Fountainhead, March 27, 1979






-�
Circulation 10,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
UP
vol. 55, No. tar
27 March 1979
Minges damaged Thursday
fU KICR1 i;lurmis
News Kditor
Minor damage was
done to Minges Colesi-
um Thursday night
vhil- a sell-out crowd
watched The Outlaws
Moll Hatchet Concert.
Approximately 6,000
iple attended the
concert, halt ot whom
were students and the
half, public.
During the concert,
rative insert
ipsed. No one was
ed in this accident.
decorative insert
part of Minges,
the roof that
the normal
tne
the coiesium.
erhanging forms
a ledge on the inside of
the building.
Several members of
the audience stood on
the ledge during the
concert, and due to the
weight on this platform,
the structure collapsed.
According to Charles
Sune, Major Attractions
Committee chairperson
and newly-elected Stu-
dent Union president,
the structure was made
of plaster on wire mesh
resembling a suspended
ceiling.
"No one was hurt. It
could have happened
though. It's not the
fault of the architecture.
A person wanted to
stand on it. Why they
did it, I don't know
said Sune.
"That structure was
never n eant to be stood
on and the pressure
caused the ledge to fall
in said Sune.
"We never like
damage to occur, but
when it does occur, we,
the Student Union,
will act in good faith
and will be responsible
for any damage Sune
explained. The damage
will cost the Major
Attractions Committee
approximately $2,000 to
repair the structure.
Other minor dam-
ages were reported
during the concert.
Light fixtures were
damaged, locks were
broken, and a window
or two were broken,
all damages and costs
to repair them should
be known by Wed-
nesday.
Sune said that the
large sell-out crowd was
not necessarily the
cause for the damage.
"We've had this
many people in Minges
before, so this isn't the
reason for the dam-
age said Sune. The
Styx Concert was held
last year at this time
and there were no
problems with damage
due to the large crowd.
Sune will be meeting
with Robert Blek,
special assistant to the
chancellor, late this
week to discuss later
concerts in Minges.
Sune feels like Major
Attractions will be able
to hold concerts in
Minges in the future.
"I don't see why we
shouldn't have concerts
there anymore he
plied.
re-
Thirty-one security
personnel, the largest
number ever at an ECU
concert, were present
Thursday night. Sixteen
student ushers were
also present to assist in
crowd control at the
concert.
Sune said that there
were several arrests
made during the night
for disorderly conduct,
resisting arrest, and
striking an officer. "It
was a rowdy crowd, no
doubt about that said
Sune.
MINGES COLESiUM WAS damaged Thursday night during Th.
OutlawsMolly Hatchet Concert. Photo by John H.
Grogan
SGA
presidential candidates interviewed
MIKE 1MS. SGA"
presidential candidate.
J!hoto b Chau Gurlevl .
A
I
KKr I I Mr I MY SGA
presidential randidate.
Photo b hap Gurley
By KAREN WENDT
Staff Writer
Interviews were held with the three SGA
presidential candidates on March 23,24, and 25.
Each of the candidates were asked identical
questions, and then one question each based on
their platforms heir answers cannot be printed in
their entirety, but the major points in each of the
answers have been printed.
What are the SGA's shortcomings, and what are its
best points? What is the chief shortcoming in the
SGA?
Brett Melvin: "The chief shortcoming in the
SGA right now has been a lack of communication
between the Student Government Association and
the Executive Branch and between the students.
There has also been a lack of communication, this
year in particular, between the executive branch �nJ
the legislative branch. Communication breeds
familiarity, and it breeds understanding,and by
communicating to the students, we can explain to
the students exactly what's going on. When an
organization is handling $150,000 of your money, I
think you should have the right to know what
they're doing with your money. The best point of
the Student Government Association, as it stands
today, would be that they had the opportunity right
now to improve the transit system
Mike Adkins: "I feel that the chief shortcoming
is the main people who are involved in it right
now. These people that are involved in it now
seem to be involved with it not with the feeling
that they are doing things for the students, but
they feel like they need to take care of themselves
and people of their own kind. There are special
lobbying groups in the SGA here and there are
things involved just for themselves and not for the
students
Libby Lefler: 'I feel probably the chief
shortcoming in the SGA is that a lot of times the
students don't take into consideration every aspect
of the deal. I feel like we should look at the merits
of the deal and how many students it would really
affect and not just who's presenting the bill. I feel
like overall the SGA has more good points than it
has shortcomings, but I feel like the advantage
whould be that the students are giving of their time
to help another student. Only like five people in the
SGA have a paid position, all the others are giving
of their time to help the students, and I feel like
the legislatures are sincerely interested in the
students because I feel: like the SGA is working for
everybody and a lot of times it seems like
What do you feel is the most pressing issue facing
ECU students today?
Brett Melvin: "There have been several issues
brought up in this campaign ranging from the
transit systpni to one that I believe in and that's
the issue of representation at this university. I feel
like that our Student Government Association once
again needs to rejoin the North Carolina Association
of Student Governments, (NCASG), of which they
are no longer a member. Also the student body
president sits on the Greenville City Council,he is
not a member of the Greenville City Council, but he
does sit on the Greenville City Council
Mike Adkins: "The most pressing issue I think
is getting out of school itself. Several years ago
there was an SGA-Media Board split and things
from then until now have been very disruptive. I
think one of the most pressing issues is to get
things going well again without the controversy and
the fighting between the two because they could
very easily compliment each other
Libby Lefler: "I think that with 12,000 students,
it's kind of hard to set just one pressing issue,
because I feel like no issue is too small or too large
to be dealth with. Because every student pays the
same amount of activity fees, and nobody has any
more of a right. And I think probably the issue that
New transit manager makes changes
By RUM GUARMIS
News Editor
ha
the
been
new
Joe Bullan
appointed as
tranit system manager.
Bullan! has held this
position since March 1.
Bullard, a junior at
ECl majoring in
political science and
business, has planned
several new changes for
the system, hoping to
improve the service of
the hu for the stu-
dents.
Bullard explained
that after this semester,
the Purple bus will no
longer continue service
to University Condomin-
ium Bullard said that
onl four or five people
use this route. He also
-aid that this stop is
dangerous because the
bus has to cross five
lanes of traffic to get to
East Brook Apartments.
Along with the dan-
ger involved, this route
is time-consuming, and
with the proposed stop
at Rivergate Shopping
Center, serving Univer-
sity Condominiums
would not be feesible
according to Bullard.
Bullard has proposed
that there will be no
more unscheduled
� stopping for anybody
riding the buses.
"The buses are
made for long dis-
tances said Bullard,
"not for braking every
400 yards
Bullard attributes the
majority of the bus
problems to the brakes.
He said that stopping
so frequently and so
abruptly damages the
brakes severely. One of
the buses is in the shop
at least twice a week
for brake repairs.
Bullard said that the
Purple bus stops at
Village Green Apart-
ments on Fifth Street.
After this stop, pass-
engers expect the driver
to stop every 400 yards
for an unscheduled
stop.
Bullard said this
stopping is dangerous,
especially on a busy
street like Fifth Street.
He said that there
would be no more
stoppping at sorority
houses along Fifth
Street and no more at
Wahl-Coates Elementary
School.
Bullard urges the
passengers not to ask
the drivers to stop the
bus at any unscheduled
time. The bus driver
will be fired if he does
stop unnecessarily.
"As it is now, we're
making 100 unnecessary
stops along this street a
week, and that's just
uncalled for said
Bullard.
Bullard is looking
into the possibility of
buying a new bus. A
new bus in definitely
needed b ecause of the
great demand of riders.
Bullard has thought
about asking merchants
at the scheduled stops
to contribute to the
cause of a new bus.
Manv students are
angered if the bus does
not run.Bullard explains
that the buses run on a
priority system. The
Purple bus will always
run provided there is a
back-up bus. This is
because 5,000 students
ride this route a week.
The Gold route is next
in priority with 4,000
riders, and the Brown
is last with about 2,000
riders per week.
If more than one
bus is broken down at
a time, the bus which
is catering the most
number of students will
be taken care of.
Bullard urges stu-
dents that if they have
a complaint about the
system, they should call
the SGA office at
Mendenhall and leave
their name and number
with the secretary. '
Bullard will return the
call, and the problem
will be worked out.
"If something goes
wrong, please don't
chew out the bus
drivers said Bullard.
He said that they drive
the bus all day and
more than likely they
cannot do anything
about the problem.
Bullard asks again that
the student call him at
Mendenhall.
Bullard hopes that
as soon as WECU is
organized, he will be
able to have an hourly
bus report, stating
which buses are running
at that present time.
This way, the students
could listen and know
ahead of time if their
bus is running.
Students should be
at the bus stop five
minutes before the
scheduled stop. Too
many times, the bus is
a couple of minutes
early , the student
misses the bus and
blames the driver.
Bullard said that all
schedules are flexible.
Vandalism has
plagued the bus system.
In the last week, four
speakers and two radios
have been stolen while
the buses have parked
at night. Bullard said
that this equipment is
not insured and new
equipment will have to
be bought using money
from the allotted
budget.
"It's a good system
said Bullard. The bus
system is here for the
student and should be
used, not abused.
"I'm not a politician
and I will not concede
to the politicians on
campus. This system
will be organized in the
best way to serve the
students, and I won't
be told to change it.
Now if the new
administration or anyone
on campus has some
good ideas, I'll be glad
to sit down and talk
about them said
Bullard.
JOE BULLARD HAS
recently been appointed
transit manager. Photo
by Chap Gurley
we hear the most complaints about right now would
be the transit system. I feel that with enough
student support behind us, we can go to the Board
of Trustees and find the money. I think we need
to reevaluate the entire system and see what points
could be improved and where the downfalls are. But
like I say, I feel like any issue that concerns the
students, concerns me because I can't sav that
something is too small or too big to work with
WTiat previous legislative experience have you had?
Brett Melvin "In the past couple of years I
was involved in the model United Nations. In the
delegation that I was in, I won honorable mention
for the best delegate. I was chairman of the social
committee when I lived in Imstead dorm. I made a
proposal which I worked for and finally got passed
that Slay and Umstead no longer had to pay WRC
and MRC funds since they weren't receiving
anything from it. The money that had been going to
WRC anrf MRC quit going to tnem m�d wa-
diverted directly to the house council
Mike Adkins: "I was elected sophomore class
president this year. I ran against my running-mate,
Charlie Sherrod. We've both been in the legislature.
I've been a member of the screenings and
appointment committee, and I've been a member of
the executive council. I grant that I have not had
any great number of years in the SGA, but I'm
sincere in my wishes, and I would like to work with
the students. Just because someone has experience
does not mean that they have made good of their
experience. I feel Charlie and I have some good
ideas, and I think they will be implemented well.
The experience factor does not have a big bearing
at this time, but I feel
that if I cannot get into office on my own merits,
I don't deserve it
Libby Lefler: "My freshman year I was a dorm
legislator, and then I was elected SGA secretary. I
served on the executive council for two consecutive
years. I was chairman of the committee to select a
law firm. I have served as junior class president,
and I was elected a day-student representative (but
when I was elected junior class presedent, 1 could
only take one). I served as speaker this year, I've
been within the legislature for two years, and in the
executive for one, so I've been in the SGA for
three years. I feel that the president needs to have
a working relationship with the legislature. I feel
that I do have the respect of the legislature
Platform Questions
Brett Melvin: How do you intend to vote against
a fee increase on the Board of Trustees as a
member of the Board of Trustees when the SGA
has no vote on that board?
"The student body president sits on the Board
of Trustees as a member of the Board of Trustees.
It used to be back three or four years ago that
every time a student fee increase came up
concerning any issue, as long as it was a student
fee increase, it was a campus-wide referendum;and
that campus-wide referendum was taken to the
Board of Trustees as the student body's opinion,
and that carries a lot more weight than the student
body president saying 'well, this is my opinion'
because it is still only his opinion, unless he can
back it up with his constituencies' opinions
Mike Adkins: You say in your platform that
working for the student body has not been the case
in the last few years. If not for the students, who
is the SGA working for and why?
I think that there have been special lobbying
groups in the SGA that have taken certain groups
into consideration for the good of the students. Like
I said before, I think things like transit, and better
lighting on campus, paving of parking lots, and just
generally things that the students want done, not
just things that the particular legislature wants
done
Libby Lefler: You say that arguing about the
past will endanger the future. Do we not learn from
the past mistakes and accomplishments?
"I feel like we do learn from the past mistakes
and accomplishments. You can learn from your
mistakes. I feel like we can't get anything done if
we're constantly bickering about something, that
we've got to get the SGA to be doing something
and not just sitting up there arguing. We don't
need the coalitions in student government.
iimn LEFLER. t.V
Photo by Chap Gurley
Vote
in
SGA
elections
Wednesday
March 28
ECU
student
dies
Charles Kearns
(Chip) Johnson, 20, died
Sunday. Johnson wa a
student at ECU and a
natie of Dunn
A sophomore at
ECU, Johnson was a
pledge of Slpha Sigma
Phi Fraternity.
The funeral will be
held on Wednesday at 3
p.m. at the Divine
Street United Methodist
Church in Dunn.
Graveside services will
be held in Greenwood
Cemetary. Bev. Tom
Loftus will perform
burial services.
Johnson is survived by
his parents, Mr. and
Mrs. J. Sherrill Johnson
of Dunn; two brothers,
William (Andy) John-
son, Dunn; and Richard
Johnson, Charlotte; and
his maternal grand-
mother, Mrs. W.B.
Kearns, Pleasant
Gardens.
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14 0 � mr w ra�1 .r y��jr44Mr�wWXi' '0 - - - - "VW,
- 444





Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 27 March 1979
Seniors
ll second semester
graduates should
purchase their caps and
gowns tor graduation by
pril 5 at the Student
Supph Store on cam-
pus The delivery dates
for rap- and gowns are
pr. 3,4 and 5. The
gowns vill he delivered
to the Student Supply
stcre. Ilie delivery
dates and points ot
deliver) are the same
tor both graduates and
undergraduates. These
Keepsake gowns .1 re
011r- to keep providing
the $10 graduation fee
which is paid. For those
receibing the Masters
Degree the $10 fee pays
for your cap and gown,
there 1- an extra
ol $9.75 for your
hood. Am questions
pertaining lo caps and
. - should be re-
erred to the Student
Supph Si ore, right
Bldg. '
Marshalls
pplieaiions lor
l')7')o Mar-hall- are
being accepted in
12 21 Mcndenhall
- udeul Center (SGA
oFfice). In order to
ipialil) lor ilii position,
in us 1 have
ed 1 hours ls
' 1111 o I S11 r 111 g
S :ic-tcr and have a
(' a eruge. Deadline
ing 1- pril 6,
Bowling
Doubles, -ingle and
mixed doubles will be
the events of the Spring
W. v. "�iu Tournmmenl
. xTTt- t �n 2,3
and 4 at Mcndenhall
Student Center. From 3
until 10 p.m. each day,
ECl students may howl
ytime and enter their
si nre- in ! he tourna-
ment. Detailed infor-
mation and rule- are
available at the Bowling
(.t nter. 1 rophies will be
given in all event
SGA
The SGA HAS
OPENINGS FOR TWO
DAY STUDENT REP-
RESENTATIVES AND
ONE SEAT IS OPEN
FOR A REPRESENTA-
TIVE FROM Slay Dorm, j
Anyone interested in
serving in the legisla-
ture in either ol the
two day student seats
or the Slay Dorm seat
should apply in the
SGA office in Mcnden-
hall. Screenings will be
held on March 27 at 4
p.m. For further
information come bv or
call the SGA OFFICE
AT 757-6611. EXT
218.
Phi Eta
Phi Eta Sigma will
meet on Wed Mar.
28, in Mcndenhall 244,
beginning at 7 p.m.
New officers will be
elected, plans for the
initiation on Apr. 11
will be made, and a
report on special pro-
jects will be presented.
All members as well as
prospective members
are urged to attend.
Conference
The Pitt County
Court Monitoring Pro-
gram Steering Com-
mittee will meet at the
Fir-t Presbyterian
Church (14th & Elm
St-). Tues Mar. 27 at
7 p.m. The Committee
will be hearing reports
nt the Program's pro-
gress, and scheduling
further developments.
Capson
A representative
from "Capson" will be
in the Co-op Office Fri
Mar. 30 to interview
undergraduate students
who are interested in
Co-op jobs with civilian
personnel in naval in-
stallations throughout
the U.S. for fall
semester, 1979. Jobs
for computer science
students are available in
Washington, .D.C and
Philadelphia, PA. Other
jobs available include
inventory management,
transportation manage-
ment, eduation special-
ists, personnel manage-
ment, statistician, logis-
tics management, house
management, industrial
specialist, and program
analyses. Interested
persons should contact
the Co-op Office im-
mediately to complete
the necessary appli-
cation forms and to
schedule an . interview
with Ms. Jeanette
Tweedv. A limited
number of interviews
will be scheduled. Call
Mrs. Harrizene Keyes
at 757-6979 to make an
appointment or get
additional inlormation.
ILO
The International
Language Organization
will present, beginning
at 8 p.m. on March 29,
th soiree francaise or
French Night. It will be
held at the International
House located at 306
East Ninth St. behind
McDonald's. The even-
ing will consist of wine
and cheese tastings of
assorted French wines
and cheeses. There will
also be a slide
presentation of various
regions of France, and
native Frenchmen with
which to speak. The
cost is $2 per person
and $1.50 for all I.L.O.
members in good
standing.
REBEL
Pre-med
Alph Epsilon Delta,
pre-medpre-dent honor
society will hold a
meeting Tues Mar. 27
in Flanagan 307 at 7:30
p.m. for the election of
officers for 1979-80. All
members are encour-
aged to attend.
Lecture
The Implication ot
Eugenics and Artificial
Insemination: A
Christian Perspective -
Inter Varsity Christian
Fellowship invites you
to hear Dr. Andrea van
Rij from the ECU
School of Medicine
discuss alternatives for
genetic counselling in
the Mcndenhall Student
Center, Rm. 221, Mar.
28 at 7 p.m.
y 2713 E 10th Street
Greenville, North Carolina
758-1042
LUNCHEON PIZZA
BUFFET
MONDAY - THURSDAY
$2.49
LATE NITE
PIZZA BUFFET
11:30-2:00
$2.75
GSAC
Members ot the
Graduate Student Advi-
sory Council will be
available during the
week of March 26-30.
1 1 a.m. - 2 p.m. in the
old student union, to
answer all questions
concerning .graduate
programs
available at
i
41ll lilt I 4 1S4 INC
104 DlcKlnion Ave.
758-3459
IH1 i I At It I 411
Stock & Hi Performance
Filters � Brakes
Rollbars � Headers
Open Evenings 6-9
� Saturday 10-5
All Greenville area
writers are invited to
attend the REBEL Rea-
ding on Wed April 4
at 7 p.m. in the
Mcndenhall Coffee-
house. This will be an
open reading. Interested
listeners are also
invited. Refreshments
will be served.
The following people
have checks in the
REBEL
E nnis,
Rand)
Harris,
Parker.
Morris.
picked
office:
Rickev
Stalls,
Michael
and
Check
Janet
Low e,
Toni
F.
John
ma be
up
from
3-5,
MonThurs. at the
REBEL office in the
Publication Center.
3005 E. 10th St,
33 Item
Salad Bar
Banquet
Faculties
7588550
Carry-out
service
Great Steaks
Coming Soon
" Flying Saucer Special "
Western Steer Family Steakhouse
CHANELO'S
ANNOUNCES OUR
QQ SPAGHETTI
SPECIAL
LWF-NIEGO S
All day every Tuesday. A large
� plate of spaghetti is only 99
WEkfhWM when you dine with as. It's
?ShKBIK cheaper than eating at home,
Bl Jlr and we do the dishes
PlXXA CHANELO'S aAQHEm
PIZZA �P SPAGHETTI HOUSE
8VB8 507 E. 14th St. tASAGjyA
DIAL 758-7400 FOR FREE DELIVERY
warn "
S3
-3 years of valuable
experience
-improved transit
-better communication
1
P
&&
Classifieds
for rent�)
NEEDED: Two room-
mates to share 2 B.R.
apt. at River Bluff
Apts. Needed for sum-
mer and or fall. 13
rent and utilities. Call
752-1598.
HAVE PRIVATE ROOM
in large house to sub-
lease for summer. Right
behind library. $62.50
mo. utilities included.
Call Jill at 752-9207,
leave name and num-
ber.
ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Third person needed to
share 3 B.R. Duplex on
Stancil Drive. $66 per
mo plus 13 utilities.
Call after 4, ask for
David or Joe: 758-1568.
MALE needs roommate
for 2 B.R. completely
furnished apt. wbar.
Available April 1.
756-8622.
NEED: A roommate to
share a 2 B.R. apt. at
Eastbrook by Apr. 1st.
Call 758-5794 after 4
.m.
sheepdog. One blue
eye, one brown eye.
Any info, please reply
758-8343 or 758-8342.
REWARD for ECU
men's class ring. Lost
in the Beef-N-Shakes
restroom. Has initials
M.L.H. IT found, call
758-8074.
LOST: Econ 2113 note-
book on Mar. 21. If
found, call Kathy.
756-0345. Reward of-
fered.
totf2
LOST: Old English
LOOKING for someone
who might be interested
in touring around
Europe this summer
with one or possibly 2
other people. Ifinteres-
ted call 752-0904 after
5:30 p.m.
COMMUTING
STUDENT WANTS TO
CARPOOL OR SHARE
EXPENSES FROM
Wilson. Classes MWF
spring & fall, M-F
summer. Call 237-08 .
BELLY DANCE
Sunshine announces the
beginning of her spring
class for ladies, be-
ginning soon. 758-0736.
RIDE NEEDED: to and
from Roanoke, VA
weekend of 6-8 April.
Can leave after 10:30
Friday morning. Will
share expenses. Call
Sue at 758-9874.
DISCO DANCE lessons
- classes in beginning,
inter. & advanced. Ex-
cellent instruction. Call
758-0736.
WANTED: Experienced
drummer for full time
work with established
top 40RockDisco
Band. Call Steve- or
James, 756-6681.
for sale
FOR SALE: Pioneer
SX-650 stereo receiver
35 wattschannel 1 yr.
old. Perfect condition,
$175 Call 752-1524.
FOR SALE: Pioneer
5x636 receiver, 25 watts
per channel, $150 or
best. Call Frank at
758-0641 MonFri
after 12.
FOR SALE: Boat, motor
& trailer. New con-
dition. Best offer.
756-0895.
FOR SALE: 2 B.R
1979 mobile home. All
electric, washer-drver.
Sail equity and" take
over payments of
1104.15 756-0895.
STEREO equipment
available through college
dealer. Check prices
before you buv eUe-
"W C,� M,h.el.
CAMERA equipment for
sale - Canon EF 35
mm. camera auto with
50 mm lens, flash auto
"ng, Canon FTB
camera 35 mm, Canon
Auto Fash 133D, toom
cns, all de.�ing ge�r
�nd instruction book
nce
tor
included p
package ot
�jeers negotiated. Call
Rhonda at 752-9144
SPECIAL: Mavvli tap,
IXLI-60 $3.10 per U�
TDK-SA-C-60, $285
DttcovMs on i mm
"W. Call M.ehaet
�52-2601.
spring is here! Turn- tor
tht portrait vou've been
tHmking about. Have it
done OUTDOORS. Cdl:
� 58-0962, portrait-
"� e Podesiwa also
resume pictures in black
an white, weddings
and all types of group
shots.

4





27 March 1979 FOUNTAINHEAO Pag� 3
Treasurer
We, the undersigned, support and endorse
Steve O'Geary for the office of SGA Treasurer.
It is our opinion that he is a highly qualified
candidate and will best serve the needs and interests
of the student body of ECU. Therefore we encourage
all students to go to the polls on Wednesday, March 28
and cast their vote for Steve O'Geary for SGA Treasurer.
Tommy Joe Payne, SGA President
David Cartwright, SGA Vice-President
Libby Lefler, SGA Speaker of the Legislature
Eva Pittman, Panhellenic President
Gerry Wallace, MRC President
Mike Morse, Student Union President
Charles Sune, Student Union President-elect
Neil Sessoms, 1977-78 SGA President
Reed Warren, 1977-78 SGA Vice-President
Nicky Francis, Senior Class President
Mike Adkins, Sophomore Class President
Lester Nail, Freshman Class President
Tommy Pharo, IFC Vice-President
Charlie Sherrod, Day Student Legislator
Latane Farmer, Day Student Legislator
Craig Coleman, Day Student Legislator
Guy Lucas, Day Student Legislator
Pat Quinn, Day Student Legislator
Starr Jackson, Day Student Legislator
Suzanne Lamb, Day Student Legislator
r Allen, Fletcher Dorm Legislator
Dasha Efird, Greene Dorm Legislator
Lynn Calder, Chairperson, SGA Appropriations Committee-
Geary
Experience, background,
and what he stands for
Steve 0' Geary has served as a day student
representative in the SGA Legislature for the past
year. As a legislator 0'Geary has served on the
Appropriations Committee, thus gaining valuable
experience and a keen awareness of the student
government's financial situation.
Also 0' Geary is a business major, thus he
understands sound financial management. 0'Geary
understands the needs of students and all student
organizations. He has seen and heard all the major
groups' beneficial ideas and their financial needs
while serving on the appropriations committee.
It is because of his experience with SGA
appropriations and his desire to bring efficiency to
SGA finances that Steve is seeking the office of
SGA Treasurer. Yet, most importantly is his desire
to help all students.
Steve 0'Geary is the only candidate for the
office of Treasurer with a BusinessAccounting
background. 0'Geary is also the only candidate
who has served in SGA.
With experience, knowledge and know-how, Steve
0'Geary will benefit ECU's student body.
With the exception of the transit system, the
SGA emergency loan fund is probably the most vital
service that SGA provides for the students.
Presently there is only $10,500 available in $25
loans which means that only 420 loans are available
for 12.500 students.
As Treasurer, Steve 0'Geary will work for at
least a 50 percent increase in the loan fund.
0'Geary's objective is to insure that as many
students as possible can benefit from this service.
For several months now, there has been a
movement underway at N.C. State and UNC-Chapel
Hill to have the N.C. Legislature and the UNC
Board of Governors allow on-campus sales of beer
and wine at state supported universities. Several
ECU students have joined in the effort already,
among them is Steve 0'Geary.
The reason behind O'Geary's support of this
effort is that profits from on-campus sales of beer
could be funneled back into student activities, thus
providing more and better service to ECU students.
One of the most vital and sensitive duties of the
Treasurer is the overseeing of confidential loans.
These loans are made available to students for
problem pregnancies. These loans are strictly
confidential and will be administered in a mature
and professional manner.
This is an area of great concern to the student
confronted with such a problem.
Steve 0'Geary understands the nature of these
situations and will insure that confidential loans are
just that, confidential.
- m-m-mm
- - � -
- - - v - - ' �





Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 27 March 1979
Low Ricky Lowe
It is unfortunate that this year's
spring election has turned into such a
vicious, name-calling, mudslinging,
melee.
The most flagrant case of this has
been the work of a previously
unknown candidate for treasurer:
Ricky Lowe. Lowe distributed fliers
around campus that were filled with
critical personal attacks, and outright
lies.
His green sheet trashy tales
accused this newspaper's advertising
manager of "refusing to print" a
platform that was submitted to him.
Of course Lowe himself could hardly
know how, since he certainly never
gave the advertising manager any
platform.
Lowe sent a fraternity brother to
the FOUNTAINHEAD office with a
handwritten, five page platform that
did not conform to the 150 word
limit. When Lowe's messenger was
told that the platform would have to
be cut he took it back and left with
it, never to be seen again by the
newspaper staff.
In addition to this he then
attempted to discredit his opponent by
making insinuations that Robert
Swaim, FOUNTAINHEAD advertising
manager, was supporting his oppon-
ent, Steve O'Geary, and thus had
"refused" to accept Lowe's platform.
Lowe showed his ignorance of the
issues when he accused O'Geary of
making "pie in the sky promises
This was obviously in reference to
O'Geary's platform promise to support
the movement for on-campus beer
sales.
The fact is that a bill has already
been introduced in the N.C. General
Assembly by an Orange County
legislator. Unfortunately, the bill in its
present form includes only UNC
Chapel Hill.
Several students, among them
Steve O'Geary, have been working
behind the scenes to amend the bill
See PIE, p. 5
3ACK, D.?iiU.ltoy�u uiY
OCUCVf UMAT THAT CAftZy AoG.T
HAS PM) NOW
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X HAvfW'T PAACD-
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IN FAotiT o yao
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jv�A sn rug ou 8v mtm u fri
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Qfi-fc2
Prudence advised before voting
Candidates can't affect BUC
T.� FOUNTAINHEAD:
This letter is addres-
sed to the student body
on the subject of the
BUCCANEER. It seems
that almost everyone
who is running for SGA
otiices is suddenly inter-
isU'ti in the BUC.
Several candidates
tor various offices have
used the BUC in their
campaigns. They have
promised to "clean up
the mess" that suppos-
ed!) exists in the office
and to deliver a year-
book to the student
bod) in September.
These candidates
(who know who they
are) are seriously decei-
ving the student body.
Yes, folks, there will be
a 1979 BUCCANEER.
This will not come
about, however, by the
actions of anyone in the
SGA, but rather through
the dedicated efforts of
a small and competent
yearbook staff.
I can only urge the
students of this univer-
sity to shy away Oom
any candidate who pro-
mises to do anything
about the BUC. The
fact of the matter is
that nobody in the SGA
currently has any auth-
ority to take any action
concerning the BUC or
any other campus medi-
a.
To the candidates I
can only say that my
staff and I appreciate
your concern and moral
support, but we have
survived all year with-
out it and are in no
Dickerson backed
for MRC veeo
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
I am writing this
letter to inform the
interested male mem-
bers of ECU that reside
in the housing on the
hill that Grady Dicker-
son is the man you
should vote for in the
upcoming MRC elections
on Wednesday.
David Hamm
Fbuntainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over SO years
EDITOR
DOUG WHITE
PRODUCTION MANAGER
STEVE BACHNER
NEWS EDITORS
RICK I GLIARM IS
MARC BARNES
Assistant News Editors
Richy Smith
Mike Rogers
TRENDS EDITOR
JEFF ROLLINS
Assistant Trends Editors
Barry Clayton
Bill Jonas
SPORTS EDITOR
SAM ROGERS
Assistant Sports Editor
Charles Chandler
ADVERTISING MANAGER
ROBERT M. SWAIM
Assistant Advertising
Manager
Tarry Herndon
Advertising Salesman
Paul llncse
Chief Ad Artist
Jana Walls
Proofreaders
Oaldra Delahunty
Sue Johnson
Typesetters
Cartoonists
Sue Lamm
Barry Clayton
FOUNTAINHfAD la the student
newspaper of East Carolina University
sponsored by the M edls Board el
ECU snd is distributed each Tuesdsy
and Thursday during the academic
year weekly during the summer).
Editorial opinions sre these ef the
Editorial Beard and da net necessari-
ly reflect the opinions ef the
university er the Media Board
Offices are located en the second
floor of the Publications Center (Old
South Building). Our mailing
address Is: Old South Building,
ECU. Greenville. N.C. 27�34.
The phone numbers are:
7S7-SSBS, SSB7. SSBB. Subscriptions
sre $10 annually, alumni SB annually.
need of it now.
I urge those mem-
bers of the student
body who plan to vote
on Wednesday to think
very carefully before
making a final decision,
and to remember that
any candidate who abu-
ses the truth while
campaigning cannot be
expected to do other-
wise after entering off-
ice.
Craig Sahli
BUCCANEER Editor
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
A point of informa-
tion for those voting in
the SGA elections to-
morrow.
The purpose of an
election is in theory to
give members of a
group the opportunity to
place leadership in the
hands of those most
qualified and responsi-
ve to the needs of the
electorate.
Tomorrow's election
is no different. Each
candidate should be
evaluated and selected
on merit. I hope that
each student will be
mindful of this when
you cast your ballot.
This is the ideal and
I would be less than
realistic to expect many
people have the inclina-
tion to be so methodical
in reviewing the candi-
dates. Most people will
vote at whim and vote
for the name they
recognize, thereby redu-
cing the election to a
popularity contest.
To this end, FOUN-
TAINHEAD has in a
recent series of articles
tried to manipulate the
electorate by not giving
each candidate equal
time. As elections
chairperson, I am re-
sponsible for each can-
didates1 access to an
equitable forum and
FOUNTAINHEAD's ger
rymandering tactics
have compromised that
effort.
In reviewing the can-
didates, remember expo-
sure is not necessarily
correlated to ability or
qualifications. Be pru-
dent and think before
voting.
Jeff Williams
SGA Elections Chairper-
son
Forum
Former SGA veep
endorses Adkins
SGA Secretary endorses Lefler
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Once again it is time
for the students of East
Carolina to choose their
representatives in the
Executive Branch of the
Student Government
Association. This deci-
sion should not be
taken lightly.
Most students do not
realize how many facets
of campus life SGA
touches. The candidates
who are elected next
Wednesday will have a
definite effect on the
direction of Student
Government.
Probably the most
influential position in
SGA is the President.
Several persons are
seeking this position,
but one candidate
stands out in my mind
as the most qualified
MRC President backs
Adkins and Sherrod
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
The upcoming SGA
elections should be of
concern to all students
at East Carolina. It
has been proven that
good SGA executive off-
icers can get things
done.
Having served in the
SGA and the Men's
Residence Council dur-
ing my years at ECU, I
have seen qualities that
help make a person
successful in student
government. Mike Ad-
kins and Charlie Sher-
rod display the qualities
that will make them
successful in dealing
with the administration
and students.
They have proven
their abilities in seeing
a problem and dealing
with it head-on. They
have expressed concern
for the current towing
system and the SGA
buses. The current
towing system is atro-
cious and the buses will
become increasingly im-
portant.
Mike and Charlie
have said they will
make no promises but
will be positive-activists.
These are the qualities
that contribute to suc-
cess rather than internal
bickering. Mike and
Charlie have my vote.
Another position of
importance is SGA trea-
surer. This poisition
does not get the atten-
tion of president but is
very important. Stu-
dents should know
where their money is
goind and for what.
The SGA Emergency
Loan Fund has been a
help to hundreds of
ECU students. Steve
O'Geary proposes to
increase the amount- of
money available for
loans.
I hope all students
will vote in the elec-
tions. A small voter
turnout could benefit
small political factions
rather than the campus
community.
r
Gerry Wallace
President
Men's Residence
Council
person for the job.
This person has
been involved with SGA
for the past three years
and has what it takes
to be a successful
President. It has been
mentioned that "fresh
blood" is needed in
SGA, but experience is
necessary. Libby Lefler,
the present SGA Spea-
ker, is the person I'm
referring to.
Libby is one of the
most versatile persons I
know. She has lived in
a dorm, a sorority
house and an apart-
ment, so she knows
what kinds of problems
students at ECU en-
counter. Her philosophy
has always been "Stu-
dents first
I have worked close-
ly with Libby in the
duration of three years.
I've seen her act
(always with the stu-
dents in mind) on many
manners, but she has
really shown her talents
as Speaker. Being the
first female Speaker of
the Legislature, Libby
has more than ade-
quately done her job.
The money situation
has proved to be quite
a problem in SGA.
Libby has worked very
hard to make sure most
groups who come before
the legislature have
received some funding.
She has been readily
available to students
who have problems
which Student Govern-
ment can help with.
Libby has always used
tact in handling any
matter.
When it is time to
vote next Wednesday,
remember to choose the
candidate who has
traditionally worked for
you, the students.
Lynn Bell
SGA Secretary
SGA Executive Council
Chairman
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Having served as
SGA vice-president last
year I observed many
types of people in
student government;
many good and some
bad, some were dedica-
ted, some weren't,
some looked out for
their own interest and
some looked out for the
interests of their consti-
tuents and the student
body as a whole.
In this years race for
president, vice-presi-
dent, and treasurer
three candidates stand
out as being dedicated,
level-headed, calm and
sensible.
These three are
Mike Adkins, Charlie
Sherrod, and Steve
O'Geary.
All three have
served in the legislature
this year, Adkins as
sophomore class pres-
ident, Sherrod on the
student welfare com-
mitee, and 0 'Geary on
the appropriations
committee - which is a
most fitting background
for a treasurer.
These guys have
worked hard and are
ready to offer their
talent and time as
executive officers.
I sincerely hope that
the students will agree
with me and cast their
votes for Adkins-Sherrod
& O'Geary.
Reed Warren
Reader questions
paper's policies
Playhouse needs SGA
funds, Melvin backed
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Your editorial en-
titled "A Campaign
Analysis" presented
opinions which will mis-
lead many students who
depend on FOUNTAIN-
HEAD for campaign
information.
Last semester, the
SGA appropriated 17530
to the Playhouse.
Chancellor Brewer rec-
ognized the important
function of the Play-
house and therefore all-
ocated $12,000 of the
Media Board's funds to
the Playhouse.
Without these funds,
the productions would
not have had the quali-
ty associated with the
Playhouse. Until the
Playhouse is assured of
funding through the un-
iversity, we must de-
pend on the SGA to
support us.
1 agree, Brett Melvin
"openly pushed" for
appropriations to the
arts. For this, I
support him.
William G. Sumner
To FOUNTAINHEAD.
As my final year
at ECU draws to an
end, I've noticed many
changes in the campus
paper. It is the recent
changes which compel-
led me to write. I am
speaking of the format
for the paper and the
use of the paper as a
political tool. If FOUN-
TAINHEAD is funded
by our student fees,
then why are we swam-
ped with advertisements
instead of informative
articles? Why is it
almost impossible for a
student to have any-
thing printed in FOUN-
TAINHEAD?
Last year FOUN-
TAINHEAD was used
as a political tool and
I've noticed the same
trend this year. I ou,
wait until the next
Lampoon to
the candidates not sup-
KSJ by F�UNTAIN
HEAD ridiculed.
we as students are
sware of why we are
seeing front page arti-
cles of Steve O'Gearv
and Mike Adkins a-
round election time.
Why was Ricky
Lowe, a candidate for
SGA treasurer told that
there would probabh be
no space for his cam-
paign ad and that "We
don't have to print
anvthing e don't want
lf Why was his
Platform not printed?
was submitted before
the deadline but he was
told later that it
misplaced.
was
It is time that we as
students elect candi-
dates by their stand on
issues instead of friend-
Slf.e.f h is lime for
FOUNTAINHEAD to
print the issues and to
start serving all the
students instead of a
select few.
Fsyc R. Elliott
Chairperson
Student Union Minority
Arts Committee
�MM -





