Fountainhead, April 10, 1979






Circulation 10,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
Vol. 55, No.
tiL
110
JjjiAJ
10 April 1979
Melvin and Lowe
are disqualified
ami treasurer.
ni'
M
-eneral Kieran Shanahan ami
new Board case Sum- v
�'���- called .i- a witness in the
Student
Melvin.
Union President
Former SGA
Charles Sune examine the evidence
President Tim Sullivan (right
photo by Pete Podeszwa
Whites suspension extended
B II KE V Hl Y
N ws Editor
Media Board
ilh extended
of
W 111 It .
several
the Board,
suspension
been for

of
an
�i be-
March 27.
-
i
3 .
Hal Sharpe, a, I
-man of the Media
Board, said that the
allegations which led to
V hire's dismissal were
primarily misman ige-
menl charges "Mi
me-
thing that is very hard
to qualify .sai'd
Sharpe, citing the
reason tor the con-
tinuing investigation into
i�i operations.
At least one member
the Board felt that
investigation into th�
paper s management
was "long overdue
and thai the paper had
not been properly
managed all ear.
rhe Board hoard
testimony, last week
from other campus
media workers and
several former Fon n -
n h -� a d employees.
V hifo was aJso prrsent
al several of the
meetings, which for the
most part were held in
closed executive .session.
There is some
-peculation that the
Board intentionally let
W bite's investigation
drag on until his year
ol office had ended and
rouutainhead
editorship came open in
April.
All publications'
executive positions arr
for one ear only.
An.me may apply for
an editorship each
spring during the time
specified by the Media
Board.
Last week the Board
announced that it would
accept applications for
all top media positions
beginning immediately.
Asked if White may
submit an application,
Sharpe replied,
he can. he has
right to re-apply
White 'ordialIv
declined to comment
the charges.
Sure
every
on
By LUKE WHISNANT
News Editor
Brett Vm 1'�Vrnmnt Association President-elect
Brett Melvmand Treasurer-elect Rick Lowe were
SZTt onda afUrnoon b fc �S R-i-
I bb l'n' TT tlvVll0n ,aH
o ffices a" � "�"�� "��P f- both
offices, wen- sworn in as president
respectively, Monday night.
The Boards derision ended almost two weeks of
The charges brought against Melvin and Lowe
for the mam part concerned the publication of The
Alternative Press, a political newsletter which
appeared on campus during election week. Although
the newsletter was unsigned and did J ��
support any candidates, it did condemn Three
candidates endorsed by Fountainhead.
Pr. �Ith r MtKi S��"t Inion
IreMden, (hares Sane eh R �
had violated SGA (,eneral Election Rules on three"
�uts: I that Melvin did no, report the
puhl.cat.on of The Alternative Press on his
ejpe.se hs, violating Article . section 2: 2. that
Wrfvw s cost ol printing the newsletter, plus his
�� w�n am�,an peases, exceeded the
and 3. that Melvm turned in only a partial list of
.at,onal Pr,n�� ( the ,rnvillc firm wbirfc
pnnted The Vlternative P�W confirmed that �
cost of produc.ng the newsletter was M73 The
party billed for the �ri ua� rornif.r WA ftrUleaJ
I im ulhan.
Article section 2 �f ,he ,1c rules �
that a candidate mus, iM ain amJ a p
incurred dur,n� his rampaiga, whether bv himself
or others. Thus, candidates W . responsible for
Mthouah the
Melin s
fraternity
�M'�s�
a Sterna u pledg.
name ol li�, suixan j ��,
�st of workers. the uor.N. sit;ma Ny
Brothers do.
Tim Sullivan is registered
by the Deaa of Men.
In order ,o prove that The Mternative Press
was political literature ami should therefore he iM(l
w.th the campaign expenses. Sum called Dr. oh�
Las, of ,hr m P�ltira N.irm.r lh ,m J h
.tness. Dr. has, holds both a Masters and a Ph I)
�We " al Nm m a,Mi,i�n l" a ,a
Uhed if he Moold ,o�sider the Mternaln, 'r,
Last replied. I HoaJd. .
� attacks specif candidates
those in opposition to tho-e
it is campaign literature�it
as campaign literature
The lter�atie Pres
and therefor it helps
candidates. Certainly
reeks of it
Ne BOKI
Suiie installed at SUbanqu
Member - r. A .l� Jmm
By KARKN ENDT
SSISTANT NEWS
EDITOR
Charles Sune took
as the president
What s Inside
Barefoot
week'
I nion
"ii th,
big shebang lr,�i
featuring Toad th,
Mai1 is ext
the Student
Mime. See
Clunk
Sanchez is
pg. 6.
Mangion,
n iewed
i.ild
ren
in
! r
ot
See
I he annual
was held thi:
Uho WOn? See
1'K
urple am
Saturday
9.
Cold
and
game
guess
J
office
of the Student Union at
the Student Union in-
stallation banquet held
on April 6. The banquet
also named the Student
Union awards r the
1978-1979 school year.
Nine members of the
Student Union were
named Outstanding
committee members.
They were Bill Martin,
Ricky Lee, Randy
Sessoni, Faye Elliot,
Charles Sune, Kathy
Dixon, Marjorie Eulie,
Karen McLaughorn and
Melody Laughlin.
The Entertainer
committee was named
Most Outstanding
committee.
The Most Out-
standing Student Union
Member, and the
winner of the Gary
Massey award was Mike
Morse, last year's
Student Union presi-
dent.
Charles Sune was
presented with the Most
Outstanding Committee
Chairman award for the
second consecutive year.
At the end of the
awards presentations
Charles Sune received
the oath of office for
Student Union Presi-
dent.
ilW1? b'ggrst prob-
jOfye Student Union
faces is ' our identity
crisis said Sune after
his induction. He felt
that many of the
students thought the
Student Union was
Mendenhall Student
Center.
"Mendenhall Student
Center houses four or-
ganizations, the Men-
denhall Student Center
organization, the
Student Government
Association, the Student
Fund Accounting Office,
and the Student
I nion said Sune. He
stressed that the Stud-
dent Union is "an
organization, not a
building
In his acceptance
speech he stated that
"at the end of my
administration, the stu-
dents will be aware that
there is a Student
Union
The Student Union
consists of eleven
different commitees:
Major Attractions, Tra-
vel, Films, Coffeehouse,
Entertainer, Artists Ser-
ies, Theatre Arts,
Special Attractions,
Minority Arts, Art
Exhibition, and the
Lecture Commitee.
Sune felt that the
Student Union has done
and will continue to do
all they can to present
first-quality enter
BJ�lfs raise parking ,dormfi
LI Kh WiflSNANT
"Vevs Editor
In their first regular meeting since
reb. 17, ECU's Board of Trustees
voted Saturday to increase parking
lees next year ISO percent- from $10
to $2and raise dorm rent by $48
per year.
The increase in parking fees
should net approximately $113,550,
which will be used to pay for various
parking-related expenditures.
Among the planned expenditures
are: a $36,000 study to analyze the
campus parking situation; $8,500 for
paving costs; and $14,000 for an
? xtra campus security officer.
Other revenues from the increase
will hi- used to pave 650 spaces in
the grassy area around Minges
coliseum, currently used for parking
only at home basketball and football
games. The Athletic Department will
also contribute to the $300,000 cost
of development.
The cost of parking in the private
lot near Ragsdale on the Fifth Street
side of campus will also increase,
announced the Trustees-from around
�0 to $108 annually.
Charlie Sherrod, acting SGA
president, questioned the need for
raising money to finance parking
improvements before the $36,000
�tady is completed.
Vice Chancellor for Business
Attars, Cliff Moore, responded that
the Board could not cancel the
scheduled improvements. "We
already have the engineer under
�fact the plans have already
been made he said
After the meeting, Sherrod com-
mented that the Board has ��
the money before they had it, Tnd
now the students are going to have
to pay for it
"In effect, they signed the
contracts before they had the
money ' Sherrod said. "I think that
before they spend any other money
on parking improvements, they
should wait for the results of this
expensive study
About the $48 rise in dorm fees,
Trustee Glenn Jernigan said that the
Board actually had no choice about
the increase and that it was basically
an inflationary cost. The increase will
bring annual dorm fees to $524.
The expected dorm revenue will
be used to pay for salary increases,
utilities, capital improvements, sup-
plies and equipment, and mainten-
ance and repairs. Jernigan explained
that the repair funds were for all
dorms, not for renovation on Jarvis.
In their one money-saving action,
the Trustees voted to change the
student bicycle registration fee from
50 cents annually to $1 for four
years.
In other business, Pirate Athletic
Director Bill Cain, introduced Dave
Odom to the Board as ECU's new
basketball coach. Odom announced
that next year's team would be
required to concentrate more on
academics, and that he would
probably enforce a "no-cut" rule to
insure that his players attend classes
during the season.
Trustee A. Louis Singleton ob-
jected to the fact that Odom was
hired without the Board's approval.
"The Board has been bypassed in
this decision, and we ought not to
be bypassed he said.
Chancellor Thomas Brewer con-
tended that the Board's approval was
not necessary for the hiring of a new
coach. "Also, we were working with
a very short time framesaid
Brewer, referring to the fact that
ECL needed to hire a coach for the
current basketball recruitment period.
After some discussion, the Board
voted to approve Odom. Trustee
Singleton registered the only negative
vote, saying that he was not opposed
to Odom himself, but that his "no"
vote reflected "a stance on what the
Trustees position ought to be on
hiring policy
Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs
Edwin Monroe reported that two
students have died since the last
Board meeting, both of natural
causes.
Monroe also announced to the
Board the implementation of ECU's
first PhD program see story pg. 3.
Former Trustee Edward Greene
was awarded a "resolution of
appreciation" by the Board for his
more than six years of service.
Greene is now a judge in North
Carolina's eleventh judicial district.
Dr. William Still of the History
Department spoke on "Underwater
History his current research pro-
ject. According to Dr. Still, ECU is
one of two schools, that is pursuing
research in this area.
The Board approved a list of
graduated seniors from Summer and
Fall sessions of last year and a list
of students who plan to graduate this
Spring.
Chairman Troy Pate announced
that the next Board of Trustees
meeting would be Wed June 6,
1979. Chancellor Brewer explained
that a weekday had been selected
because "I was informed that after
Memorial Day, nothing is scheduled
on Saturday except at the beach
tainment.
I think we're going
to have a good year, "
aid Sune in an
interiev alter his
induction.
the damage done to
Minges Coliseum during
the Outlaws concert
was a topic which also
came up during the
interview.
The Student Union is
prepared to issue
immediate payment of
damages" for the
estimated $1500 dollars
damage done to the
coliseum, Sune said.
Sune commented
that the "Film series is
consistently well atten-
ded" with an average
85 percent attendance.
The Student L'nion
receives it- money
directly fron student
lees. They receive $5.25
per full time student
during the regular
academic semester. The
exception to this is the
Major Attractions com-
mittee which is sell -
supporting.
The Student L'nion i
now in the process ol"
getting together their
schedule for next year.
In the fall they are
planning a student survey
to find out the students'
needs in entertainment.
The Artists Series is
expected to announced
before the end of the
semester.
The travel committee
is planning a trip to
Hawaii for the spring
r
pro-
break in 1980,
expected to b
good value.
The Lecture -
committee is tring to
develop a lecturer in
residency program,
where guest lecturers
will be staying al East
Carolina for several
days and not only
presenting public lec-
tures hut also lecturing
to individual class, s
Mr. Rudolph Alex-
ander. Student center
Director, praised the
Student Union, saying
that "the whole
fi'ram did well
The Rud awards
were also a event at
the installati
The Con wax r witty
award wa woi by
Randv Sess m -
The Ta-mai1 Devil
award wa- ren ied by
Cathv Dixon.
The Telephone award
was presented to Pave
Elliot.
The Student
Christmas party
w a s won 11
McLaughhorn.
The Bee Gee
was presented t
& hite.
The Bosh ui uard to
Charles Sune (I r
obvious reason
The Corvetu um-
mer award was pres-
ented to Steve Bachner.
Two people were
inducted into the
Student Union Hall ol
Fame: Bill Martin and
PhHiCo�way
I nion
award
Karen
i award
1 Doug
ECU's Board of Trustees met
to raise parking and dorm fees.
Saturday in Mendenhall Student Center and decided
photo by Chap GarleyJ
f
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W �" ' . W' i S S 1 . .� ; - -
