Fountainhead, April 3, 1979






Circulation 10,000
Carolina University
North
Vol. 55, No. yT
3 April 1979
VM-Pres.dent-Elert Chadie Sherrod was sworn in
londa night, and for a while his duties will
include IW of SGA president. Sherrod was the
wnl executive officer sworn in.
Sherrod
By LUKE WHISNANT and RICHY SMITH
News Editor Assistant News Editor
Vice-President-Elect Charlie Sherrod was sworn in
Monday night at the 5:00 p.m. Student Government
Association (SGA) meeting. The oath of office was
administered by Kieran Shanahan, Attorney General.
The vice-president was the only officer of the
four executive positions to be sworn in, and since
President Tommy Joe Payne's term of office ends
today, Sherrod will begin his year as acting
president.
Brett Melvin, who won the presidential election
in a recount of last Wednesday's ballots, was not
sworn in Monday due to alleged campaign
violations, according to Shanahan.
The swearing in of Treasurer-Elect Ricky Lowe
was also postponed due to campaign charges
brought against him by his opponent, Steve
U Geary. Lowe was unavailable for comment at
press time.
Lynn Calder, Secretary-Elect, was out of town
for the ceremony. She will be sworn in at a later
date.
About the alleged violations, Shanahan said that
he had referred the cases to the Review Board, and
that he hoped the Board would act on the matter
by next Monday or Tuesday.
The charges against Melvin were filed by his
Acting Presid
KSElf har T Un�n
.��rCnXM,Ure �f
MeJvin declined comment on the matter.
recounted IITt ?�? election were
cou' of1 L hay.l l� 3 �����"� first
Vice-Prefident n m 'n8' according to then
ballotV DaV,d Cartw�ght. "Some of the
ballots were counted over and there was some
discrepancy in the count he said.
by a m.�?�Umf 7nOWed' h�WeVer' that MeIvin won
the needeTw 1? V�teS more than
MeW PerCem �f the t0tal votes ��
Croats M-SUPP�rti " the e,eCti�n Came froPra the
Heailh10868' J�neS' S,a' A-k, .�dP Allied
wi the presidenual race, was backed bv the polls at
Be Ik, Garret Fleming, Greene.Clement, Cotton and
.ndVe�iedd�Mndenh "er
aa Ifl Umstead dorm
from Flehe'rWhTe6 1, 'T "UPP�rt
Student SuM; Sore ' d�rmS a"d the
Charlie Sherrod, who was running unopposed
wonthe vice-presidential race with a fotal ofljti
CheA-l thFelheCretarS Lyn" Ca,der deated
Cheryl Felb.nger by 668 votes, even though
Felbinger was disqualified for not turning in an
expense account two days prior to the election
Kicky Lowe defeated Steve O'Cearv for SGA
treasurer by 290 votes.
"There were the typical write-in votes for
offices, said Cartwright, "including Thomas
Jefferson, M.ckey Mouse, and some other
well-known personalities
As usual, voter turnout was low. "The voter
turnout ,s absolutely apathetic, ridiculous said
Lester Wad, freshman class president. "Onlv twenty
percent of the student body took the time to vote
lor a person who is going to represent them in all
activities concerning the university, and it is onlv
those twenty percent who will have the right to
complain. 6
. A 0t?erL SGArelated news, Kieran Shanahan
introduced the recommendations of the Joint Judicial
Board to the legislature Mondav night (see related
story this page).
The legislature defeated a motion to chance
the recommendation to "Favorable" on LB 21-4 a
bill to appropriate $500 to the National Student
Speech and Hearing Association. The monev was
to be used for the group to attend a speech
convention in London, England.
The SGA decided to leave five vacant legislator
positions unfilled, since there are onlv two regular
business meetings left this year.
"MW -mW-w- lc,uger tV o6� votes even thn��u I ���, uictr mere are onlv two regu
m W W S' eVen though business meeting, left this year
Ur. Home retires after almost 20 rears
By WILLIAM SHIRES always active educator hnhh L 7 ' 5
ECU New. Bureau administer . flT' .h,�bb!e8' but. TC� had Ity, facilities and "Fin��. .M ;� ��, �
Dr. John H. (Jack)
�iornc is retiring this
-pring after nearly 20
a Dean of
idmissions of East
Carolina University, to
ursue his many hob-
bies and at the same
ime maintain a lifelong
nterest in young people
n preparing themselves
veil to go to college.
"HI keep busy
ays the trim, slim and
always active educator
administrator, a familiar
figure with wavy white
hair, much loved and
respected both on the
campus and in Green-
ville.
"I'll golf, fish, do
some traveling, raise
flowers, re-do the house
inside and outside,
repair furniture which I
have collected, and
read says Home, who
turns the traditional
retirement age of 65
this month. "I've been
piddling with these
hobbies, but never had
the time to do them
Working with pros-
pective students knock-
ing hopefully at East
Carolina's doors has
been the chief ocupier
of Home's time for the
past two decades during
which the term most
frequently applied to
the school was "rapidly
growing
And rapid growth of
ECU into a major,
diversified university m
terms of an enrollment
of more than 12,500,
What's Inside
ECl Playhouse production of A
Cry of Players is reviewed pictorially,
See p.6.
Governor Jim Hunt, Leo Jenkins,
and Thomas Brewer dedicate the new
Medical School. See p. 3
? George C. Scott's hardcore
portrays a "sleazy underworld" and
"erotic exploitation See p. 6.
GEORGE C. SCOTT
faculty, facilities and
programs indeed has
been spectacular. Twen-
ty years ago, for
example, the combined
offices of the director of
admissions and registrar
of then East Carolina
Teachers College ECTC
handled only about
1,800 admissions appli-
cations per year. This
year, not counting the
graduate schools, appli-
cation for admission
total more than 10,000.
The baby booms
which followed World
War II and Korea were
big contributing factors
to the college
pressure of the 60's and
70's, Home said.
"When it came, 18
and 19 years later the
colleges were not
equipped for it. They
didn't have the dorms.
Students were looking
for any school which
had the space for
themhe said. And
limited space continues
to be a problem.
'The goal is to
achieve a happy medi-
um between quality and
quantity he says.
Home also notes
other factors. There is a
"greatly different clien-
tele today he says.
ECU Judicial Board meets,
makes recommendations
By RICKI GLIARMIS
Staff Writer
The ECU Joint Judicial Board, after meetina this
pnng for the first time in three years hlsmade
everal recommendations for the improvement oHhe
ampus judiciary system. ' the
The recommendations will now go to the Student
-overnment Association for review
Kieran Shanahan, SGA attorney general and
airman of the Judicial board, said" that lie work
t the board is now over and the proposals will be
produced to the SGA. He said that the board
harges the SGA to fulfill its responsibly � the
wiftT k308 Whh aH du' P-d-ce and
oard �" recoramendations proposed by the
Seven recommendations are being sent to the
islature. The first is the SGA create a new all
oundl t0 bC eDtitled "Acdem Honor
Shanahan explained that the existing Honor
ounal ,s weighed down with cases. If "he
.commendanon passes disciplinary problems will be
Ul be hind, r KC�UnCil While academic m"ers
Ui be handled by the proposed board.
e Lmn fUrrther "PUined th� t�e board would
e 7h7Tl 8even pLerson8-The chairm� ���
on�r r F �� who � the "iT� of the
onor Councfi. Three faculty members will be
eT,Let1nbHhe dreUor � thrCC udenfrot
on a"? "�n0r kCouncil- (The members would
piinaVbr) �" membere �f �
The Academic Honor Council will try cases
dealing with cases of academic dishonesty referred
by the appropriate dean. Appeals from the board
will be to the chancellordf.
of ?nh"i rtecommendations include the establishment
ol an Interim Honor council" for the fall srhnnl
year of 1979-80. Chooi
J It was recommended that the SGA allocate
annually the sum of money required to fun" Te
Student GovevaBent.udical Handbook. It was also
suggested that the Judiciary annually submit a
budget for approval by the SGA. This budget would
include the salaries of the judiciary positions and all
other costs mcdental to the operation and
mamtenance of the Judiciary including the allocation
for the Judicial Handbook, according to Shanahan
SGA attorney general was also proprosed to be
bXT f f�.r Preparing and 8ubm�"ing the annual
Blue8 RihKr 'r JudlCUry- In �ther � the
Blue Ribbon Committee members will be asked to
submit two names to the SGA president for hi.
selection of attorney general no later than one week
after he is named the winner of the election in the
spnnff.
?k J!Z la,8t re�mmendstion made to the SGA is
tha the Honor Council and Review board be picked
in the spring proceeding the fall that they will take
office It was also proposed that the board leave
-LHF, �peVn,each board M n dtc"��e to be
selected from the freshmen class.
Shanahan explained that some of the
recommendations will have to be presented to the
SGA in the form of bills while other proposals can
be introduced as resolutions or constitutional
amendment �
'Financial aid is avail-
able and has made a
tremendous difference in
enabling people to go to
college.
"For someone who
wants to go to college,
if he will prepare
himself in high school
there's no reason in the
world he cannot get a
college education this
day and time. Preparing
himself is the kev
Home, himself a
teacher and professor
for 44 years-tenured as
a full professor in
education-believes that
today's "average" stud-
ent doesn't have the
"background in math,
reading and grammar"
of those of a few years
ago.
"Certainly my inter-
est in young people
preparing for college
and preparing well will
not be diminished
Home said. "It's a
lifelong interest
Recently he atte-
nded an occasion at
Grainger High School in
Kinston, N.C, and
tound the meeting in a
third floor room. "It
was the same room that
housed the oldchemistry
lab where I began
teaching, in chemistry
and physics, and urging
scholarship back in
1936 he recalls.
Born in Rocky Mount
and raised Spencer,
N.C, Home attended
the University of Chic-
ago and holds BA
MA, and Edc. degrees
from UNC- Chapel Hill.
He taught at Grainger
for six years, at Polkton
in Anson County for
one year, served as
principal at Grainger for
10 years and joined the
East Carolina faculty as
associate professor of
education in 1957. IN
1963, he became Dean
of Admissions and the
Office of Registrar was
separated from Admis-
sions.
He and his wife,
former Marguerite Coc-
hran of Lacona, Iowa,
are parenty of two
children- John Jr a
Laurinburg "attorney
recently named one of
five "Outstanding You-
ng Men in North
Carolina by the
Jaycees, and daughter
Ann, of New Orleans,
La.
The Homes will
continue to make their
home in Greenvillle.
"We've lived in eastern
North Carolina for 40
years or more-with the
exception of World War
II (Home landed in
Normandy June 6, 1944
and won six campaign
stars, other decorations
including the Bronze
Star, Silver Star and
Purple Heart) - and we
see no reason to move
away to Florida, or
somewhere. Our friends
are here
So is East Crolina
University and the
young people the
Homes love.
"I'd like to see East
Carolina with a multi-
million dollar scholar-
ship fund10 million the
proceeds of which would
be used for academic
scholarshipsa million
dollars a year. Think
what could be done he
says. "That's what we
need more than any-
thing right now
Tributes to Home
were voiced by ECU
Chancellor Thomas B.
Brewer and by Dr.John
M. Howell, Vice Chan-
Dr. John H Home, retiring Dean of Admisak
has served through 19 years of often sTul
growth in enrollment, facdities a�3 SPectactti�
Fri u � � "Y � l,es &nd programs at
ECL. He joined the East Carolina faculty in 1957.
cellor for Academic
Affairs.
"I have known Dr.
Home during the entire
time he has been at
ECU, and our associa-
tions have been varied.
For four years, I also
an admissions officer as
I was serving as dean
of the graduate school.
1 have interacted with
him as a fellow
professor and as his
immediate administrative
superior. In all of these
relationships, he has
been an extraordinarily
satisfactory colleague.
He has been in tune
with the growth of ECU
�n the paM and he ha
contributed immeasu-
rably ,o the progress
which has been
realized Howell said.
Brewer said, "Dur-
ing my First vear at
�ast Carolina , Dr.
Home completely cap-
tured my confidence
and gained mv deep
appreciation for the
many contributions he
has made to this
institution. He has
played a unique role in
helping build East
Carolina into a major
diversified university
White removed
Photo by Jobs Grogaa
Marc Barnes
Acting Editor
By LUKE WHISNANT
News Editor
FOUNTAINHEAD
Editor Doug White was
removed from office last
Tuesday by an executive
session of the Media
Board. The removal was
effective immediately.
Several members of
the Board declined to
comment on the decis-
ion, which was reached
in closed session. No
official reason for
White's removal has yet
been given; however,
there is some specu-
lation that the Board's
action is a temporary
one.
A History major
from New Bern, White
had been a staff
member since his fresh-
man year and editor
since last April. He is
also chairman of the
Student Union Coffee-
house Committee.
The Media Board
named Marc Barnes as
Acting Editor. Barnes
had been FOUNTAIN.
HEAD News Editor until
last week.
Due to the change
u� personnel, FOUN-
TAINHEADS anou.
Mampoon
will be ' delayed. i he.
issue traditionally
appears on April Fool's
Day.
'�.
t

