Fountainhead, March 22, 1979






Circulation 10,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
Vol. 55, No.
II
22 March 1979
Noted journalist speaks
at Mendenhall center
B KM m SMITH
Assistant New Editor
lexander, one of America's foremost
talists, spoke to a small crowd in
iter, Mendenhall Student Center at
s vi ral books. lexander focused her
her most rcenl work, "Anyone's
k aooit Patt) Hearst and
ark- were directed toward her
inl partner, James Kilpatrick. "Man)
- me do I realh hate Jack she
t hate the poor fool
her reserach tor a segment id' CBS's
sander saidTl usuallv takes about
nish what I -tart Jack doesn't do any
he made up hi- mind thirty years
ning and entertaining as -he
:ii ni: about her male
and in discussing her lengths
� Patt) Hearst.
look at something as closel)
- � -� lv and through a micro-
a writer loads, we feel
me central subject and
ler ha- done.
�ur time Alexander
rst.
Hearst ston a- a great
I) won irorn the rase.
74, Hearst was brought to trial
SLA ies in 1976. Jimmv
esident and wo began a
established with the Hearsl
It wa- the first political
ransom monev wa- tax ex-
emptable
it was also the first time that a victim of
kidnapping was tried for a second crime and where
brainwashing was used as a legal defense, she said.
Perhaps the most interesting thing was that six
members of the SLA took the press captive for the
time the) had kidnapped Hearst, she said. "They
forced us t broadcast their communiques and we
did it
The case was prosecuted because the "public
demands it Alexander said. "Everyone presumes
to speak tor the public
Alexander is mistrustful ot the phrase because
-he says it leans itself toward the apathetic society
that we are.
Referring to leadership, Alexander said more
women should be occupying those positions. "I
don't consider myself a pioneer. An endurer
perhaps
Alexander compared the Lindberg case. the
kidnapping of the Lindberg child, to the Hearst
case, saying earlv publicity could have brought Pattv
Hearsl home sooner, but all in retrospect is clear.
Retrospect is the sp) glass of retired admirals
Alexander ha been a feature writer fur Now
rk distinguished newspaper, PM. and a Lib-
magazine staff writer, the first woman to over hold
that position. She was noted for her column "The
fommino Eye which won main honors.
She has been editor of McCalls �, the nation's
largest women magazine. She was the first woman
ui .)() years to hold that position. Later she was
named a contributing editor of Newsweek. A
one-time radio commentator, Alexander is probablv
best known lor her commentary, "Point Counter-
point. Her evening lecture wa- as delightful and
wittv as she was.
and the liberal half of the "PointCounterpoint
feature on CBS 60 Minutes. loured in Hendrix
theatre at the Mendenhall Student Center Tuesdav
night. leander discussed the trial of kidnap
victim turned terrorist, newspaper heiress Patricia
Hearst, and the role of women in nierican life.
What's inside
N i v - w eek -
orms, along
endorsement
. . see pp. �
v as m deputv
ECU .
Secret Vgent.
will perform in
Mondav . . see
Media Board discusses staff
NEW BASKETBALL
COACH? See p. 10.
B KAREN WKNDT
Staff Writer
Consideration of a
lew editor for EBONY
HERALD next year and
discussion of FOUN-
TAINHEAD's Operations
Manual were the chief
topics oi discussion at a
media board meeting
held March 19.
Joyce Evans stated
an interest for the post
of Editor-in-chief of
EBONY HERALD for
next year. Evan- said
she could get a paper
out on time if given use
of proper equipment.
The operations man-
ual for FOl NTALN-
HEAD was the chief
topic of discussion at
the meeting. The
operations manual is the
book which covers all of
the basic operating
aspects of the paper.
The major changes
were the addition of a
glossary of newspaper
terms, and the possible
addition of seven new
staff members.
The glossary of
terms was developed by
Ira Baker, professor of
Journalism. It is in-
tended a- an aid to
present and future
employees so that the)
would be more familiar
with the terms used in
the manual ami on the
job.
Most of the discus-
sion centered around
the possible addition of
seven new staff mem-
bers. These addition-
were considered neces-
sar because FOUN-
TAINHEAD has gone
from an eight page
tabloid to a 10 page
broad sheet. Revenues
have also gone from
$16,000 to an estimated
570,000 in three year-
time, running on the
same number of staff
members.
The new positions
are: Assistant to the
Editor, Technical Super-
visor, Classified Clerk,
Librarian, Copy Editor,
Managing Editor, and a
layout staff (which will
probably contain more
than one person.)
The Assistant to the
Editor would assist the
Editor in any way
possible, from research
to correspondence.
I he Managing Editor
will be responsible for
the overall operation of
the editorial division of
the newspaper, will take
the place of the editor
in case of necessity,
and will be assuming
the responsibilities of
an) absent de-k editor
Librarian will be
responsible for keeping
a reference file up to
date and filing photos
in a photo file.
I he Copv Editor will
he responsible for
editing all of the copy
which comes into the
newspaper.
The Layout Staff will
he responsible for
laying out their as-
signed pages and
contacting the respective
desk editor if anv
problem- arise.
The Technical Sup-
ervisor will be handling
internal layout, duties
lor the advertising
department, and will
report errors to the
advertising director.
The classified clerk
will be responsible for
all classified ads and all
payments for classified
ads.
I he funding of these
position wa- a matter
concern for several
th' hoard member
Most anybod) would
like to get a- near
perfect a- possible, but
there i- the matter
funding -aid Rudolph
Alexander. aciate
dean of student affair
However. the new
-tatt would not take
un I
budget was
next v-
The onl
decision
would bt
the postag
cover travel
since the trav t .
had been
due to n :
to ant pat
functioi -
HEW hauls
500 to court
RALEICH A crackdown
on student loan defaul-
ters by the U.S. Depart-
ment of Health, Educa-
tion and Welfare
brought 500 former stu-
dents from North Caro-
lina and -even other
Southern -tale- into
court last vear. accord-
ing to an HEW official.
B) July, HEW At-
lanta office plan- to
bring another 4.500 de-
faulters before judge
said Carmen L. Batlrag-
lia. regional adminislra-
�r HEW '
student asi -
lai � .
riu gt�a is t�
to court poop.
afford In r pav
loan- bul ha-
do so. 01 199
caxs that hat goiu
court Iroui I he riant a
office, I'W re-uhed in
conviction be -a
CORRECTION
SPRING OFFICIALLY ARRIVED yesterday, and girls
sunbathed in the areas around the women's dorms.
As this picture shows, in spring a young man's
fancy turns to love. Or photography, as the case
may be. Photo by Pete Podeszwa
In the Tuesda) edi-
tion of FOUNTAIN HE Al
Dean of Men James B.
Mallorv was quoted as
saying in the top front
page stOC) that Terrv
W hitehead of Tabor
City died at the Sigma
Nu fraternity house.
Mike Sorenson,
president of Sigma Nu.
said that the boy died
in an out building
which is separate from
the fraternity house and
that his presence on
their property was
unknown.
Sorenson stated that
the youth was not a
guest of the fraternity
and that he came onto
the Sigma Nu property
uninvited.
f
0-0 a

