenhall's patio was ready to live it up.
In a matter of minutes, several, lovely ladies
-trolled out. They looked at the crowd, and spoke
so smooth you knew their wish would definately be
our command. They strutted, styled and moved with
a precision choreography Sister Sledge would be
proud of. These ladies were "Stepping and they
were looking mighty good.
It seemed everyone was getting into the "block
show" spirit. Folks were shaking "Groove things"
and slapping palms. This was definitely the patv to
be. F
While this was the place to be, a small group of
ECU coeds were feeling out of place. They didn't
know what was going on.One coed turned to her
friends and asked perplexedly, "Who are these
sisters, and do you know why they're doing this9"
Young lady, this article is an explanation for you
and your friends. This first part of a two-part series
deals with those soulful ladies, their identities and
the reasons behind their block shows.
km TJHe l y,?"ng ,adies you see 'performing on
Mendenhall s patio are members of one of three
Creek letter sororities. These sororities are Alpha
Kappa Alpha (AKA), Delta Sigma Theta (DST) and
Sigma Gamma Rho (SGR).
This reporter spoke to representatives from each
of the three sororities, and they provided much
insight into the art of stepping and block shows
For these sororities , block shows and stepping
are as traditional as pledging or rush. But, the
sorors don't consider block shows a tedious tradition
that must be carried out. Each representative said
steppmg was a great deal of fun for the sorority as
well as the crowd.
"Block shows are lots of fun. They give each
sorority a chance to talk to the people and let them
know where you're coming from said Claudia
Massenburg (SGR). 'The crowd enjoys watching
and we enjoy doing it 6
Florence Goode (AKA) took this idea a step
further. Sure, block shows are fun, but they're
also good advertisement for us. People see us step
tongetheT AKA'S ,0�k ,ikt' they're rea�y
While the sorors consider block shows fun, ther
there is an extra incentive to do good-sisterly
rivalry. I think there is pressure on you when
you re stepping related Athena Neblitt (DST)
You want to have a great block show. Deep down
everyone wants their show to be the best "
Ms. Massenburg (SGR) readily agreed with Ms.
Neblitt s statement. "She definitely has a point.
Each sorority strives to have the best show. We all
try to come up with unique ideas
Ideas for new steps come from a variety of
sources. Many steps are traditional and are part of
the sorority's style. Some steps are taken from
block show moves observed at other campuses.
But, most steps come from ideas suggested by
group members.
After polishing up their steps, each sororitv
gives at least one block show per semester. These
shows are held on Mendenhall Student Center's
patio.
"Our shows used to be held on the block near
Austin but now we have them on Mendenhall's
patio, stated Neblitt (DST). "We have more room
to maneuver on the patio
These soulful, stepping ladies definitely
maneuver. And they will tell you exactly why they
do it. '
"We step to let people know that we are here
related Good (AKA). "Stepping also provides an
excellent opportunity to show AKA unity. We feel
Mendenhall pa
when people see our unity, they'll want to become
a member.
Massenburg also believes stepping relavs
he stsT h 7�nt ry- "StePPin � a Wof
the sisterhood we have she said. "Everyone
contributes to the show, and once it's polished�
have something everyone contributed in "
For the sorors of Delta Sigma Theta, stepping
reveals their inner feelings. "Stepping allows Ss to
expre-s ourselves, "said Neblitt "We can teH
seoVrorrr" " fed ab�Ut �Ursdves �d ou
but'ou ZZ 7$k "�'���
the crowd can identifv w h C�ntinud-
you've done something 'go ' " " "�
have ll.T
ever get. Thjy have' tt ST?
The mighty Commodores M . I
in mind when thev a ked "H "�
lose with the stuff thev uJ tl Can ,h�'
one is easy. These ladies can. anScr lo ,ha�
keep on stepping. Can ' ,ose- Thev'll Jut
DECA attends annual convention
Nine members of East
Carolina University's
Collegiate DECA Club
attended the annual
DECA state convention
in Winston-Salem
recentlv
Gunn c
Anne Gunn of Dur-
ham and Ira Jacobs HI
of Wilmington, both
sophomore voice majors
jn the East Carolina
University School of
Music, won first piace
in their categories at a
regional singing compe-
tition in Winchester,
ECU DECA member
Tern Pippin of Farm-
vdle was elected to
serve as state collegiate
chairperson during the
academic year 1979-80.