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j
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 3 April 1979
REBEL
We
Phil Arrington and
e Blaylock will be
featured writers at
RKBEL reading on
Vpnl 4 at 7 p.m.
Mendenhall Co-
ise. Alter they
we will open the
any attending
would like to
his or her work.
reshments will be
1 d Everyone is
Housing
REBEL
rhe following people
he ks in the
office: Janet
Rickey Lowe;
Stalls Toni
Michael F.
and John
Checks may be
up from " 3-5,
MonThurs. at the
KEBEL office in the
ation i,enter.
Lecture
rhurs April 5,
ni. in BD-302,
S iology-Anthropo-
I ub will sponsor a
ion bv Dr.
Phelps entitled:
HEOLOG1 OF
WU NORTH
VROUNA. All in-
are welcome
d to attend.
Students with an
interest in foreign
languages, cultures, or
simply wishing to
broaden their under-
standing of people from
other nations: Vacancies
are expected for the
rail Semester for
American students who
are interested in sharing
rooms with foreign
;indents enrolled JZCUJ
these vacancies are
expected in the Inter-
national Area of Aycock
Hall for men, in the
proposed International
Area of Tyler Hall for
women, and at the
International House
located on Ninth Street
for male or female
students.
Applicants for the
International House
must be junior classifi-
cation or above, includ-
ing graduate students.
Applicants for the In-
ternational Areas od
the residence halls may
be any classification. If
interested, see Mr. Ron
Scronce in the Counse-
lors Office in Aycock
Hall for further infor-
mation about the "In-
ternational Area "in
�KB contest
The deadline for the
submission of papers in
the AKD PaPer
contest has been
extended to Fri.
April 6. Cash prizes will
be awarded to winning
papers. Runners-up
awarded prizes also.
Submit your paper on
any sociological topic, to
the Soc. Dept. Office,
4th floor Brewster.
Gamma Beta
Gamma Beta Phi will
meet on Thurs April 5
at 7 p.m. in Menden-
hall 244. The drawing
for the dinner will be
held at this meeting.
All members are re-
minded to bring their
tickets.
Senior
Auction
ng your own
"S " put up for bid,
'� items such as
records, refriger-
rk, etc. Ref-
ts served. Wed.
p.m. at the
-i Student Cen-
E. 5th St. For
rmation call 758-2030
1 eeds go to the
House.
ACU k
tioi
El.
ormation
room
als �
residence
the Interna-
ise and Mrs.
unting for inf-
attout sharing
(o internation-
al women'
halls.
Comics
The ECU Comic
Book Club will meet
Wed April 4 at the
Nostalgia Newsstand at
919 Dickinson Ave. at 7
p.m. Topics of dis-
cussion will include the
upcoming Minicon on
April 22. All interested
persons are invited. For
more information, call
758-6909.
The Department of
Housing and Manage-
ment, School of Home
Economics, will sponsor
an Annual Senior Show
of student projects in
Mendenhall Student
Center Multi-Purpose
Room on April 3 and 4.
The exhibition will be
open to the public
between the hours of 9
a.m. and 4 p.m.
Included in the show
will be projects such as
floor plans, renderings
and swatch boards, as
well as slides of display
and refinishing projects.
Senior Housing majors
and members of Young
Home Designers
League, a student
organization sponsored
by the department, will
be available to answer
questions. The Senior
Show is being directed
by Dr. Patricia G. Rice
and Ms. Marilyn D.
Casto.
Guinness
The ECU Sign
Language Club is pre-
senting World Guinness
Night at the Elbo
Room, Thurs Apr. 5
from 7-9:30 p.m.Over 20
different sponsors have
provided door prizes
and there will be 3 big
contests. The Coca-Cola
Company will present
its newest soft drink,
Mello-Yellow, and a fast
drinking contest will be
held. There will also be
a Krispy-Kreme
Doughnut eating contest
and hamburger eating
contest sponsored by
Pollard's Trading Post.
These contests will be
held in an attempt to
set new world records
as judged by the Guin
ness World Book of
Records. Winners will
receive unbelievable
gifts. Twenty Door
Prizes will be given
away from 7:15 p.m. on
and will include one
free hour of flying
instruction from ALFA
Company and dinner for
two at a number of
local restaurants, and
free T-shirts and rec-
ords.
Tickets for the con-
tests and a chance to
win one of 20 door
prizes can be purchased
at the Office of The
Program for Hearing
Impaired Students,
A-114 and A-115
Brewster, at the Elbo
Room, and from mem-
bers of the Sign Lang- '
uage Club. Advance
tickets are 75 cents and
SI at the door.
EGGC
The Student National
Education Association
will be meeting Apr. 10
in Rm. 244, Mendenhall
Student Center. It will
begin at 5 p.m. so as
to accomodate student
teachers. All members
are urged to attend;
this meeting is very
important. It is our last
meeting; old and new
business must be dis-
cussed, a convention
shared, and officers
elected for next year.
Please send nominations
for president, vice-
president, and secretary
treasurer to the add-
ress given, or post it on
my door. Please send to
Anna Myers, 305
Greene Drm, ECU, or
call 752-9093.
Concert
The Plymouth
Ministerial Association
will present the West-
minster Chapel Choir in
concert on April 20 at 8
P-m. in the First
Christian Church, Ply-
mouth. The public is
cordially invited and
there will be no charge
for admission.
The East Carolina
Gay Community will
hold a meeting Tuesday
at 5 p.m. at 608 E.
Ninth St. Business
matters will be dis-
cussed and further
plans will be made for
those members who are
attending the Southeas-
tern Gay Conference in
Chapel Hill April 6-8.
All interested persons
are invited to come.
Marshalls
Applications for
1979-80 Marshalls are
now being accepted in
Room 228 Mendenhall
Student Center (SGA
Office). In order to
qual.i) lor this position,
you mut have com-
pleted 95 hours by the
end of Spring Semester
and have a 3.0 average.
Deadline for filing is
April 6, 1979.
SFC
Nurses
Everyone is welcome
to participate in the
wr,kl discussion of
spiritual topics as they
appJ) to our dailv life.
Students for Christ meet
every Tues. from 8:30-
9:30 p.m. in Bi
D-308.
(rewster
LAE
There will be a
mandatory meeting of
LAE on Thurs April 5
at 101-A Belk Building.
The meeting will be at
4:30 p.m. and important
issues will be discussed
and voted on.
The representative
from Nightingale Uni-
form Company will be
in the School of Nursing
building, Rm. 105, on
April 18, 8:30 a.m. until
1 p.m. to measure each
freshman nursing
student for uniforms.
The total amount for
uniforms will be as fol-
lows. $70.65 for female
students, $46.30 for
male students. A money
order for the exact
amount must be sub-
mitted with the uniform
order. Please stop bv
the School of Nursing
Office, Room 152, to
make an appointment.
Study Hall
A Learning Center
with various reference
books has been set up
'n e Scott Hall
basement Study Hall.
The supervisor will help
you find the appropriate
texts in BIOL, ENGL,
or HIST or college
catalogues for many
Graduate Schools. It is
open from 8-12 p.m. on
Sunday through Thurs.
nights. Anyone is wel-
come to this quiet area
for studv.
Family Fun
Each Thursday
during April is Family
Fun Night at Menden-
hall. From 6-10 p.m. all
children under age 18,
accompanied by a
parent or responsible
adult, may bowl, play
billiards or play table
tennis for 12 off the
regular price. Each
game or line of bowling
will be half-price for
children and billiards
and table tennis will be
halfprice for the entire
family.
Only one adult per
group must have a
Mendenhall Student
Center Membership
Card or ECU ID card to
participate.
Dental Tost
The Dental Aptitude
Test will be offered at
ECU on Sat April 28.
Application blanks are
to be completed and
mailed to Division of
Education Measure-
ments, American Dental
Association, 211 East
Chicago Ave Chicago,
IL 60011 to arrive by
April 2. These appli-
cations are also avail-
able at the Testing
Center, Room 105,
Speight building, ECU.
Senior show
Dora Hernandez and
Karen Bruce will pre
sent their senior show
in Joyner Library from
Apr. 6-12. Works ex
hibited will be primanh
in clay and mixed
media. Karen Bruce will
be graduating with d
BFA in Ceramics and a
minor in Art Histr
and Dora Hernandez
will receive a BFA in
Ceramics with a minor
in Communications Art
Bowling
Doubles, singles, and
mixed doubles will be
the events of the Spring
Bowling Tournament
scheduled for April 2,3
and 1 at Mendenhall
Student Center. From 3
until 10 p.m. each dav.
ECU students may bowl
anytime and enter their
scores in the tourna-
merit. Detailed infor
mation and rule- are
available at the Bowling
Center. Trophies will be
given in all events.
Seniors
MCAT
The Medical College
Admission Test (MCAT)
will be offered at ECU
�n Sat April 28.
Application blanks are I
to be completed and
mailed to The American
College Testing pro.
gram, P.O. Box 414,
Iowa City, Iowa 52240,
to arrive by April 2,
1979. Application blanks
are available at the
Testing Center, Speight
building, Room 105
ECU.
� YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN' IS: THRILLINGLY CRAZY
� RICH WITH LAUGHTER. A CLASSY Sew
TO BE WITH US FOR YEARS
-Charles Champlm. LOS ANGELES TIMES
in
FUNNIEST FIUT
Student Union Films
Committee presents
All second semester
graduates should
purchase their caps and
gowns for graduation b
April 5 at the Student
Supply Store on cam-
pus. The delivery dates
for caps and gowns are
Apr. 3,4 and 5. The
gowns will be delivered
to the Student Supplv
Store. The delivery
dates and points " of
delivery are the same
for both graduates and
undergraduates. These
Keepsake gowns, are
ours to keep providing
the $10 graduation fee
which is paid. For those
receiving the Masters
Degree the $10 fee pays
for your cap and gown,
but there is an extra
(w of $9.75 for yotir
hood.
-G�ne Shaht. NBC-TV
YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN'IS: MORE ZANINESS
!KS BEEN SEEN IN ANY MOVIE
SINCE THE MARX BROTHERS
Bruce Cook. NATIONAL OBSERVER
"MADDER, FUNNIER,
MORE INSPIRED THAN
ANYTHING BEING DONE
IN MOVIES TODAY
Jay Cocks TIME MAGAZINE
YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN' IS: ONE OF THE
FUNNIEST MOVIES OF THE YEAR "L
Ul 'nc ' "�� loseph GHms. NEWS0AY
-� SCREEN NvtAlSWZ,SS �
-PmuUne � THCNEw VO�Kf
MASTERPIECE:
-�� Aloft SATUfiOAr fV!�r
BKUUKb. -Judith Cnst. N� YORK MAGAZINE
Ploo Woody Allen EVERYTHING YOU ALWAYS WANTED TOVwliwTLl
Classifieds
Si
rii
ng is here! Time for'
th1 portrait you've been
thinking about. Have it
done OUTDOORS. Call:
758-0962, portraits by
P te Podeszwa also
resume pictures in black
and wliite, weddings
and all types of group
hots.
19o dwcc Kawasakifc?
sale, excellent condition.
Has carry-all rack and
back rest, also Hi-way
foot rests. 2 new tires
go with it - 1800. Call
758-0962 after 7 p.m. If
you call earlier, leave
name and no. with ans.
service.
BSR Quanta 450 turn-
table, mint condition - 5
mos. old, must sell,
price negotiable. 758-
9686.
FOR SALE: 50 mm.
Minolta Rokkor Lens,
brand new, never been
used. Will sell at low
price of $59. Day 758
9942 or 752-0567
between 7-10 p.m.
STEREO equipment
available through college
dealer. Check prices
before you buy else-
where. Call Michael,
752-2601.
FOR SALE: Ranger 23
sailboat, loaded, immac-
ulate condition , 1978
motor, knot meter,
compass, stove, life-
lines, bow and stern
pulpits, anchor and
much more. Day 758-
9942 or 752-0567 be-
tween 70 p.m.
WANTED: Female
roomate, preferably a
gradute student. Begin-
ning May 1 for both
sessions summer school.
Would have furnished
private room. Rent
187.50 plus half utili-
ties and phone. Call
758-1636 after 5:00.
i
S
��
2 ROOMMATES
NEEDED: For summer
months; Duplex on 3rd
St. $160 per mo. plus
utilities split equally.
Call Mike at 758-9173.
NEEDED: Two female
roommates to share 2
bedroom apartment at
River Bluff Apts. for
summer andor fall. 13
rent and utilities. Call
752-1598.
NEED: 2 female room.
-
m�tes to share 3 B R
�P� 1 block from '
campus. $58.76mo.
plus 13 utilities. Call
758-2417 a�d .sk
tvim or Sue.
WANTED. Raleigh
roommate - female t0
��r the summer ' oalv
c�� Ruth 758-8293
�g�W FOR RENT .
StwJent St -et
JeTcTllTsgJ
Jjefore 11 p.m.
NEED: A roommate lo
jW � 2 B.R. apt. J
-�� 758-5794 after 4
Part-
����� Eperim�
ApiOy at Pai-
aaao or call 756-7300.