Adkins, Sherrod, Calder are endorsed
27 March 1979 FQUNTAINHEAD Page 5
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
to
Hardly ever would I
take the time
licly disclose
to this
school
pub-
mv opinion
section of our
newspaper,
reason being that 'i feel
many have taken
vantage of
the right
themselves
through
HEAD.
ad-
and abused
to have
heard
FOUNTAIN-
However, because I
will soon be leaving
student government and
ECU it becomes evident
to me that I should at
least lend my support
to those persons who I
feel will best carry on
the duties and responsi-
bilities of each executive
office.
The combination of
Mike Adkins and
Charlie Sherrod for SGA
president and vice-pres-
ident is a winning one.
Having served on the
executive council with
Mike Adkins I have
found someone who can
sit back and take a
second look at situations
without becoming so
involved in the contro-
versy that may surround
the issue. It is this
objectivity which is so
badly needed in SGA
representation today.
I also see Charlie
Sherrod as a very
qualified and res-
pectable individual. I
seem to sense that
Charlie has sincere
characteristics and po-
tential that remains
untapped. He has a
very outstanding but yet
assertive personality
which is quite an asset
to him as a voice of the
Selection of poll-tenders biased
FOUNTAINHEAD:
SGA elections are
held twice a year - fall
e,ecions for student
representatives and
spring elections for SGA
officers.
I'i preparing for
these elections, one of
the responsibilities of
the acting chairperson
of the Elections Commi-
ttee should be to adopt
some type of procedure
in -electing poll ten-
ders. No such procedure
is in practice at
present.
Recently, I approa-
ched the chairperson of
the Elections Committ-
ee, Jeff Williams, and
requested that the
Park Recreation, and
vation Society he
opportunity to
i the foil- for the
Man h 28 elections. Mr.
" iams made no
the PRC
past services
told me point
that Psi Chi, a
honorary psychology
organization, had al-
ready been promised
ami
t'lank
the responsibility to
man 19 precincts for
the upcoming election.
The PRC Society has
tended the polls in the
past, ans as a result of
those services, David
Cartwright (fall election
chairperson) verbally
assured to recommend
PRCS for the position of
tending the spring
elections. This recom-
mendation was never
acknowledged probably
because past standards
and procedures were
never checked upon.
My intent of this
letter is not to cry over
spilled milk, but to
strongly suggest that
the Elections Committee
devise some type of
standard procedure in
-electing poll tenders.
Groups should be
chosen to man the polls
on the basis of their
dependability and need
lor the project, not on
the basis of personal
preference by the
Elections Committee.
There will be many
student elections in the
years to come, and the
Senior-class veep
endorses O'Geary
To FOL NTAINHEAD:
I would like to give
my endorsement for
Steve O'Geary. who is
running tor SGA treas-
urer. Steve's qualifica-
tion and experience
make it obvious that he
i- the best candidate for
the office.
Steve's past per-
formance in student
government is exempli-
tied by his hard work
a- an elected member
ol the legislature as a
day -tudent represen-
� jk � ��
tative. Having never
missed a legislative
meeting, Steve has had
an active role in the
decisions of the Ap-
propriations Committee.
As a member of the
ECU Law Society and
several other campus
organizations, he is
concerned about the
students' opinions and
will make sure these
opinions are heard if
elected to office.
Guy Lucas
Senior Class Vice-Pres-
ident
Music Forum president
backs Melvin, Lowe
To FOINTAINHEAD:
The offices of SGA
president and treasurer
need very effective and
apable people. Brett
Melvm and Rickv Lowe
isess such qualities.
Brett Meivin has
been very efficient in
the position of chairman
ol the SGA appropria-
tion- committee. His
concern for the arts
-how- that he is a
-tudent who advocates
opportunities that pro-
vide a well-rounded ed-
ucation for all ECU
students.
Kicky Lowe, another
student in support of
the arts, is very deter-
mined to make sure
that students are aware
of the use of their
tuition fees. His oppo-
sition to the on-campus
sale of beer exhibits his
knowledge of the SGA
and the North Carolina
legislature. I greatly
endorse these candi-
dates.
Glenn Davis
President
School of Music Forum
Reader wearies of
SGApaper feud
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
As a student of
ECU, I am becoming
increasingly concerned
with the current, all
out, war that seems to
be existing in FOUNT-
AINHEAD towards some
members of the SGA
legislature.
I feel that I can no
longer pick up a copy
of the paper without
having to separate the
political undertones from
the facts. To me, a
school newspaper is
representative of the
entire student body and
not just of a particular
faction or issue.
It is also very dis-
tressing that there
should be so many
corrections printed each
time the paper comes
out. Again, this to me
signifies poor reporting
and I wonder if FOUN-
TAINHEAD is not so
deeply immersed in old
political issues that the
contents of the paper
itself are being jeopardi-
zed.
Catherine Vollmer
problems that the PRC
Society confronted can
be avoided in the future
if standard procedures
are adopted concerning
the selection of poll
tenders. Misunderstand-
ings are tolerable, and
even excusable; but,
there is no excuse for
personal biases to be a
decisive factor in
determining the selec-
tion of poll tenders.
The Elections Com-
mittee should not cater
to the needs of a select
group on the basis of
favoritism; instead, they
should practice the
principles of democracy
the foundation of the
SGA.
Di Worthy
President, PRC Society
students.
In the office of
treasurer I surely would
not want to see anyone
except Steve O'Geary. I
have had the privilege
of knowing Steve since
he arrived at ECU. He
has faced the obstacles
that accompany growth
head on.
Steve O'Geary is most
�f all a responsible
individual. He takes his
duties seriously and
puts a lot of himself
into whatever he under-
takes.
At the elected office
of SGA secretary I
support Lynn Calder 100
percent. Lynn is such a
sincere and outgoing
person you can't help
but like her. Most
importantly she is a
seeker, one who thrives
off of accomplishment
and responsibility. Lynn
is a worker and a
leader, a combination
which is growing more
scarce daily. From the
first time I had contact
with her she spoke and
carried herself well
above her age and
station in school. Not
often have I seen
someone who is so
sincere in their en-
deavors. Whether or not
we both agree on the
same issue or not I
have always admired
the way she stuck her
neck out for what she
felt to be right.
Now no matter how
you feel about the
student government or
how you feel about me,
it is the responsibility
of each student here to
choose their represen-
tatives. I only urge
you to get out and
carry out YOUR duty,
and vote on March 28.
As the president of the
graduating class of 1979
I have made my choice.
Nicky Francis
Senior Class President
Lowe pledges more
emergency loans
Forum
Adkins, Sherrod are towin
f a
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
This school year
plenty of us have seen
expensive cars being
towed off campus,
destination: somewhere
in the city.
We can assure you
that having cars towed
will damage them. It's
incredible for us to
believe that our school
will allow these vultures
to drag students' cars
all over Greenville. The
"�.
cars get damaged,
students have to locate
personal property and
pay $20-30 to a guy
who's vocabulary con-
sists of expletives.
We propose to get
rid of the two trucks
and use wheel locks on
students' vehicles or
give tickets where the
fine payments remain
with the university and
not the tow truck
owners. Hopefully the
fine money could be
funneled back to benefit
students.
We the students are
the products of this
university. Without us
there would be no
faculty or staff. Our
vehicles should not be
dragged all over Green-
ville when better
alternatives can suffice
in the students' best
interests.
You wanit.0. elect
enemies
two people who are the
enemies of tow trucks
then elect Mike Adkins
and Charlie Sherrod
Wed March 28.
Mike Adkins
Candidate for SGA
President
Charlie Sherrod
Candidate for SGA
Vic�-Preiiitiem
After waiting in line
half your lifetime, you
do what all ECU stu-
dents must do pav
your fees. By cash,
check, money order
whatever, you pay.
That little slip of paper,
with its perforated
stamped activity card, is
all you get back.
Have you ever won-
dered exactly where
your money went?
How much went to this
department or that pro-
gram?
whv no
Ever wonder
one ever told
vou
The
should.
SGA treasurer
If you put me
in office, 1 will see to it
that a total breakdown
to the last dollar is
handed to each ECl
student. The treasurer
must see that our
emergenc) loan our
confidential loan and
our SGA budget are in
order, and he must
make sure the "ECU
taxpayer" the -tudent
-� is well informed.
I would al-o like to
see emergenc) loans
opened up more to
freshmen who don't
know about it. and 1
will make -ure the arts
and other- can rei on
the budget- we git-
them.
EDITOR S NOTE: Ri,k IW, eandidae platform.
P.ivt�uM' appeared i" the laM issue �f
FOlNTIHED. is printed above. The platform
was temporarily lost b FOl NT IM1k D. and wa.
receded in time to be printed with the other
platforms.
FOUNTAINHEAD sinrereh regents the error and
�i ramaiKn lamaK� it mu haw .aus
FOUNTAINHEAD endorsements
Steve O'Geary
In the race for SGA Treasurer
there is embodied in one candidate
the experience, academic background,
and intelligence needed in an ex-
ecutive office holder, especially one
controlling student government finan-
ces. That candidate is Steve O'Geary.
O'Geary has served this year on
Lynn Calder
If there is a truly independent
SGA legislator who really does think
for herself, it must be Lynn Calder,
candidate for SGA secretary.
Calder has worked and served in
the legislature for two consecutive
years now.
This past year, she served as
vice-chairperson and chairperson of
the SGA Appropriations Committee.
Rather than being a political
appointment Lynn had earned her job
through two years of dedication and
constant work.
Lynn would probably be most
effective as SGA secretary on the
SGA executive council. This powerful
body of top SGA officials has the
responsibility of formulating the
executive branch's budget and poli-
cies.
Calder would act on the will of the
students rather tnan for political gain
and would nor be afraid to take a
hard stand on an important Issue.
Her two years of student govern-
ment service, service that has seen
and touched many different areas of
student life, more than qualifies her
to serve as SGA Secretary.
the important SGA Appropriations
Committee. This is the committee that
hears all requests for SGA money
each fall. It was through his dedicated
service to this committee that O'Geary
learned the financial ins and outs of
SGA.
His familiarity with the way money
is appropriated and spent is a must
for any qualified candidate seeking
the office of Treasurer.
Of course O'Geary's academic
background is also an important plus.
It is imperative that the treasuere be
familar with accounting principles and
business policies. O'Geary is the only
business major seeking the treasurer's
office.
How can one expect to be a
financial officer with responsibility for
such large amounts of money without
a working knowledge of accounting
and record keeping?
Few legislators can boast of a
work or attendance record that will
match O'Geary's.
With such a contrast between the
two candidates for treasurer the
choice seems quite clear. O'Geary is
the man who best fits the bill.
Poli
icy
statement
Recently, some questions have
been raised concerning FOUNTAIN-
HEAD'S election coverage. It is the
policy of this newspaper to be fair
and objective in its news coverage. If
anyone feels that FOUNTAINHEAD
has not been following this policy, we
apologize.
In this final edition preceding the
election it is our attempt to provide
equal coverage for all SGA presiden-
tial candidates to ensure that the
student body is familiar with each
candidate.
PIE
continued from p. 4
to include ECU.
This is not a "pie-in-the-sky"
promise but is a reality of work that
is in progress.
Lowe referred to O'Geary as
"irresponsible" and "high schoolish"
to promote the sale of beer on
campus. Probably the only reason that
Lowe attacked the issue was because
he wasn't smart enough to think or
know about It first.
What is most appalling about
Lowe's common behaviour was his
attack on an opponent who has never
done him any harm, and certainly did
not insult Lowe, or attempt to mar
his reputation the way that Lowe did
him.
Lowe, who knows all too well that
his poor name identity, lack of SGA
experience, and shortcomings in
business background, put him in a
bad light beside the experienced and
hardworking O'Geary, thus finds it
necessary to spread false and mal-
icious rumors in an attempt to
discredit his opponent.
Does the student body want such
a treasurer who will stoop to such
vulgar practices?
� .0 � tf; r riB
"
it





Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 27 March 19N
Greek Forum
By R1CKI (iLlARMIS
"News Editor
Greek Week, the
highlight of the year for
fraternities am)
sororities, will get
underway this Saturday,
March 31, with P!
Kappa Phi Field Day.
On Monday, April 2,
the Greek games and
track meet will be held.
Tuesday, April 3, the
Co-Greek Banquet will
be held.
The Lambda Chi
Mpha Raft Race will
k place on
Wednesday, followed by
a dance ai the Ameri-
i hi Legion.
Kappa Sigma
'Funky Nassau" will be
held ,n Tursda, April
5.
Friday, April 6, the
Phi Kappa Taus are
sponsoring a -pring
Fling. M user's Farm
will round out the week
on Saturday, April 7.
nnouncements:
ihe Phi Kappa Taus
ihe process of
tickets for a
Irawi a beach
weekend for two. The
dinner will be staving
al the Whaler Inn at
Atlantic Beach and will
receive room expenses,
�50 spending money,
ami one-hall of a gallon
ol liquor.
On April 6. the Phi
Tau- will be having 25
at their
students at
I ms wouJd
rage all
Greek gel out and
v,�te on Wednesdaj in
ihe St; elections. Phi
I an brother Sieve
' Gear) is seeking the
office of SCA treasurer.
I !ie Sigma Phi Epsi-
lon fraternity will hold a
Sweetheart Serenade lor
Carol JCfease on
Thursday a! 7 p.m.
M Sunday, pri I,
nni-
mding
iijrmg
ears, more
than 22) men have
been initiated into the
chapter.
Ihe Sigma Nu Little
Sisters are having a
Happy Hour at the FJbo
Room on Tuesday,
March 27. starting at
8:30 p.m. Advance
tickets may be pur-