���� ��

� - 0 0
0 0 0 0 4
0 4 0
-� � �





Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 22 March 1979
Interviews Conference Home Ec. Car Wash Bowling
Heart-fund Indians
Ralph Buxton, a
representative oi Kitty
Hawk Kites, Inc in
Sags Head will visit
Cl on Thurs evening
to speak and show a
n on Hang Gliding.
Anyone interested in
ig gliding or in the
- s i l i I i t y of gaining
m ploy ment with Kitty
k Kites is welcome
attend. This event,
tsored by the Parks,
r cat ion and Conser-
Societj of ECU
take place on Mar.
at 7:30 p.m. in Rm.
of Mcndenhall
Studeal Center.
Car Wash
Hue to the bad
weather a leu weeks
i g o, t h e Sigma N u
Fraternit) will hold their
V ash this Sat
Mar. 2 from ll-5 at
the Texaco Station on
the Corner of 4-th &
Charles.
There will be a
Men's and Women's
Conference Sat Mar.
24. The conference will
be held at Jarvis
Memorial United Meth-
odist Church. The cost
is $4.50 including lunch
and materials and
registration is from
8:45-9:15 a.m. with the
conference ending at
3:30, sponsored by-
Campus Crusade for
Christ.
REBEL
The following people
have checks in the
REBEL OFFICE: Janet
Ennis; Rickey Lowe;
Randy Stalls; Toni
Harris; Michael F.
Parker; and John
Morris. Checks may be
picked up from 3-5,
Mon. -Thurs. at the
REBEL office in the
Publications Center.
The School of Home
Economics will hold its
annual Spring Con-
vocation at the Willis
Bldg. on Mon Mar. 26
at 4 p.m.
Dr. Carol B. Stack,
Dir Center for the
Study of the Family and
the State, Duke Uni-
versity, will be the
major speaker. Dr.
Stack's address is en-
titled: Policies & Fam-
ilies: Bridges or Barri-
cades.
Elections for the
Dean's Advisory Council
and the Home Eco-
nomics Curriculum
Committee will be held.
The annual scholarship
awards and the out-
standing seniors in the
departments will also be
announced.
The Kappa Deltas
are having a car wash
at the University Exxon
on 5th St. across from
campus on Sat Mar.
24 from 10-4. Price per
car will only be $1 so
come out and join in
the fun.
Circle-K
Circle K Club of
ECU is sponsoring a
Barbeque Chicken Din-
ner to be held at Pitt
Plaza on Sat Mar. 24
from 10:30-6. The din-
ners will include half
chicken, cole slaw, roll,
and a dessert for $2.85.
The money that is
raised will be used for
community service pro-
jects.
Tickets may be
purchased from any
Circle K member or
just come on out to Pitt
Plaza for your Saturday
meal.
Free cups of
fountain Pepsi
during spring
semester
Just ask!
Order any large pizza and get up to four free
cups of Pepsi! If you order a small pizza, you
can get up to two free cups of Pepsi! No
coupons necessary - just ask !
This offer is valid through May 1 2th. 1979.
Stated prices do not include applicable state
sales tax.
Hours:
4:30pm-1:00am Sunday-Thursday
4:30pm-2:00am Friday-Saturday
n
All Pizzas Include Our Special Blend of
Cheese and Sauce.
Our Superb Cheese Pizza:
12" small $3.20
16" large $4.75
Domino's Deluxe:
Pepperoni, Mushrooms, Onions, Green
Peppers, and Fresh Sausage.
12" small $5.60
16" large $8.35
Additional Items:
Pepperoni
Mushrooms
Olives
Onions
Green Peppers ,
Awcfcovies
HOT Pepper Rings' '
Ground Beef
Fresh Sausage
Ham
Double Cheese
Extra Thick Crust
12" small $.60 per item
16" large $.90 per item
e Copyright 1979
758-6660
Fast, friendly, free delivery
1201 Charles Boulevard
Doubles, singles, and
mixed doubles will be
the events of the Spring
Bowling Tournament
scheduled for April 2,3,
and 4 at Mendenhall
Student Center. From 3
until 10 p.m. each day,
ECU students may bowl
anytime and enter their
scores in the tourna-
ment. Detailed informa-
tion and rules are
available at the Bowling
Center. Trophies will be
given in all events.
Gamma Sigma Sigma
Service Sorority pledges
are sponsoring a Mile
A-Money with all pro-
ceeds going to the
Heart Fund. The service
project will be Mar. 26
from 9 a.m4 p.m. in
front of the ECU
Student Store. Prize6
will be awarded to the
sorority, fraternity, club
or dorm raising the
most money for the
Heart Fund.
There will be a
meeting of the Indian
Students Organization
on Wed Mar. 28 at
6:30 p.m. in the
Ragsdale Hall con-
ference room.
Officers will be
elected and a constitu-
tion approved. It is
important that all in-
terested students attend.
For additional informa-
tion call Jacqui Haw-
kins, 757-6075.
Interview
Arthur DePalma,
from the National Labor
Relations Board Office
in Winston-Salem will
visit the Co-op Offia
Tues Apr. 3 to inter-
view undergraduate
students interested in a
Co-op position a a field
examiner in labor
management relation
Interested persons
should contact Mr-
Harrizene Keyes at
757-6979, 313 Ravsl
Bldg ECU campu-
I.
U
Pre-Inventoiy Clearance
S606 8-Track In-Dash w AM-FM
(Digital clock and frequency readout)
Regularly
$279 05
S630 8-Track In-Dash w AM-FM $239 95 SOLD OUT
T100 Cassette Under Dash Player $109 95
72
00
T606 Cassette In Dash w AM-FM
(Digital clock and frequency readout)
T610 Ga7rtte,to Dash w -AM-FM
$289 95
191
00
$169 95 SOLD OUT
T609 Cassette In-Dash w AM FM $154 95
T611 Cassette In Dash w AM FM $199 95
T632 Cassette AM-FM In-Dash
(with automatic reverse)
V440 Powerplay 6"x 9" Speakers
(Dual cone-10 oz magnets)
V460 Powerplay 6"x 9" Speakers
(Coaxial-10 oz magnets)
$239 95 SOLD OUT
$ 49 95
$ 69 95
31
00
43
00
V461 Powerplay 6"x 9" Speakers 79 95 S4900
9422 Custom Speakers$ 39 95 sneoo
V503 Powerplay Stereo Amplifier
(with graphic equalizer) $239 95 s 16600
R731 Deluxe Flush-Mount 5V4" Speakers$ 84 95
S103 8 Track Player 59 95
317 Arlington Blvd Greenville, N.C.
Financing
Arranged
Open Monday-Friday 10-9,
Saturday 10-6
Phone 756-9988
Classifieds
torsde
IL
FOR SALE: 3 female
AKC Irish setters, 7
weeks old. See both
sire (from championship
show stock) and dam
(from championship
hunting stock). Reas-
onably priced. 758-3326.
FOR SALE: Boat, motor
& trailer. New con-
dition. Best offer.
756-0895
FOR SALE: Batavas -
Moped - yellow and
black. Perfect around
campus vehicle. Approx.
125 mi. to a gallon.
$300. 6 mo. old. Need
money for school. Call
758-7715.
FOR SALE: Macrame
planthangers, inexpen-
sive! Call or come by
corner of 14th &
Dickinson, brick house,
upstairs. 752-3593. Ask
for Cathie.
FOR SALE: 1972 Chev.
Impala PS, PB, AT,
$500. 758-7120 or
757-6611, ext. 213.
FOR SALE: Pioneer
5x636 receiver, 25 watts
per channel, $150 or
best. Call Frank at
758-0641 MonFri
after 12.
FOR SALE: 2 B.R
1979 mobile home. All
electric, washer-dryer.
Sail equity and take
over payments of
$104.15 7560895.
FOR SALE: Pioneer
SX-650 stereo receiver
35 wattschannel 1 yr.
old. Perfect condition,
$175 Call 752-1524.
STEREO equipment
available through college
dealer. Check prices
before you buy else-
where. Call Michael,
752-2601.
for rent (jj)j
WANTED: Two female
roommates to share apt.
at River Bluff beginning
in August. Call 758-5823
after 5 p.m.
FOR RENT: Completely
furnished small bedroom
across from university,
private entrance.
758-2585.
NEED: A roommate to
share a 2 B.R. apt. at
Eastbrook by Apr. 1st.
Call 758-5794 after 4
p.m.
ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Third person needed to
share 3 B.R. Duplex on
Stancil Drive. $66 per
mo plus 13 utilities.
Call after 4, ask for
David or Joe: 758-1568.
pgraonca$
COMMUTING
STUDENT WANTS TO
CARPOOL OR SHARE
EXPENSES FROM
Wilson. Classes MWF
spring & fall, M-F
summer. Call 237-0861.
BELLY DANCE .
Sunshine announces the
beginning of her spring
class for ladies, be-
ginning soon. 758-0736.
DISCO DANCE lessons
I daSS,es n beginning,
inter. & advanced. Ex-
�wn8t�ion-C"
WANTED: Experienced
drummer for fuH u
Ton anWJtb. estHed
top 40RockDisco
Band. Call Steve or
James, 756-6681.
I m
LOST: Diamond and
emerald pendant to a
necklace. Very special!
If found, please call
752-3485 for Debbie.
Reward offered!
�as.
� .
- m
mM&mwllm mm.ir
'v'�' ��





22 M�r� 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD P�9 3
L
(ft
Bis for.
!
Bare
Beauties at
Blount-Harvey
A.
is also for Bare Traps
Bold wood bottoms bolster your casual or dressy wardrobe, and Bare Traps build some
of the best. Choose from a variety of styles and heel heights for big looks that take you
through a busy day.
A. Tan Leather Uppers133
B. Cinnamon Leather27
Navy & Biege Sailcloth25
C. Tan Leather Uppers38
D. Black Or Maroon Calf38
fe&
B.
D.
S.
C.
-&��?
1
A
70.
c
bare traps
�tssl-
B.
and for Bass
Bass believes basic casualwear begins with boun-
cy bottoms at all heights. They then top them
with beautiful leather to give you warm-weather
buddies just bursting with bare fashions.
A Cinnamon Leather Uppers 24 C. Bourbon Buffalo Uppers . 33
B. Chestnut Leather Uppers. 22 D. Buffalo Leather Uppers. J28

fc
w
.
D.
Downtown
Shop Daily 10 A.M. to 5:30 P.M.
Free Parking Downtown
Mall i j4
T
i
'M&Mmmi0k MyA' - -
u





r
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 22 March 1979
A campaign analysis
It's interesting to look at the
backgrounds of two of the candidates
for SGA president.
Libby Lefler and Brett Melvin have
a lot in common when it comes to
learning the political ropes at ECU.
Both candidates have very strong ties
to the old political machine run by
Tim Sullivan and his cohorts.
Lefler first gained campus wide
attention last spring when she
unsuccessfully ran with Tim Sullivan
for the office of vice-president. She
continued her alliance with this group
through last fall, enabling her to be
elected speaker of the legislature by a
very small margin.
It was evident by her appointments
committee chairpeople in the
legislature that she and Sullivan were
still together. It's strange that she
appointed Brett Melvin as chairperson
of the powerful Appropriations Com-
mittee and now the two are opposing
each other for the highest office in
SGA.
True, Lefler has served in SGA for
a number of years, and her posters
state that experience counts. Howev-
er, only good experience counts; bad
experience is of no value to anyone,
especially not to the students.
Lefler's term as speaker has been
marked with inconsistent leadership,
ignorance of parliamentary procedure
and an inability to control the
legislature.
Any student who has attended a
legislature meeting can attest to the
fact that at times no one knew what
was going on or where business on
the floor stood. Is this the type
leadership that a student body wants
in its Student Government?
Brett Melvin, on the other hand,
seems to be Tim Sullivan's hand
picked candidate for the office of
president. It is common knowledge in
political circles at ECU that Melvin
and Sullivan are the closest of allies.
Through his position as chairperson
of the Appropriations Committee,
Melvin had considerable influence
over the spending of student fees.
His philosophy on how student money
should be spent went hand in hand
with those held by Sullivan.
The arts (music, drama, and art)
all received large sums of student
money, even though these programs
should have been funded by the
individual academic departments.
Student activity fees were spent for
programs in which students received
academic credit.
Melvin openly pushed for these
bills to be passed and his campaign
slogan of moving the SGA forward
can only mean that more student
money will be spent on academic
programs rather than pressing student
needs. Dr. Brewer has already made
public his intentions to divest this
responsibility from SGA and distribute
it fairly among the various depart-
ments.
The SGA has reached a point
where it can break away from such
wasteful spending. It can open new
avenues to student clubs and organi-
zations that in the past have suffered
at the expense of special interest
groups and politicians who have
supported these groups.
Students must be made aware of
the fact that if either of these two
candidates are put in office, student
fees will continue to be wasted on
areas Student Government has no
business funding.
Coach search must be open
Forum
MRC candidates are endorsed
I FOUNTAINHEAD:
As a
student. I
share my
two of
candidate-
concerned
would like to
knowledge of
the MRC
that will be
running for office next
Wed March 28. As a
member of this year's
MRC General Council I
have had the privilege
working with David
Murra) and Grady
Dickerson throughout
the course of the year.
David is currently
serving as secretary of
the MRC and is familiar
with the way in which
the MRC operates.
Experience is always a
aluable asset, but this
may not be David's
strongest quality.
His initiative has
brought about several
changes in the MRC
that have been very
beneficial and needed
for some time. I am
sure that he will
continue with a high
level of interest in the
MRC and provide
current as well as new
service that the entire
hill may enjoy.
In the MRC General
Council Grady was the
most active member
serving on innumerable
committees, often as
chairman.
Grady Dickerson is
blessed with an indus-
trious nati're. His
involvement in the
university is multiple
and diverse. Grady and
myself worked together
on the Scott House
Council and he provided
ideas and suggestions
that led to a very active
year for Scott Dorm.
They are both hard
workers, but more
importantly, they care
about the Men's Resi-
dence Council and the
students on the hill.
Support the MRC and
vote on March 28.
Gerald Floyd
Gov. Scott Hall
With the recent resignation of
ECU Head Basketball Coach Larry
Gillman, the university has started the
arduous task of looking for a
successor who can lead our program
to a winning season. It's no secret
that the selection committee charged
with finding a new coach is a
well-guarded secret. Neither the
Athletic Department nor the adminis-
tration will reveal the makeup of this
important committee.
This comes as no surprise, since
questions have been raised as to why
the last committee ever hired Gillman
in the first place, especially without
investigating the validity of his
resume more than they did. Based
on the past work of such a
committee, we can understand why
someone would not want it known
they had a hand in choosing the
coach.
ECU students have a right to
know if they have a voice in this
decision. Student fees makeup a very
large segment of the athletic budget
totalling over $300,000 a year.
Certainly, some part of this money is
spent on basketball.
Student fees also provided a
substantial sum toward the construc-
tiCfh of Minges Coliseum, along with
Xhe grateful help of the Minges family
here in Greenville.
Student fees bought the lights at
Ficklen Stadium, which enables some
of the Pirates' night games to be
telecast, and in turn bring more
revenue into the Athletic Department.
Without student money, our athletic
programs wouldn't be able to compete
on a Division
Chancellor
yesterday in
interview that
members on
yet
student
level
Brewer acknowledged
a FOUNTAINHEAD
there are no student
the committee, "not
The decision to include a
or not should be known
selected
we the
a great
within the week, according to WITN
Sports Director Dick Jones.
Should the new coach be
without student input, then
students have been done
injustice. It is the student body
which consistently supports and helps
finance our athletic program.
We have every right to be a part
of the decision process, especially
when it involves a great deal of our
money. The administration and the
Athletic Department should consider
why they are here and who enables
them to be here. They should make
public the members of the committee
without delay, and it should definitely
include at least one student
Uppity Women
Women must know their history
Readers question
paper's judgement
in FOl MAIN HEAD:
Upon scanning the
front page headlines of
the March 20 edition of
FOUNTAINHEAD, we
were appalled to see
one of the articles
printed there. Reference
is made to . the
Associated Press release
entitled, "Three Stu-
dents Arrested
Immediately we que-
stioned FOUNTAIN-
HEAD's sudden interest
in the events
Roanoke Rapids.
of
As residents of that
city, we believe the
news media has blown
the even way out of
proportion. As well, we
resent FOUNTAIN-
HEAD's most indiscrim-
ination decision to "air
our dirty laundry" in
their simple attempt to
fill up space.
Connie Powell
Eddie Bradley
By CHARLENE CARTER
Staff Writer
The disinterest which is evident in a
disconcertingly large portion of the female
population of this country, regarding the women's
movement, makes me wonder why, of course. But it
isn't really that hard to figure out. If you don't
know where you came from, you can't possibly have
a clear idea of where you are today, or where you
are going in relation to where you've been in
other words, if you are making any progress, or if
you are back-sliding.
Face it in our lifetime, we women have always
had the right to vote, We've probably never really
thought about how frustrating and powerless we
would feel if we were not able to vote. Or not able
to attend college if we are qualified. Y'all, it ain't
always been this way!
But why don't we think about it? Why are we
not aware of it?
In my opinion, it is because we are not
educated, throughout our lives, with regard to our
past and our history. Women's past. Women's
history.
Of course, there are always a few token
paragraphs in the history books. But they always
seemed separate' to me, somehow. They never
seemed to be really included in the mainstream of
the history that was being presented.
But, as stated before, if you don't know where
you came from, then you don't really knwo where
you are now. If women believe, as the history
books present the story, that for the most part the
makers of history were men, and women just
provided little extra bits and pieces, then how can
women be motivated to try to do more?
It wasn't that way. Women have always made
history. But why don t we know about it?
Now there are a few women's history courses at '
some of the more conscientious learning institutions.
Ok. That s some progress. But it seems to me that
I recall a Supreme Court ruling from a few years
back which stated that the concept of 'separate but
equal was not good enough. Are the women going
to settle for it anyway? �w,nK
Come on, women! We must move into .k
mainstream of life in this country, in eve� w
including the history books wa�
Founlainhead
Sarvtng the East Carolina community tor war 50 yaars
EDITOR
DOUG WHITE
ROBERT M SWAIM
STEVE BACHNER
NEWS EDITORS
RICKI GLIARM IS
�ARC BARNES
Assistant News Editors
Richy Smith
Wilit Rofl.rs
TRENDS EDITOR
JEFF ROLLINS
Assistant Trends Editors
Barry Clayton
Bill Jonas
SPORTS EDITOR
SAM ROGERS
Assistant Sports Editor
Charlt, Chandlar
Assistant Advertising
M anager
Tarry Horndon
Advertising Salesman
paul Ltncka
Chief Ad Artist
J�ne W .lit
Proofreaders
Da.dr. O.i.hum,
Sue Johnson
Typesetters
��bb.a Notaung
Cartoonists
Sua Lamm
��"� Clayton
FOUNTAINHEAD
"���papa, of Ea.t c�, 'h �����l
.pon.00- Dy �1 C.rol.n. Uniity
����! Thursday durina .?. Tm��0)��
���' wkIy durin;7h, i ������
Editorial oDlniori. ���"��� ar).
ECU 'A ' Old S. .1' "�������
ECU Oraaa.Hi ,J c Su�h� �-i-dino
'��a ohon. "v 2734
r
a�a "ii'iaaajaaMMtaytwuiii aw-
� Aw
" mtimmimfiimhmmMI