ECU's delegation
also included Nancy
Benton of South Mill
Ieresa Murrv of Wil
son, Tim Setzer of
Castonia, Edd.e Bradlev
and Connie Powell of
Koanoke Rapids, AI
Va recently.
The two were top
winners in a competition
sponsored by the
National Association of
Teachers of Singing and
hosted by Shenandoah
Conservatory in Win-
chester.
Each year the Asso-
fi
GWeuell of Swansboro,
Dana Spear of Creswell
Jn�' W,nu Moore of
oeaulort.
Ration conducts sUte
" whicST1 audaion
�J hich time superior
��ngers .re seleetedT
vo.ee teachers from ,�
region. Ifte
Having Won th
state competition h-m
t
The, were
pentioa will, � "��
D.C.
I





China Syndrome is 'prophetic9
24 April 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
BARm CLAYTON
Wtant Trvnus Editor
Absolutely kpv
Sndron,e ,s the mn7 "y d�ubt' Thp Chin�
Scant days a ProPW movie ever made.
��leilt very f1uit! tV lm,s please, a nuclear
nin, uoured thVaVs lhat deicted �
Power Plant Th i , hree Mi,e Is,and Nuclear
real-life ditWr JTt" 5 amJ in lhe
cas� there I, a astou�dingly s.milar. In both
�Itiloun �� lhl " , , ImP�ding horror of the
� caused bv f.�rS ��re e,ement: both
lechnicianS on duty , � P?" "huh led the
-c4an, to the ?ea�or bl�� were adding
�� ZiZrt!U amtherebj brin��s
meltdown could W P�mt " "
StSSLitft.froib ,U lnCredib,e �"��
�a Sy r , . ,K h? lhe 1'� and real-life, The
,�,M ' f-ss.yeU as one of
T n to be released m a very long time
- �r is exciting, fast-moving, and absorbing
!hlir dCal a�� and sense of realism
,Ss , w�ted in the waj of dialogue
��vr lhe �pnaii be JSS
technical hardware.
� a nothing of the absolute!) breathtaking
UT' I' raM ls led b J�ne Fo"da who
" r - Kimberl) Wells, a soft-news reporter
; led to handling stones about eoo animals'
irIMs ,and commentaries about migrating whales,
"u longslo be an investigative reporter of the
'�rsl class. Her chance comes when she is present
Southern California's Ventana Nuclear Plan, when
�' near-castastroph) occurs.
The frantic attempts of Ventana's control-room
team to contain the situation-brought on by a
faulty indicator-is captured by Wells' fast-thinking
cameraman played by Michael Douglas.
Although the television authorities refuse to air
the Him on Kimberly's news-spot, the beleaguered
pair take the damning footage to an anti-nuclear
hearing to try to force the Ventana complex into a
shutdown.
Their major aid comes from Ventana's chief
engineer (played by Jack Lemmon) who has done a
little investigating on his own, and has discovered
that critical inspections of the reactor have been
falsified. Torn between his love for the Ventana
complex and his sense of responsibility to the local
community, the chief engineer agrees that Ventana
should be shut down, and proceeds along his own
rather direct course of action to make certain that it
is.
The performances sparkle in their own right.
Fonda has somehow managed to bring herself down
from the pretensions of stardom to a level of
audience-identification. Douglas (who originally
conceived the film and produced it) delivers a fine
performance as the 60's hold-over turned camera-
man.
But the real performer in Syndrome comes from
Jack Lemmon who plays the part of the tormented
engineer torn between loyalities. Rather than
harping upon the talents of three remarkable actors,
suffice it to say that there will be more than one
Oscar nomination produced by this class cast.