- �i'T�RE �
E in
er. field,
R 1
r 'light, snorkel ?
� jackets. Back Packs.
atttie
HGGAN'S
SHOE RKPAIR
AM)
LEATHER SHOP
New leather purketbooks,
belts, ainl Iwlt buckles.
Shoes repaired to look
like new.
11 W. 4th St.
Downtown Greenville
Sherlock's
Restaurant
On rith St. arrows from
the Book Barn
G.mhI Food
�v Good People
Vegetarian diets
respected.
MonSat. 11a.m9p.m.
chased from the door
for 50 cents or from
any little sister for 25
cents. �
The Pi Kappa Phi's
inducted five new
pledges. Tickets are still
on sale for the Beach
Trip being given away
at Moser's Farm.Tickets
are one dollar and can
be bought from any
brother or pledge.
The trip includes
four days and three
nights at the Yachtsman
Motel at Myrtle Beach,
two free meals,
champagne, and $30
spending money.
The Alpha Xi Deltas
held a mixer with the
Sigma Nu's at N.C.
State on Wednesday,
March 21. The mixer
kicked off an exciting
weekend lor the Pink
Rose Ball Formal which
was held on March 24,
at Bogue Banks Country
Club.
The Epsilon Province
Convention of Alpha Xi
Delta will be held thisd
weekend in Greenville
m
at the Holiday Inn.
The Sigma Sigma
Sigmas are holding their
(all rush workshop this
Sunday.
The Tri Sigs are
busy planning their
Founder's Day which
will be held the third
week of April.
The Chi Omegas are
looking forward to their
chapter visitor's
this week.
stay
Thisweek the Delta
Zetaswill behaving
MostEligibleBatchelor
ConteSt.Everyone is
urgedtocomeout and
voteforvourfavorite
balebxlor.
itchell's Hair Styling
e
Retro HairShort
Pitt Plaza Shopping Center
Greenville North Carolina 37834
OUR STYLISTS
HAVE RECEIVED PRI-
VATE PROFESSIONAL
TRAINING IN THE NEW
RETRO-CUTS.
COME IN AND TRY
THIS NEWEST LOOK.
CALL 756-2950 or COME DM
ATTENTION
STUDENTS
You may be eligible for a two-year Air Force ROTC scholarship. The scholarship includes full
tuition, lab expenses incidental fees, a reimbursement for textbooks, and $100 a month tax free
How do you qualify? You must have at least two years of graduate or undergraduate work remain-
ing and be willing to serve your nation at least four years as an Air Force officer. Scholarships are
available to students who can qualify for pilot, navigator, or missile training, and to those who are
majoring in selected technical and nontechnical academic disciplines, in certain scientific areas in
undergraduate nursing, or selected premedical degree areas. Non-scholarship students enrolled in
the Air Force ROTC two-year program also receive the $100 monthly tax-free allowance just like the
scholarship students. Find out today about a two-year Air Force ROTC scholarship and about the
Air Force way of life. Your Air Force ROTC counselor has the details.
CONTACT:
Allen T. Tinkham Captain, i ,vAF
Recruiting Officer
Wright Annex 757-6597
ROTC
Gateway to a great way of life.
2nd Annu
s
SPRING FLING AND
April 6 at the Phi Kappa Tau House, 409 Elizabeth St.
25 FREE Kegs
Everyone is invited to attend.
The Drawing for the Beach Weekend raffle
will be held at the Keg Rally.
0000
Room
DRAWING FOR
PHI KAPPA TAU
BEACH WEEK-END FOR (2)
At
IWiaferlnn
Includes:
$50.00 Spending Money ft Gal. of Liquor
$1.00 DONATION
You do not have to be present to win!
Sponsors
Fast Fare
Coca Cola Bottling Co. of Greenville
Shirley's Cut & Style
Bond's Sporting Goods
Beer Supplies Through the Happy Store
Mike's Bike Shop
Hie Tree House Restaurant
The Attic
UBE
Stereo Village
Pepsi Cola Bottling Co. of Greenville
Pipeline Restaurant
The College Shop
Rum Runners Dive Shop
Balentines Cafeteria
Roy Rogers
Traffic Light
Apple Records
Jason's Restaurant
Roffler of Greenville
Blue Bell Factory Outlet
H. L. Hodges Sporting Goods
Proctor's Ltd.
Jerry's Sweet Shop
Blount Fertilizer
Allied Industrial Service, he
Rick's Guhar Shop
Quick Copy
Burger Barrel
The Pride Car Wuh, E. 10th St.
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re
quired to be readily available for sale
at or below the advertised price in
each A&P Store, except as specifi
cally noted in this ad
V ��i� �����, 11.1 '� - �'
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT, MARCH 31 AT ASP IN Gn'tmli Ni.C.
ITEMS ORDERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
HearlliMde
(�;(ilni
Festival
HANDPAINTED
STONEWARE
SAVE
MORE
THAN
50
Collect the complete set
Choice of 3 patterns
? Prairie Flowers
D Sunshine Rowers
? Highland Rowers
Get matching
companion
pieces at our
low prices.
OPEN STOCK GUARANTEED
FOR 5 YEARS
EACH
PIECE
ONLY
FOLLOW THIS WEEKLY SCHEDULE PLAN
1st
WEEK
DINNER PLATE' 59
2nd
WEEK
3rd
WEEK
4th
WEEK
5th
WEEK
CUP
SAUCER
59c
59c
SALAD PLATE
CEREAL BOWL 59c
59c
A&P is a Delicatessen
FRIED CHICKEN Iroast beef $3 �
Hot - Ready to Eat i' � I?S!vl, " ' "
5 piece box
Good only at Greenville A & P
$- 99
IPOTATO SALAD 59
� Sliced to Order - Babv
SWISS CHEESE 2
ANN PAGE LOOK-FIT
LCE MILK G&WPIZZA
W'
HASUOCR 10 or
SAUSAQC PKG.
CRISP TASTY
ICEBERG
LETTUCE
CRISP CRUNCHY GREEN PASCAL
CELERY
LARGE STALK �Bk A
39
EACH
MEAD
ONLv
ONLY
TKNOER FRESH SPRSNQ
ASPARAGUS
LB.





Del Lewi
direct
A Cry of Players
rv �f Pi �
V of Plavrrs. Wiiam P.I
Ira I of ihr � " Glhso'� s mov ng
,s,on leave hom! . ShakesPeare and his
�� w�'� open � V T H1 ,he London
Theatre lor a ten-night
rfulh , � Pais a vivid
� ttxiras, traditions, trends jnW k.v
�' l sccur ii L decBion to glve up a
;hl .htres,rafw ,he aM�y
.I L"1 �' e play, "1 believe
rK "lan. for loday's audience. Anyone
l'r lueanoned ihe things he does in ,l�.
re is?' will
it I,
asked himself f!s thai all the
WiH druggie, the urge of his talent
driving within him to emerge
X1 r,nh;r !h P�ece is Will, pUyed by
U��nl Junior Gar) Carter. We see the
�between his as ve, undefined need
' m'irk " his world a�d the need to
ur,t for his wife and family. As the
- meet Anne, Will's wife, played
i'n by Holl, Jereme, a Senior from
� Wma their daughter Susanna, played
� a ,ud�' �" Wahl-Coates School in
Will's irn,al,e brother Gilbert (Clark, New Jersey
Ml,Hr bar'�a.ds, townspeople and local author-
iKs in Stratford and a group of travelling players
�rehearsal of Marlowe's Tamburlaine in a
room above ,he local tavern ends in disaster.
The product,� opens April 4th and runs through
'�- � � 'uh'ecu chealre of the Easa
Sumla, u H S T l CamPus' ever night except
pa- dlDI8-1? T,ckets arp available from the East
Car pIavhouse Box Offioe
btluni '� am. and 4 p.m. daily.
�. the east are Susan Adams, New Bern
Bern i" V U,S� a freshman from New
rn , � Bern Sophomore Erie van Baars Lee
.Ii' r r�m R:Kkv M�um Ba'h nior
Uonabi Rav Cartwnghl Steve Cooper a
v ilmi.imn n'shm.n a v i i- F-1' d
from H I Prenmanl Ann Franklin, a .Senior
S ,r H-T'V J�hc Denn Je a Wilmington
Kara En r Dennis Kahn Chris
Kara-rnell. a MMl,or from Wilmington, Delaware
Raleigh Freshman Truet, McGee Paul Maultsbv, a
; -���. Jum�r Clifford R. Pvron, a Junior from
� i Neck, New Jersej Washington Junior Bill
Roberson Efland Sophomore Michael A
Summer, Now Bern Freshman William Sumner
� J- rhornton, a senior from Hendersor
lal,i Wagoner a Wi
?� � H'Bl1 Po,m Jreshm��T� wS�"
s I; �" �S � t� Raleigh Windsor
�ngh Debra Zumbach, Cary Sophomore
� �f PWrs ' arc S2.50 each, or
i t� lAA students.
4 '
.

I�� rfirecl. efce Playhouse production of A Cry of Player.
MM- f T.w�-e ro��rn0r. o A Cry of Plavers
MaratSade is a 'wrenching experience
Peter "Weiss' daring
ly experimental play
created a sensation on
Broadway, but this film
version, also directed by
Peter Brook, has had an
even more extraordinary
impact on its viewers.