22 March 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
SGA candidates present platforms
MMNV CANDIDATE for SGA president.
I hoto by hap Gurley j
it!kins. Sherrod
offer "new blood'
iC
!
ill
rn i ampus has been
� �� ' al problem for main
year No one as of vet
is taken the initiative
ai i posith el. Alter-
natives such as wheel
ticket systems
"iii.lt' it the
nt i- interested.
ntrolled sale
� beer
i on campus
ssibilitv if
n i- app-
tl.
d and
! cannot make promises
re sincere in what
HNN (ALDER. CANDIDATE for SGA secretary
Photo by hap Gurley j
Felbinger pledges
7i on est v am bition
to the
: i ing an
SG
have
put into
M
and
make more
:� mri oncerning
SG � i lable to
y. It I
I will be
: ambiti
ept and
nsibilit)
ting the
5 retard of
the SGA.
One innovation that I
wish tu begin is an
open report that dis-
closes Student Govern-
ment activities and
plans.
I enjoy my studies
at ECU and look
forward to greater
involvement in the
I niversit). Help rue
reach my goal by, voting
C her) I Felbinger for
SG Secretary Wed
March 28.
Lefler
offers
experience
l challenge students
to place their confidence
in me and my ability to
render fair judgement,
to uphold the Constitu-
tion and oath of office
with my decisions
strictly my own. Let's
not argue about the
factions of the past, or
we will endanger the
future. It's this future
thai 1 am so concerned
about.
The future of transit,
consumer booklets,
whether or not ECU
sells alcoholic bevera-
ges, a better book
buying system and
increased communication
between SGA and
students.
LIBBV LEFLER. CANDIDATE for SGA president
f Photo In Chap Gurley
I have faced the
students of this campus
in five elections. I know
the issues which con-
tern you most. In my
three years with SGA, I
hav(
with
essential th(
h av e this
become familiar
all aspects. It's
president
working
knowledge to get
anything done effectively.
Melvin
promises
more arts
money
If everyone who won
SGA President in the
last five years kept half
his promises, ECU
would look like Fantasy
Land. The problem we
face each year is that
great ideas are kicked
around, one person gets
the office, and then we
all find out that the
promise can't - or wont
- be kept. Remember
2-deck parking lots
(1977)? Or beer on
campus (1974, 1975)?
How about book co-ops
(1976, 1977)? SGA is
held in low esteem now
because such promises
were marie, we believed
them, and we were
deceived.
BRETT MELVIN. CANDIDATE for sG president.
Photo by Chap Gurley j
S G A' s 1 u n d i n g of
Music, Art and Drama
must be better organ-
ized and more reliable -
and it can Ik.
- The students' seat
on the Board of Trus-
tees
active
have
in a
an
increase
done.
mu-t be more
the studei I -
a right to vote
referendum � on
fee or parking
It can
be
Sherrod promises
to be SGA activist
CHARLIE SHERROD. CANDIDATE for SGA
vice-president. Sherrod is unopposed in this race.
Photo by Chap Gurley
Calder offers more
emergency loans
V hen I entered the
legislature this year I
soon discovered the lack
of positive-activists. Few
in student government
concern themselves with
the proper management
of affairs, especially the
dispersement of student
fees thai are allocated
to SGA. Thousands of
dollars are handed out
by many that hav
difficult) balancing
own check-book
positive input has
slight.
Someone has
insure the continuance
of an effective Transit
system for all ECU
e
their
The
been
to
students. New buses
must join the fleet and
a non-student manager
tor transit is imperative.
The two trucks MIST
go! Wheel locks or a
ticket system where the
fine payments remain
with the university
should be considered.
Mosl importantly, some
common sense and
quality control will
insure that publication
failures are averted.
High schools can
publish a school annual.
1 want to be the
positive-activist vice-
president that kept a
litician out!
I would like to see
emergencj loan- opened
up more to freshmen
who don't know about
it. and I will make sure
the arts and others can
rely on the budgets we
give them.
Since there really
isn t a heated platform
for an SGA Secretary
candidate to run on,
I'm running m; inly on
experience. lne
advantage of having
been actively involved
as a SGA representative
for the past two years.
As well as being a
member of the 1978
Spring Elections Com-
mittee and l')78 Ban-
quet Committee, I have
served on the Appropri-
ations Committee both
years and have had the
honor of presiding as
chairperson this spring.
Through this exper-
ience, I feel that I
understand the function
and processes of Stu-
dent Government well.
By stressing good
communications from
the office and working
whole-heartedly at the
job, I feel that 1 could
serve ECU students wed
in the position of
Student Government
Association Secretary.
STEVE 0 GEARY, CANDIDATE for SG V treasurer.
Photo by Chap Gurley
O'Geary supports
campus beer sales
RICKY LOWE. CANDIDATE for SGA treasurer.
FOl NTAINHEAD did not receive a platform from
this candidate. Photo by Chap Gurlev
All ot us sometime
during the school vear
run out of money and
sometimes the onlv
place to turn to is the
SGA Emergency Loan
Fund. Currently there
are only 410 $25 loans
available, 210 for men
and 210 for women. As
Treasurer, I would work
to increase the amount
available so that more
students could benefit
from this service.
As a member of the
Executive Council, I
would support the
growing effort on I NC
campuses to petition the
I niversit) of North
Carolina Board
Governor- in an effort
to allow the sale and
consumption of beer on
campus.
I will insure that the
students are informed of
what monies are avail-
able to nice! all of their
need Overall mv
is to strive tor sound
financial management
and good bookkeeping.
Forum
IFC veep endorses O'Ge
CHERYL FELBINGER, CANDIDATE for SGA
secretary. Photo by Chap Gurlev J
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
In the race for the
office of treasurer of
SGA, Steve O'Geary
more than fits the bill.
New and unblem-
ished enthusiasm is
what is needed in our
student government.
I feel that Steve has
ary
this enthusiasm and
surely no one can hold
anv controversy over his
head.
The office of treas-
urer is one which bears
recognition and respon-
sibilities surpassed only
by the office of the
president. .
Steve is the type of
person who will serve
and benefit this office
and will work for the
good of the students
and not just a chosen
few.
So wholeheartedly
endorse Mr. 0 Geary
for the office of SGA
treasurer.
Thomas A. Pharo
I.F.C. Vice-President
Alcohol has 'tremendous potential dangers'
Student endorses
Lefler for president
By JERRI LOTTERHOS
Special to
FOl NTAINHEAD
The campus visi-
tor who died last week
as a result of an
overdose of our primary
drug of consumption -
alcohol - reminds us
again, tragically, that
thi- chemical has
tremendous potential
dangers.
la our nation's third
largest public health
concern, alcohol abuse appreciation for its
a contemporary nature as a depressant
chemical.
Attitudes which have
health and social
problem issue which
Viewpoint
deserves the attention
of everyone. Alcohol is
a positive benefit to a
pleasant life when used
with wisdom, responsi-
JtY find rational
existed for a long time
in our society run
counter to a rational
and responsible use of
alcohol. The attitude
thai "thf mm you ran
drink, the more of a
man you are runs
counter to the chemical
reality that "the more
you consume, the
drunker you get and
this attitude in our
culture only promotes
heavy negative drinking
behavior.
Actually, we desper-
ately need to develop
some maturity in our
culture relative to
alcohol use. When we
can cease viewing
alcohol as either "yes-
terday's tired old sin"
or the other extreme of
alcohol being "the
solution for everything
we may begin to realize
that alcohol consumption
is no big deal and like
any other human
behavior, can be a
positive and pleasant
experience in modera-
tion.
As long as we
maintain our immature
ambivalence toward
alcohol consumption,
negative drinking stan-
dards, alcohol problems
and alcohol overdoses
will continue to be a
part of our collective
experiences.
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
In regard to the
upcoming SGA elec-
tions, I feel there is a
presidential candidate
who stands head and
shoulders above the
rest. That candidate is
Libby Lefler.
I have seen Libby
work with SGA for
three consecutive years.
She does not have to
prove her qualifications
to anyone since her
endless hours of work
speak for themselves.
You, the students, can
be assured that she will
not suddenly lose
interest in her duties if
matter
the
t h.
elected. For Libb is
the type person who
undertakes every project
enthusiastically and does
not lose her initial
enthusiasm no
how unpleasant
task.
One thing
students can be assured
of is the fact that her
office will be open to
everyone. Libby honestly
feels that every student
on campus has a right
to be represented. She
is always ready to listen
and work with students
no matter what the
problem.
Gretchen Fahrenbruch
I ' . w
' f 0 0 �
'��.