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FLAS
Pa�� 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 10 April 1979
rr
NTE Exam
There will be a
special administration
of the National Teacher
Exmination on Sat
Maj 12 at ECU.
Candidates interested
in registering for this
special test date need
to contact or come by
the Testing Center,
Speight, Rm 105
(telephone 757-6811) for
special registration
materials.
Please bear in mind
that the present State
policy on the issuance
of a temporary permit
lor one year lor those
not having met NTE
score requirements does
not extend beyond June
30. Anyone to be
certified with a certifi-
cate effective July 1
must already posses an
TE score meeting the
minimum score require-
ments.
Please note that a
special charge of $5
must be paid by each
individual taking the
Mav 12 exams. A
person taking one test
will pay $18 and a
person taking two tests
will pa) $31. Completed
registration forms must
be returned to Mr. J.
Arthur Taylor, State
Dept. of Public In-
struction, Raleigh, NC
B April 20 to ensure
admittance to the May
examination centers.
Day Rap
Applications are now
being taken for Day
Student Representative
to the Media Board.
Please come by the
FOUNTAINHEAD office
and see secretary for
application, and bring
resume if possible. The
Media Board will set a
future date for screen-
ings of this position.
Pinball
ECGC
The ECGC will
sponsor a Barbecue
Dinner on April 10.
Menu will be barbecued
chicken, potato salad,
bread and iced tea. To
help cover the cost of
tin- dinner we ask that
al! those participating
bring SI.50. Dinner will
begin around 5 p.m.
Topic lor discussion at
this meeting will be the
nt trip to Chapel
Hill for the South-
eastern Conference for
Lesbians and Gay Men.
This conference will be
lul.l Ar U 6,7,8. The
ECGC is helping anyone
that wants to go.
Housing and food have
been obtained.
For more information
on the conference the
meetings place for the
dinner is 608 E. Ninth
St. Dinner will be held
in the back yard.
Bowling
Come to Mendenhall
and bowl on Mondays
from 1 p.m. until 4
p.m. Monday is Dis-
count Day and bowling
is 13 off.
The MSC Pinball
Tournament is in its
fourth week and it's not
too late to join the
competition. Each week
a winner is declared
and the competition
begins again.
Each weekly winner
receives a prize of
hisher choice, valued
at $15, from a selection
including dinners for
two from the Tree
House and Pizza Inn
and gift certificates
from Apple Records and
the Gazebo plus free
passes to Sportsworld
and an Atari T-shirt.
The second place
finisher for the week
will also receive an
Atari T-shirt.
The grand prize for
the competition will be
a new 10-speed Moto-
becane bicycle valued at
over $200. The bike, on
display at The Bicycle
Shop, 207 E. 5th St
will be awarded to the
player with the most
high scores for the
entire tournament.
The competition,
sponsored by Menden-
hall Student Center, will
end on Fri April 20.
Contast
A Singles Table
Tennis Tournament will
be held tonight in the
Multi-Purpose Room in
Mendenhall at 7 p.m.
The double elimination
contest is sponsored by
Mendenhall Student
Center.
TKE Boxing
The TKE-ECU box-
ing tournament champ-
ions will host the Uni-
versity of South
Carolina club boxing
team in a one-night-only
boxing match Wed
April 18 at Wright
Auditorium. The event
will feature nine action
packed bouts of
championship caliber.
Bouts begin at 7 p.m.
Reduced beverage prices
at the Elbo Room
following the fights.
Convention
The ECU Comic
Book Club and the Roxy
are sponsoring the
Fourth Greenville Comic
Book Mini Convention
at the Roxy Theatre 629
Albemarle Ave. on
Sun April 22. The
admission is free to the
public, and anyone with
Comics, science fiction,
fantasy or related items
is encouraged to set up
to sell free of charge.
The convention will
start at 9 a.m. and last
til 6 p.m. All interested
persons are encouraged
to attend. For more
information, please call
758-6909 before 7 p.m.
or 752-6389 after 7 p.m.
Family Fun
Each Thur !iy
during April Family
Fun Night at enden-
hall. From 6-10 p.m. all
children under age 18,
accompanied by a
parent or responsible
adult, may bowl, play
billiards or play table
tennis for 12 off the
regular price. Each
game or line of bowling
will be half-price for
children and billiards
and table tennis will be
half�price for the entire
family.
Only one adult per
group must have a
Mendenhall Student
Center Membership
Card or ECU ID card to
participate.
LAE
LAE car stickers are
being sold for $1, to go
into LAE account and
used later for LAE
functions. There will be
a party April 28, time
and place to be ann-
ounced. LAE Giveaway:
your choice of 1 cast of
beer, magnum of
champagne or a fifth of
liquor.
Will all LAE
members pick up their
tickets from Mr.
Campbell, you each will
be given 10 tickets
with your name on the
pack. If you don't sell
your tickets, you buy
them. This money will
go to the department
party to help pay for
expenses. Tickets will
be 50 cents each.
Biology
Biology Club meeting
Wed April 11 at 7
p.m. in BN 1.02.
Business will include
the election of officers.
Classifieds
Spring is here! Time for
that protrait you've
been thinking about.
Have it done OUT-
DOORS. Call 758-0962,
portraits by Pete Pod-
eszwa, also resume
pictures in black and
white, weddings and all
types of group shots.
FOR SALE: 13.6 cu. ft.
refrigerator. Excellent
for house or apt. Call
752-0912.
1976 500cc Kawasaki for
sale, excellent condition.
Has carry-all rack and
back rest. 2 new tires
go with it - $800. Call
758-0962 after 7 p.m. If
you call earlier, leave
name and no. with ans.
service.
FOR SALE: 1 pair BIC
formula 4 speakers -
$180. Call 758-5252 or
come to 342 Garrett.
FOR SALE: Customiied
Corvette car cover. Leas
than 1 year old. Price
is negotiable. Phone
758-8009 after 6 p.m.
FOR SALE: 1973 Ford
Torino. Runs good.
Needs some body work.
$495. (150 off this price
with valid ECU ID).
Call 756-5409 after 3
p.m.
YAMAHA (Y56)30
fiberglass tennis racket
(strung) like new, $45
price negotiable. Konica
35 mm. camera, 50
mm. & Vivitar telecon-
verter lens, tripod &
strap, all $200. Call
758-8168.
1978 SR500 Yamaha.
Single-cylinder, four-
stroke. Black, gold pin
striping. 4300 miles.
Perfect condition. These
cost $2027 new. I want
$1500. See behind
Memorial Gym. Call
Terry, 758-3414.
torri9l
TWO FEMALE room-
mates needed to share
an unfurnished room in
house 2 blocks from
campus. Rent $50mo.
Pom pom
There will be an
important meeting of
the '79'80 Pom Pom
Squad Tues April 10
at 6 p.m. in the
Fletcher Music Bldg. If
you cannot attend,
please call Carol (758
6346), or Jo Ellen
(752-0354).
SNEA
The Student National
Education Association
will be meeting April 10
in Rm. 244, Mendenhall
Student Center. It will
begin at 5 p.m. so as
to accomodate student
teachers. All I members
are urged to attend;
this meeting is very
important. It is our last
meeting; old and new
business must be dis-
cussed, a convention
shared, and officers
elected for next year.
Please send nominations
for President, Vice-
President, and Secre
taryTreasurer to the
address given, or post
it on my door. Please
send to Anna Myers,
305 Greene Dorm or
call 752-9093.
Phi Lambda
Phi Beta Lambda
would like to recognize
its members who placed
in the state convention
which was held at the
Hyatt House in Win-
ston-Salem, NC. They
are as follows: David
Leonard, 2nd place in
Economics; Wayne
Nixon, 4th place in
Accounting I; Ronald
Worley, 4th place in
Business Administration.
There is a meeting
of importance scheduled
for Wed April 11 in
Rawl 130. All new and
old members are asked
to be present.
Uniforms
The representative
from Nightingale Uni-
form Company will be
in the School of Nursing
building, Rm. 105, on
April 18, 8:30 a.m. until
1 p.m. to measure each
freshman nursing
student for uniforms.
The total amount for
uniforms will be as fol-
lows: $70.65 for female
students, $46.30 for
male students. A money
order for the exact
amount must be sub-
mitted with the uniform
order. Please stop by
the School of Nursing
Office, Room 152, to
make an appointment.
Gontast
Judging for the First
Annual Crafts Center
Photography Contest,
sponsored by Menden-
hall Student Center,
took place this past
week with the winners
being named as follows:
First Place - Chris
Palmer; Second Place -
Susan Edmunds; Third
Place - Julie McDuffie.
There were nine fourth
place winners in the
competition.
The winning
photographs are now on
display in the lower
ease located near the
;Student Bank in
Mendenhall.
Gospal
The ECU Gospel
Ensemble will present
their Spring Concert
April 22, 1979 at 6
p.m. The concert will
be held at Hendrix
Theater in Mendenhall
Student Center.
Movie
On April 11 at 7:30
p.m. in BD-302 The
Sociology-Anthropology
Club will sponsor the
filming of the movie
The Massachusetts
Story.
Dr. Peter Fricke, a
visiting professor at
ECU, specializing in
maritime sociology has
been invited to voice
his comments on this
film and how it relates
to maritime concerns in
coastal North Carolina.
Workshop
A workshop on
slides will be sponsored
by students in Com-
munity Health. All in-
terested persons are
invited to attend. The
speaker will be Mr.
Walter McLendon of the
ECU Audiovisuals Dept.
Workshop will be held
on Thurs April 12
from 3:30-5:30 p.m. in
Rm. 206, Allied Health
Bldg.
Seder
There will be a
Passover Seder on
Wed April II, 6:30
p.m. at the Baptist
Student Center, 511 E.
10th St. Reservation is
a must. Call Dr. B.
Resnik 756-9453 or Jeff
Gleiberman 752-9453.
Openings
Applications are now
being taken for position
of Editors for:
Buccaneer. Ebony
Herald Fountainhead
and Rebel See
secretary in Fountain
head office for
application, and bring
resume if possible. The
Media Board will set a
future date for screen-
ings of applicants.
Dantal fast
The Dental Aptitude
Test will be offered at
ECU on Sat April 28.
Study Hall
A Learning Center
with various reference
books has been set up
in the Scott Hall
basement Study Hall.
Sapervisien
The supervisor will help
you find the appropriate
texts (in BIOL, ENGL,
or HIST) or college
catalogues for many
Graduate Schools. It is
open from 8-12 p.m. on
Sunday through Thurs-
day nights. Anyone is
welcome to this quiet
area for study.
Concert
The Fountain of Life
Christian Fellowship
Choir will present their
Spring Concert April 12,
1979 at 7:30 p.m. The
concert will be held at
Wright Auditorium. The
public is cordially
invited to attend, and
there is no admission
charge.
The Student Union Films
Committee presents
The
Burmese
Harp
A Special Film Presentation
Wednesday night at 8 p.m.
in the Hendrix Theatre
plus 14 utilities. Call
758-3688 after 5.
APT. NEEDED: Would
like to rent a 1 B.R. or
share a 2 B.R. fur-
nished apt. at Tar River
Ests. for the summer.
Call Robin 758-9322.
FURNISHED one B.R
Apt. to rent for
summer. Call 758-7368.
NEED to sub-lease apt.
for summer, Georgetown
Apts. May 1-Aug. Par-
tially furnished, phones.
$235 mo. Please call
752-1478.
.NEED: Responsible
person(s) to sublet a 2
B.R. apt. at Eastbrook
by May 1. Call 758-
6750.
NEED: Someone to
sublease apt. for the
summer, 2 B.R. for
$130-140 mo. Stove and
refrigerator provided.
Convenient location. Call
Terry King, 752-8879.
WANTED: 2 persons (or
1) to sublease trailer
from May through
mid-August. Located 6
miles from campus, 2
B.R fully furnished,
water and washer
included. $110 a mo. or
best offer. Call Susy at
752-9052 after 5 p.m.
FURNISHED, 1 B.R.
apt. available for the
summer. Convenient
location to campus. $150
per mo. Call 758-0642.
NEED: A responsible
female roommate to
share a 2 B.R. apt. at
Eastbrook. Rent $63.
Call 758-5794 after 4
p.m.
MALE roommate
needed to share ex-
penses in 2 B.R. apt. in
Tar River Estates
beginning the end of
August. If interested,
call 758-4747 during the
day.
ROOMMATE needed to
share mobile home at
Shady Knoll Trailer
Park, beginning May 1.
$75 mo. phis half
utilities and phone.
Contact Ronnie, 758-
3615.
NEEDED: Roommate(s)
to share 2 B.R. Apt. at
Oakmont Square for
summer months. Call
Mark at 752-9694.
2 ROOMMATES
NEEDED: For summer
months; Duplex on 3rd
St. $160 per mo. plus
utilities split equally
Call Mike at 758-9173.
NEED TO SUBLEASE
upl. Irom May 5 thru
snwmrr. Total'h jur.
nislud. Mui bV j.
ponsiblr. ixt.r guff
Apt. Call 752-5560 anv
day after 1:00. J
2HI lnr 8-5.
to
COUPLE Uesire
sublease house
near CreenMlU. froiB
��d-M�y to hue A "
space. Flexible
pancy dates. Call 758
Choreographer needed
for local band. Secretary
(part-time) also needed
7f2-1715. If not there,
please leave message.
Chanelo's Need. Cashier
nelp. Come by 507 r
14th St.
K�chen Help Nested.
Co�e by Chanel 507
� 14th St.
Ck SOT E. i�u
t
s
�.