ciss' conception
was that of
�the
in-
an a-lum of
plav -w ithin-a-pia)
reenailmenl l� the
mates of
the legendary assassin-
ation b) Charlotte
Cordav of the physicall)
ill and mentallv troubled
LFrench revolutionary
extremist Jean-Pau
Marat.
This interior play is
(iiro�ed by the asylum's
most noted inmate, the
Marquis de Sade.
Within this binary
structure is a deeply
complex and troubling
film, a wrenching
intellectual and emotion-
al experience. The his-
torical forces represent-
ed by Marat are highly
significant, but permea-
ted with an unresolvable
ambiguity, liberating in
rejecting economic ex-
ploitation of the masses,
but enslaving in the
enshrinement of terror
as the method of
revolution.
profoundly pessimistic,
committed to an almost
Hobbesian vision
of eventual chaos and
mercilessness, trusting
only himself to fulfill
his
own ai
as well as cognitive
ferment. Brook's camera
moves, zooms, pulls
focus; all in the
intense environment of
anguish and insanity.
cin-
The strength of
these ideas is given
definition by way of
confrontation with those
of the Marquis. Where
Marat is fundamentally
optimistic in his belief
in the ultimate justice
of the triumph of the
collectivity, de Sade is
But Weiss' construct-
ion of this epic dispute
lends a sense of eerie
unity to these polar
opposites, and the
Brook setting reflects in
visual terms this non-
Euclidean result. There
is no single center, but
rather a process, an
upheaval, a perceptual
John Crist
"MaratSade surrounds
and saturates a
philosophic debate and
political crime with all
the trappings and
terrors of psychopath-
ology. The all-embracing
theatrical effect vanishes
with the earners wheh
Peter Brook, an experi-
enced moviemaker, has
used to brilliant
em a tie effect.
e are separated,
literati) b bars, from
the sUrging lunatic mob,
hut thou the camera
dissolves the bars and,
with the intense realism
of the close-up, the
mob itself dissolves into
individuals, each with
an aberration, a psycho-
sis, a physical manifes-
tation of madness that
in its slobber, its distor-
tion, its palsy and its
catatonic paralysis
becomes a personal hor-
ror.
r eneea moviemaker, has r
Hatchet leaves audience charged up
By WILLIAM JONES bands in the U.S. Mollv The ad, " JL
Magee and Richardson
r
By WILLIAM JONES
Asst. Trends Ed.
The second part of
this r ij� u i
appear in Thursdays
edition.
Last Thursday night,
ECU was host to two of
the most popular and
talented "Southern
kick-ass rock-and-roll"
bands in the U.S. Molly
Hatchet, and The
Outlaws are both truly
Southern bands. Hatchet
hails from Jacksonville,
FL, and The Outlaws
originated in Tampa.
Their "redneck"
heritage is proudly and
loudly reproduced in
their music.
The audience came
to its feet as Molly
Hatchet took the stage
and kicked off the
evening of rock-and-roll.
Molly Hatchet's music
is anything but subtle,
it is pure,
whem-bam,
fans, tock.
Powered
Hellacious,
thank you
by three
lead guitarists, the
gutteral vocals of Danny
Joe Brown, and near
exploding Peavey amps,
they ripped through
their current hit, "Gator
Country" and other
songs from their only
album, "Molly Hat-
chet including
"Bounty Hunter and
"Dreams I'll Never
See The hot licks of
guitarists Duane Roland
and Dave Hulbeck were
the highlight of the
performance.
After onlv a half
hour playing, I0
Hatchet departed. They
left the crowd still on
their feet and charged
up tor the
Outlaw how
coming
B JEFF ROLLINS
Trends Editor
f Music presents schedule ft
During the intermis-
sion, looked upward
steel girders of
I eouldn't help
recalling the
being done to
the floor of the gvm
and racquetball courts
even lime it rains, as
into the
Minges.
wonder,
damage
be performed from the opposing balconies of the
auditorium in the tradition of a 16th-Century
cathedral.
The School of Music has a busy week scheduled
tor it's faculty and students. Recitals, reed music, a
choir performance and a jazz festival are all planned
lor the next few days.
Stan Benton, from Garland, will give his
senior recital at A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall on March
27 (Tuesday) at 9 p.m. Works included in this piano
ital are J.S. Back's "French Suite II in C Minor
well as his 'Sinfonia 11 in G
'Sonata in
C
reel
Allemande)
-vnrmanue; as wen as ins .jiiiiuiiia n in
Minor. Benton will also perform Haydn's 'Sonata
E-flat (Allegro Moderate)' Poulenc's 'Novelette in
Major' and Brahams's "Rhapsody, opus 79, 2.
A Potpourri of Double Reed Music will be presented
by School of Music students along with faculty
member David Hawkins on Wed March 28 at 8:15
p.m. The presentation will take place in A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall and is open to the public, free
of charge. Bassoon, oboe, English horn and piano
will be the featured instruments.
Matthew Morris, and Susie Bell on bassoon and
piano respectivedly will do Mozart's "Concerto in
b-flat (Adagio). Shelby Hamilton and Cindy Cooley
on oboe and bassoon respectively will perform
Beethoven's Duet in Callegro). Finally David
Hawkins, on oboe, Terri Svec on oboe, and James
Poteat on English horn will perform Beethoven's
Trio in C in it's entirety.
The East Carolina Choir under the direction of
Brett Watson will perform its home concert of the
season on Thursday evening, March 29, at 8; 15
p.m. in Wright Auditorium. Featured on the concert
will be sacred music of the Rennaissance, which will
The choir will be accompanied by brass and
woodwind choirs and will perform works by
Uckeghem, Joaquin, Victoria, and Schutz. Also
included on the first half of the program are the
tuneful "Flower Song" of Benjamin Britten
The second half of the concert will be of a
lighter nature and will include folk songs of Ireland
Scotland France, Russia,the Phillipines, and the
United States.
The choir made a highly successful tour durine
the recent semester break performing in schools!
churches, and cathedrals in Virginia, New Jersev
Washington, D.C. and New York City. A special
service was sung at the Cathedral Church of St
John the Divine in New York and Masses were
sung at St Patrick's Cathedral in New York and the
Walton me �f thC ImmaCU,atC C�nCePti0n in
The admission charge for the Thursday evening
concert is $1 and the public is invited to attend
Keith Robert Henry, Jr. of Raleigh will present
his senior recital of clarinet on Thurs March 29 at
the A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall at 730 pm
Accompanied on piano by Barbara Plummer, Henry
will perform the Sonatina for Clarinet and Piano by
Bernard Heiden, Six Studies in English Folk-Songs
by Ralph Vaughn Williams and Poulenc's Sonata for
Clarinet and Piano.
Jo Ann Lee of Washington, ' will present
her senior recital in piano on March 29 at 7:30
p.m. at the A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall. She will
perform Mozart's Adagio K.V. 540, Debussy's
ParonloTenin 9 Maj�r 3nd R�bert Schumann
rapillons, Opus 2.
Charles J. Plisco, Jr. of Virginia Beach will
present his senior saxophone recital on Thurs.
TXfill lb' 9 -TV ThC redta1' �iven with R-
A yF Lh RW,J1 ?,aJ ,f a�Phone' will be held at
Henrf F 7 RecUalDHa,L P1o includes Sonata by
Henr, Eccles a Baroque violin transcription
arranged by Rascher, Concertino da Camera Dy
Jacques Ibert and Diary II by Ed. DiamenTe for 2
BarLrPI t3pe- PuSt�, Wi" be -ccompanied by
eBdtaamnPtr�cUWh� � 2 music
Ronald L. Turbyfill, from Charlotte, will present
his senior rectal ,n saxophone Thurs March 29 at
1 P;?VVheuH Fletcher Recital ��. He wHl be
assisted by Ms. Stephanie Batson, piano, and Mr
Jim Kittre 1, cello. This is a jmm recital with
foraTeenor SC0' f'o" Wi� Perform SinfoS.
�i;enc Saxophone and Piano by Nicola Porpora,
iTJy III EHwan,d nAnderS�n 8nd' With P�8
uiarry it by Edward Diamente.
rre,er Ward �f JCary' wiJ1 Pres�"� his senior
recital in voice and composition Friday, March 30 at
7.30 p.m ,n A J. Fletcher Recital Hall. He wU
pZT TVnC �nhiS �Won Work8: Declamation, Four
Poems, The Dung Pits of Glyue, Lamus and
Chanson pour Flute. In addition he will sing Der
Arme Peter by Robert Schumann, Four Sonfs bl
fnmt T Et, in SPiritum Snctu" froTgM.ss
�n B) by Bach and A Piper by Michael Head.
Ward will be assisted by Elirabeth Braxton on
piano J,m Poteat and Harvey Stokes, oboe, Adr
tZt 7lTe?and Wards compositions will e
Cvnsonedan7 f-TJ nTanno�a. flute, RichaH
Levinson and Richard Duncan, trumpet; Benny
Ferguson, trombone; Richard Moncure, trombone;
Bill Chamberlain, tuba; Susan Owen, soprano and
Melissa Usserv, piano.
FnT� I"d l, e 7t Phi Mm AIPha Sinfon� ��� the
tLU School of Music present their 1979 Jaxx
Festival and Clinic which will take place Sat
h a1 r.0111 t0r.5 With a roncert ,ha� evening
by the ECU Jazz Ensemble, directed bv George
Broussard at 7:30 p.m. All events will be in the
A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
Seven area jazz bands will be participating Thev
are from ECU, director Mike Regan; N.C. School of
he Arts, director Ronald Rudkin; Pembroke State
University, director Andrew Gelt; N.C.A ami T
University director Ted McD.niel; Atlantic Chnsti.n
College director Allen Molineux; Kinston High
rr0.10' ClluOI EppS; and Rose High School,
directed by James Rodgers.
Clinician and guesit soloist is Willie Gillon of
Charlotte . ir. Gillon is a music educator and
jazz performer ,n the Charlotte area. He has
performed toured, and recorded with the Glenn
Miller Orchestra as lead alto sax and clarinet Mr
Gillon ,s a graduate of East Carolina Unive� y and
fraternTy �f M" A,pha " f �
The festival and clinic is sponsored by Zeta Psi
Chapter of Phi Mu Alpha, ECUStudent Gvernmen
Assoc.at.on ECU School of Music and fhe
Burroughs Wellcome Corporation of CreenviUe
Local people .nvolved in the planning and
organ.xat.on of the festival are Gary Bfiaaard
president of Zeta Psi Chapter of Phi Mu Alpha
Smfoma; Ceorge Broussard, ECU School of Music
faculty; and members of the Ja� Fe.tiv.l
Commmee - Ron TurbylilL, Chairman, D.e Hul
Gary Shaver, Dave Watts, Mickey EurV, and Dale
Hair, students in the School of Music.
� � ���v
���
Vltfti
' 4fc�aMM
n





r-age 8 FOUNTAINHEAO 27 March 1979
Wouk's War and Remembrance
brings out the human element
I raj�p
I Ik
B JOHN WALDEN
Staff Writer
Herman ouk's new
novel, War and Remem-
brame, i tin- thrilling
sequel to his other
brilliant work. The
Winds of War. In his
earlier hook, Wouk
gii's u the story of
Captain ictor Henry
iinl his lamih and their
struggle to survive in
"in �'t llie world's worst
i ulastrophes, namely
ttorlil War II.
I'he tale of this
laniilv - triumphs and
tragedies reflected
against the background
��I the Second World
W ar make u� feel what
ii was reallv like to
have lived back in that
moving eta.
W hen i he captain
and In- wife, Rhoda,
lirsi o to German) in
I u. we are given a
glimpse of the confident
pre-war atmosphere of
(iermanv and of the
troubles which were be-
ginning to brew there.
I : 'ubles also begin to
appear in the Henry's
marriage when Victor is
attraeted to another wo-
n named Pamela who
i- in love with him.
Meanwhile, Bvron,
iptain Henry's son,
linds out fir-t hand
ul the frightening
i apabilities ol the Ger-
Blitzkreig when he
in Poland
girl Natilie
�m he loves.
- the ston eontin-
Captain Henr) i
� � al assign-
I - lent Roos-
�ver critical
around the world
during this
he meet- both
men such as
hhill and madmen
-u.l as Hitler.
- �i- n�vcU take
around the world,
b nbed out Lon-
Mos-
his relationship
Pamela continues
until he i
love with her.
- the bonk ends with
bombing of Pearl
Uarr. Captain Henr
-till left with the
dilemma of whether or
to leave hi- wife lor
sake ot another
�man.
Vl the beginning of
W ar and Remembrance,
Henr) is -till laced with
tin- problem, but now
In has ,i war to light.
s" lik his sons Warren
and Bvron, he puts
;tide his personal prob-
lems and prepares to
-� ili�- biggest naval
� ti in history.
In the meantime, his
wife, Rhoda, is also
liting her own war at
home against the temp-
tation o another man.
Hunt are even worse
b�r Natilie who is now
Byron's wife. She is
irapped again with her
�m le tin- time in war-
ring Italy and must get
"(it before the Germans
rapture them.
- tin- plot of each
character unfold we
are given a highly
e itiug novel about pe-
ople while at the same
lime learning history.
I be great victories and
defeats ol wars are
always brought out in a
better light by a human
seeing, feeling and re-
ading to them than bv
�i dry history book.
W ouk also makes
-ure to not gloss over
the embarrassing facts
ol history such as the
British government's re-
fusal to let Jewish
refugees into Palestine
during World War II
and the secret Russian-
German peace talks
that were going on in
1913.
Admittedly, there are
manv other romantic
novels which show us a
good view of both
history and the human
spirit at the same time.
Yet, Wouk's novel is
set into a class by itself
l�ccause of his ability to
penetrate into the im-
personal events and
bring out the human
element. And combined
with the fictional ac-
count of the Nazi Gene-
ral Annin Von Roon
view of the war, the
reader can make some
sense out of a confusing
subject such as World
W ar II as seen "from
the other side of the
hill
Wouk puts all these
details together with his
fine writing technique to
make a highly entertain-
ing and informative nov-
el. And although War
and Remembrance is
the second part to The
W inds of W ar. the
author has made it so
that each book is a
i omplete storv in itself,
and could be read
-eparatelv.
It i- true too that
W ar and Remembrance
i- a somewhat lengthv
book to take on in
between term-papers
and tests. But if vou
have some time to
spare during your sum-
mer break, you might
run on down to the
bookstore and pick it
up. It will be a novel
you will never forget.
The Student Union Films Committee presents
Peter Brook's
Marat Sade
A Special Film Presentation this Wed. at 8 p.m.
Help prevent
LOW
BIRTHWEIGHT
The most common
birth defect
(3) MARCH
OF DIMES
r

i

SALE
30 to 40
OFF
This week only
At Barre , LTD
805 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville 752-5186
PURE PRAIRIE LEAGUE
ln concert
at N. C. Azalea Festival
Friday night, 8 o'clock, April 6
TRASK COLISEUM
Tickets: $7, $8 and $10
On Sale! Azalea Festival Office
121 Chestnut Street
Open daily, telephone 763-0905
I)
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T-SHIRTS AND
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Let our professional art
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FUN AND PRIZES
Ladies Nile 9:00 - ?
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Sunday-Couples Night: 2 delicious
EIl PrMerS of Shrimp' �ysters- F�sh,
Cole Slaw, French Fries and our Famous Hush
ruppies.
Only $7.99 for 2
Monday-Shrimp-A-Roo: a delicious
entre' of Calabash Style Shrimp with French
Fries, Cole Slaw and Hush Puppies.
All For Only $3.50
Tuesday-Fish Fry:ah the Fried Fish1
(Trout or Perch) you can eat with French Fries
Slaw, and Hush Puppies. Hq takOOUt
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Brown Fried Oysters with French Fries, Cole
Slaw and Hush Puppies
Only $3.75
Thursday-Family Night: Great
Specials on Shrimp, Oysters Trout Or Perch
No Takeout
8hnmp�$5.50
Trout Or Perch$2.75
Oysters $4.95
Flounder����� $4.50
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Horn: Open 4:30 P.M. To 9 P.M.
Sunday-Thursday
4:30 P.M10 P.M.
Friday and Saturday
n 7 ��
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. cMOicesr products prov.ob its
U�5, FtHBST OF HOPS AND 3RAINS �
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"I've got Pabst Blue Ribbon on my mind"
O 1979 PW1STBREW.N6 COMPANY M(
���uM. W andom,
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H
f
p - .mmmmm