r-tiytj o ruuraiMinincMu 4 Mar en i��
Professors present study
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Hugh Wease, Asso-
ciate Professor of His-
tory, and Joseph Con-
gleton, Professor of
E h ition, ECU, pre-
- ntrd the results of a
res arch study at a
erenoe of the
�iuia Council
Studies in
Charlotte. The study,
concerned with how
elementary and sec-
ondary school students
respond to indefinite
expressions of time, was
conn
in selected
in the Pitt
1 during the
1
repre-
group of
teachers and profession-
al historians were asked
to respond for purposes
of comparison.
Approximately 200
students from the fifth
through the eleventh
grades were asked to
provide a definite date
for twenty-two historic
time expressions, nor-
mally used in social
studies classes. Ex-
pressions such as "co-
lonial period "The
beginning of modern
times" "The old west
and "Middle Ages"
were included.
It was found that
high school students do
not perceive these time
expressions in the same
way as teachers and
professional historians.
Although other studies
have shown that
children in the upper
elementary and junior
high schools can
effectively be taught
historic time concepts,
fifth and eighth graders
in this study showed
little understanding of
the time expressions.
The use of indefinite
time expressions without
proper instruction con-
tributes little to the
development of an
understanding of chron-
ology and a mature
sense of time, the
researchers said. For
example, the expression:
INewsweek Washington
representative to speak
�! the nation's
inguished and
journalists
the campus
1 lies Mar.
a.m. in
i' - Do) le. deputy
t the W ashington
Newsweek,
ieak at a special
n tor jour-
and writing
publication
hers, and all
university
� 1 (acuity.
i! was ar-
special
of
.tii
Newsweek, the Depart-
ment of English and its
Journalism Program.
The Society for
Collegiate Journalists,
campus honorary jour-
nalism fraternity, has
been assisting with
campus arrangements
also.
Doyle won a Pulitzer
award, in a cooperative
story venture, while on
the staff of the Boston
Globe. Before joining
Newsweek, Doyle served
for special Watergate
prosecutors Archibald
Cox and Leon Jaworski.
Doyle is a graduate
of Boston College and
earned a Master's from
the Pulitzer School of
Journalism at Columbia
I niversity. He is a
former Nieman Fellow
at Harvard University.
The visitor will
appear on only two
other state campuses
other than ECU. They
are Shaw Universitv and
I NC-Chapel Hill.
Doyle will be
introduced Tuesday
morning by Kay Wil-
liams, local president of
the Society for Col-
legiate Journalists.
The general public is
invited as space
permits.
CHANELO'S
LWJN1K1B S
Pizza &
Spaghetti House
Bread and Pizza Dough
Made Fresh Daily
HAD A PIECE LATELY?
sandwiches spaghetti
pizza lasagna
FOR FAST-FREE DELIVERY
CALL
7587400
Thurs. 11:30 1:00
Fri. Sat. 11:30 2:00
Sun.
11:30-12:00
vSd�
if you're a "gal on the go
you have extra special
vitamin needs . .
you've earned
v

ii' .11. ii
PLUS IRON
60 TABlfTS
HIGH POTENCY
STRESS FORMULA
VITAMINS PLUS IRON
This new supplement is specially formulated tor
y "todays woman High pressure and stressful
situations can rob your body of important vita-
mins Rexall Stress Formula Vitamins work fast to
replace water soluble B Complex Vitamins as well
as Vitamin C. Vitamin E and that highly important
mineral - Iron. When a hectic day starts to get
you down - remember to reach for Rexall High
Potency Stress Formula Vitamins PLUS IRON'
SALE
2 Bottles of 60 for $5.47
Keg. $5.47 each.
Compare price and quality with
STRESSTABS 600 WITH IRON!
DRUG STORES, Inc
Quoity � Compmliiivtt Pricms � Service
Unl Srmtillf Fir tor a �,�, fWilf � 1mr.
No ' No ;
P�on;�n0S Phone 7S8 4)04
8am-7 30 p.m. 8a.m-l0pm
"The beginning of
modern times" may
take some students as
far back as 1,000 years,
while for other students
the length of time is
limited to the 20th
century. For some high
school students, the
beginning of "modern
times" does not go
beyond their own life
span.
The study further
indicated that students
can provide accurate
meanings for such time
concepts as "century"
and "decade" but when
asked to apply these
meanings to such ex-
pressions as "previous
decade" or the "next
decade" of the "late
18th century" they are
unable to do so.
Approximately 700
social studies teachers
throughout North
Carolina attended the
two-day conference in
Charlotte.
BIOOD DRJVE TROPHY - David Goodwin of Apex
preS,dcn, of ,he ECU chap.er of Sigma Phi EpSoa
Ihc ECU Air Force ROTC. The chapter received aa
award from AFROTC for having a great percentage
of its membership donate blood it a recent Red
Cross blood drive sponsored by AFROTC.
ECU News Bureau Photo
i

nmmmm0b0
- �� ��





ww vw
22 March 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
Jazsman Corea
releases new album
UN:
1 r�inls .Jiti.r
al,Ui has a definite
:n in the new
sical music that has
i written this
century.
� tit
Drifting
song "Drifting'1
sesses some of
irea - best composing
a single voice. The
melody itself drifts
the gentle
impulse ol the padding
� Chirk Corea's
arc among the
s being written in
�v slvle
Si Blues" is
a self-confident, up
n. sophisticated blues
mber. hi between the
'it. suave vocals arc
in- b Corea
and company that will
� �
1 If firsi song on
second side ol the
album. "Fickle Funk"
is jusl that. Stvcho-
rnythic staccato brass
with cruim'
izzutti on trumpet i-
simply amazing on tl
is Corea a!
In- bestmodernistic
. gement u ith
but lot OO