Medical school dedicated
tiunt principal speaker
B STEPHEN WILSON . . . �"�
B STEPHEN WILSON
Staff Writer
P"na�plurgt�Veril0r James B Hunt was th
e Medical Educ T breaking ceremony for
' jnhol of Medicine last Friday.
ceremony marL. ti , . � .
onstmclio, �r what �, I k a b"K�"�"g of
facility of the Shll 7� j e t'rimary leaching
�e School of Med.cine, and will centralize
�� -�� � u� �rs:� vharare now heing ,au�ht
Medical EducC Facing ! �n? T"8' L"
�����. offices ScTool
�.a�, i�' aK,man �"ed �� and
speakers w�rl7l educators. Among the o.her
Wuhan, lda' 'VEC "fN Carolina President
Brewer ECll tCha���or Dr. Thomas
EC. Board' .ChTamellor E�eruS Leo W. Jenkins,
I, n Trustees Chairman Trov W Pale
�� WiC EMUnp�:f MEDU SCh001 rf MedidDe
future hT .we'?med "tendents ,o the
School oTMedjJne "XT'5 d"��' �f
support of the IN R , ,�� rec0�n�d the
Pi� Count, Board of r �' (l"r�" �" the
I Ihe Schotl Com� i� reading the
recoEenLdM1,diCa' u00 D,a" Willi"� E. Laupus
' h;7nkrn; �' f�� Ed' Med.can
Wallace Woolc, who is now chairman
Edwin.Monroe ECU Vice Chancellor for Health
sa.d that the stor) ol the foundation fo the
School ol Medicine at ECU was unique ,n North
Carolina history. He said that the Medical School is
a monument to those who forsaw the needs of the
region.
Governor Hunt remarked that the legislators
present a. the ceremony "show the scars from the
fight for ECU's School of Medicine He also
remarked that those who fought for the School
knew that the Lord was on their side and that
todays weather proved it He called it "one of
North Carolina s greatest days, and, perhaps,
Eastern North Carolina's greatest days "
The addresses were followed by 'a benediction by
the Reverend Tommy J�.e Payne, after which the
ground breaking took place.
The ceremony was followed bv a reception in the
dmmg area ol Pitt County Memorial Hospital.
Rebel reading to be held
B KAREN WENDT
Assistant News Editor
Phillip Arrington and
Faye Blaylock will be
presenting a reading of
their poetry and prose
a' Mendenhall Coffe-
house Wed. at 7 p.m.
in this year's fourth
REBEL reading, accord-
ing to Renee Dixon,
Associate Editor.
Arrington is an ECU
professor and a former
REBEL editor. Blaylock
is a member of ECU'S
w n'ters' Guild and an
English major.
After these readings
the floor will be open
to the public, and
anyone who wishes to
read some of their own
work may do so.
"There are a lot of
writers on campus who
enjoj sharing their work
with an interested
audience said Dixon.
"We feel like it's the
3a
torn
All AROUND
Next time you get hungry for some-
ng really good to ear, head for
Hardee's. And bring a friend and
this coupon with you. It'll get you
the best eatin' in tow
th,
n, up n
down, all around. And lots of it
Hardee's Best Eatin Special.
Two of the biggest, most
special tastin' sandwiches you
have ever sunk your teeth
into. And at a price that's
real special, too. So special,
you're gonna think Hardee's
is downright crazy to charge
so little for so much fine eatin