27 March 1979 FOUNTAINMEAD Page 9
ECU
NEXT
LOWE
f
Picture this:
S,1!?'1"8 of ECU students,
ULut their own ��ancial
problems weighing heavily
on their minds, waiting out-
side the Student Fund Ac-
counting Office, hoping that
12 l? P"ce of paper they
are cinching in their hands
win be turned into a SZS
check from the SGA
Emergency Loan.
it
Sorry, we're out. Try us next
week comes the sym-
pathetic reply from the
woman, who must turn them
away because old, unpaid
loans have cheated these
people from the money thev
need.
Something can be done about
it, and it's up to the SGA
TREASURER to do it.
Another scene:
A teacher from the School of
Music is in desperate need of
funds that the SGA
Legislature appropriated
earlier, but the records are
unclear and a cross-check has
to be made. This red tape
could take a f ew minutes or a
day.
It is up to the
TREASURER.
SGA
A third, final story,
sad but true:
An ECU couple is sitting in
the Treasurer's office. The
girl is pregnant, and the
couple needs financial help,
either for an abortion or to
deliver the baby. They don't
want to be there, but an SGA
Confidential loan is their
only hope. Will the couple get
the help they need, or will
they be turned away?
The SGA TREASURER
decides.
In each of the three instances
the SGA TREASURER'S
character, knowledge and
concern are important. I
know that the $25 Emergency
loans are vital, because I've
used them. So that students
aren't turned away, the
Treasurer must see that old
loans are collected. A good
collection system opens the
door to more money available
to those in need.
The teacher, whether from
the Arts or from some other
department, must get a
straight answer and reliable
information, and only a con-
cerned Treasurer will give it.
The couple will seek help
only from a trustworthy
Treasurer who can keep a con-
fidence. Trust is the key in
such a delicate situation.
I realize these responsiblities
of the SGA Treasurer as well
as anyone, and I wouldn't put
my name before you as a can-
didate for SGA TREASURER
if I couldn't do the kind of job
ECU students deserve.
I
, � ��
If you elect Ricky Lowe as
your Treasurer, you will get
the best service I can give.
Sincerely,
Ricky Lowe
ENDORSED BY:
ZACK SMITH,
SGA TREASURER 1978-79
AND CRAIG HALES, SGA
TREASURER 1977-78.
THESE TWO STUDENTS
KNOW WHAT IT TAKES
TO BE TREASURER, AND
THEY KNOW THAT
RICKY LOWE IS
RESPONSIBLE ENOUGH
TO DO THE JOB.
� 0
1 , � - r
' f






Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 27 March 1979
DAVE ODOM
New Pirate basketball coach
Sen ECU coach Dave Odo
m
Photo by Pete Podrszwaf
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
In an efforl to rebuild its sagging basketball
fortune KaM Carolina announced Friday that Dave
Odom ha- been chosen as its nev head roach.
Odom, an assistanl coach under Carl Taev at
Wake Forest Unviersit) for the last three seasons,
replaces Larry Gillman who resigned under pressure
three weeks ago alter only two years at East
Carolina.
36 year old native of Goldsboro, Odom spent
seven seasons as the head basketball coach at
Durham Senior High School before joining the Wake
Forest staff in ll7b. He becomes the fourth
basketball coach al East Carolina in just seven
years.
I feel very fortunate to lie here and I'd like to
thank the -election committee tor the support thev
gave me Odom -aid alter East Carolina Athletic
Director Hill Cain introduced him at a mid-morning
pre conference. "I'm impressed with the
committment the university and the alumni have
given the basketball program here and 1 think with
their support we can develop a program everyone at
East Carolina will lie proud of.
Odom and hi- wife visited the ECU campus
Wednesday and after conferring with Cam THursday
evening, he was offered the job. If Odom had not
accepted the job. it was reported athletic officials
were prepared to name Pirate assistant Terrv Kunze
the new head coach.
Virginia assisant coach Richard Schmidt and
former I diversity of Florida assistant Dick Crubar
were the other two candidates interviewed for the
vacancy. Cain said earlier more than 50 applications
were received lor the ECl coaching job.
Although terms of his contract were not
disclosed, Odom said he had received a
"multi-year" agreement and was satisfied with the
financial arrangements. It was believed Odom signed
a three-to-four year contract and will receive an
estimated S21,000 per year.
I he East Carolina program -till face- alledged
recruiting violations involving freshman center Al
i'v-on from nearbv Winterville. ECU and NCAA
officials have completed its investigations and the
Enforcement Committee is expected to make an
announcement sometime next month.
Mr. Cain and the -election committee were
very honest with me about the situation Odom
sau- 'I hope the program can be exonerated, but
you have to be prepared for the worst, and I will
iive with whatever come- out of it
Despite the NCAA investigations and four
straight losing seasons, Odom m-ts the ECl
program ha- potential. "The program here has been
somewhat dormant over the last few years, but the
administration want- a first-class program and that's
what we're aiming for.
My immediate objective- are for us to work
hard both on and off the court, and 1 think if we
can do that we'll have a plea-mg representative
here Pat Dye has
football program and I
positive elements lie has
Odom -aid re ruitmg
be hi- two two prionti-
lor high sofi players 1-
than three week- aw a �
He, rmtmg i- no!
-aid. "It would be hai
need right now be, ause I
1 don't wan! to go oul
want peple who can conn
Odom is a gradu it
he plave,l football and : �
the Besi 1 ndergraduat
re ei ed his masters
East Can, lina in
He
School before p ;
Durham H .
there and wa
vear !r � � � - � �
staff
0d as Ian A
touted re, ruiting
� R gers, G M VI �
ne
He -
thev
Simply Sports
Sam Rogers
(hlom no stranger
n � MhHMic Directoi Bill Cain �.�,
Dav 0
-n t
in
V
rid w ake
HIS ba-
rn.
line
" � � r ruiling
I � Idsboro
' 8 forward Alvis
spent even more
this vear re, ruiting
portant is that the
reputable basketball
w ill niev itabv le bring
' Carolina program. Dave
I has a quick smile
everyone. The name Dave
� � i ' � sketball coach.
� to be here Odom
irge pre gathering at
nter. There are a lot oi
ike to be m M!v place
I'm impressed with the
has given the program,
develop a pleasing
Carolina
r, Larry Gillman, Odom
Simply put, Odom
mdation for the East Carolina
;I from there, much like Dye
'tball team. And that starts
� ifl the court.
�'� has done a remarkable job building
rn North Carolina Odom said,
the positive elements of the
from there
East Carolina basketball
I "i sure I'll have amble
few weeks to learn about the

VX "��"� impressive about Odom is that
�s reputation the ECU program
the last four vear he mists a
in , an be developed.
-veil aware of the NCAA investigations,
I m prepared for the worst that could happen
We i! jusl have to live with whatever
hard to imagine a basketball program that
I have bee m any worse shape by the end oi
rhree players had quit by the end of
? ear, assistanl coach Herb Dillon resigned
during the season and the internal problem- Gillman
reated were endless
I nhke Gillman, Odom spent eleven yeas
coaching at the high school level and knows the X's
��ndO- as well as any coach around. He became a
talented recruiter al Wake Forest during his three
vear- there and has the consumate qualities of a
top major i ollege coach.
Dave Odom is by far the finest head basketball
coach East Carolina University has ever hired. And
with the support of the university and the
Greenville community, Odom will undoubtedly build
a successful program here.
And after two seasons of Larry Gillman, ECU
buis certainly deserve that much.
I ECU players
impressed
with Odom
Kv MM ROf.Fff
Sports Editor
Hen Krusen was -
learned Davi Odom wa
basketba
team.
;
S
Sage stretches for throw
More slams another big hit
the junioi
happy an announcement was I
ECl athlei
three-week search Friday w�
Cam introduced Odom
conference. Odom. an a �
the last three vear r :
resigned after only two sea
'I'm just happv it-
got a coach Krusen -
with Odom Friday morning.
cares about everyone and
players. Right now.
foundation ol the
he wants to w i
Odom becuu,
ball coach in just -e
at V
r
t e i
He seems
i'p
In
ram
East i ar
ind Kr �
com
oaw todtn in just seven years, and Kr .
has labored under three
arrived at ECU in 1976. He plave
Dave Patton before Gillman was
i n
with win over Va. Tech
It s reallv t
system even vear
any play
K rusen i - .
1 � � aiwavs a
i ii
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Assistant Sports Editor
I he East Carolina baseball team completed a six
game home stand with a 6-2 win over Virginia Tech
Sunday afternoon, their fifth win in the home stand
I he win came the day after a 6-3 loss to that
same Virginia Tech team. "That win was a very
big m.e lor us said Pirate coach Monte Little
We may look back on it as the turning point of
our season
'We could have hung our heads after the loss
on Saturday Little continued. "We certainly
performed well under adverse conditions "
Though the Pirates got but nice hits in the win
over the Gobblers, Little was pleased with his
team s play at the plate. "We hit the ball hard "
he said. We had several hits taken away from
us. Of course, that speaks well for Virginia Tech
I hey re one of the finest teams we will play this
entire season
The two-game series with VPI was preceded by
rxr ri. T a doublp-�eader agains't
I NC Charlotte last Thursday. The Pirates won the
games by 5-2 and 14-0 scores, respectively.
In the opener, East Carolina accounted for only
two hits and one earned run. Five UNC-C errors
attributed to most of the Pirates' five runs.
Led by Macon Move, the Pirates bounced back
strongly in the second game. Moye scored three
runs, slashed a 2 run double, and smashed a two
run homer in the 14-0 Pirate rout.
Little noted that the Pirates may have been a
httlc down in the first contest. "I think our guys
probably took them a little too lightly in the first
game he said. "This is Charlotte's first season
as a Division 1 team and we were probably a little
overconfident
"But Little continued, "the transition between
the first and second games was a bright point for
us. We realized that we had somelthing very
valuable at stake. We definitely had something to
prove and did so
Little noted that the play of Move was a vital
part of the Pirates' five victories in the si-game
home stand. "As much as anyone, Macon pulled
through he said. "He
is not trying to overpower the ball, but is rather
just putting the ball in play. His plav has
definitely made a difference in the offensive
production of the entire team
The Pirates now face a tough, and very vital,
part of their schedule. Between now and April 2
they must play UNC-Wilmington, Virginia, Mary-
land and North Carolina.
Little says that these games will either make or
break the Last Carolina season. "These are four
very important games he said. "If we can play-
to our potential, they can be four very successful
games. I feel very strongly that this four-game
stretch ,s the turning point in our season The
season is on the line, right now not later on
m "If we are to reach our goals he continued,
we must get things rolling immediately "
The Pirates, now 11-7, travel to Wilmington to
ace he Seahawks on Thursday. The Cavaliers
from V.rginia come to Harrington Field kfor a 7 30
p.m. contest when the Pirates return home Fridav
coining and going
coaches like we've hai
each coach's style of plav. But I'm
things will work out tor us
Krusen chose to remain at East I
last two turbulent seasons under G
his teammate- quit or left the squad
Mailer Mo-elev and Al
although it i- believed Tvsori
before the end o the semester,
not attend the team meeting Kr
Odom.
"I haven't talked to Al lately.
Odom could persuade him t
said. "Everybody on the tear,
next tall when we come back
H-
H
have
he'
any tavoritt
give ev
U! 1 thl
come t
start
- �
� l
H�
which is important.
rvbody a
ham
And that's exactly wh a i t
. �� iiaut l ut Vva-n t irett mr .1.
to plav he said. "The wf! C L CkW,0e
, ,fu � Coach Odom
P,ven "�� �' new a��ude
vear
to plav. n
explained thing- sure
about basketball for n ;
Sure I think everybody was , ;ttU
that Coach Kunze didn't get the ioh k P�
gomg to'give Coach Odom m . e� Ut "ft
knows? He cou d be the he i i Percent. m,
He might just be the � tc � had"
national d( h to ,akf' "s to tru.
Kvle Powers, like km � finals
dec ivrusen ha- i
ifferent coaches in tour vear U V!) lUrrv
from Fayetteville, is hopefuMh V 'he Jun�"
be best during hilhmgS turn � for
I think mavbe its best m . V se�on.
even though ,ts re. y ,OUgh 0n S TJ "
and me who have seen three P� hke Herh
b-n here Powers �, "(23C "
like a nice guy and I tk l Ud�ni seemed
for .he bes,g ' sure h�l rn"?5, m'gh' ��
something good P m las' ear �"� hold
f