Greek Forum
10 April 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 3
K K)� kl (,lUKMsJ
ield
Ut't,
;ur-
1
'� second; and .)�((
K ai p Pi Kappa Phi,
coming in third.
I he u inners ai Pi
Kappa Phi Field ).i
Saturda were
Kappa Delta and Sigma
I -in ratmna. Both
winners reeeied
hit's v Imh -odd d ,�)�
i tall
f Outstanding Brother
iven t
troi
Iraternity. I'd. winners
.i- Colli ws Mike
i K i i lpha;
Raymond Iripp, Kappa
ma; Rob .
Kapj
si Nu;
k

M
M
I au;
lay
Pi
I -reck

also recognized a l dr
winnei ol the Outstan-
ding Greek Award
which was presented
James Mallory
I he Presidents
w.iid was presented
hy Denson to Joe
VI ard, Kappa Vlpha,
and outgoing I h (
-1111 � i
I ho Installation ol
new o11 i ers 11dIow� ed
the awards and closed
! he han(uet 1 he new
ill oificers loi : he
hool vear are
Miki Smith, president;
Mark O'Ravitz, execu-
vice president; Cla
lunds, administrative
president; Roh
sei 11 i a i ,
I I 'i H uggins,
Dean Mallon will
as advisor to
till).
Because ol mu
on Mon-
day, the Greek F irum
will In- moved to
I hursday - paper next
ad ol 1
Please turn
hi articles on
. pril 18
I) . n
would like in congral
ulati Dalton Drnson lor
winning the Most
Dedi ateil Greek Man
w ard, w Iik h t Ins
sponsoi
I ho Sij� in a Sigma
Sigma - arc planning
theii Founder's Das
� ' � 11 � Ioa Inin 11. i j i11 18
iheii senioi d i h
tentatively planned foi
reading da
I he (.In Omegas got
iiI new -innii t)lelges
last week The spenl
an afternoon at tin1
I diversity Nursing
Center and are now
preparing for their
annual Fastei egg hunt
lor underprivileged chil-
li I it w hud lhe sponsi
with thei I.ami.da Chi
lphas.
1'h. lpha , Deltas
held a stieces � j 1 prov-
ince Conv i and

itional
attend.
lp Xi's
� I
pledges. (tn Tuesday,
nl In the lpha Xis
ami the Phi Sigma Pl-
an- sponsoring a happy
hour with all proceeds
I'l'ing to tin- Heart
Fund. At tin- happy
hour, a lukiiu contest
will he held with the
prizes heing $100 and a
weekend for two at the
heai h ll are in ited to
attend in order to
support the Heart Fund.
I to I au Kappa
I i hoxing tourn-
.luo in champions w ill
host the I nivcrsit ol
I arolina i luh
hoxing team in a � mi
uly hoxing match
W ednesday. pril 1 at
i ight And n io in m .
Ki -i I in i d In , prices
at the Film Room alter
the lights. The tourna-
ments hegins at 7 j
r or mine intormal ii m
call 752-1 151.
(Don I Iiirgel next
�� eeks i hangi il dead
due ti I ister
Breal
11,


I
Fa
M
' i- had
ther
i
.?'
A
�1" i �
South Seas
Pet Shop
' ! i i mild S u u a r
750-0222
MonSat. 12-9p.m.
BUNNIES-$5.00
Come see "Buick" the Wonder Cat.
We now have Cocker Spaniels,
3omeranians, Pekingese, Minature Poodles
Minature Dachshunds & Black Labs.
ECU gets PhD okay
ntinuii
�tlirLN!5tafi"S
I
st r
ms
m, uost-
(- .
the
School,
-
nt- "a
lor East
PhD
� o-
I ' I
into:a
�work
� r a I
EC! . the
� NC Biiard ol goven
� otn)leted action
- 1976
plan outlin
tnt developmi
1 institut ions in
FREE � FAST
FRESH HOT
DELIVERY
-pass it on
758 7400
Delivery starts at
12 noon
ART & CAMERA
T2() S. Contanche St.
Downtown
COUPON EXPIRES
n LIMITED TIME OFFER
12 Exp. Color Film
Developed and Printed
� Kodacotor
� OAF
� Fug
(Foreign Film
Not indyjOfS
49
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'valuable coupon "
I MUST ACCOMPANY OKOCT I
COUPON EXPIRES
�limited TIME OFFER
20 Exp. Color Film
Developed and Printed
. KodacokK
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(Fx�ig� F�
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49
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VALUABLC COUPON
I MUTT ACCOMPANY OHM
COUPON EXPIRES
'LIMITED TIME OFFER
MOVIE OR SLIDE
EWAChrom or Kodachrome Processing
20 Exp.
AQ 8IMM
� Mont
110.
120 or
136
JSttSSSSS
PLAZA CAMERA
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
Wright Building
New Slimline TI-25�.
From Texas Instruments.
For the student or professional on the go.
WE HAVE OTHER MODELS TO
CHOOSE FROM.
CHECK OUR SELECTION OF
CALCULATOR ACCESSORIES.
30-DAY FREE
Replacement of Defective Units
MonFri. 8:30-5:00
Sat. 9:00-12 noon
Advanced state-of-the-art
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attractive slimline sty-
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scientific calculator will
quickl) handle a broad
range ol mathematical
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W ith versatile four-ke)
memor and easy-to
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Automatic Power Down
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the advanced circuitry
ol the Slimline TI-25,
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years of normal use
from a set ot batteries).
ADVERTISED
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Each of these advertised items is re
quired to be readily avadable for sale
at or below the advertised price in
each AEtP Store, except as specifi
cally noted in this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT, APRIL 14 AT A4P IN
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
HANDPAINTED STONEWARE
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38.650 CASH PRIZE WINNERS
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LARGE
STALK
ONLY
39
LB.
99
1