Bob Hope
says:
"Red Cross
can teach you
first aid.
And first aid
can be a
life saver
KlbbWS
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Free pregnancy test, birth control and
problem pregnancy counseling For
further information call 832-0535 (toll-
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Raleigh Women's Health
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917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N.C. 27603
COUPON
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Clip this coupon for
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FOUR LOCATIONS
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i- � � -m mm
mmmmi Hi





� � y
Pirates down Flames 6-5
B) CHARLES CHANDLER
Assistant Sports Editor
East Carolina scored three runs
the ninth inning to gain
Baptist Saturday, giving the �,ri,
two-game series with the Flames
"i the bottom o
win over Liberty
- a sweep ol a
The I

swing to increase K( I .247 team batting average
ie Pirates, now 20-14, had jumped to a 2-0
lead lhe ird when a Billy Best single was
followed by a home run to left by Butch Davis.
lhe Flames were held to but' one hit through
the first five innings b) Pirate starter Bobby
Patterson. But in the fifth the Flames got thing's
going when centerfielder Richard DeWitl reached
base alter being hit by a pitch, and eventually
scored on teammate Peter Guy's infield out.
Libert) Baptist scored three more runs j� the
seventh, giving them a 4-2 lead and sending
Patterson to the showers. Leftfielder Sid Bream led
thing- oil lor the Flames with a double to left
'enter and eventually -cored the tieing run on a
Pirate error.Numerous other East Carolina error- led
to the other two Flame runs.
I thought I was going to lose my mind said
Easl Carolina coach Monte Little of the errors. "We
started throwing the ball all over the field, and I
JUSl couldn't believe it
Bob .Nell s solo homer in the seventh cut Libertv
Baptist's lead to one at 1-3.
The Flame- scored aiam in the eighth whi
Peter Guv reached base via another Pirate error
! oiu Sweat's sacrifice flv s ored Guy and
Libert) Baptist a 5-3 lead oinu nit-
inning.
leadofi homer in the nintl P
designated hitter Hick Derei hail
to be a mo-t eventful inning lor h
W ith the score now 5-4, the Pirati
make up lor their man) earlier m � r
Derechaillo's blast, Jerry Carravs
moved ti, second on Bob Nell s infi
Best followed with a single
Carrawa) and knotting the -� �
The r lam i hose to walk P
Da i- to set up a force at aov I I I
nearly succe ded when 1 . �,
short, but Davis -hd hard a
an) chances for a double M .
scored Nefl and gave lhe Pirates victoi
1 he Pirates were led by Best
with three hit Nell and Da
piece.
I he Pirate- nexl home en -� �
tonight at 7: JO when thev fac N
eslev an.
Simoly Sports
Sam Rogers I JJ
ISo word from NCAA
VROLINA vTHLETIC OFFICIALS
-
- involving Al Tvsoi
EC I Vthleti D
IV. witt
David - ,h traveled to
�'
� '
gan last summer after it was
"����� an assistant coach at the University
NCAA offici 'Five
:hl against East
charges rnadi
na summer
I
I Carol
: illeged
� Dail) Reflector. "Thev
e. but vs don
- led anvthing
� anv dei ision
NCAA for s, u-ral week. I:
-� anv penalitie it
I niversitv at its own
rHF PIR TES CONCH DED their Spring
than a week a and the EC1
several players tor their
e during the 20-dav session.
- M Laurin was the mosi improved
junior Chink Jackson was the
rker. Senior oah Clark
: as: the most improved player in
Clark, a native of nearb)
- tackles in -top, a-t
i 27 assists. He also had
umble re ov erv to his credit
IF MOST IMPROVED PLAYERS OFFENSIVELY
nd Bill) Rav Washington, guard
hman from Richmond, irginia .
� Harrell. Punter Rodnev Mien was
: spei ialist while Mitchell John-ton
the top hitter of the Spring.