���:$&�
REBEL'S place to
encourage that sort of
artistic exchange as
much as possible.
That's why we sponsor
the readings
The REBEL is
ECU'S literary arts
magazine. h js an
annual publication and
contains many different
pieces of poetry, prose
and artwork from
different sources usually
connected with ECU.
3 April 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 3
ADVERTISED
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V
Pago 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 3 April 1979
In memorium
what's All "Wis, mEAS?
A.J. Fletcher, prominent North
Carolinia philanthropist and patron of
the arts died late Saturday at the age
of 91 at Rex Hospital in Raleigh. He
was the chief executive officer of
WRAL-Television
In his early career, Fletcher was a
newspaperman. He served as editor of
The Enterprise in Mooresville, and
the Journal in Apex.
He attended law school at Wake
Forest, and in addition to his law
practice he was active in the business
community. He founded Capitol
Broadcasting Company, which operates
WRAL, WRAL-FM, The North
Carolina News Network, and Capitol
Publications.
He was also founder of Dixie Life
Insurance Company, which later
became the Southern Life Insurance
Company.
In the area of the arts, he founded
what later became the National Oera
Company in 1948. His purpose in
doing this was to bring opera to
students. Fletcher also helped to
found the Hayes Barton Baptist
Church in Raleigh,and he gave
generously of his time and resources
to the Baptist State Convention. In
fact, convention honored him in 1975
by naming their new communications
facility the A.J. Fletcher Baptist
Communications Center.
Fletcher was described as a very
courtly gentleman of the old school.
Throughout his lifetime, he gave of
himself and of his resources quite
freely. One of the largest benefactors
of his gifts was the ECU School of
M usic.
From 1973 to the present, Fletcher
has donated funds to make educations
in music possible here at ECU.
According to Dean Everett Pittman,
Fletcher took a personal interest in
each student who received a
scholarship.
Pittman reported that Fletcher
corresponded with each recipient after
the students had left school.
Fletcher had also arranged concerts
each year, with the musical duo of
the ECU Orchestra and the National
OPera Company in Raleigh. In the l
local area, he also supported the
Greenville Youth Orchestra.
Perhaps the most important thing
that Fletcher aided this university
with was the building of the facility
which now bears his name. Dean
Pittman recalled that when the
A.J.Fletcher Building was before the
Legislature for funding, it ran into
strong opposition. Fletcher reportedly
went to the governing body, and did
some lobbying on ECU's behalf. The
result? A new music building named
at East Carolina in Greenville. In the
fall of 1970, the building was justly
named for him. "We all admired him
a lot Pittman said. He added, "He
was vitally interested in each
student
He was admired. And it is a
certainty that we will all miss him.
Uppity Women
By CHARLENE CARTER
The following state-
ment is a paraphrased
quote by Phyllis
Schlafly, made at a
celebration of the sup-
posed "defeat of the
ERA This is the
greatest victory for
women since they won
the right to vote.
In case some readers
are unaware of who
Phyllis Schlafly isshe
is one of the most
active 'leaders' of the
opposition to the ERA.
Her group is called
Stop ERA.
Here is some back-
ground on Phyllis
Schlafly. She worked in
an ammunition plant to
put herself through col-
lege, where she grad-
uated Phi Beta Kappa,
and later got her mas-
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community tor ovor SO yaara
ACTING EDITOR
MARC BARNES
PRODUCTION MANAGER
STEVE BACHNER
NEWS EDITORS
Marc BarnM
Luke Whianant
Assistant Maw Editors
Ricfiy Smith
Karart Wandt
Mika Rooms
TRENDS EDITOR
Jaff Rollins
Assistant Tttnom Editors
Barry Clayton
Bill
ADVERTISING MANAGER
ROBERT M. SWAIM
Am taut AovartraJng Manaoar
Tarry Harndon
AaVarfisino
Paul Uncka
CMaf Ad Artist
Jans Walls
Tmwmtmv
Mary Storey
Sua Hurtard
SPORTS EDITOR
Assistant Sports Editor
CnarlM Chandler
Datdra Oelahvnty
Sua
Cindy
Certoonrers
Sua Lenmt
Berry Clayton
FOUNTAINHEAD Is lit studani
mwiptptr of East Carolina Unlveraity
sponsorad by lha M adla Beard el
ECU and Is dlatrlbalad aaeh Tuasdsy
and Thursday during lha acadamic
year (araakly during tha summsr).
Editorial opinions ara thosa el tha
Editorial Board and de net nscasssri-
ly raflael tha opinions ef lite
univarslty or tha Madia Beard.
Oiliest ara leeated en lha aaeend
floor of tha Publications Canlar (Old
South Building). Oar mailing
addrass la: Old Beuth Building.
ECU, Oreanvilla, N.C. 27134.
Tha phana numbara ara:
757-63M, tS�7, �30l. Subscriptions
are $10 annually, alumni SB annually.

ter's degree at Harvard.
She was employed as a
research assistant in a
bank when Fred
Schlafly "came along and
saved me They mar-
ried, had six children,
and her husband
became a Congressman.
They worked together in
various right-wing
causes. She joined the
John Birch Society in
1960, and began to
appear on rightist radio
and television programs,
such as the programs of
the Reverend Billy
James Hargis, a notor-
ious 'evangelist whose
radio 'ministry' grosses
more than 10 million
dollars a year.
Phyllis Schlafly has
run for political office a
number of times since
1952. She is the author
or co-author of eight
right-
wing-type books. She is
the author of a regular
newsletter called the
Phyllis Schlafly Report,
which has eighteen
thousand subscribers.
She has a regular CBS
radio program called
'Spectrum she writes a
syndicated newspaper
column, and she makes
speeches and special
radio and television
appearances all over the
country. Ail this activity
is very interesting when
' is compared to her
basic stance that a
woman's place is in the
home, and not in the
mainstream of outside
activity.
Be that as it may,
she is one of the most
active campaigners
against the ERA. She
claims that the funds to
support her huge enter-
prise come from sub-
scriptions and small
contributions to the
Eagle Forum, which
publishes the Phyllis
Schlafly Report, and
from the proceeds of
thousands of bake sales
put on by dedicated
supporters.
A little extra re-
search might be re-
quired to reveal the
support of huge corpor-
ations, including the
Coors Company. (This
revelation was especially
painful to me, because
in my opinion they
make the best beer in
this country, but never-
theless, I have boy-
cotted Coors beer, and
urge readers to do so.)
Here is another
quote from Phyllis
Schlafly: "I think I am
a good example of how
women can do whatever
they want with their
lives. They don't need
legislation to have a
fun, exciting, fulfilling
life
Phyllis Schlafly is
obviously adept at
double-thinking.
The following are
organizations that have
gone on record as
opposing the ERA: the
Communist Party, the
Daughters of the Amer-
ican Revolution, the
John Birch Society, the
Knights of Columbus,
the KuKlux Klan. Their
skill at double-thinking
has become obvious
over the yean. And we
all know how much
they, and Phyllis
Schlafly, are concerned
with the good of our
country.
WO, I uAS fctuwrJiMro. o cdeci
A TIC T�T ?�CMrt th.s ,1
Loejic Ckgyt,Lat
CMC- IT Oor� T4� �ol�S flrte SiPctT
hLL TA� V'CtT fltoD rtoo� YouA. ptrc�
Akeot Ttte 8�4Ab. tfets You TA&: th�
PYAI'Oj I'LL USE T4� BA&6L iou oll.
f,AS.T
L3�c t��'3.I'��
Aertp�- LtM
xXCo TO THC GAX4
Go DtftECTLV To TH� G-AzA.
T loor PASS 3"�fcJSALerr).
C�X-L�CT fuC rTTjrtjotf OiLFi�US. "
rtmm wrtrrr Do Y�o call TtftS G-4�e ?
'SHoTTLfc tiPLOvrtCV

Greenpeace
By JERRY ADDERTON
Over the past few
weeks there have been
many developments that
relate to ecology and
peace. Some are good,
and some are not so
good, and some uncer-
tain. I will mention
some things here that I
believe to be significant
and worthy of notice,
and if anyone knows of
anything that I missed,
please inform me,
because now is a good
time to get going on
important issues; spring
brings renewed vitalyV
and a recommitment to
things that will hopeful-
ly make life and
preservation of life a
little closer to us all.
On the whaling
issue, there have been
two major points that
have been and are still
being acted upon.
President Carter opted
to delay invocation of
the Pelley Amendment
against the outlaw
whaling nations of Peru,
Chile, and Korea and
gave the reasons for
doing so. He said that
since the threat of
invoking the amendment
was brought to public
notice, Korea has joined
the International Whal-
ing Commission, and
Peru and Chile have
expressed 1 intentions to
following suit. If Peru
and Chile do not act
within a month to join,
there will be a renewed
effort by Greenpeace
and other concerned
groups to again push
for invocation of the
Pelley Amendment. It
appears that this is also
Carter's intentions, so
we can consider this a
positive step forward in
the fight to save the
whales from extinction
by the hands of a
misguided minority of
men wno still do not
see the implications of
their actions.
More immediate now
is the effort to persuade
the U.S. delegation to
the upcoming I.W.C.
meeting to press for a
ten year moratorium
on all commercial
whaling. Just as letters
from concerned people
(many from this area -
thank yon!helped to
bring about such
positive action on the
Pelley Amendment iss-
ue, the same action will
certainly be beneficial to
this very important part
of our plan to save the
whales. It is generally
believed that if the U.S.
initiates this proposal, it
would pass - meaning a
major victory for the
whales. Please write
your letter expressing
your support of the
moratorium now. I will
be glad to supply the
envelope and stamp,
and it is such a small
thing to do for such an
important issue. Just
give me your letter or
leave it at the Founta-
inhead office, and walk
away knowing you have
helped to save a part of
this troubled Earth.
I don't really know
what the future will
hold for the Middle
East, but I do believe
the Egypt-Israel peace
treaty is a very
significant and reassu-
ring action for peace in
that volatile area. I
hope you will join with
me in commending this
brave step toward
peace. I think it
represents something to
inspire the people of
the world to strive for,
whether it be in
Ireland, Vietnam-China,
Uganda-Tanzania, or
Newfoundland.
Now, another matter
on a local level: I need
to know from musicians
and crafts people
concerned about our
environment and the
work of Greenpeace to
perserve it, if they
would like to participate
in a benefit event by
offering their services
and wares for the sake
of ecology.
I need input
from you all on just
how you would contri-
bute to this and how it
could be beneficial to
both ecolocv and the
local-community. What I
have in mind is having
workshops, shows,
music and educational
information on ecology
related themes. The
event would be a fund
raiser with the money
going to Greenpeacea
non-profit organization
whereby all money
comes from events of
this kind and donations,
at large) and an
attempt to raise consci-
ousness; all in having a
good time to boot. What
do you say? I am open
to suggestions and
anyone in any capacity
relating to ecological
theme could be part of
it. If it comes together,
we can get to work on
a site and date(s). Right
now, its just an idea,
but with a little work
and cooperation. it
could be something! Let
me hear from you.
One final item: The
Extinction Committee in
Congress met to decide
the fates of the Tellico!
Dam and the snail
darter. This was the
first test of the newly
formed Extinction Com-
mittee. The Committee
decided in favor of the
snail darter and the
dam would not be used.
With such a decision,
the Extinction Commi-
ttee itself now qualifies
as endangered.
If you would like to
discuss anything men-
tioned above, please call
me or leave word at the
Fountainhead office.
Any help will be
needed anH greatlv
appreciated. Thank you.
Forum
Reader criticizes paper
To Fountainhead:
I would like to
congratulate Ms. Elliott
�on her letter ques-
tioning Fountainhead's
policies. If I am not
mistaken, this' is a
school newspaper sup-
ported and read mostly
by ECU students. Yet
when one thinks, it
that this person when
told it would have to be
cut "took it back and
left with it, never to be
seen again by the
newspaper staff Yet
on page five under
Lowe's platform which
was "temporarily lost
the editor's note stated
that it should have been
Forum
Forum letters must contain the name, address,
fchone number, and signature of the authors) and'
�hould be typed or neatly printed.
) Letters are; subject to editing for brevitv
obscenity, and libel.
No more than three letters on any subject will be
printed in one issue. Letters should be limited to
three typewritten, double-spaced pages. :
Letters must be received by noon on Mondavs aaWl
Wednesdays at the FOUNTAINHEAD office, second
floor, Publications Center.
, Authors nanes will be withheld only whe
inclusion of the name will embarrass or subject
(ridicule the author (such as letters discuasin
homosexuality, drug abuse, etc.).
printed in last weeks
edition and was re-
ceived in time!
When one turns to page
four, Low Ricky Lowe is
the first thing which is
seen!
The editorial states
that Lowe's platform
when sent by a mes-
senger, did not meet
the one hundred and
fifty word limit and also
time (an entire week);
meaning that the failure
in printing Lowe's plat-
form hurt his campaign
beyond repair. The
main thing is that I feel
Fountainhead abused
Lowe very badly and a
public apology is necea-
�7- In case you did
not realise, this is
known as being cour-
teous and respectful
which is
Fountainhe
�ble of doin