performs
ment
"Bagatelle � m
posed b) Bela Bartok.
the piece was a certain
melancholic longing in
ii- tone. It's as if Corea
were reminiscing about
some long lost love or
home. Corea uses
background vocals and
synthesizer in his ren-
dition ol this bagatelle,
two sounds we're sure
Bartok never though of
the piece as he
originally intended it.
"Hot News Blues"
is a -n with a
definitely urban feeling
teaturing Corea's own
voice backed up by
some soulful soul-
sisters Consequently
i- a blending of
ihc latino, modern jazz
and spiritual styles of
musii 1 he number is
particularly compelling
and includes -nine
ent -i at-singing on
a - par
entral Park" is
most exciting song
the album in terms
id-lire perform-
ances by the band. It's
also the song in which
1 rea's latino roots are
lent. The song
Park" as well
whole Secret
ViM'iit album. convevs
joie dc vivre of
young and in love
I i fe n o w.
Chick Corea releases Secret Agent
School of Music schedules Percussion Ensemble
p.m. in the .J.
r Rental Hall.
W rk in luded in the
- hiffman's
"1 u -i�i Buttula. IWoata
Ih,
�rd-
1.
ol Moda-Ling t . Peters,
Suite for Sideman
and Handclappers bv
McK rh� pro-
to the
fre harge.
On Mi mdav. Man b
Men's Glee
I 11 . Women - Glee
t lie I nivesity
irale will imn to-
gether in present East
?Una's Spring Con-
. m the .J.
I � ' her Recital Hall.
I tn- c�ncerl is also
open in tin- public free
ge.
The Men's Glee
Club, directed b Ed-
ward Glen will lertiirm
a Welsh Air. Men of
Harlerh, arranged b
Koerner as the first
song in the concert.
I hen they w ill do an
ynus )ci by Kalin-
niku (arranged bv
Rosewall) and the Hos-
podi Pomiloi bv Lvovsk)
(arranged by Weaver).
The spirituals "De
Animal- A-Comin
"High Barbary" aND
Goodbve, hare nu
W ell" arranged bv Bar-
tholomew . Hall and
Lubolt respectively will
be the next pieces done
by the Men Glee
Club. And finally the
group will sing "Dr
Bone arranged by
Gearheart. Charles
Currinwill acompany the
group on piano.
The omen Glee
Club, directed bv
Rhonda Flemming will
then -in four songs for
women - chorus bv
Johannes Brahms.
I hey are "I hear a
harp, Come awav,
i ome away Death
Greetings, and "Song
from Ossian's Fingal
Paula Scarangella, on
harp and Jud Fordvce
and Sherry Jones on
horn- will acompam the
group for this selection
ill songs.
Then the women -
club will present tl
choruses Irom Mice in
W onderiand : tin
composer, Ir ing Fine.
The three choruses are
"The Lobster
Quadrille "Lullaby ol
the Duchess, ' and
Father William
ne Bridger, Susan
Davis and Pan; Henry
will accompany the
group on the choi - -
rhe I niv ersit C h
Chorale will perform an
anonymous lleluia
led by Charles W .
Mi ore, and then an
Ml Sl
Art Wilson returns to Hendrix Theatre
with travel film of Chicago on Tuesday
Art Wilson,
reknowned travel lec-
turer, will return for
another ol many succes-
sful presentations in the
Hendrix Theatre in
Mendenhall Student
Center on March 27,
. at S p.m. He
will present his
travel-film "Chicago
Believe It or Not the
travel film with a twist.
The film is part of the
Travel-Adventure Film
Series sponsored b
Mendenhall.
It any film ever
contested preconceived
ideas about a place,
this one certainly does.
The film portrays a
magnioficen! city which
the viewer can look at
with a certain proprie-
tary sense and a feeling
ol pride. Among Chica-
go trademark the
stockyards are non-exis-
tent today, but the city
still host- the nation's
most important annual
livestock how. Among
the entertaining features
ol that event is a rodeo
which, in turn, will lead
us to a Chicago suburb
where we find a special
school lor training rodeo
-tars.
The film will take
the viewer to the
whole-ale fruits and
vegetable market and
the famous Merchandise
Mart. On a visit to the
Chicago Museum ol
Science and Industry
the film shows how the
museum is truly a
push-button, do-it-your-
-elt museum.
mazing to main
people is Chicago's sys-
tem ol 551 park- cover-
ing 77,000 acres N
other American citv has
within close reach ol -
many ol it- citizens
-uch a varielv ol park
with so man v 1 ree
facilities and activities
in them. For it- entire
26-mile length, the non-
industrialized lakefronl
ol the citv consists of
nothing but park- and
30 beaches. W ith all
that the citv has to
offer we are abb
lully appreciate the
ling on this
Queen Citv.
Iickets tor the
program are priced al
S1.50 and v an be pur-
ha-ed al the Central
rickel Office. dillu-
sion tor E.C.I . -Indent
will be by ID and
ctiit Card- while
admission tor E.C I .
lacultv and -tall will be
bv MSI! Membership
Card.
Learned appears at Wright on Monday
Michael Learned
Michael Learned,
"Olivia Walton" of the
television show 'The
W altons, will appear
with Anthony Zerbe in
a show entitled "DEAR
Liar" on March 26,
in Wright Auditorium
on the Fast Carolina
campus. Curtain time
is 8 p.m.
Michael Learned has
been part of the "Wal-
tons" cast since Sep-
tember of 1972 when
the show premiered.
Since that time it has
become one of the most
popular and acclaimed
shows on the air, and
she has become one of
television's most famous
women stars. Her
recent departure from
the show was sad for
cast, crew, and audi-
ences, but Ms. Learned
fell her many other
offers were loo impor-
tant to pass up. After
winning three Emmy
awards, she was ready
lor a new challenge.
She is presently starring
with Marlon Brando in
the film "Apocalypse
Now
Zerbe
Anthony Zerbe is
also an Emmy winner,
having earned his award
for his co-starring role
in "Harry-0 Other
credits include television
work in "Onct An
Eagle "How the West
W as W on and
"Glitier Palace His
most recent film role
was with Shirley
MacLaine in "Turning
Point
Besides having two
great performers, "Dear
Liar" has a fine script.
The show is adapted
lrom the correspondence
of George Bernard Shaw
and Mrs. Patrick Camp-
bell, who appeared in
so many of his plays.
The love-hate relation-
ship of the brilliant
iconoclast and the
beautiful Victorian act-
resses is one of the
most fascinating literary
love stories in history.
The two great wits
exercise charm and sar-
casm to their fullest.
Sometimes the show
brings tears and some-
times the show brings
tears and sometimes it
eleicits gales of laugh-
ter, but it always gives
insight into the two
people involved.
Reviews
The performance has
received excellent crit-
ical reviews throughout
the country. The Los
Angeles Times was
especially impressed bv
the sequence in which
Shaw pledges to write a
play for "Mrs. Pat of
whom he is enamoured.
W
len tie
writes the
greal play "Pygmalion'
(the basis or ' Mv Fair
Lady"), she wails, "You
made Elua a cockney
just to torment me to
which he replies. "I can
can't imagine thai act-
ing common should be
difficult tor you
Tickets for the show
are $1.50 for E.C.I
students $3 for fa-
culty and staff, and
$4 for the public.
Groups of 20 or more
may purchase tickets for
$3 each. For further
information, contact the
Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student
Center, 757-6611, ext.
266.
I
I





�$�. rvjUNTAiwHEAD 22 March 1979
ixr.rv miw hii travel lecturer
-�'I retrun for anolher (f m smcces8ful
resentalions in the Hendrix Theatre in Mendenhall
Mudent Center on March 27, l9;o. at 8:00
�� Hillpresent his travel-film "Chicago - Believe ,
Wt Hi trawl film nith a twist. The film is
rt �l the InneAdventure Film Series sponsored
l ii��nhall �tudent Center.
'No Other Love9
features Kavner
d Thomas
B? VI UK J. liOUR
VI' I cleision W rit�-r
� geles W A
- species, the TV
- � Cap-
! issuing forth
and then
warm drama
unit breaking stride.
CBS and
for-T
The
man, il-
a liking
n ks and the ladies
lriv thei
trucker
ics, too
- � - th
"And
is Jonah"
I h
? r two
taining
with
Her father Robert
Loggia, a well-to-do
builder, want- to pul
Janet in a high-class
sanitarium; her mother
wants her at home,
Kntcr brother Bruce
Scott Jacoby.
He realizes his sister
is capable of life on her
own, and takes tier to a
pleasant hostel for
young adults who. like
Janet, are marginally
retarded.
There she falls in
love with Richard
rhomas, the spirited,
clever Andrew Madison.
Andrew, too, is retar-
ded.
'N Other Love
Saturday on CHS.
Cheers to Mr. Sell tor
this one. I hope this
doesn't mean we're
due for another trucker
llick.
in
N
Lo ve" t r
N
It i- the tory ol
tarded
love
married,
md touch-
too
Kavner
rhe -tars are CBS
Julie Kavner,
Rhoda and
1 homas, who
oam alton's
in as John-Boy.
ATTIC
1- Ka
plays
� t Mi. haels: 22,
b : addicted to
and living
�tei live
Net ol her guiltladen
mother Elizabeth Allen.
COUPON
SPECIALS
FAMXUT
School of music includes glee clubs
Bv JEFF ROLLINS
TRENDS EDITOR
School of Music'
faculty members Rodney
Schmidt and Rosemarv
Fischer will present a
joint recital on Sun
Mar. 25 in Wright
Auditorium at 8:15 p.m.
Schmidt, on violin, and
Fischer on piano will
perform a varied pro-
gram of Paganin, J.S.
Back, Johannes Brahms
and Georges Enesco.
Violinist Rodney
Schmidt was educated
at the Oberlin Con-
servatory of Music,
California State Uni-
versity at Northridge,
and the University of
Colorado at Boulder
where he earned the
Doctor of Musical Arts
Degree. A scholarship
student of Andor Toth,
St. at each school, Mr.
Schmidt has also
worked with the original
iungarian Quartet and
studied at the Acadamie
Mozarteum in Salzburg.
In 1970 and 1971 he
Meadow mount School ol
Music. In 1978 Mr
Schmidt iwas chosen as
Music
studied briefly with
Dorothy DeLay and then
spent the summers of
1975 and 1976 at the
one ol twenty violinists
to perform under
Maestro Henry Szer-
yng's tutelage in Ann
Arbor. Muhigan
Pianist Roseroar)
Fischer holds the
Bachelor ol Music
degree from the Oberlin
Conservator) ol Mush
and th' Master ol
Music degree from the
1 niversit) of Michigan,
both in piano perform-
ance. She has served on
the faculties ol G
verse College and the
Brevard Musi Center.
Ms Fischer
registered musu thera
pist and a member
the musk therapy
music education
ultie- ol tbi S I
1 isi at �� irolina
University. She has
performed a- concerto
soloist with the As!
vdle. N C 5ym
and m recitals
throughout the
ea-t region.
South
fot
-tsii
v&e&w
,pte(
u�
Howdy ECU Students "
Clip this coupon for
good Western Eatin
WESTERN FRIED
CHICKEN
FRENCH FRIES
MEDIUM DRINK
$1.60
offer good 'til 3-31-79
- The SGA has been ineffective due to factions that have disrupted progress bv thai
political in-fighting. We are not politicians and certainly do not belong to anv oraun
of the past. "Fresh blood" in SGA is long overdue. any group
We propose to oin with other N.C. campus governments to petition the University
of N.C. Board of Governors in an effort to allow the sale and consumption of bear
on campus.
�There is no greater priority than the continuance of an efficient Transit System for
all ECU students.Fuel costs win oe mgher every year. Students will rely on our buse
to get to classes and this is why we are totally committed to mass transit. 8
The tow trucks MUST go. Alternatives we propose include wheel locks or a ticket
system in which the fine payments remain WJtn the university and not the tow truck
owners. muck
(Paid poHttaJadrM