-� ,rm,�
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 10 April 1979
Time to look ahead
It's a shame, but ft had to
happen.
Brett Melvin and Ricky Lowe were
found guilty yesterday of charges that
they had not correctly listed campaign
workers on their financial report. As a
result, they were disqualified from
holding political office next school
year.
Politics, especially politics which
involve the overseeing of one of the
largest student activity fee budgets in
this country, are too important to go
without regulation. That's why there
are rules, and that's why rules are
strictly upheld.
Without the use of regulation,
those of us who can would take
advantage of those of us who cannot.
The rule which limits campaign
expenditures, for example, gives each
candidate an equal chance at the
election. How someone spends the
specified amount is up to him,but it
is a comfort to know that it is
impossible to buy an election here.
The rules are set up that way.
It's time to put the SGA
campaigns and elections behind us.
There is much work to be done
before the end of the semester. There
are appointments to be made and
budgets to be approved. The SGA
Transit is a continuing concern that
must be dealt with. The continuing
controversy over proposed state fund-
ing for programs previously funded by
SGA must be investigated, dealt with
and resolved. We need to get going,
because the campaign and elections
have taken valuable time from the
business of government for students of
this university.
Libby Lefler has a big job ahead
of her. To her falls the responsibility
of restoring public confidence in
student government. In this light, to
her falls, too, the responsibility' of
restoring student committment to the
process of government in this country.
If educated people lost interest in
their own government at the univer-
sity level, how can you expect them
to take an interest in national politics?
There's a new day at East
Carolina University. We have a new
chancellor who is pledged to make
this an institution of excellence in all
things-athletics, student life and
academics. It will be up to Libby
Lefler, in her role as SGA President
to work with the chancellor on this
undertaking. It will be up to her to
insure that the SGA becomes an
institution excellent in itself.
In an interview published on Mar
27, Lefler was quoted as saying "
feel that we learn from past mistakes
� � we can't get anything done if
we're constantly bickering about
something. . . we don't need the
coalitions in student government "
Well said. We send the hope that
Ms. Lefler can preside over a
harmonious legislature, although we
doubt that any government agency
could run that smoothly. We can say
however, that we wish her the best'
and that we hope that next year's
bOA will do much better than this
year's did. We hope that next year's
debates and arguments will be over
honest differences of opinion, and not
over petty politics.
OF TM� fc8cT Co, flWNt rtgp
BoT TiWT fAiAi 141TCAOA1 (UP tig MV S�owj
Of V�T. I CoolD't FwO Hi wVioc��.
TU. w -Tb Do ?
MOTHiWft- TMT COUCD ft
misiMTWAfreD i tu ,m
sumer
By PATRICE STEADMON
CCRS Assistant Editor
rum
dumnist
To Fountainhead,
I vsuuld like to
comment on the occas-
ional column" Uppity
Women I think
Charlene Carter writes
with kili, humor, and
insight; I appreciate the
time and effort she puts
into research. I wish
her articles could
appear in every paper
and be longer. Afterall,
the throwing off of
old-fashioned,diced, and
and sexist attitudes
benefits everyone here,
m Fountainhead
Serving ,h. E.st Carolina community lor W.r 5oW,
ACTING EDITOR
MARC BARNES
PRODUCTION MANAGER
STEVE BACHNER
NEWS EDITORS
M�rc Barnes
Luke Whisnant
Assistant News Editors
Riy Smith
Karen Wend!
Mike Rogers
TRENDS EDITOR
Jeff Rollins
Assistant Trends Editors
Barry Clayton
Bill Jones
SPORTS EDITOR
Sam Rogers
Assistant Sports Editor
Charles Chandler
ADVERTISING MANAGER
ROBERT M. SWAIM
Assistant Advertising Manager
Tarry Herndon
Advertising Selesnan
Paul Lincke
Chief Ad Artist
Jane Wells
Typesetters
Mary Storey
Sue Hutford
Proofreaders
Deidre Detahunty
Sue Johnson
Cindy Ceveneas
Cartoonists
Sue Lamm
Barry Clayton
FOUNTAINHEAD i. the ,tudent
n.w.p.p.r of E.� C.ron. Uni.?.My
sponsored by ,�. Media Board if
and tk" "��"��"� each Tue.d.y
address i� � �Mf mailing
ecu n 0,d s�u�" Bulldlno
Th-V N c mi�. �'
7 57-�a��P .B,I,numbr� �'��
� r. $10 a �"�� Subscription.
- 10 y. alumni $6 annually
male, female, student,
and teacher.
I , personally, have
had little trouble with
sexist attitudes being an
obstacle. But I do find
it interesting and
helpful to read about
what problems woment
have had in the past. I
feel thankful, after
reading the column,
that I managed to be as
independent as I am.
There are a lot of
females, and males, in
this area that need
some enlightening educ-
ation along these lines.
Charlene,we want more!
Charlene or someone
else could also include
another column concer-
ning discrimination
against students in this
area and how to fight
it. Not all students are
irresp nsible,lowiyhippies.
Often I have felt that
the townspeople, many
of whom make their
living because students
are here, and university
administrators, teachers,
I and staff, who have
their jobs because we
are here, enjoy being
obstacles and in every
way making life difficult
and expensive for us.
Because students are
generally younger, more
vulnerable, and trans-
ient they often are
cornered into arrange-
ments (such as renting
a dwelling from John
Causey tnat are
inequitable and very
expensive. A column
that exposed offenders
and high-lighted good
businesses and persons,
and gave advice for
students in this area
would be well-read, I'm
sure.
And while I'm at it,
I'd like to mention the
names of the people in
the Administration at
ECU who have been
most helpful to me: Dr.
David B. Stevens,
Attorney Advisor; Dr.
John M. Howell, Vice
Chancellor for Academic
Affairs; Gilbert Moore,
Registrar; Robert M.
Boudreaux, Financial
Aid Officer and his
assistants; Richard
Morin, Continuing Ed-
ucation; Dr. Jack Hore,
Dean of Admissions;
Eugene Owens, Assoc-
iate Dean of Admis-
sions; Charles McLaw-
horn, SGA student
lawyer; Mrs. Bobbie
Jean Austin, Associate
Registrar; and Mrs. Pat
Ridenhour, undergrad-
uate Clerk. Credit should
be given where credit is
due, these people in
particular were suppor-
tive, encouraging, and
more than pleasant
when I was having
problems. I cannot
thank them enough.
These are the people
that are pro-student an
should be highlighted in
the "Student Advice
Column" Thank you
for giving me this space
to air my complaints,
suggestions, and praise.
Micheie Mennett
Students are paving
more attention to
establishing credit, and
credit card distributors
are paying more atten-
tion to them.
Melanie Stockdell,
director of the Con-
sumer Relations Boarad
at Kansas State Univer-
sity, says that many
students seek advice
on credit. And Evelyn
Fox of Oklahoma State
University's Consumer
Action Council savs her
group is preparing a
student guide to esta-
blishing credit.
Naturally, most com-
panies in the multi-bill-
ion dollar industry have
noticed this trend.
Spokesmen for major
films say there are
sound investment reas-
ons for designing credit
programs for the college
market that ignore
youthful finance draw-
backs such as no pro-
perty, no income and
no credit history.
"We like the Jesuit
concept of 'get 'em
while they're young'
because the college
student of today is the
consumer of tomorrow
says Kenneth V. Larkin,
senior vice-president of
the Bank of America,
the country's largest
commercial bank.
John Lockwood, dir-
ector of the Interna-
tional Consumer Credit
association, adds: "Stu-
dents are more charge
card oriented nowadays.
They are brought 'up
needing charge cards
'he St. Louis-based
ICC A is a trade assoc-
iation for credit card
companies.
Industry statistics
show the entire country
IJ becoming more
credit card oriented "
The Nilson Report, a
trade newsletter, reports
that ,f every plastic
credit card holder was
to spend up to his
credit limit on each
card, the total debt
would be over $260
billion. By 1985, the
figure is expected to
reach $500 billion.
But even with this
growth, hassles still
exist for college credit
applicants.
'The problem for
students has been being
educated enough to
know how to go about
establishing credit
nowing where to go
says KSU's Stockdell.
Mary Alice Minnev.
director of education for
ICCA, suggests to stud-
ents that, "The last
thing you should go
after is a major credit
card, because that is
the last thing vou're
going to get
She suggests starting
�mil
small : opening an
account at a local
department store, retur-
ning mailed applications
of established compan-
ies, and joining a credit
union at work.
Taking out a small
loan even when it is
not necessarv and
Paving it back'promptly
is also a good start for
a credit rating, Minnev
says.
If an Oklahoma
State student is denied
credit, Fox suggests he
go and find out why.
"The first thing that i
emphasize to people is
the Fair Credit Report-
ing Act, passed in 1971.
Vou have to be told the
reason why you were
turned down for credit
;if it's legitimate, that
information could help
in the future
It may take some
planning and persistence
to start getting
but some companies arc
eager to help out. One
reason is that a college
student is expected to
work in a higher salar)
bracket after graduation
and recene pav increa-
ses at a faster rate than
people without a college
education says Bob
Arieta, of Atlantic Rich-
field on Co.
And sometimes,
"students e.xhibif an
above-average loyaltj to
a compan) if the) get
their credit card' into
the student's hands earl)
says Irwin Penner,
chairman of Gracious
Lad) Services . GLS is
the parent compan) tor
College Credit Card
Corp which promotes
its clients" credit cards
on man) college camp-
uses.
"Students feel that
the compan) who first
extended credit gave
them a chance when
the) read) didn't have
I lie credit background to
go anywhere else
"Selectivity" is the
e) to choosing the
right college market.
Penner concludes.
Credit companies run
the gamut from extreme
selectivity to none at
Simple Remed
By AGATHA M.
Thrash, M.D.
The process of
learning is controlled by
natural law and is as
biologic as is digestion.
A clear mind is not a
happenstance. Each
person must play his
own part to produce a
clear mind, capable of
keener perception and
greater memory reten-
tion. Certainly, the first
feature of good learning
is the ability to focus
the attention. In order
to focus the attention,
one must be disciplined
to set aside all other
things from the mind
and concentrate on the
subject at hand. To
assist one in directing
the attention, begin
with being orderly about
one's desk and personal
things. If all things in
sight are in order,
attention to the subject
at hand is more easily
accomplished. Further-
more, if one is orderly
about one's daily habits,
scheduling the same
thing at the same time
each day, the mind is
kept in better order,
and can prepare itself
to receive new material
Have a set time in the
daily routine for study,
meals, sleep, and all'
other things.
In order for the
mind to be keen, the
health must be good.
Anything that prevents
perfect circulation, is of
course, capable of
interfering with the
circulation to the brain
cells, thereby causing
poor discernment and
imperfect fixation of
concepts in the mind.
The health should be
carefully guarded by
meticulous attention to
such matters as proper
sleep, regular elimina-
tion, daily exercise, and
simple food.
Exercise is one of
the most important
single matters leading
to a good learning
experience. The consc-
ientious student who is
attentive and motivated
will be a better student
if he also gets plenty of
exercise. Exercise tends
to banish from the
blood the toxic subst-
ances that build up
through the ordinary
metabolic activities,
substances that reduce
the ability to think
acids, aldehydes, ami-
nes, and alcohols.
Through exercise, we
bum some of these
substances as fuel, and
others are eliminated
through the breath,
bowels, sweat, and
urine. Further, exercise
causes the brain to lose
the burden of electrical
�c'mty which can
develop through an
excess of mental exer-
ctae. Brain work causes
a heavy discharge of
electrical energy. After
several hours of stud)
or dasswork, the brain
becomes overburned and
congested, the temper-
ature of the brain
tissue actually increases
and oxygen delivery to
the cells decreases
creating a temporary
starvation of brain cells
for essential nutrients
and oxygen. Exercise,
n balancing the elec-
trical impulses in the
various portions of the
central nervous system
increases the ability to
Perceive and impress
new material on the
brain cells.
. The diet is also
important in the learn-
ing process. Too much
�ood can cause fermen-
tation m the intestinal
tract with the produc-
tion of the toxic
materials already menti-
oned, that interfere with
thought processes in the
same manner as do
drugs or alcohol.
t