Softball team enjoys weekend
27 March 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Pago 11
� JIMMi DtPREE
Staff W ritrr
t'thall
Tin- Ladj Pirate
squad captured
three victories during a
five game weekend
tour.
ECU hosted North
Carolina A&T Fridav
and swept a twinbill.
rhe first game was
tied 6-6 after five inti-
ings � but a seventh
inning scoring spurt led
b Mar) Bryan Carlyl.e
Teresa Whitley, Janis
Parlon, Jan McVeigh
Jo Carol Bi
am)
narrow
liited the Bins to an
I 1-6 finish.
A&T gave the Pir-
ates more of a battle in
the second contest,
however. h took' ECU
ll innings to win 8-7.
McVeigh crossed the
Plate with the winning
run when the A&T
second sacker hobbled a
grounder by Cindy
Meekins.
The team traveled to
Greensboro Saturday for
a three game marathon
session at Ltndley Park.
Play was scheduled
to begin at 10 a.m but
due to inclement cond-
itions the start was
moved back to 11 a.m.
The condition of the
playing field improved
marginally during the
hiatus.
ECU opened with
Appalachian State in a
game filled with errorrs.
spurt
took
7-5
th
e
The Mountaineers
an eight inning
decision.
In the bottom o
last frame, ASU's
Debbie Wynn reached
base on an error and
was driven home with a
sacrifice flv by Mary
Boliek.
The Lady Bucs were
unable to answer the 15
hit attack of the Moun-
taineers, managing only
seven safeties. Fresh-
man Donna Eason was
the losing pitcher.
The Lady Tar Heels
of UNC fell to ECU in
the second game, 6-3.
UNC forged a 3-0
lead in the top of the
second, but the Pirate
bats came to life when
centerfielder Shirley
Brown legged an inside-
the-park homer. Robin
Faggart, Barrow and
Carlyle each provided
key singles as the Bucs
took a 4-3 lead after
two frames.
Michigan State captures
NCAA Championship
"We knew it would
take a team effort
said eoach Alita Dillon.
"We were hitting pretty
good and fielding well
In the finale, ECU
dropped a heartbreaker
to UNC-Greensboro, 2-1.
Kathy McDaniels
and Sandy Tarlton prov-
ided UNC-G with their
runs in the third inning.
For ECU, outfielder
Kim Holmes doubled in
the sixth and was
driven in by Brown's
single.
The Bucs stranded
11 runners on the bases
as their record dropped
to 5-3 on the season.
"During the UNC-G
COUPON
SPECIALS
SALT LAKE
Cm P) Coach Jud
Heathcote rails it a
�P He and
xplain how it
works without a black-
board and lots of chalk.
i- succeeded
ere all else had
this season. it
Larry Bird and
State, and
Heath-
Mi higan State
ans the 1978-79
NCAA �
ated
- r OOSS
wake oi a
Monday
i the top-
Sy ca in ores.
only the
lirst tiin � '�. games.
lesci ibe m
W ith Ean in Johnson
points and
Kelser nine.
State arcd
halftime
hen unheralded
inelh sudden))
11 help the
the t i r -1
: its alter
' ill.
intermission andmount a
commanding 44-29 ad-
vantage with 17:18 to
play.
In their unbeaten,
storybook surge to the
threshold of greatness,
the Sycamores had
trailed by as many as
1 1 points several times
and rallied to win. Bit
never had they been
down b) If), and never
had the) laced "Magic"
Johnson and "Special
K ' Kelser. And, hard
as the) tried to write a
happ) ending to wehat
had been a fairy-tale
season for them and
BUI Hodges their rookie
head coach, the) never
got closer than six.
W th 10:05 remaining
and Johnson shackled
with three fouls and
Kelser with lour. Bird
muscled through the
air-tight Spartan de-
fenders to hit a short
jumper and make it
52-46.
But a Johnson tree
throw and a Johnson
bucket made it 55-46
and returned the
momentum to the Spar-
FAMTUT
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3 or more $16.00
BIG SALE in Progress on
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12 Price on Mens & Ladies
Golf & Tennis Socks
SUPER SELECTION on ALL
New and Used golf Clubs
We also accept used Golf Clubs
on Trade
Large Selection of Etonic KM
Streetfighters
For men and women
JUST ARRIVED
Gordon I). Fulf)
(�olf Professional
C-renvill Country Club
�� 4 vjt.h a
Phon ?5i 0SM
)pe ' -Jays d wee unw Oarv
SPAGHETTI
ALL YOU
1 CAN EAT!
Shoney's Real
Italian Spa-
ghetti with su-
perb, tasty,
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Parmesan
Cheese, Hot
Grecian
Bread
SHONEYS
Located beside
the Ramada Inn,
264 By-pas.
SAUt
$299
tans, who tuner let go
of it.
At the end, Bird put
hi laee in his hands as
ii to hide tears. He
scored l'J points, a
good game for anyone
else but a dreadful
night tor a man who
averaged almost 29
through the season and
heea m e ev erv bod v "
player ol the year.
e would hav e
one man and a hall on
him when he put the
ball on the floor
Heathcote explained the
defense ol Bird. "We
would have forward on
him ami a guard come
in to help. Ol t defense
worked well tonight.
� Howdy ECU Students "
Clip this coupon for
good Western Eatin'
"double
r bar burger
REGULAR
FRENCH FRIES
MEDIUM DRINK
$1.60
offer good 'til 4-7-79
Notice is hereby given that on March 1, 1979 East Carolina
University tendered an application to the Federal Communications
Commision in Washington, D.C. requesting a constuction permit
tor a new Educational FM Broadcast Station in Greenville, N.C.
to operate on FM Channel 217A, 91.3 MHz, with total input
power of 1 50 watts and an effective radiated power of 282 watts
from an antenna radiation center 1 34 ft. above terrain.
The proposed studies and transmitter will be located on the
campus of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. The
proposed antenna support stucture will extend a total of 139 ft.
above ground level. A copy of the above referenced application
which contains a complete listing of the applicants, officers,
and governing board is on file for public inspection during normal
business hours at the office of WECU Radio and the SGA
President's office.
game, it seemed like
we ran out of hits
commented Dillon. "I
think our hitting has
picked up a lot. We're
cone entrating on it
more in practice.
"From seeing those
teams, I believe we will
have a close race again
this year. There won't
be any undefeated
teams at the end of the
season
A story with a happy,
healthy ending
Fear of the unknown is something to wh,ch no one is im-
ordp?, Frfm V a fam"y W'th a h,Stor of 3enet,c dis-
orders For them, pregnancy is an anxious time A March
of D.mes-supported genet.c serv.ces program at the
toTa?L� SrthemrKCal,f�rn,a L Anger's is helpmg
Wtlson M D IeaThe Pr�9ram ,S headed bV Mlm
wii chief of genetics division
Pizza JLxuti
AMERICAS FAVORITE PIZZA
o

PIZZA BUFFET
ALL THE PIZZA AND
SALAD YOU CAN EAT
$2.39
MonFri. 11:30 2:00
�Won. & Tues. 6:00 8:00
758 6366 Hwy 364 bypass Greenville , If. C.j
SCHOOL KIDS
RECORDS
Fabulous Spring Sale
We are having a close out sale on our
inventory for
ONE WEEK ONLY, MARCH 26 31.
Our entire stock of $7.98 list LP'S
NOW ONLY &4.49
Higher priced LP'S also reduced
Hurry while supplies last!
SCHOOL KIDS RECORDS
521 Cotanche St. Georgetowne Shoppe
218-B University Arcade
Greenville, North Carolina 27834
PresentsThe Traditional Button-Down Dress Shirt
Just as you'd expect, we've recendy received many new
button-downs for Spring from Chaps by Ralph Lauren, and
Gant We have a fine selection of patterns as well as solids
and they are all 100 cotton of course. As always, you'll
find classic collegiate, clothing in a friendly atmosphere at
The Clothes Horse.
i
- ��� - -� - ���. � .� - jji r x 9 f -r. r ;
" '� . : z







v� � W f �.
i � � I k. 0 l A. 11 Ul V4 I � J
Magic' leads Spartans to NCAA title
B VER1N VNDERSON
ISSOT.IATED PRESS WRITER
SAL'l LAKE Cm (AP) rhe Magh Man. Marvin
had played with bewitching grace, but
a- magh to spare in his smile as he sat
dk about winning it all.
was a basketball nel hanging like a laurel
hi- in id nothing i do but savor the
v State's NCAA basketball title.
lohnson who had scored a game-high 24
who had picked up his flagging
�nd hall. Johnson who had
o.iui pla . and, most oi all. it
�enl Indiana State to it- first
rnes and the Spartans to their 11r�� t
hampionship.
AND
IirTTEKFLIESi
325 Arlington Blvd.
Greenville, N.C. 27834J
756-8770
ATTENTION
STUDENT TEACHERS
We Have Teaching Aida
Of ALL Kinds
Bring Thia Ad And Receive
10 OFF
ALL TEACHING AIDS
Offer good through April 30 1979
OPEN Jlon. thru Sal.
10:OOam� 9:00pm
;&&m
�tm i3oii
Liner
THE PILOT BALL LINER: A MAGNIFICENT
STEP BACKWARD IN WRITING gg,
no amahhg a? mn goon twei
ART �P CAMERA
526 S. Contanehe St.
Downtown
COUPON EXPIRES
LIMITED TIME OFFER
12 Exp. Color Film
Developed and Printed
� Kodacofor
� OAF
� Fug
(Foreign Rim
Not Included
VALUAtU COUPON
�MUST ACCOMPANY OttPtK I
COUPON EXPIRES
! LIMITED TIME OFFER
20 Exp. Color Film
Developed and Printed
$3�
� Kodacotor
� OAF
�Fugl
(rOfejQfi Film
Not Included
4 ft
VALUABLE COUPON,
1 MUST ACCOMPANY QMtWI
COUPON EXPIRES
' LIMITED TIMt OFFER
V.VCJI
MOVIE OR SLIDE
Ektechrome or Kodechrome Processing
� Movts
136
' MUTT ACCOMPANY
PLAZA CAMERA
rhe talk at the post-game news conference was
ot tactics ami missed chanches; how the Spartans
had defensed Sycamore All American Larry Bird,
what Gregory Kelser's foul trouble had meant to
M i higan State.
But there was the Magic Man smiling that
it-couldn't-have-been-an) other-wa) smile.
'The coach gave us a job to do on Larry Bird
and .ill we had to do was go out and do it. He
gave us a great gam plan said Johnson, who
guarded Bud lor part of the game.
Kelser, Johnson's teammate and off-courl buddy,
picked up his fourth foul early in the second half
and the Spartans, hitting on only one giant cylinder
instead ol two, hegan to falter.
"When Greg went out we tried to control the
ball an-l take some lime ofl the clock Johnson
sajtJ "And by doing that we kind oi lost the
momentum for a little while. So coach told me l
had to take charge and do a lot more things on
offenseSo I hit a couple of baskets and Greg
ram back in and we got the job don
Johnson, a 6-foot-8 sophomore, had barely sal
down when he was asked to question that will
continue to be asked in coming days, will h- turn
immediately to professional basketball or return
Michigan State in the fall?
"I- this my lat college game? I -till don t
know Am I going to apply tor hardship? I
don't know. VI Jl�-n will J decide? Oh no, I've go
enjoy this first. Then I'll decide latei i �
weeks, I've got a lot of time
ENDORSEMENTS
�Tommy Joe Payne, SGA President
David Cartwright, SGA Vice-President
�Charles Sune,
Student Union President-Elect
�Nicky Francis, Senior Class President
�Lester Nail, Freshman Class President
�Susan Artino, President, Greene Dorm
�Gwen Harris, SGA Legislator
�Hansen Matthews, SGA Legislator
�Al Patrick, SGA Legislator
� Dasha Efird, SGA Legislator
� Latane Farmer, SGA Legislator
� Grady Dickerson III, MRC
� Leandor Greene, ECU Football
�Oliver Mack, ECU Basketball Team
� Steve Goode, ECU Wrestling
Vote
MIKE ADKINS
For SGA President
Charlie Sherrod
For SGA Vice-President
- The SGA has been ineffective due to factions that have disrupted progress by their
political in-fighting. We are not politicians and certainly do not belong to any group
of the past. "Fresh blood" in SGA is long overdue.
We propose to join with other N.C. campus governments to petition the University
of N.C. Board of Governors in an effort to allow the sale and consumption of beer
on campus.
-There Is no greater priority than the continuance of an efficient Transit System for
all ECU students. Fuel costs win oe mgner every year. Students will rely on our buses
to get to classes and this is why we are totally committed to mass transit.
The tow trucks MUST go. Alternatives we propose include wheel locks or a ticket
system In which the fine payments remain w�n tne university and not the tow truck
owners.
(Paid political adyertiaement)
T
t





Title
Fountainhead, March 27, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 27, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.553
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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