PLACEKICKER BILL LAMM, the
1 last year with 64 point
5 ring and certain!) rank- as one ol
ili-sts in East Carolina historv I arum
17-yarder in the Spring game and
I goal attempt- last fall. Rodney
- '�� improve his punting and recentfv
,r"m Dye. "Rodnev has matured into a
this Spring Dve said. "He lotted some
I dropped the -hor, one- in when we
!h�- too. He's become verv
-l-tent.
L VST C XRoi.lN "s T ! irni . i
1 � l U.h 1 hu pitching -tatl
��"� countrv for earned run
rdmg to the initial NCAA statistics The
' 1 91 ERA after 24 game- which
ahead ol Pan American at 1.96. Parker
I1'1 ls ,hml "� individual rankings with a 0 19
ERA alter inning- of pitching. Davis owns a fine
5-0 re. ord this season.
THE KEYDETS OF VMI who will lace East
Carolina Sept. 29 in Fickle Stadium, ran into some
problem- with their annual Spring football game
Everything was sel to go. but Fridav evening more
than 30 players were hit with intestinal virus so
head coach Bob Thalman called the game of!
FORMER LAST CAROLINA CHANCELLOR ,�
Jenkins had hi- statement he made at the Pirate's
lootball banquet published in this month's edition ol
the NCAA News. "Athletic programs are not the
mosi significant part oi university life he recently
said Education and careers must come first
Athletic programs are vital, but definitely secondary.1
The mental attitude of an athlete is much
better il he knows he is a respected part of un
tversity hie.And anything less than this is not
worth) of a university
e



9
v gj�
' . '
aEfck-4. v v; K
Halfback Anthony Collins, quarterback Leander Green and halfback I
Sam Harrell u ill form explotire backfield
Improved Pirates ready to attack toughest
schedule in East Carolina history this fall
Bv SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
East Carolina football
has aireadv been described
returning
The
scheduh
by many gridiron observers as one ol
,t toughest in the school's histroy.
Vfter opening with Western Carolina.
the Pirate- must lace N.C. State
Duke and Wake Forest during the
next three weeks befon
home again.
Bul after a brilliant spring
practice, highlighted by the perfor-
mance ol the offense, Fast Carolina
head coach Pat Dye is eagerly
anticipating the upcoming schedule.
Ml o the offensive starters will be
-�' when the Bucs return to fall
Tactile drills and Dve js very
encouraged with the team attitude
and enthusiasm.
T thought we showed some really
positive signs this spring that we can
a good football team in 1979
l)sr said. "The entire offense really
njoved spring practice, I think.
things went well for them and just
about everybody improved. From the
standpoint of attitude and enthusiasm
particularly, we have things movine
well
Little wonder. Offensively, seven
starters return and despite numerous
injuries during the spring, the Pirates
will still have one of the strongest
defensive units in the country.
Up front, speedster Billy Rav
Washington returns at tight end
while Vern Davenport replaces East
Carolina's all-time pass receiver Terrv
Gallaher. Matt Mulholland and Joe
Godette will be at the tackles while
Mitchell Johnston and Wayne Inman
are the starting guards. Jeff Hagans
returns as center.
lhe backfield promises to be one
ol the most exciting ever at East
Carolina despite the loss of halfback
Fdd.e Hicks.
Leander Green returns for his
final vear at quarterback while
Ihcordore Sutton. the Pirate's top
rusher lor the past two seasons, will
be at fullback. Sutton rushed for 621
yards last season and was named the
Most Valuable Player in the Indepen-
dence Bowl while Green completed
46 fiasses for 838 yards and had a
hand in 12 touchdowns.
Anthony Collins, one of the most
dangerous kickoff return threats
around, returns at one halfback
position while Sam Harrell will be at
the other. Collins was the team's
third leading rusher with 479 yards
and a 5.8 average while Harrell
scooted 71 yards for a big touchdown
against State last season.
"Sutton and Green both had an
outstanding spring Dye praised.