Roxy presents
Spring Breezes,
art you can hea
iwarcn itf�9 FOUNTAINHEAD Pajf 9
Spring Breezes is
the beginning in Green-
ville. Not the beginning
ol Art Art, for Some
reason, has been
blossoming in this little
Eastern North Carolina
town for manv years
nl even though it has
not been encouraged
and even though its
struggle looked hopeless
it survived. And now
this little town is ready
make a statement
and that statment is
ing Breezes.
rhe Rox, aiong
with Art Enterprises, a
company dedicated to
manifestation of
rt, bring- you Spring
Breezes. And the songs
couldn't be better.
1 he Roxy has a
responsibility to culti-
vate Art in the
community but during
this cultivation it
ilized that some of
the artists, although still
growing, were already
capturing this life as
well as anyone in the
world.
Spring Breezes gives
you four of the Best.
You can see the best
on one night, March 30
at 8:30 p.m.
Tommy G will take
you on a walk down his
dusty roads. The streets
he walked are in his
songs, his voice his
soul and he has the
rare gift of being able
to give these away.
Rick Cornfield cap-
tures country breezes
and songs of love.
The two poets, Bill
Bhong and Jim Carrol
make words dance to
the rock and roll beat.
Although rock and roll
is different to both of
them often it is the
same.
Spring Breezes is
the beginning. Spring
Breezes is the Best
MUSIC
mtinued from p. 8)
Vlleluia b) Will James,
directed b Denise
Moore.
v illiam Robinson
will direct the LChorale
on his own piece,
"Pr.ii � Him All Ye
Lands1 Then Joy
Hm-ie will direct an-
other Vlleluia, this one
b) Martin Mailman.
Mi hael Regan will be
ompanist tor this

Alleluia.
Kyle West will be
the accompanist and
Johnice Johnson the
director for the Univer-
sity Chorale's rendition
of Aaron Copland's ar-
rangement of The Little
Horses. Terri Svec is
the oboe accompanist
and Michael Regan the
director for the song
"AH the Pretty Little
Horses arranged bv
William Hall.
ARMY NAVY STORE
1501 S. Evans
B5. bomber, field,
deck, flight, snorkel
jackets Back Packs.
HAD YOUR ICE
CREAM TODAY?
NOW OPEN
located in Rivergate Shopping
Center on 10th St. Ext.
PHONE 752-0949
HOURS 11:00-9:00 MonThur
11:00-9:30 Fri. and Sat,
2:00-9:00 Sun.
ICE CREAM, SUNDAES,
SANDWICHES WE SERVE
DELICIOUS HOT DOGS!
. em
FESTIVAL
CD ALL
YOU
CAN
EAT!
EVERY
Flounder Dinner
All You Can Eat
Includes French Fries, Salad Bar,
Tartar Sauces & Hush Puppies.
FRIDAY'S SPECIAL!
5H0NEY&
Located beside
the Ramada Inn,
264 By-paae.
Fri. & Sat. at 7 & 9 p.m. in the Hendrix Theatre
Presented by the Student Union Fiims Committee
WE WEEK SAILING
TRIPS along the
OITER-BAIVKS
for young adults
(18-35 years old)
RIGGAN S
SHOE REPAIR
AND
LEATHER SHOP
Net leather pocketbooks,
belts, and belt burkles.
Shoes repaired to look
like new.
11 W. 4th St.
Downtown Greenville
'100.00
Complete
Trips Begin May 13th
Write for Info:
United Methodist Ministry Outdoors
Camp Don-Lee
Arapahoe, N.C. 28510
3005 E. 10th St.
33 Item
Salad Bar
Sherlock's
Restaurant
On 3th St. arross from
the Book Barn
Good Food
& Good People
Vegetarian diets
respected.
M onSat. 1 la.m9p.m.
OYD'S BARBER
nd HA1RSTYLING
1008 S. Evans St
Phone 758-4056
ByAppointment Only
MervinH Boyd
MelvinH.Boyd,Jr.
Franklin C Tntm
Banquet
Facilities
7588550
Carry-out
service
Great Steaks
Coming Soon
A Close Encounter of the Choicest Kind'
Western Steer Family Steakhouse
WOMEN. YOU'RE EQUAL
IN THE AIR FORCE.
Women start out on the same footing as men in Air Force
ROTC. Women wear the same insignia and hold the same
cadet positions in AFROTC, just as they do later on as Air
Force officers.
And the same AFROTC scholarship can be yours as a
woman If you qualify, you can have your tuition, book costs
and lab fees paid by the Air Force, and receive $100 a month
for other expenses. It helps free you to concentrate on your
education. And that's important.
As an Air Force officer, you'll be expected to use your train
ing and education, and be a leader managing people and
complex systems Youll be handed executive responsibility
starting with your first job
It's a great way to be equal, and a great way to serve your
country Check into the AFROTC program at your campus
Be sure to ask about AFROTC scholarships � you may be
helping yourself earn an exciting new lifestyle
contact; Allen T. Tinkham, Captain, USAF
Recruiting Officer
Wright Annex 757-6597
VV rjuti muiirt
ROTC
Gateway to a great way of lif
FRIDAYS
1890
Seafood
Special Features
Sunday-Couples Night: 2 delicious!
seafood platters of Shrimp, Oysters, Fish
Cole Slaw, French Fries and our Famous Hush
Puppies.
Only $7.99 for 2
Monday-Shrimp-A-Roo: a delicious
entre" of Calabash Style Shrimp with French
Fries, Cole Slaw and Hush Puppies.
All For Only $3.50
Tuesday-Fish Fry:Aii the Fried Fish
(Trout or Perch) you can eat with French Fries,
Slaw, and Hush Puppies. No takeout
Only $2.75
Wednesday-Fried Oysters.Goidenl
Brown Fried Oysters with French Fries, Cole
Slaw and Hush Puppies
Only $3.75
Thursday-Family Night: Great
specials on Shrimp, Oysters Trout Or Perch,
No Takeout
Shrimp�$5.50
Trout Or Perch$2.75
Oysters $4.95
Flounder$4.50
"All You Can Eat"
Hours: Opon 4:30 P.M. To 9 P.M.
Sunday-Thursday
4:30 P.M10 P.M.
Friday and Saturday
tils?
Loeatod On Evans Stroot
Bohind Sports World
Call RedCross now for a
Mooddonor appointment
rl f �- 0 0

0 �T 0
1
� W �
� 990
40 0 40 0 0 w � 00 0P "� "�" " " " "�
� 0 0000000 0 000 0�0 "�� 0 0 0 0
0 m � m � 9 �
��' �
� �





" rt-rn
Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 22 March 1979
Coaching candidates now down to two
Odom, Kunze
last two choices
B SAM ROGERS
Sports F.Hitor
hastily deciding to hire Larr) Gillman as
4etball coach two years ago, it's not
and why East Carolina Athletic
Hm' Ca�" and the rest of the selection
��m" carefully, and cautioush screened
late during the somewhat length) search
nil.
nt' universitj official has admitted
was a mistake, and since his contract �
miversitj a reported $22,000 next
fii' department ran ill afford
N - I ' nation Director all Atkins
ements for a press conference
VX ' ach i- expected to be
' � tl �� Fridav
applied for the job
under pressure three weeks
'he � department said
just four candidates
nd with an announcement
appears the selection
� ither Easl Carolina assistnat
� Kunze or Wake Forest assistant David
� head coach.
f Florida assistani Dick Grubar and
'ach Richard Schmidt were the
nsidered by the committee
- f,ui both have reportedh been
�1 i i -1.
� ') remain the two most likeh
! both are certainh ven
tits.
pla rs � hoice all
received stn acking from
- well as . alumni.
Duluth, Minn he was
the I nivei
from there in .
� the St. Louis Hawks .it
� n and plaved thn �
�Id H
lour war- playing pro kail in
1 nited States where
at tch at Mora
X1 � - " � H. ined the Minnesota
inder Jim Dutcher
ist vear.
very popular with the East
arrived an � , the V-
welj as am former Pirate
TKRM kl NZE,EC!
assistant basketball
(�oath. j�. being consi-
dered for tbe head
coaching job vacated b
Larr Gillman. Daw
Odom, assistant roach
at ake Forest, is
another candidate under
strong consideration for
the post.