Greek Forum

3 April 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
" 1
By RJCKI GUARMIS
Staff Writer
Pi Kappa Phi Field
Da was held Saturday
and was a big success!
The six foot trophy
served as an incentive
to compete, not only
part
The Kappa Deltas
were the winners of the
field day in the sorority
division and the Sigma
lau Gammas won the
trophj for the fraternity
division of competition.
Tht Greek games
and track meet were
held Monday. The
winners of those events
will be announced
tonight at the Co-Greek
Banquet.
There is still more
come this week as
far as games and
rtying are concerned.
Today the Bed Race
will be held on the
mall. Wednesday, the
Lambda Chi Alphas are
sponsoring their annual
Raft Race which will be
followed by a dance at
the American Legion
Wednesday night.
Thursday, the Kappa
Sigma Funky Nassau
will be held at the
fraternity house on
Tenth Street.
Friday, the Phi
Kappa Taus are st ging
their annual Spring
Fling.There will be
plenty of refreshments
and plenty f good
times. Moser's Farm
will round out the
Greek Week, 1979 on
Saturday afternoon.
Announcements:
The Sigma Tau
Gammas were visited
Wednesday, March 28,
by their regional direc-
Looking fr a job
or Career?
Piui D. Otman
Northwestern
Mutual Life
NML Agents are confi-
dent types who actively
seek out what they want
in life. If you think you
can meet the challenge
call for an appointment.
752-4080
tor and expansion
director, Ron Erickson
and Mike Motznik,
respectfully. The visitors
were treated to a social
Wednesday night with
the Alpha Delta Pi's.
The Sig Tau's first
annual golf tournament
to be held at the Ayden
Country Club has been
moved back to April 9,
10, 12, and 13. The
final day for registra-
tion is April 5. There is
a $10 entry fee which
covers both rounds of
golf.
The Phi Taus held
their Second Annual
Hawaiian Luau Party
this past Friday night.
The party began at 6
p.m. with a meal
consisting of some
typical Hawaiian foods.
Following the meal
everyone continued to
have a good time
getting sand in their
shoes and dancing the
night away.
The Phi Taus are in the
process of selling tickets
for a Beach Weekend for
two. The winner will
receive room expenses
at the Whaler Inn, $50
spending money, and
one half of a gallon of
liquor. Tickets are only
a dollar and you do not
have to be present to
win. The drawing will
be held at the Phi Tau
house during the Spring
Fling.
Mike Smith was
elected IFC president
last week. The Phi Taus
would like to congrulate
Mike.
The Alpha Delta Pi's
are having a beer blast
at the Chapter X on
Friday, April 6, immed-
iately following the Phi
Tau Spring Fling. It will
last from 6 p.m. until 9
p.m. and everyone is
encouraged to ateend.
The Chi Omegas will
be celebrating their
Founder's Day which is
April 5, with a cookout.
The Sigma Sigma
Sigmas held a very
successful rush work-
shop Sunday. Sisters
and pledges were in
attendance and everyone
benefitted from the
meeting.
The Sigmas are
planning their Founder's
Day for April 18 and
their Senior Send-on for
Reading Day.
Kappa Delta National
Collegiate Advisor, Jen-
nifer Williamson, visited
the ECU chapter last
week. Three new
pledges were inducted
this month.
The Kappa Delta
annual Cocktail Party
was held Friday night
in the backyard. Many
alumnae returned for
the event.
The "Kaydees" are
currently enjoying a
winning season in
volleyball. Plans are
under way for Parent's
Day, April 22.
The Kappa Deltas
were also busy this
weekend supplying
water and Gatorade for
the runners in the
Greenville Road Race.
Writers! Poets!

j This year's fourth Rebel
Reading is Wed 7:00 at
the Coffeehouse, featuring
Phil Arrington and Faye g
B Blaylock. All writers
m welcome to read.
I
HOSIER'S FARM
SPECIAL
� One case of your
favorite l2oz. premium
party beverage
�Bag of Ice
�SO cups
All for the low price of $9.99
IX os. Premium Single Case Price $7.89
12 os. Light Beers Single Case Price
$8.19
l2os. Michelob s Single Case Price $9.19
Offer good April 3-S)
at 10th St. Stop-n-Go ONLY
SPAGHETTI
Shoney's Real
Italian Spa-
ghetti with su-
perb, tasty,
meat sauce,
Parmesan
Cheese, Hot
Grecian
Bread
WED.
ONLY
SHOMEYS
Located beside
the Ramada Inn,
204 By-pass.
WITH
SALAD
ART �P CAMERA
526 S. Contanehe St.
Downtown
COUPON EXPIRES
LIMITED TIME OFFER
12 Exp. Color Film
Developed and Printed
� OAF
Finn
a ;
VALUABLE COUPON
1 must accompany oaoet 1
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MOVIE OR SLIDE
EMechrome or Kodechrome Processing
20 Exp.
AQ Slides
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110.
128 or
196
I MUST ACCOMPANY i
PLAZA CAMERA
2nd Annual
SPRING FLING AND KEG RALLY
April 6 at the Phi Kappa Tau House, 409 Elizabeth St.
25 FREE Kegs
Everyone is invited to attend.
The Drawing for the Beach Weekend raffle
will be held at the Keg Rally.
0002
DRAWING FOR
PHI KAPPA TAU
BEACH WEEK-END FOR (2)
At
vwv
Room
IDfoiterlnn
Includes:
$50.00 Spending Money xh Gal. of Liquor
$1.00 DONATION
You do not have to be present to win!
Sponsors
Fast Fare
Coca Cola Bottling Co. of Greenville
Shirley's Cut 6t Style
Bond's Sporting Goods
Beer Supplies Through the Happy Store
Mike's Bike Shop
The Tree House Restaurant
The Attic
UBE
Stereo Village
Pepsi Cola Bottling Co. of Greenville
Pipeline Restaurant
The College Shop
Rum Runners Dive Shop
Bakntines Cafeteria
Roy Rogers
Traffic Light
Apple Records
Jason's Restaurant
Roffler of Greenville
Blue Bell Factory Outlet
H. L. Hodges Sporting Goods
Proctor's Ltd.
Jerry's Sweet Shop
Blount Fertilizer
Allied Industrial Service, Inc.
Rick's Guitar Shop
Quick Copy
Burger Barrel
The Pride Car Wash, E. 10th St
at these
wwv
Big Discounts!
Save up
to $3.00!
Records
Top artists!
Major labels!
C Hundreds of records! Classics included!
w j many selections in this special purchase.
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
Wright Building
SALE NOW IN PROGRESS
Frless Start at Sl.fC
DON'T MISS THIS SALE
Come early for best
f