'They both had some find
scrimmages and are both better
football players now than thev were
last fall. Somehow Leander manages
to get the ball into the end zone
most of the time. We want to
establish a personality on offense that
we had a few years ago. We need to
have a punishing, physical running
game this fall and have the people
who can do it
Dye aso praisej bads Mike
Hawkins. Roy Wiley, Jesie Hilton.
Marvin Cobb, guards Ernest Bavne
and Jim Laughridge along with
reserve quarterback Henrv Trevathan
lor their play during spring drillls. 'A
lot ol younger players showed a lot
ol good things un offense in the
spring, too, enough to where whey
Ul11 1 plamg some this fall
put the same unit
we hope will b
w estern Carolina
All-America
Brewington returns,
along with Jeffrev
Charlie Carter. R iffj
V illie Hollev , ompri
need secondary.
Noah Clark an.
Iin
arren
M N
� v
I
We need to have a
punishing, physical running
game this fall and have the
people who can do it
ECU Coach Pat Dve
A tough defensive unit ha-
always been the trademark of Dve
coached teams a. East Carolina and
next tail should be no exception. But
with so many regulars out with
injuries during the spring, � as
difficult lor the coach.ng staff to
evaluate some of the talent.
Only five starters return from last
years unit which finished second in
the nation in total defense.
"We got to look at a lot of voung
players and help them improve this
spring Dye said. "But I'm not sure
we got an honest look at our defense
because so many people were hurt
this spring
"We have a good nucleus to
build upon this fall, but injuries
hampered us from even being able to
return at the ta� kle pos
are long vvavs
"e need to be on defense, b
tackle- (ike Noah Clark , y
ru.glcr linebackers Mike Hr,
�' Jeffrey Warren and
C�rter, Willie Hollev ln,i
M� � � � m anu K
eill in the -econdarv. lvt. u"
good base to build on Lm �,��.
�ur defense will develop ,ha, ,
hMheIped us so �� one
John Hallow, ,he out
f-Hmen las, falI, Uill J
Felon at nose quard while C ,
ms and John Morris n
bb,3 e � the deten- .
posrtKHis. Either Thomas M,L' , r "
Wayne Perry will renl, , "r
Hall a, free safe.) f " C��W
Top defensive reserve i
��� h.v� another good �� . ' 'hmk
a lu"8 -J from thal �,V��
8��g I. hae ,o work , , h "
�� �� where we need ,��� hd '�
I'
t





ECV Softball team captures
APPalachian State tournament
24 AP 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 9
�� NX rit,r
Pirate
in t.l
' Vpalachian
') Invita-
i .eni

P unli a -o
,M'r'i Caro-
n�al game
"lu- plated
nj" in the
�� sacri-
Shirlej
d the
:i un-
in ihe
ir-
ner
Mill
an �
Pirates sign Sikes
"H the Catamounts.
,U score one run
('M b�"om of the
7,Urtih ui rallied for a
four runs in
Ihe sixth.
VUl' Beth Crisp
�'ngled and scored on
Pam McMahan's homer
'V 'he Catamounts
�� Une run
scored on an error and
llt was driven in
�) hurler Kern Cooke
�s' Pirates were
h�n�red with member-
ship on ihe All -
l"tuiiii team: out-
j der ShirleN Brown,
Kobm Faggari and Kim
"�hnes, first baseman
Whitley, piteher
Man Bryan Carlvle and
-hortstop Marx Powell.
Powell, a sophomore
Jacksonville, N.C
as named the Tourn-
� M�M Valuable
1 laxer.
victories in the
lournej lifted the Lady
Bins' x-ason record to
16-12.
ECl closed out its
regular season atr
Monda) with a double-
header with Methodist
College in Fayettev ille.
The Lad) Pirates
compete in the
V.AIAW Tournament in
Graham April 28-29.
fflSAAD'S SHOEREPAIR
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Dage
v �
Ol'N'TAINHEAD 24 April 1979
WATCH THE TA9TEBUPSin actual commercials) QN "SATURDAY NlGHT LlVF"
t







Title
Fountainhead, April 24, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 24, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.560
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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