i �-





10 April FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
Review Board rules in favor
of Lefler, O'Geary, and Suii
Coat, from p. I
' Mike Morse and Nancy Sherrill present
award a! Friday's Student Union
!��� �� Pele Pedeszwa
Psychic to read
and plot on Mall
M Ruble Rook.
d astrologer ami
� II give indi-
- : palms
� II plot astrolog)
as part of
the Mall"
April 17
soeiol
orth-
rersity, as
�) hit
M - in for-
ull
-
-�
� hie art
her !
P :
as Irorn her
man's
as
an
innate sixth sense that
ran bring entirely new
dimensions into a
person's life She
warns people that the
occult can be danger-
ous and is net some-
thing to pla with.
lake attraets like, so
make ure your spiritual
development i posi-
tive urges Ms. Rook.
Ms. Rook has de-
lighted thousands with
her descriptions and
predictions. She has
appeared at the Chicago
PI a lo Club on a
ii.w basis. On April
l . at ' Barefoot on the
will read
ti uras, palms, and
-ornewhal detailed
Ltsii. . j, charts. She
will be on the Mall
from 12:00 until 5:00
p.m.
In his defense, Melvin attempted to prove that
Sullivan was not a Sigma Mu breause he had been
inactive all year, and that th- Sigma u brothers
were not responsible for printing "The Alternative
Press.
Melvin's evidence included several letters, one
from the Sigma u brothers which stated under
oath that the fraternity did not have anything to
do with the writing, editing, printing or distribution
of The Alternative Press
Mark Srenson. president of Sigma Nu. testified
that the fraternity did not consider Sullivan a
member, as he had not paid dues or attended any
social functions this year. "As far as the fraternity
is concerned, a pledge is not a member he said.
Melvin also presented a note in Tim Sullivan s
handwriting which was delivered along with a copy
of the newsletter to the president of the Kappa
Alpha fraternity. The note read. This helps Libby
as much as Brett
"If The Alternative Press' was campaign
literature, as Dr. East testified, then it was
campaign literature definetely not directed toward
the assistance of anv single candidate said
Melvin.
Joan O'Donnald. a Kappa Delta sister and
roommate of" candidate Libby Lefler, stated in a
letter to the Board that she had contributed money
to "The lternative Press and that she had helped
to pass it out.
The Board later confirmed that Ms. O'Donnald is
a Siyrna Nu "little Sister
Board announces decision
Vfter a forty minute deliberation in closed
session. Review Board Chairperson Howard Newell
announced. We find in favor of Charles Sune and
disqualify Brett Melvin on the grounds of violation
ol election rules
Libby Lefler, who had also filed charges against
Melvin. was sworn in as president a few hours after
Melvin's disqualification, since she was the
runner-up in the election. Lefler dropped her
charges.
"I feel that the respect of the judicial process
has been upheld Lefler said after the derision. 'I
had laith in God and the students, and now I look
forward to a successful term.
Sune commented that be had brought the
charges against Melvin as a concerned student.
n student has the right, and the obligation, to
question a chandidate s campaign practices. I
considered it my duty to report these obvious
n iolations
Brett Melvin did not wish to make a comment
on the decision
O'Geary vs. Lowe
Two of the charges in the Melvin case also
applied to O'Geary vs. Lowe. Lowe had listed Tim
Sullivan as a campaign worker and had not included
mention of "The Alternative Press" in his expense
account, nor did he add the cost of printing the
newsletter.
Attorney General Kieran Shanahan. who acted as
prosecutor, railed Sullivan as a witness in his
presentation of charges against Lowe. Sullivan
testified that he had "paid for. laid out and
written The Alternative Press. and that he was
the sole person responsible for its publication. He
also stated that Kicky Lowe did not know of
Sullivan's involvement with "The Alternative Press.
"1 had no knowledge of "The Alternative
Press . Lowe concurred. T would not have been
naive enough to hire Tim Sullivan as a campaign
worker if I had thought "The Alternative Press"
would appear
Sullivan insisted that he did not print the
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newsletter for the benefit of any one candidate. "I
would not put forth $.190 of my own money for
anyone on this campus but myself. Sullivan said.
"I had to sell my complete eomir book collection to
pay for it�the complete Marvel comics
"I he Alternative Press was a reaction to the
rampus paper for the third year in a row trying to
bamboozle the election. he said.
lhe third charge against Lowe concerned an ad
in Fountainhead whirh Lowe failed to report on his
expense account In-causr of some uncertainty
concerning the publication of the ad. I was told
that the ad would not be run. Lowe said.
Hie ad appeared in the Mar. 17 insUe of
Fountainhead. after the deadline for filing of
expense accounts.
ifter another closed session meeting. th�- Board
decided that Low wa- not guilty of failure to rport
the Fountainhead ad. but was guilty of the two
charges pertaining to The Alternative Press,
therefore was disqualified. Lowes opponent.
O Geary, was sworn in later as the new
treasurer.
"I in just relieved that the whole thing e
with. said (M.earv. Lowe had no comment.
ami
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-truck down a Delaware
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t
m r
Romantic' Latin sound
captured in Children
B WM. JONES
t. Trends Ed.
die.
ithout dreams of hope and pride, a man wil
not
bi
�g
Though his flesh Mill moves, his heart sleeps in tht
grave.
V ithoul land man never dreams, cause he's
Tree.
All men need a place to live with dignity
In America, few jazz musicians make "the
time as tar as general popularity goes. And that's
OK with most jazz afficionados. But, occasionally a
good jazzman does catch the public eve and "come
mto his own" in terms of lame and fortune. One
such musician is Chuck Mangione.Chuck Mangione's
steadilj growing popularity skyrocketed two years
ago,when his single "Feels So Good" climbed to
the top ten
It was at about the time Mangione was finishing
up the album "Feels So Good' that he was
contacted b) Hall Bartlett to score the movie, "The
Children of Sanchez
'The Children of Sanchez starring Anthony
Quinn in the title role, is the storj of a Mexican
family's struggle tor survival and ' dignity in the
ghetto 'barrios' of Mexico City. Mangione found
the temptation, . . to compose music for a motion
picture was irresistible He shut himself up in a
hotel room, and in just one weekend had created
the basic -core for the movie.
f The album . "The Children of Sanchez was
written, recorded, mixed and edited in three
h 'he product of a marathon of
engineering and musical effort. Four of the cuts on
the double-album are. in fact, first takes.
The overall result is a fresh, honest.
Latin-flavored sound.
ide one and two appear the basic melodic
that recur, in other guises, on sides three and tour
Toad
load The Mime will
appearing at the
Student Union's Bare-
the Mall a
spring festival, on .prj
I7- 1979, at 12 and I
p.m. on the East
Carolina I niversit)
Mail 'Barefoot on the
Mall" features all types
arts, crafts, food and
The Children of Sanchez Overture" characterizes
the ache ol unfilled dreams. It is a driving
desireous, thoroughly Mexican sound, captured on
the first take. The melody delivered in the
Overture" ,s resumed in the "Children of
Sanchez Finale the last song on side four.
"Lullabye the second song on side one, is the
diametric opposite of the "Overture "Lullabye" is
simple, quiet, innocent. It serves as a fine contrast
to the proceeding "Overtureincreasing the effect
ol the latter's brassyness while the "Overture"
makes "Lullaby" seem all the more subdued.
On side two, "Consuelo's Love Theme"presents
another melody to be used again later in the album.
'Consuelo's Love Theme" is a mellow, terrificly
romantic song, the perfect sort of music to put on
when having someone special over for wine, dinner,
and whatever.
The basic melody from "Consuelo's Love
Theme" recurs in the next three selections on side
three, "Hot Consuelo "Death Scene and
Market Scene which when played in succession,
tend to lie repetitive.
Side three also contains Mangione's previously
released "Bellavia" and a lyrical version of
Lullabye "Lullabye's words are simple and
touching:
Please somebody hold my hand
I'm scared and feel real shaky
Please somebody understand
I just now lost my daddy
Daddy said goodbye today
i miss him so already
I love mommy very much
But mommvs can't be daddvs
Sell-produced, "Children of Sanchez" displays
Mangione's fine writing and arranging capabilities.
I he rawness ol first take recording adds a
spontaneous, honest quality to the double-album.
Chuck Mangione's latest: Children of Sanchez
Unfortunately, this rawness developes into poor
playing toward the end. Mangione never has been
that good a fiugelhorn player. For this album hi
abihty IS barely adequate. But his arranging makes
Children of Sanchez" warmlv listenable music
Two members of Mangione's quartet deserve
special mention for work in this album Chris
Vadela does some fine sax, flute and clarinet
Playing. And Grant Geissran's classical gu.tar
performance is impressive.
Also album designer Junie Osak, has done a
anfcharl Tl j�bu SHe " Benno Fr-d�n
and Charles Bush s photography to produce a clean
but express cover and inner .leaves.
Mime appears at 'Barefoot on the Mall
entertainment.
Toad the Mime
Toad the Mime is
the pseudonym of An-
tionette Attell. She
could very well be
called a Voyeur
Voyeuse, as well as a
mime. In her role
she i neither male nor
fern ah a she observes
and uses the people
and scenes around her.
Mime has been a
classical art throughout
the ages and though
Toad has mastered it,
she has also broken all
the old rules. By
making her performance
a part of the environ-
ment, she delights
people by reading their
bodies and incorporating
them into her improvi-
sation This type o
experience has been
exceptionally successful
with both the deaf and,
somewhat surprisingly,
the blind, who partici-
pate in a tactile rather
than a visual sense.
In Toad's world,
leering playboys become
shy little boys, dream
monsters become alive
in the morning, gang-
sters are foiled by
children (from the
audience), and monkey's
outwit organ grinders.
Toad also teaches.
She will teach a master
class on the Mall to all
who are interested in
learning more about the
various aspects of
mime. She will charm
everv member of the
audience.
Performance
In her individual
performance. Toad ue
sound effects and re-
corded music to enrich
her show. Her bodv
cartoons include not
only various members of
the animal kingdom, but
also centers on a cur-
rent scene approach
including airline ste-
wardesses and single-
bars.
Join Toad the Mime
and the East Carolina
Student Union a 'he
go harH , n ,fH. maj
or, Apri 17.
Three student soloists featured
in performance with Symphony
Thr� Ctllriont TL
Three student
soloists in the East
Carolina University
School of Music will be
featured in performance
with the ECU Symphony
Orchestra at its Tues
April 10 concert.
The concert is sche-
duled for 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium, and
is free and open to the
public.
The student per-
formers are pianists
Benjamin Leaptrott of
Statesville and Alisa
Wetherington of Kinston
and flutist Mary Jo
White of Greenville.
They were selected
ECU's annual concerto
auditions several months
ago.
The orchestra, under
the baton of conductor
Bobert Hause, will open
the program with the
premiere performance of
a work by ECU com-
poser Alan Leichtling,
"Fantasy Piece-V
Opus 77.
Following will be
selections featuring the
student performers: the
Ibert Concerto for Hutr
and Orchestra (Man Jo
White), Prokofieffs '
Concerto JVo. 1 for
Piano and Orchestra
(Alisa Wetherington),
and Rachmaninoff's
Concerto No. 2 for
Piano and Orchestraben
(Been Leaptrott).
The second half of
the program will consist
of a performance of the
Saint-Saens Symphony
No. 3 in C Minor.
Mary Jo White
Mary Jo White, a
junior at ECU, is a
student of Beatrice
Chauncey and the
daughter of Dr. and
Mrs. James L. White.
A graduate student
at ECU, Alisa Wether-
ington is a student of
Neims Mckelvain. She
is the daughter of M.
G. & ehterington of
Kinston.
Benjamin Leaptrott,
a junior and a student
of Paul Tardif, is the
son of Dr. and Mr
Richard Leaptrott of
Statesville. He
also been recenth
named a winner in
School of Music
Young Artists Com-
petition and will per-
form ia a special honors
recital April 12.
has.
the
A Cry of Players 'is a sensitive
production' by ECU Drama Bent.
Bv SUE Mri.F.nn th w;u -
Antoinette Attell is Toad the Mime
By SUE McLEOD
Staff Writer
East Carolina Drama
Department's final play
of the season, A Cry of
Players, is a sensitive
production which reveals
not only the talents of
director Del Lewis, but
also those of the actors
and technicians of the
Drama Department.
Written by William
Gibson, A Cry of
Players presents an
imaginative view of the
life of young William
Shakespeare, before
fame and fortune. The
play deals intricately
with the troubles a
creative spirit en-
counters while trying to
find a means of un-
leashing that spirit upon
the world
An air of realism
permeates the play, not
only through dialect and
performance, but also
through costume and
setting design. The
rough clothes, furniture,
and language of the
common folk serve as a
marked distinction be-
tween their lives and
that of the refined and
elegant Sir Thomas. The
actual disproportion be-
tween the large number
of commoners and the
few elite is also tact-
fully explored.
The large cast blos-
soms under the direc-
tion of Del Lewis. The
entire show is marked
by spirited and control-
led performances.
Steven Williford delivers
an impressive perfor-
mance as Sir Thomas.
He creates a character
who is proud and im-
perious and yet still
powerfully restrained.
The control and de-
meanor achieved by
Wiliford is precise and
clean and amazing
��"y e. jereme,
who portrays y0ung
Shakespeare's wife,
Anne, presents a
smooth measured, and
forceful performance
She brings Anne to hfe
with a mixture of 8pjrit
ove and strength fogged
Ann WL0nUn'S wi�- In
Anne, the forCe 0f .
woman's candour
cteerthngth �f Ch-
fcter inherent within it
� remarkable reSed
C�y Carter, �
oun� Will, seems to
have difficult) gra l�
�he breadth of PJ
character. He deals
effecmely wh ,he
w�h K fnd tension
hich plagues Will, but
seems too weak in his
moments of desperation.
Nemp, portrayed bv
Aubrey Thomas Siip.
and' ,Sf ff,0TS, he"ty
and full 0f ,ife H-
manages to mainUln
self-confident .ir ,nj
Will. eU
withhei�pV " raw
with lovely COmic
moments and stunning
serious scenes. The �
xlH
lr PLAYERS p?)
�' �- ��





10 April 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
Christian choir sings of 'peace'
Marcella Ruble Rook, astrol
oger
By DKIN1SE Dl'PRKK
Staff Writer
Peat ol mind, joy
and happiness. These
art' life's virtues and
must oi your life is
spent searching lor
them. To make it
harder, you can'l huy,
borrow or lake them.
Either you have it or
you don't.
You can almost tell
when someone has it.
It might be their ra-
diant smile or the way
they carry themselves.
It might be neither.
But one thing's for
sure, il you're happv
somebody will know it.
A group that defin-
itely has it and shows
i is the Fountain of
Life Christian Fellowship
Choir. This young
group of ECU students,
directed b) Music Ed-
ucation major Vernon
Jones.
isn't content to merely
possess peach, joy and
happiness. The) have
taken to singing about
their happiness and the
source ot it.
"K e ing to the
glory and honor of God,
which is reallv impor-
tant to the choir
Rook, astrologer and
psychic appears here
u.
in -
I on thi Mail
. er-
w arris
" Vtllt
and
not - ing
"Like at-
.
tual
-
uwtLts Vl�.
- vour -hoc- surprised when a char
ireioot on the ismatic blonde says,
Mif lli the Student
�: I Marcella Pardon me, Your stars
k. Don't be arc showing
M- R I
-
1C
Barefoot on the
Mail
I
Sh will

. .in.
PLAYERS
continued from page 6
at times ami then to
separate at others, et
both are always within
scene which
Is Will, Fulk, and
Hit hard- in the stocks
and the judgement
scene which follows are
� eptionall) powerful
im redible per-
formances and a blend-
tiiiv and tragic
events. I lie judgement
s( ene is further en-
i hv the lighting
Dav id r Dow ning as
sun streams into Sir
chamber
through latticed win-
dow s.
The conflict between
those in control and
those who long to
create is a never-ending
battle constantly, seeking
balance or medium.
V Oy of Players
thoughtfully ponders
this conflict, presenting
a comprehensive ami
realistic view of the
problems on either side.
Del Lew admirable
direction and a talented
cast have joined to
create a powerful and
meaningful production.
The final show of the
season, A Cry of
Players, runs through
Saturday. April 14, in
Studio Theatre.


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Jones related. "Every-
bod) in the choir is a
Christian and we feel
we know the lull mean-
ing ol the songs we
sing
Jones feels the
choir's Christianity helps
them sing Gospel -migs
convincingly. "It's
easier for a Christian to
sing of Christ and really
mean it than a non-
christian. An audience
can tell who reallv
knows and means what
they're singing he
said.
Choir member Holle)
Hicks definilel) agrees
with Jones's theory.
"It makes a lug differ-
ence in your singing
when you've accepted
(.lirist as otir personal
Savior. You're singing
to praise and glorif)
God she said.
Ms. Hicks said
Christ's love is really
evident in the choir.
'Everyone in the choir
is a Christian, and ou
;m jusl look around
and see the love she
continued. " song
Chap Edwards taught
us during our recent
revival seems to sum
up the vvaj everyone
feels
1 lie words arc
special to all of us, and
I d love to share
them she said. The
song goes like tin "I
love you with the love
ol the Lord. Yes, I love
you with the love ol the
Lord, I can see it in
your face, the glory ol
my King. Yes, I love
vou with the love ol the
Lord
Although the choir
was oflicially formed
earl) Spring Semester
1979, they've been sing-
ing together lor some
time. I he choir grew
out ol Fountain of Life
fellow Iship meetings.
Every Wednesday night
at the meetings, we
would all sing and I'd
play the piano Jones
related.
Alter a great deal of
interest was expressed
by fellowship members,
the choir was formed.
At first, our main goal
was to sing at the
Fellowship Revival held
at Wright Auditorium
February 1-3, 1979
Jones said.
"After the revival
was over, the members
wanted the choir to
continue Jones added.
The group continued to
rehearse and performed
at churches in Elizabeth
City, N.C. and Wake
Forest, N.C.
I he choir- next
concert will be April 12,
1979 at Wright Audi-
torium. The starting
time will be 7:30 p.m.
At the end of our
concert. w e will he
doing -everal mass
numbers with the ECl
Co-pel Ensemble
which i- directed
Johnice Johnson
Jones related.
Jones believes
choir is an extension of
Fountain of Life Fel-
low-hip. He said fel-
lowship meeting- give
everyone a chance to
express their religion
openly.
W e welcome every -
one at our meeting
I here are no racial or
religious harriers. Just
stop by at 7:00 p.m.
W ednesday night at the
Ledonia Wright Afro-
American Culture
Center he said.
Jones, a voice stud-
ent, said the choir tries
Io do a varietv of
gospel songs. "In a
program, you catch the
audience attention
)V
tin
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with a variety of music.
We try not to do all
fast songs or all slow
songs. We mix every-
thing up he said.
"We also try to
cover various artists. A
few whose works we've
used are James Cleve-
land, Walter Hawkins,
Donald Vale and Andre
Crouch Jones said.
Aside from thirty
melodious voices, the
choir is strengthened hv
a fine instrumental
section. These musi-
cians are Tony Beet on;
percussion, Pamelv
Henry and Director
Vernon Jones; keyboard,
and Harvey Stoke
bass.
Peace of mind, jov
and happines- Each
member of Fountain of
Life Fellowship Choir
has attained these
precious virtues.
This group of ECU
Christian songsters isn't
satisfied to merely have
this true happiness.
The) want to share it
with everyone thev
meet The Fellowship
Choir share their hap-
piness with others bv
singing of the one who
give- them peace and
jov -Christ.
I ou might -av
Fellowship singers
merely agreeing
the Psalmist.
I will praise thee. O
lr.l. with rnv whole
heart; 1 will shew forth
all thev marvellous
work I will be glad
and rejoice in thee
will -ing priase to thev
name. () thou most
High Psalm 9: 1-2
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f
0 � 0 0