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�Mi
$�� &





tr, i m
1 �
Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 3 April 1979
� fH
Scott heacQines in
Shrader's Hardcore
B M. JONES
and
BARRY CLAYTON
sst. Trends Eds.
Paul Shrader, writer-
director of Hardcore,
describes the movie as,
'a confrontation betw-
een the hardcore of the
old morality and the
hardcore of the new
hile the concept of
intercultural collision
makes tor an interesting
�lot, it cannot, on its
own, deliver a movie
worth seeing. Hard-
rore's moral message is
substanciated thoroughlv
l realistic cinemato-
graphy, convincing
portrayals, and an
excellent screenplay.
George C. Scott
stars in the film. A
like an Dorm, a
lurniture manufacturer
from Grand Rapid
Michigan, he plays a
true here, a capable
man with a worthy
ise. Jake i- deeply
religious, in the "old
hioned" sense. He is
levout member of
the Dutch Reformed
Church (Calvinist),
embracing predestination
and the hopeless state
of man due to original
sin.
Van Dorn's daugh-
ter, Kristen (note the
closeness in pronuncia-
tion to Christian,
summarizing Van Dorn's
background), is played
by Ilah Davis. While on
a church sponsored trip
for teenagers to Calif
Kristen runs away.
Subsequently, Van Dorn
hires an oddballish Los
Angeles private-eye,
named Andy Mast, to
find his daughter. The'
seemingly incompetent
detective is played to a
tee by Peter Boyle.
Boyle is able to bring
across the mixed
personality of the
investigator accurately;
pity, detached warmth
and a humorous,
humbling "regularness"
of everyday mistake
making create a sad but
lovable character.
After firing Mast,
an Dorn begins to
-earch the porno jungles
of the West Coast for
his daughter. All Mast
had been able to turn
up was a pornographic
film of Kristen. Van
Dorn TsnTraTn-peredjinit,
ally by the tola!
strangeness of the
sleazy underworld of
erotic exploitation. He
soon learns to adapt to
this new environment
and begins to make
some progress in search
alter hiring a "parlor
girl" who had met his
daughter.
Season Hubley por-
trays this teenage
hooker, Niki. Hubley's
performance is nothing
less than perfect. She
delivers the wordly wise
innocence of heart
neccessary to make
believeable the coalition
between Niki and Van
Dorn. Niki sees in Van
Dorn, hope. Hope that
if someone as "stra-
ight" as Van Dorn can
brave the wilds of the
pornographic jungle for
someone he cares for,
perhaps someone might
care for her also.
Unfortunately, she mis-
takes this "someone"
for Van Dorn.
! can envision no
other actor portraying
as accurately the lead
role in Hardcore as
George C. Scott. As is
generally the case,
superlative ability to
evince, disgust, heart-
sickness, and particul-
arly, rage, is well
exercized in this film.
Scott describes Har-
dcore as a "verymoral
film Hardcore's moral
message is delivered
strong and clear. It is a
cry to all parents to
stay in touch with their
children. It screams out
to parents the dire
possible consequences of
alienating their children.
The use of nudity in
Hardcore is absolutely
necessary for realism
and impact. I hope
people generally offen-
ded by nudity in the
movies will not avoid
Hardcore because of its
inclusion.
And I sincerely hope
those who see Hardcore
will take its message to
heart. v
In his role as Jake Van Dorm, Academy Award winner
George C. Scott searches the sordid night world of Los
Angeles for his runaway daughter Krisen.
Second Annual Bluegrass Festival held Thursday
Bv MARC BARNES
EDITOR
The Second Annual Bluegrass Festival was
held last Thursday night in the Jenkins Fine Arts
ter Auditorium.
The festival was sponsored by the English
Department, and expenses were defraved bv funds
ated through the office of Dean Richard Capwell,
ol the College of Arts and Sciences.
Dr. Paul Dowell, professor of English, was
master ol ceremonies for the occasion. Dowell is
iated with the ECU Folklore Archive, and prior
to the concert, bluegrass musicians played for his
klore classes.
Five groups performed in the festival. They
included The Pierce Family from Richlands, NC; a
group of two folklore students from one of Dowell's
es; the Pine Wood Ramblers, an all-female
bluegrass band from ECU; the Bassett Mountain
String Band, another bluegrass group from the
university and the Carolina Bluegrass Band, from
anceboro, NC.
The Pierce Family played an inspired, down
home variety of bluegrass. Led by one of the
hottest fiddlers in this writer's recollection, they did
a variety of traditional tunes, and they were the
only band that I saw use an autoharp in their set.
They were unique in that their band represented
two generations of Pierces, a father and two sons.
The second group to perform was helped out by
the fact that a fiddle player from a local band
playing at the Attic that night stepped in
Lack of rehearsal hurt the two students, but
they were enthusiastic, and the instrumentals were
good.
The third group to appear was the Pine Wood
Ramblers. I hope that I won't get letters about this,
but I have never heard of an all female bluegrass
band. Until now. Those girls can really play
bluegrass, and they can play it quite well. The Pine
Wood Ramblers are Dee Braxton, fiddle and
penny whistle, I Lin Langler, guitar; Ann Massengill,
banjo; Lorraine Jordan, mandolin; and Susan
Merritt, bass.
The Ramblers lent a great amount of slapstick
comedy to their act. At one point, a large voice
microphone fell off the stand in front of the banjo
picker. The guitarist politely started to pick it up,
when she knocked another microphone off its stand
in front of the fiddler. Her guitar strap promptly
fell off, and she caught the instrument before it hit
the floor. The fiddler and the banjo picker juggled
the microphones for a while, for comic effect, and
the guitarist desplayed a huge frowning clown face
which was printed on the back of her guitar in
green ink.
The audience roared, and at the end of their
set, they gave the Ramblers a standing ovation,
which brought them back to the stage.
The Basset Mountain String Band played next,
and they were Nelson Jarvis, fiddle; Chris Tacker,
banjo; and Marc Basset, guitar. They were one of
the more unusual bands of the night because Basset
Mountain's guitarist had a style all his own. He
played the accoustic guitar in almost the same
manner that one would play an electric bass guitar.
It was unusual to see, but it was highly
entertaining to listen to.
The fiddle and the banjo were also good, and
the entire group displayed a talent for music beyond
their years.
The Carolina Bluegrass Band from Vanceboro
took the stage for the final set of the evening.
Despite some problems with the sound system, the
band was well received and very entertaining. Led
by Dickie "Poochie" Robinson, who is billed as
North Carolina's number two fiddler, the band
featured Theodore Morris on banjo, Odis Whitaker
on guitar, Joe Whitaker on bass, Lorraine Jordan
(also of the Pine Woods Ramblers) on mandolin,
and Hattie Morris, singing tenor.
Bluegrass bands generally have an announcer,
that is, one of the performers who jokes with the
audience, and tells stories about how his fellow
performers are "hams or are always getting in
trouble with their wives for coming in late at night.
One of the most effective "announcers" was
"Poochie" Robinson of the Carolina Bluegrass Band.
One of Robinson's favorite lines was to tell the
audience that he had just started playing the fiddle
two weeks ago. Naturally, he would then go into a
fast rendition of "Orange Blossom Special which
told the world that he had been playing that fiddle
for a good many years.
Some of the featured bluegrass songs were
"Rocky Top "Rawhide "Lonesome Fiddle
Blues and "Cripple Creek
This reviewer has only one complaint about the
festival. Songs were auplicated by several bands. I
think I counted "Orange Blossom Special" played
four times. Dowell hopes to see the bluegra�
concert played once every semester.
Bluegrass is a particularly entertaining form of
oral narrative which is handed down from
generation to generation. It had its root? in country
music.
Country music started out as slower dance tunes.
and it was played by instruments imported from the
old country. The guitar started being used in
country music, around the turn of the century.
With the advent of recording equipment came
record producers into the Appalachian foothills
around the first quarter of the century. They felt,
evidently, that they could create a market in other
places for Appalachian-style country music. Mando-
lins then saw increased usage, and with the
influence of the Monroe brothers, bluegrass was
born.
The main difference between bluegrass and
country is that bluegrass is played much faster. A?
musician Mike Cross jokingly puts it, "You take a
three minute song, and hella bluegrass band ought
to be able to do it in seventeen, eighteen seconds
Another difference between bluegrass and
country is the style in which the fiddle is played. In
country, each stroke of the bow counts for one note,
and in bluegrass, each stroke may count for three
or four notes. This lends a slurred, sliding sound to
the effort.
Del Lewis' A Cry of Players is
a 'demanding' production
1
Director Del Lewis and daughter Amy watch
rehearsals for A Cry of Players Photo by Pete Podemw
The East Carolina
Playhouse production of
A Cry of Players,
William Gibson's fast-
paced and moving por-
trait of the young Will
Shekespeare which
opens tomorrow evening
at the East Carolina
Playhouse Studio
Theatre, will offer both
actors and technicians a
chance to show their
mettle. The modern
work offers an intri-
guing challenge to the
many artists and arti-
sans who go into
making the play ready
for a A audience.
A Cry of Players
offers our actors a
chance to extend them
selves in a number of
ways says noted dir-
ector Del Lewis. 'The
characters are, many of
them, actual figures
from history-some of
the most noted thea-
trical figures from
Shakespeare's day. But
they are so much more
than figures from the
theatre history books.
Gibson has painted real
people, and it is the
actor's task to bring
these figures from the
page into living,
breathing reality. The
play calls for an assort-
ment of low-life types,
Will's cohorts in Strat-
ford, as well as an
acting tourpe made up
of Will Kemp, Ned
Heminges, and so many
other famous names
from the Elizabethan
theatre, and, of course,
Will's family, his wife
Anne, his daughter
Susanna, his brother
Gilbert-all of whom
have sparked conjecture
from scholars for cent-
turies.
This play makes use
of all that conjecture,
but it does it in such a
way that we never
forget that these are
the people, real,
flesh-and-blood folks
who helped to shape
the man who gave us
the best drama written
in our language. It's
a real challenge for our
actors to strike that
balance between histor-
ical figure and human
being, and I must say I
think our actors have
met that challenge
well
If the actors face a
challenge, no less can
be said of the techni-
cians for this play. The
realistic mode of the
play requires a number
of technical devices
which Shakespeare him-
self might have shied
away from as too dif-
ficult to carry ott.
Scenically, the play
jumps from the woods,
to the upper room at the
inn, to the town square,
to a room in Will's
house. Ed Havnes'
imaginative unit setting
deals with the problems
of localization through
suggestion and economic
use of shifting machin-
ery.
Costumer Maria
Jurgianis is faced with
transforming a two-
armed actor into a
one-armed character, as
well as designing
clothes which can be
torn off during a fight
scene night after night.
Prop Master Michael
Banks has had to locate
a life-like fox which has
been trapped, mugs
which will break on
cue, and fish which
have been caught (but
will last lor the entire
ten-night run). "Most
of those were prettv
eas to find he
pointed out. "The
most difficult thing I
had to get was a bunch
of marigolds. Did you
ever try to get mari-
golds at this time of
year:
A Cry of Players
opens tomorrow night at
the Studio Theatre in
the Drama Building,
and runs ever) night
except Sunday, through
Saturday, April H.
Tickets are $1.00 for
ECU Students with
activity card, or $2.50
for the general public,
and can be obtained
through the Playhouse
Box Office, room 108 of
the Drama Building
between 10 and 4 Mo
day through Friday.
Call 757-6390 for reset-
vations.
3
i
i
i
��vii� jwv cr
�Si
�-liillU m-rn'mmmm m