Pepe 8 F0UNTA1NHEAD 10 April 1979
Matt Weinstein brings Play fail
Weinstein brings Playfair here
hen was the last
time you played a game
with two hundred laugh-
ing smiling people a
ganu' where everybod)
wins and nobod) loses?
That's what in -tore
on April IT, 1979. at 2
and 6 p.m. on the Eat
Carolina University Mall
when the Student Union
presents plavfair a- part
"Barefoot on the
Mall'1 festivities.
"Barefoot on the
Mall" i- a festival
which include- all types
ot arts, crafts. food,
and entertainment.
Playfair i- the creation
of Matt Weinstein.
Playfair give- adults a
hance to meet each
other by playing toge-
ther, by sharing the
joyful and laughing side
of themselves says
Wein-tein. "When we
were young we used to
form play communi-
ties We used to get
together with our
friends and our main
activity was to play
together and have fun.
Playing together was
our main way of rela-
ting to each other. As
adults, we never get
the chance to do that
any more, and that's
what Playfair is all
about
When Matt Wein-
stein first started play-
ing with groups of
adults, he soon found
that most traditional
games wouldn't work at
a Playfair because they
all involved winners and
losers ami competition
among the player
"1 wanted to plav
game- with people
where everybod) feel-
good says Weinstein,
but in working with
traditional game- 1
found that someone
always wound up feel-
ing bad, because they
were left out or weren't
fa?t enough or -mart
enough or were unfami-
liar with the skills
involved
So Vv einstein began
changing old games and
inventing his own
games, game- that
allow all players to feel
good because they are
playing with each other
instead of against each
other. As a result,
most of the games that
will be played at
Playfair on April 17,
will be physically active,
non-competitive large
group games that no
one on campus has ever
played before.
In most situations
where adults plav toge-
ther, you have to be a
good athlete to have
any fun av- Wein-
stein. "That's
not true at a Plav lair.
People come to me all
the time and say "I hat'
games but I loved
Playfair That's be
cause Playfair games
are so supportive. No
one ever feels incom-
petent. You can't win
or lose at Playfair
games.
Matt einstein has
toured the country with
Playfair, playing with
groups from colleges
and universities, school
systems, hospital staffs,
social service agencies,
growth centers, ami
-enior citizen programs.
"It's with each other
-tates Playfair"s creator.
"Unfortunately, we
don't have the structure
in our society for ex-
pressing our appre-
ciative feelings easily
according to Weinstein.
"In designing Playfair
we've provided a struc-
ture and a space where
that can happen and
doe- happen
Does it always work?
"Sure it does he
says with a grin. "Can
you imagine what a
powerful experience it is
to be with hundreds of
people who arc laughing
and feeling good about
you? Come on out and
play
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j 113 GRANDE AVE.
at j COLLEGE VIEW jCLEANERS
Sherlock's
Restaurant
On 5th St. across from
ihe Hook Barn
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I604 Dickinson Ave.
758-S4SO
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Three voices win
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WEEK OF PREGNANCY
$150.22
Free pregnancy test, birth control and
problem pregnancy counseling For
further information call 832-0535 (toll-
free number 800-221-2568) between
9 A M -5 P M weekdays
Raleigh Women's Health
Organization
917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N.C. 27603
Three voice students
in the East Carolina
University School of
Music were winners in
a recent competition
sponsored by the North
Carolina chapter of the
National Association of
Teachers of Singing in
Greensboro.
Anne Gunn of Dur-
ham and Ira Jacobs III
of Wilmington, both
sophomores at ECU,
won first place in their
respective categories.
Both are students of
Gladys White of
ECU voice faculty.
the
William Lear of
Kannapolis won second
place in his category.
He is a student of
Antonia Dalapas.
The three, as win-
ners in the state com-
petition, will be allowed
to compete in the Re-
gional NATS Compe-
tition at Shandendoa
Conservatory, Win-
chester, Va later this
month.
31 ART YOUR SUMMER IN
THE N.C. SOUNDS
Wilderness canoe expeditions and
cycle tour of the Pamlico, Albemarle, and
Currituck Sounds within an intentionally
Christian community.
Canoe Expedition May 14-21 $85
Cycle Tour Aug. 2-12 $110
Contact: Robin Hulbert
Camp Leach Rt. 2, Box 391 pjone
Washington, N.C, 27889 9199234221
Cowboy chic is latest fad
By LARRY POPELKA
I'm trading in my
disco shoes for a pair
of cowboy boots. In-
stead of the hustle, I'm
going to learn to dance
the cotton-eyed Joe.
And while most folks
are buzzing to shiney
dance floors in sports
cars, I'll be searching
for a honkey tonk
saloon in a pickup
truck.
Today you may think
il crazy, dumping disco
to play cowboy. But I
won't be the only one.
In the months to come,
cowboy chic will stomp
America by storm, and
within a year millions
will throw away their
three-piece suits to
become Saturday night
cowboys.
And they won't all
be in the wilds of the
rural southwest. In
New York, Los Angeles,
Chicago and every other
major city in the
country, they'll soon be
drinking Lone Star beer
COUPON
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any Food Order over $1.50
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INCLUDING VEGETARIANS
and listening to Willie
Nelson.
Playing
cowboy-America's
oldest pastime-is a re-
surging fad, and it all
oddly started about a
year ago when Esquire
magazine Editor Clay
Felker went to Houston
to make a speech at
Rice University.
After the speech,
-some of the people at
Rice invited their guest
speaker out for a drink
at a local saloon called
Gilley's Club.
What Felker saw
inside Gilley's made his
head spin.
The building was
huge. The inside
covered a whole acre of
land. There were 40
pool tables, four sep-
arate bars, hundreds of
tables and a dance floor
nearly the size of
basketball court.
The people inside
the bar all seemed to
be dressed in costumes.
They wore ten-gallon
hats, cowboy boots,
faded jeans and belt
with their names etched
on the back.
But the didn't look
like real cowboys-the
kind that ride horses,
rope cattle and carr sii
shooter Rather, the)
seemed to be sort ol a
new, oung, uban breed
of cowboy. The drove
pickup, vsorked on oil
rigs and carried bottles
ol Lone Star.
w hat amused I elkcr
the most, though, wen-
all the contraption- the
cowboys at Cille as had
to entertain ihemselves.
Thv put quarter-
into a me tianized
punching hag and took
nnglil wing at it a
tin- vxoiuen (or cowgirl,
a they're called) looked
� n. Sometime they hit
the bag so hard it cut
their hands, staining th
bag with blood
Already the urki
cowbo) lifestyle has
begun infiltrating se
eral major �ities.
Student- and
iiieruun- everywhi
are starting to i
co who) hat-
Loot nd vesta nd
Mis.
Redneck saloons ar
opening up in
middle ol urban ai
and tin- in breed
v i.ung. -ll k I- 'I .
rowbo) 1 - stomping
u a through ii
meri an v hile tuui,
� mii n i r v - i ngi-r- chi
M getting ba k
ih- bai lib
Latham explains
urban cowboy a- a
who-i time ha- i utni
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Mugs, Ice buckets, Glasses up to 50 OFF
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One group T-Shlrts 40-50 OFF
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One group wall posters 50 OFF
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Slide rules 75 OFF
� � �

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10 April 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 9
Green propels
Z Purple team
past Gold 30-6
Anthony Collins (left) and Theodore Sutton (right) scored touchdowns in Saturdays sprins same
photo l John II. Grojjan
Dye pleased with
rushing attack
B iwin iKKm
Staff W riter
V ith the football
ad, Pirate
ich Pat
ifronted with
dbility ot having
rise that v 111 be
� 11 � t r i m
o i fe n s e o 1
i tg
X the defense
� tdlining
� Pirate football
with such
ark Valen-
� -did Hall and
mmy Summer, this
-quad will tea-
no less than
ensive team.
offense flayed
- iturday when
they i lobbered the first
string defensive team
� a $0-6 win. With a
i kfield that features
iperstar running backs
such as Anthony
llins, Theodore Sutton
and Sam Harrell. the
Pirate- seem destined to
prove that 197' may
well be the year ot the
offense
"We are farther
along on offense and
farther behind on
defense said Dye,
referring to the progress
made by the football
team thts year during
its annual Spring drills.
Quarterback Leander
Green demonstrated his
indispensability to the
Pirate cause in the
scrimmage contest as he
almost singlehandedly
guided the offense to
nearly 400 yards total
ohense (334 rushing62
passing).
According to Dye,
the only thing preven-
ting Green from becom-
lflK great quar
� is his inconsis-
tent pa
Dye has set some
standards for next
) ear offense. "Our
goal lor next season is
to average 300 yards
rushing and 150 yards
passing It we do that,
then vve will average
thirty point- a ball-
n e
By tar. the most
experienced part of the
offensive structure next
year will be the bat k-
field.
They're something
else, aren't they?" -aid
!)�� about his five
backs who will assume
trout line with several
returning veteran- in-
cluding Wayne Inman,
Mitchell Johnson, Joe
Godette and Matt Mul-
holland.
In passing situations,
the familiar Green to
Billy Ray Washington
combination will still be
there, but gone is the
fleet-footed bidder of
the school receiving
record Terry Gallaher.
In his place -pin end
Vern Davenport will
sacrifice quickness and
speed tor a pair of
sticky hand
Vern is a good
receiver noted Dye,
but he just doesn't
have the -peed of a
Gallaher
'We're farther along on offense
and farther behind on defense. ()Ur
goal for next season is to average
300 yards rushing and 150 rtirds
passing. If Uf do that we will
average 30 points a game
ECU coach Pat D
the majority of the
rushing duties next fall.
"Right now, our five
starting backs will be
Sutton, Collins, Harrell,
Roy Wiley and Mike
Hawkins, with the pos-
sibility of Marvin Cobb.
We're also expecting
some help from our
freshmen backs, too
The offense will also
feature an experienced
(reen runs left on an
option play
photo by John H. Groganj
nth
m
too
By DAVID MRKUn
Staff Writer
A potent second quarter offense lea i, East
Carolina Pirate quarterback Lender Green - red
unanswered point- a- the P ,rple team
an easy 30-6 victory over the Gold squad � the
annual Purple-Gold intrasquad football game,
Saturday, in Ficklen Stadium.
It - obvious we've got -orne problems
on the offense and a lack of defense admitted
Pirate head coach Pat Dye af'ter the scrimm
"Anything in the way of bright spots would hav
be the offense. I'm glad we don't have to lin
and play a football game now, though
In the contest, the first team offense worl
with the second team defense (Purple) against the
second team offense and the first team defense
(gold). As many a- twenty player- were absent from
the contest because of injury related probl
including five defensive regular Among them was
Mar linebacker Mike Brewington who missed the
game because of a hip pointer.
Compared to how we've been in past vea
this stage, I'd say we are farther ahead on
and farther behind on defense noted Dye.
Offense was definitely the name oi th
Saturday a- the Purpie often showed
experience by racking up 334 yds. on the gt ind
and 62 more in the air under the lead
Leander Green.
Although the Gold defense held the I
offense at bay in the first quarter. thev
contain the explosive Purple backfield o
Collins, Theodore Sutton and Sam Harrell
second quarter of action.
I he versatile Collins who semed i
-hap scored the first touchdown of the dax
three yard plunge and kicker Bill Lamm added the
extra pomt to make the -ere 7-0 in favor oi the
Purple.
A Green to Billy Ray Washington pass
Purple to a
ir: the extra
point attempt, nevertheless, he did
impressive M yard field g with thr
on the clock before the ait to give
16-0 advantage over the Gold at the half.
Freshman Gold quarterback Aaron Stewart
-bowed potential m the opening minute- oi the
second half when he broke loose tor 16 yards and a
touchdown. Stewart showed excellent quickm ss
the field lor the most part, yet his inexperience led
to a couple fumbles. Gold running back tailed in
the try at a two point conversion.
Later in the half, Purple running back- Sutton
and Collins added one touchdown apiece on short
runs and Lamm was successful on each extra point
attempt to close out the scoring. Both Sutton and
Collins finished with 90 yard- rushing while Sam
Harrell added an additional 74 yards on the ground.
Green's passing attack was sporadic, however.
he did show some ol his old form when he teamed
with split end Vern Davenport on a 38 yd. pass
day leading to the first touchdown by Collins. His
scoring strike to Washington was the onlv other
pass he completed.
Defensively, the Gold showed some familiar faces
and some new ones. Chuck Jackson led the Gold
with 20 tackles with Thomas McLaunn and Brian
McDaniel were close behind with 17 and tackles
re-pectivelv.
Two freshmen, Andre Bentley
Norris, led the strong Purple defense
fumble recoveries while Bentlev
interception to his credit.
According to Dye, the key to winning all games
on next years' schedule will be the defense.
However the rebuilding task he laces will be tough
since six defensive lettermen were lost.
The Purple-Gold game traditionally ends tin-
Spring drills, but several more days are left in the
alloted 20 days of practice. Dye plan- to end
practice Thursday. Included in the final days will be
another scrimmage game not open to the public.
24 yard- and six point- vaulted the
commanding 13-0 lead. Lamm tailed
mnect on an
- � onds left
the Purple a
and Smokev
Lach had two
also had an
Purple
Gold
0 16 7 7
0 0 6 0
30
6
P - Collins 3 run (Lamm kick)
- Washington 24 pass from Green (Kick tailed)
P - Lamm 47yd. field goal
G - Stewart 16 run (2 pt. conv. failed)
P - Sutton 2 run (Lamm kick)
P - Collins 7 run (Lamm kick)
A - 1000 .
Plimpton to speak
George Plimpton,
noted author and ama-
teur sportsman, will ap-
pear at East Carolina
University in the Hend-
drix Theatre on Tues-
day, April 10, at 8 p.m.
He will present a
lecture on the topic
'An Amateur Among
the Pros The lecture
is under the sponsorship
of the Student Union
Lecture Series Commit-
tee. Plimpton is re-
placing Rev. Jesse Jack-
son on the 1978,1979
series.
Born in New York,
George Plimpton was
educated at Harvard,
Cambridge University,
and Franklin Pierce Col-
lege. He is fully
qualified to dispel the
illusions about the easy
road to professionalism.
?
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Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 10 April 1979
Tyson decides
to remain at
ECU next year
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
Al Tyson said Thursday he has decided to
remain at East Carolina next year and will not
transfer to another school.
Ivson, a 6-ll freshman center from nearby
Winterville, quit the team near the end of the
season and did not travel toSouthBend, Ind. for the
Pirates final game against Notre Dame.
I've talked with Coach Odom and I've decided
to come hack next season and play Tyson said.
He's been very honest with me and very
encouraging about the team next year. He's told
everybod) on the squad that they're all going to get
a fair shot and he's told me the same thing
Tyson started several games this season and
finished the year with a 6.0 scoring average while
grabbing four rebounds per game . His best
performance oi the year came against N.C. State
when lie gunned in 26 points and had eight
rebounds.
Al and I have talked a lot about the situation
and I think he's making the best decision for the
future concerning his basketball career by staying at
East Carolina Odom said.Al has a big'future
here at East Carolina and I'm looking forward to
working with him next year. He's certainly a real
asset to the program here
I lie Last Carolina basketball program still faces
alledged recruiting violations concerning the recrui-
tmenl ol Tyson. ECU athletic officials are scheduled
to meet with the members of the NCAA Enforcement
Committee within the next two weeks. Ton was
"I "bject of h hitter recruiting struggle between
East Carolina and Mississippi last vear.
Ml ol the NCAA violations are not true and
there's nothing for me to worry about Tyson said
earlier.
son
will be the Pirate- lone returning center
next year. Greg Cornelius, the Bucs starting center
tor the last three years, graduates in May.
Eighi lettermen will return next year including
-tarter- Herd Krn . . nrgp Mavnor. The
Pirates finished ith a 12-15 record
Yankees to win
AL crown again ?
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Assistant Sports Editor
Leander Green is smothered by defense
photo by John H. Grogan
Softball team suffers losses in tourney
b jiivuvn Dupree
s)ort- ritrr
Hie Lad) Pirate
Softball -quad dropped
their record 9-9 this
weekend after compet-
g hi tin- North Caro-
5tate Lfniversit)
onal Softball
irnament.
East Carolina's
ening round matchup
with North Carolina
A&T University ended
with a 4-2 Buc victory.
US. I scored their runs
in the third when Dove
received a base-on-balls
m ECU pitcher Marv
Bryan Carlyle.
Dove -cored on a
triple by Mary Hall,
who later -cored when
ECl .fanis Parlon
ermrred a grounder bv
Govan.
Lillian Barnes led off
the !ir-t inning for the
Lad) Bui - with a
single. She later scored
when a drive by Robin
Faggarl wa- too hot to
Barnes again reached
ha and scored in the
third. She walked and
was driven home by a
double off the bat of
shortstop Mary Powell.
In the fourth, Teresa
W hitley singled and
waltzed home courtesy
ol a LuAnn Davis
-ingle. Donna LaVictoire
reached base on an
& T error and was
pushed across the plate
by Carlyle.
The Lady Pirates
dropped their next two
game- in the double-
elimination event, how-
ever.
INC-Chapel Hill
bested the Bucs 3-2 to
advance the semifinals.
Lisa Perry led off a
third inning Lady Tar
Heel attack by securing
the first base on an
error by Davis. She
later scored on a throw-
ing error at the plate.
Cindy Kress followed
with a single and
scored on Wendy
Stout's RBI single.
Mauri Cosgrove singled .
and scampered home on
a one-bagger by Angie
Ferguson.
The only ECU of-
fense came in the fifth
as W hitley reached first
on a fielders choice and
scored as Donna La-
ictoire legged her first
homer of the season.
The crushing blow of
the Tourney came in a
devastating 14-1 defeat
at the hands of host
NCSU. The Lady Wolf-
pack quickly jumped on
Bob Hope knows just
how much Red Cross
helps veterans.
the Bucs1 hurler for three
tir-t inning run
Hie big inning
lor State was the
fourth, with Joy Ussery
knocking out a three-run
homer and Amv Carter
a two-run four-bagger.
NCSL tallied nine run-
in the fourth.
Appalachian State
University captured the
title with a 6-3 win over
NCSL in the finals. The
Lady Mountaineers went
ECl meets NCSL
today at 3 p.m. in a
double header on the
ECl softball field. The
Lady Pirates compete in
the Appalachian State
Invitational Tournament
Friday
First in a two-part series
At first glance, the American
League pennant seems all but sewn
up. With the additions of free agent
pitchers Tommy John and Luis Tiant
and outfielder Juan Beniquez, the
two-time champion New York
Yankees appear unbeatable.
Sure, the Yanks should again win
the A.L. pennant, but they are
certainly not guaranteed it. To win a
fourth straight A.L. flag, the Yanks
must avoid team dissension and
lengthly slumps, a factor that almost
stopped them last season.
Also in the way of the Yanks are
the Boston Red Sox, California
Angels, Kansas City Royals,Mil-
waukee Brewers, and Texas Rangers.
These five teams appear to be
the only American League clubs that
have a prayer to stop Bob Lemon's
(or really George Steinbrenner's)
Yankees.
New York is loaded at every
position. Thurman Munson returns at
catcher and though his numbers
dropped a bit last season, he remains
one of the game's best behind the
plate.
The Yankee infield is super-solid.
First baseman Chris Chambliss,
second bagger Willie Randolph,
shortstop and World Series hero
Bucky Dent, and third baseman Graig
Nettles form about the best infield
group in the majors today.
The infield is adequately backed
at first base by Jim Spencer and at
the other positions by unsung World
Series star Brian Doyle, who filled in
during the fall classic for Willie
Randolph and batted .438.
The Yankee outfield is deep and
balanced. Reggie Jackson, who will
be the designated hitter quite often,
heads the group. Speedster Mickey
Rivers, Lou Piniella, Roy White, Juan
Beniquez, Paul Blair and Jay
Johnstone are all quite talented
members of the Yankee outfield
group.
It will not be a surprise to anyone
if one or even two of these member-
end up on the trade block before
long.
The pitching staff is awesome
Manager Lemon can choose from C
Young winner Ron Guidry (25-3 last
year with a 1.74 ERA), Catfish
Hunter, John Tiant, Ed Figueroa,
Don Gullett and Jim Beattie for a
starting corps. Rich Gossage is a
super reliever and should be joineij
in the bullpen by Dick Tidrow.
The Yanks, as should be evident,
have an awesome lineup. Barrinp
disaster, they should coast to the
East Division championship, the A.L.
pennant and a third straight World
Series crown.
The story on the Red Sox is that
losses from the pitching staff, nameh
Tiant, will be their achilles heal. This
is not so. The Sox still have an
awesome lineup that includes Jin,
Rice, Red Lynn, Carl Yastrzemski.
Carlton Fish and Butch Hobson. The
will still batter opposing pitcher-
Bosox pitching losses will not hurt
because Red Sox pitching has never
been that great anyhow.
The Brewers, like Boston, have a
super offensive lineup. Headed bj
Larry Hisle, Gorman Thomas, Cecil
Cooper and Sal Bando, Milwaukee
led the League in homers a year
ago.
Milwaukee pitching is noteworthy
also. Mike Caldwell was the C
Young Award runnerup to Guidrv last
year when he posted a 22-9 record
and a 2.37 earned run average. The
Brewers picked up Jim Slaton during
the off-season to go along with other
starters Larry Sorenson, Bill Traer-
and young Moose Haas.
hat all these names mean is
that the Brewers do have the
potential to be a big winner. But,
more than likely they will have to
count on Yankee pitfall- if thev are
to survive the regular season.
WESTERN SIZZLIA
PRESENTS
STUDENT SPECIALS
Beef Tips
N.Y. Strip
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Shishkbob
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Party facilities available
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Title
Fountainhead, April 10, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 10, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.557
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57192
Preferred Citation
Cite this item
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