Acting in Rog�r8 demands a certain level of camp
3 April 1979 FOUNTAiNHEAD Page 7
Buck Rogers flick limps from lack of innovation
By BARRY CLAYTON
and
BILL JONES
Assistant Trends Editors
Well, there's a new
sci-fi flick in town.
So what? you ask.
And well you may.
lor not many save
comic-book enthusiasts
anc hard-core
science fiction fan
could find much to
become exited about
with this latest of camp
pulp movies.
I m talking about
Buck Rogers ,
course.
of
Presenting itself as a
sort of watered-down
mashed potato cross-
breed of two relatively
innovative popular films
Star Wars and
Superman, Buck
Rogers limps across
the silver screen con-
veying little in the way
ot socially redeeming
qualities, and of inno-
vation nothing at all.
The acting, which
obviously demands a
certain level of camp,
hammy deliveries, suc-
ceeds only in that it
manages to put the
Swiss Premium company
to shame. Some of the
lines actually do come
off, but by far they
Although there are a
few very well designed
shots of the Inner City
(a modernistic haven for
the remanants of
Earth's population), the
Cinema
hover somewhere bet-
ween being moronicaliy
trite and merely sopho-
moric.
space battle scenes,
which should embrace
the imagination of
moviegoers, do not
manage to get past the
handshake level. This is
really unforgivable since
shots of brawling
spaceships can be seen
(properly done) on any
Galactic Sunday
night episode.
The plot centers
around the fact that a
20th century American
astronaut by the name
of Buck Rogers spends
some five hundred years
drifting around the
cosmos in suspended
animation until he is
picked up and thawed
out by the fighter
Kaczender's In Praise of Older Women
'is certainly no Academy Award winner9
B DARREN
BLRGSTEIN
Staff Reporter
In Praise of Older
women is somewhat of
an oddity. While view-
ing it. almost wondered
at times if it was
supposed to be a
comedy, or a serious
piece of filmaking.
The film is both. It
is somewhat tongue-in-
cheek, because vou
cannot take Andres'
escapades seriously, for
surelj this can happen
to no one man, right?
Tom Berenger
portrays Andras. a
young man who begins
to yearn for some of
the more adult things in
life (earlj in hi child-
hood), and immediately
makes his wishes come
true with an all too
promising prostitute
whom some absent
marine had left lying
about. Not long after
that, Andras' desires
reach full magnitude,
and, as a teenager, his
schoolmates of the
feminine variety poke
fun at his advances,
and he begins to doubt
himself.
It is only when he
tries to deflower a girl
vhom he had been
dating that he decides
that he must be
taught-and by educated
women who had manv
years of experience
under their belts.
Andras meets Maya,
juicily portrayed by
Karen Black, a pretty
astute woman who
catches Andras longing.
Andras asks her to
spend the night with
him and to his surprise,
she accepts, and Andras
starts on what may be
called the Golden Road.
Director George
Kaezender handles the
various love scenes with
tasteful, but erotic style.
Here, also, is where his
mode ol tongue-in
cheek' SURFACES.
Kaezender surrounds his
love scenes with light-
hearted, 1930's style
background music, to
give the scenes more of
a humorous, softened
approach, as if
Kaezender wanted to
play down the eroticism
ami make it more of a
'game
Berenger portrays
his role with consider-
able gusto, obviously
enjoying himself thor-
oughly. He manages to
keep the character,
Andra, down-to-earth,
while at the same time
crating a sort of young
Casanova that sweeps
older women off their
feet. Andras approaches
the women he picks
with nearly child-like
innocence, and evenual-
lv enacts his debonair
qualities to them.
And the women in-
deed are very beautiful.
Karen Black looks pret-
tier than ever, and this
seems to be a much,
much better role for her
than the little nothing
part she landed in
Capricorn One.Here, she
portrays a complex and
involved character, and
makes her grow.
Also in the film are
Helen Shaver, who por-
trays Anne MacDonald,
the last of Berenger's
red hot lovers (no pun
intended). Shavers looks
pretty indeed, and
comes across as the
very character she por-
trays, that of an adul-
terous American house-
wife.
ABORTIONS UP TO 12TH
WEEK OF PREGNANCY
$150.22
Free pregnancy test, birth control and
problem pregnancy counseling For
further information call 832-0535 (toll-
free number 800-221-2568 between
9AM-5PM weekdays
Raleigh Women's Health
Organization
917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N.C. 27603
Hill fitf EACINC INC
X6O4 Dickinson Ave.
75S-34S9
IHI 11 41 It 14f
Stock & HI Performance
Filters � Brakes
Rpllbars Headers
Open Evenings eo
& Saturday lOf
PURE PRAIRIE LEAGUE
ln concert
at N. C. Azalea Festival
Friday night, 8 o'clock, Apr! 6
TRASK COLISEUM
Tickets: $7, $8 and $10
On Sals! Azalea Festival Offlcs
Wilmington, N.C.
121 Chsetnut Street
OpsnollvJJIajgh
In Praise of Older
Women is certainly no
Academy Award winner,
but for its efforts, I can
say it merits a small
amount of praise.
ARMY�NAVY STORE
1501 S. Evans

��
-
B-15, bomber, field, J
deck, flight, snorkel
jackets. Back Packs.
M:MMMMMM ?
RIGGAN'S
SHOE REPAIR
AND
LEATHER SHOP
New leather pocketbooks,
belts, and belt buckles.
Shoes repaired to look
like new.
II W. 4th St.
Downtown Greenville
Wed.
900 ?
Ladies Nite
Music of
KURT
FORTMEYER
�h�rlock,ii
On 5th St. across from
the Book Barn
Good Food
& Good People
Negetarian diets
respected.
MonSat. 11a.m9p.m.
itchelTs Hair Styling
� P.tt Fin,
TCrcenv.lle
Shopping Cefei
North Carolina 17U
Retro HairShort
OUR STYLISTS
HAVE RECEIVED PRI-
VATE! PROFESSIONAL
TRAINING IN THE NEW
RETRO-CUTS.
COME IN AND TRY
THIS NEWEST LOOK.
CALL 756-2950 or COME IN
CHANELO'S
ANNOUNCES OUR
99 SPAGHETTI
SPECIAL
li��rlN vB 5 4
,11 day eyery Tuesday. A large
plate of spaghetti Is only 99
when yon dine with as. It's
cheaper than eating at home,
and we do the dishes
pifcXA CHANELO'S siUghizt,
PIZZA fiP SPAGHETTI HOUSE�
SUBS 507 E. 14th Ste tA�AOiVA
768-7400 FOR FREE DELIVER
squadron of the flagship
of the Draconian peace
mission. The flagship is
en route to Earth to
establish trade relations
and is not supposed to
be armedbut then,
you've got to have a
villain, right?
Draconian
Since the Draconians
cannot bring themselves
to believe Rogers' story,
they quite naturally
assume that he is a spy
and set him free in his
spaceship.
The plan?
To track his space-
craft down through the
Earthmen's impenetrable
force-field and thereby
learn how to success-
fully invade Earth.
A dm
ission
Told vou they
up to no good.
were
Exactly why the
Draconians, who by
their own admission
control fully three
quarters of the univ-
erse, are so facinated
with the conquest of
one small, burned-out
world is not clear. But
DONT MISS
A CRY OF
EL2YERS
William Gibson's colorful and moving
portrait of the youthful Will Shakespeare
April 4-7 and 9-14
Studio Theatre East Carolina Playhouse
$2.50 ECU students $1.00
Call 757-6390 for reservation
then, why should this
be any different than
the rest of the film.
Buck Rodgers
As for the rest of
storyline-�well, wh)
both -ry
Beyond a doubt,
Burk Rogers would
appeal to a lew isolated
groups ol -par�- fantasj
afficianados, but th-
vast majority of viewers
would be happier with
anj ol tiic several fine
movies currently plaving
in town.
ATTIC
Wed. & t
Thun.V
(filmed
for TV)
Notice is hereby given that on March 1, 1979 East Carolina
University tendered an application to the Federal Communications
Commision in Washington, D.C. requesting a constuction permit
for a new Educational FM Broadcast Station in Greenville, N.C.
to operate on FM Channel 21 7A, 91.3 MHz, with total input
power of 150 watts and an effective radiated power of 282 watts
from an antenna radiation center 1 34 ft. above terrain.
The proposed studies and transmitter will be located on the
campus of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. The
proposed antenna support stucture will extend a total of 139 ft.
above ground level. A copy of the above referenced application
which contains a complete listing of the applicants, officers,
and governing board is on file for public inspection during normal
business hours at the office of WECU Radio and the SGA
President's office.
EYEGLASS SPECIAL
Lxecvi- Juz
OPTICIANS
&
opticians
association
of america
REMEMBER!
Your Eyeglass
And Contact Lens
Prescription
Is Yours! , r
YOUR DOCTORS PRESCRIPTION
ACCURATELY FILLED
I � '
iscount to all ECU Students
lOfcD
(Excluding Specials)
FIRST QUALITY
EYEGLASSES
Single vision white
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Page 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 3 April 1979
Purple-Gold scrimmage
scheduled for Saturday
B SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
Spring practice ends in seven days for the East
Carolina football team and like most coaches during
spring Pat Dye just isn't overly pleased with
Pirates performance.
Injuries have plagued the Bucs during their
spring drill- and Dye admits the necessary
siveness and intensity just haven't been there.
Hi wever, Dye hopes some of those things will
ehang Saturday when East Carolina stages its
Purple-Gold .scrimmage which highlights the
-�ring practice drills.
ght now, the only unit that looks like its
with an enthusiasm out there is our first
ve unit Dye said Saturday after a lengthy
nmage session. "We haven't had any injuries
therefore we haven't had to use too many
players offensively. Our first offensive team
ver) experienced unit and they've played well
during most of the spring drills. I hope it
tinues
However, we didn't look that quick out there today
worries me hut we had some real tough
workouts both Thursday and Friday which may have
Minted t.r some ol the problems
Meanwhile, several defensive starters have seen
ited practice time because of injuries which has
the coaching staff the opportunitv to
nent with new players.
the Bucs expected starting ends next
John Morris and Clifford Williams, are
while linebackers Jeffrev Warren and Glenru
Mo
rn
lave also been sidelined.
- Brewington i the only linebacker we've
right now who has played Dye said.
the injuries our players are not surgical
ones, but they're keeping people off the field and
they need to be out there getting the work. It's
given our coaches the opportunity to see some of
our younger players and we've had several who
have looked good and could help us next fall
One of the biggest question marks entering the
spring drills was the quarterback situation. Leander
Green returns next season for his final year, but
the search for a reserve quarterback has progressed
slowly.
Henry Trevathan, a junior from Greenville is
currently the number two quarterback but the other
possible replacements, John Felton, Aaron Stewart
and Jess Eberdt have all been hampered with
injuries.
Felton, a freshman from Edenton, missed last
year with a severe knee injury he suffered before
pre-season drills? Eberdt, a walk on during the fall
has been awarded a scholarship and is considered
one of the Pirates top passing QB'S.
"Henry Trevathan is our number two
quarterback right now, but the rest of our
quarterbacks have missed a lot of practice time
because of injuries Dye said. "They have all
looked good at times, but we're looking for that
consistency. It's important we have a capable
backup quarterback in the wishbone system. Leander
was injured a lot early last year and we had more
than our share of problems at quarterback
Saturday's Purple-Gold scrimmmage game will not
conclude the Pirates spring drills. The NCAA allows
teams 20 actual practice days and Dve. said spring
drills would probably end Thursday, April 12.
East Carolina, the defending Independence Bowl
champions, opens its season Sept. 1 at home
against Western Carolina University. The Pirates
will then play N.C. State, Duke and Wake Forest
following their opener before returning home again.
The Bucs have 12 returning starters back from
last year's team which finished the season with a
9-3 record.
�w �Ml $
eander Green and Anthony Collins arc the Bucs top offen
sive returners
Golfers finish 12th in tourney
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
The East Carolina
golf team concluded its
1979 season this week-
end with a disappoint-
ing 12th place finish in
the Camp Lejeune Invi-
tational tournament.
The Pirate
gether a three
of 937 which
behind the tea
pion North Care
finished with
strokes. Duke tc
while Old Domi
put to-
ay total
vas far
i cham-
ina who
870
ok third
lion fin-
ished fourth, followed
by Elon and North
Carolina-Charlotte.
North Carolina's
Steve Smith captured
the individual title while
Duke's Jeff Goettman
finished in
place.
"We left
our regulars
for this tournament so
that some of our
younger players could
get some tournament
experience East Car-
olina coach Bob Helmick
said. "We still didn't
play as well as I hoped
we would, but I think,
we've got a good
second
most of
at home
nucleus of players for
next season plus the
fact we're bringing sev
eral talented freshmen
which should help us
immediately
Carl Beaman was
the low man for the
Pirates with a three-day
total of 233 strokes.
Beman had rounds of
78-78-77. Frank Acker
followed Beman in the
Pirate lineup with
ounds of 74-79-83 for a
236 total.
Other East Carolina
scores were Joe Dillon
77-81-85-243, Joey
Huntley 84-77-85-246,
and Robin Saleeby
84-81-84-246.
"This was not a
loaded tournament; and
since it was the last
tournament of the year
for us, I was glad to
see some of our
younger players get
some experience
Helmick noted.
"Besides, the way
we've been playing, we
really didn't expect to
win either
race
Rick Clear heads for finish line in Sunday
Clear captures first
Greenville Road Race
By CHRIS FARREN
Staff Writer
I- Jf rf,ruSt AnUUal Gretville Road Race was
kicked off this past Sunday, and nearly 550 entrants
showed up to tackle the 6.2 mile course.
Kick Clear from Cherry Point captured first place
overall for male runner, with a time of 31:28 East
Carolina own Linda Mason was the top women
iin.sher, completing the course with a 41-54
clocking. ����
W iZ�� irthue,ma,e categories included:
21 29 R r?d bC,OW' ChaHie Powe11 the
21-29 group, R,ck Clear in the 30-39 group, Edward
to theen5oV 40"49 gr�UP 3nd Ken"e'h Ada�
in tne DU-59 category.
The female winners were: May Forbes for 20
and below, Linda Mason in the 21-29 group
fn :he4R9itCh 'n " "d G k
in the 40-49 category.
Hundreds of spectators showed up Sunday
afternoon to watch the mass of runners Lrt down"
Keed St. at 3 p.m. Thirty-one minutes and
wenty-eight seconds later the runners staged
returning, first one and two at a time, and later on
in groups.
It was a beautiful day to be outside, but the hot
sun forced the runners to put up with over 80
degree temperatures. Rest stops were positioned
throughout the course to help the racers combat the
heat. Still many runners dropped out and collapsed
from heat exhaustion.
The Greenville Police and Rescue Squad did a
superb job of controlling the traffic and helping the
injured runners. According to Bob Gotwals, race
director, all of the injured runners who were taken
to the hospital, were treated and released bv
Sunday night.
The race was sponsored bv H.L. Hodges
Sporting Goods in collaboration with the Coastal
Carolina Track Club, with all the proceeds going to
the Easter Seal Foundation.
The event was very well organized and an
overwhelming success. Thanks are in order to: Bob
Gotwals, the race coordinator and director; the girls
of the Alpha Delta Pi and the Kappa Delta
sororities; Jim Woods; and to Jo Perkins and the
Easter Seals Society.
More than 500 people competed in the Greenville Road Race Sund
r
�.
-� -





r � t f ,
t t r
� � �
� t t '
Softball team
improves record
By JIMMY DUPREE
Sports Writer
ThuTrsdavUdJ l SWePl a double-header
t- win in ,k r Mary Bryan Car,y,e daime �
the sJcond si gamC WhUe D�nna Ea8�n t0�k
shelV f tHe SCOrin� for the Buc. when
Lu nn nl � lT innin and �"� home on
It Ld S d�Ub,e- The bi� innin� for E� was
erroCTonnaCkruJaniS Par,�n reached base on �
Parl on ! " Sin�,C Teres W"itley.
Par n scored on a single by Mary Powell and
Wtattej on a sacnfice from Shirley Brown. Powell
Has.driven home by Donnn LaVictoire's sacrifice.
�nly offensive glimmer for St. Augustine's
was. two-run homer by Brenda Rozier in the
ixtn.
second meeting was somewhat more
SrS5 r yn" Hurd,e and Whit, e�ch singled in
he third frame and were sent across the plate on a
long double by Jo Carol Barrow
In the fourth, Cindy Meekins led off with a single
followed by a double by Eason. Meekins scored
hen a grounder by Addie Carter was errored.
Lason and Carter scamperedl home when St.
Augustine s shortstop bobbled a grounder by
Hurdle. J
St. Augustine's cut the margin to one in the sixth
when Rozier tripled home Mary Knowell and later
-cored. They were unable to pr�duce the necessary
run to knot the game, however.
In Saturday action at Lindlev Park in
Greensboro, the Lady Bucs did not fair so well.
The Lady Wolfpack of N.C. State conquered ECU
in the opener, 3-2.
The Pirates' runs came in the second inning
when Robin Faggart singled and scored on an
infield grounder by Carlyle. Barrow doubled and
crossed home on a Parlon single.
State capped the game in the sixth as Wagner
got to first on an error by Carlyle and later scored.
Romano and Allen each singled and scored as the
Pack forged ahead of ECU.
Western Carolina University fell to the Bucs in
the second contest, 11-10.
The Lady Pirates exploded for 10 runs in the
se� nd, as they were awarded five walks bv the
WCL' hurler.
The Bucs received nine free passes during the
contest. The winning run came in the sixth when
Donna LaVictoire walked and scored on Barrow's
single.
Cl netted three runs in the second with a
homer by Whitworth. Mintor also added a three-RBI
homer in the sixth.
Revenge belonged to N.C. A&T University in the
finale as they masacred ECU 17-1. The Bucs took a
twinbill from A&T earlier in the season.
Two four-baggers sparked an eight run second
frame for A&T. Debbie Lyons paced the A&T
batters with two homers, while Jones and Capehard
legged one each.
The Lady Pirates drop to 7-7 on the season with
pitchers Marv Bryan Carlyle 5-5 and Donna Eason
2-2.
ECU hosts North Carolina Wednesday in a
double-header on the softball field adjacent to
Harrington Field.
Mpiw mn ruuNiAiwrifcAP Page g
One of the more attractive entrants in Sunday's Road R
rhrtn by Pete Podeszwa
A $
contribution
is enclosed
Please send me the symbol of support checked below
Belt Buckre($10) j Winter Games Tote Bag ($25)
u Ski Cap ($25) - Bookends ($50)
sntrtbutiOd
'ai deductible
North Carolina
edges Pirates 9-8
By CHARLES
CHANDLER
Assistant Sports Editor
'We're not down.
We still feel like we
have a fine ball club
These were the
words of East Carolina
baseball coach Monte
Little shortly after his
Pirates had dropped a
heart-breaking decision
to North Carolina 9-8
Monday afternoon. The
loss was the East
Carolina's third in their
last four outings, a
stretch of games Little
had deemed vital one
week ago.
"We're not out of
anything yet Little
said. "We still have
over half of our sched-
ule left. We just need
to get a good string of
wins going. That's
vitally important now.
Our schedule will get
easier. It sure cannot
get any tougher
While the loss was a
big blow to the Pirates,
there was something
very positive gained
from it. Down 9-3 going
into the ninth inning,
the Pirates battled back
to cut the lead to 9-8
and actually had the
tying run on third base
before UNC ace Greg
Norris entered the con-
test to kill the ECU
rally.
The rally began with
a double by Raymie
Styons and was followed
by three consecutive
Pirates reaching base
via walks, which scored
Styons. Highlighting the
rally was a two-run
single by Jerry Carr-
away.
Carraway eventually
scored on a single to
right center by Billy
Best. Best's single
moved Bob Neff to
third, making him the
potential tying run.
The Tarheels then
replaced reliever, Steve
Streeter with ace Greg
Norris, to face Raymie
Styons, who had started
the rally, in the two-out
situation.
Styons then ground-
ed out hard to short to
end the game.
Before the contesi
with the Tarheels, the
Pirates had dropped
decisions to UNC-
Wijmington and Virginia
and won at Harrington
Field against the
Terrapins of Maryland.
Today the Pirates
now 11-10 have a
double-header slated
here against Old
Dominion, a team that
took a twin bill from
the Pirates last season.
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�� I





Title
Fountainhead, April 3, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 03, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.555
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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