H
M ���

. i tiWi '���� -w�
Km
other choice, would also
i ertainly ha- all the
Id a winner at East
�ro and was the head
5 dor High School for -even
was named the conference
three tune Odom joined the
�� rung staff in 1976 and brought in
consider the fines! recruiting
ountn last vea
n North Carolina well and is
- his peers as one of the finest
� mtic Coast Conference.
speculated Odom simply
instant's job at Wake Forest and that
m barely match the salary he's
n's staff.
then, insist Odom just wants a head
��� rests in the hands of the
and it will certainh go a long
ermining the future o the Easl Carolina
mi.
ether the committee -elect- Kunze or
ive certainh found two professionals
years ol Gillman, what could be an
-

� �
Cain, committee
not hurrying
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
Easl Carolina Athletic Dir. B
W ednesday the -election commil i
choices to two candidates for the v i
basketball position, However,Cai I
who the two candidate- und i siderati
According to sources insi
department, it i- believed the fin
tor the Ka-t Carolina job are Pirat �-
terry Kunze and Wake f- iresl vssisi
Odom. Although athletn officials had
official announcement late Wednesda
i- expected to lie named at a Frida)
i onference.
rhere's nothing definite righi now, but
two candidates we're interested in Ca i
Wednesday. "However, we're -till con!
�arch for a new coach and I -till doi
when ve will name one. 1 had hopi
Friday, but there is -tili nothing :�
no v
Kunze said Monday fie felt hi-
dropped from the list ol possible
indicated Wednesday afternoon fie was -�
those being considered for the job.
He met with members ol the selecl omm
Luesday afternoon and had another mee
scheduled Wednesda) with Easl C u
rhomas Brewer and assistani t
Clinton Prewett.
"There is still nothing
definite right now
Bill Cain
mcial
arra .
PAT STEW ART.A junior
from Seminole. Fla volleys against
an earl) season opponent. Stewart is

ol th
one ot the Kir,s that Udy p.
Coach Barbara (Mschner looks to for
strong performances.
Photo b Doug Melton
Odom, who recenth complete
;ln assistnat on the Wak, Foresl -
'n!erv,e� lasl eek, but has not returned
Greenville mother interview
not returned to Greenville for i intervi, M ,
,Ki discuss an
-1' � ' rding to a WFl spol
Dick Grubar, - lSsistai l
University ol Florida and , � ( perfor
North Carolina, was om the fin
candidates mentioned b meml ers
committee, but he said Wednesday I
trorn the Easl Carolina
contacted him this week. However, there were
reports Grubar visited Greenville Mondav and talk
with some athletic official although he
ston.
Virginia Assistani Richard Schmidt has
dropped from the list of candidates
apparently remain with the Cavalier staff again n
year. He was one ol the final four
with the ECl job.
Kunze, a 35-year-old native of Duluth. M
joined the East Carolina coaching staff last vear H
was the chief recruiter and scout at the Univers
of Minnesota under Jim Dutcher b, I ,r lea i .
Goper staff.
Kunze also plaved one vear in the Nai
Basketball Association with the St. Louis Hawks
played two years for Minnesota in the old B A H
b'i-k'tbdn ? Europe p,aving Pr �
basketball before returning to the states in 19
The coaching vacancy at East carolin was �
hrt "eeks (a' when Lam Gillman submitted
resignation after two seasons. The P.rate- pi
"2 ;tin refve J Probation period for ailed,
recruiting violations which occurred last vear
officials are expected to meet with meml
ncaa tnforcement Committee
month.
Pirates dump ECSC behind four hit pitching ofB
By CHARLES Chandler r � " J
netime
By CHARLES Chandler
ssistant Sports Editor
Back-to-back home
ins by Mike Sage and
Jerry Carraway high-
five-run
md inning as East
defeated
Eastern Connecticut
State 6-1 behind the
tour hit pitching of
Mil key Bntt Tuesday
night.
The Pirate- sent
ECSC Starting pitcher
Brian Murphy to the
showers after tagging
him for five hits and
the five run- in that
crucial second inning.
Britt, now 2-2, did
not allow ECSC a hit
during the last five
innings and did not
give up an earned run
all evening. The lone
Eastern Connecticut
State run came after a
fielding error by Pirate
third baseman Jerry
Carraway. Britt's earned
run average tor the
season i- now a mere
0.70.
Pirate head boach
Monte Little was well
satisfied with the play
ol In- team, especially
considering the chilly
sub-50 degree tempera-
ture
w e played an out-
standing game -aid
Little. "I was espeically
proud of our play de-
fensively. Mike Sorrel
played super, and has
now played several
outstanding games at
shortstop for us
Little was also
pleased with his team's
performance at the
plate. Mired in a sea-
son-long batting
drought, the Pirates
opened up for 10 hits
against ECSC. "We
definitely hit the ball
better tonight he said.
"But, of course, we had
to.
Little wa impressed
with the performance of
ECSC relitd" pitcher
Russell Allen, who came
in for Murphy after the
home runs by Sage and
Carraway. Allen allowed
but one Pirate run for
the rest of the night.
"Allen did a super
job for them said
Little. "He was ex-
pecially good when he
got behind out batters.
We could have reallv
hut him if he hadn't
gotten tough when he
was behind
A bright spot for
East Carolina was the
fact that each Pirate
batter got on base at
least once in the game.
"It is encouraging to
see everyone get on
said Little. "I've said
all along that we can
definitely get on base
and score runs
I wo Pirates got a
couple of hits apiece in
helping their team im-
prove its record to 6-6.
Catcher Raymie Stvons
doubled and singled
while Carraway picked
up a single in addition
lo his second inning
blast.
The loss dropped
ECSC to 4-2 on the
season.Though the mar-
g'n of victory was
decisive, Little was im-
pressed with the play of
ECSC. "They're a fine
dub he said. "We
have to play them twice
more this week and we
are surely not taking
anything for granted
East Carolina is
scheduled to meet the
49ers from UNC-Char-
"lotte in a double-header
tonight at Harrington
Field before meeting
Eastern Connecticut
State again Saturday
afternoon.
ECU's Rick Derechailo slashes a doubl
� against Eastern r
eastern Connecticut St
ate
Photo b Chap Gnrievj
t





ft f f ' f ' � � � ' t r r
-frffrrrr'
w r r r t
22 March 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 11
Tudor ends career in NCAA's
ECU SPORTS
INFORMATION
For East Carolina's
John Tudor, Saturday's
swim as a member of
the Pirates' 400-yard
freestyle relay team at
the NCAA swimming
championship at Cleve-
land State could be the
culmination of a young
child's dream.
For Tudor, a sprint
freestyler from Greens-
boro who began the
sport at age seven,
national recognition has
been an elusive reward,
but not because he
hasn't worked for it.
Since starting his
aquatic career, Tudor
has labored almost daily
to become better, faster
each year. He has
worked out daily since
age nine and shown
illWBSe
Pirate Mike Sage rounds the bases
Photo by Chap Gurley
Tennis team loses to
UNC and ACC, now 0-4
Mike Douglas
says: "Give
a gift from
your heart.9
.99
Call Red Cross now
for a blood donor
appointment.
B DWll) MAREADY
Staff W riter
Carolina
team
third and
tennis
la ag-
I NC Tarheels
Hill and
i against the
Atlantic
in
icperienoed
coached bj
Randolph could
me
- thej
dominated
Tarheels in nine
I- - sing
rial shut
dogs, the Pirates again
lost all thress matches
with the final scores
being Love-w inches-
ter (EC) vs. Attlered-
Aldridge (AC) - 6-2,6-1;
Campbell-Byrd (EC) vs.
Alvarez-Staub (AC) -
6-1, 6-3; Zengal-Cuning-
ham (EC) vs. Morris-
Blomgren (AC) - 8-6
(final set forfeited.)
The two losses for
the Piratt- squad coup-
led with two earlier
losses extended their
losing steak to four and
left their overall record
at 0-4. Two home
matches are scheduled
for the Pirates this
week - Friday at 2
p.m. against California
State and Saturdav
against the UNC-W
Seahawks at 11 a.m.
Both matches will be
played on the Minges
Tennis Courts.
- EatlisUlf
i.rrrnrillr. C.
U
ECU sophomt
; t 11 u 1 d
set away
SATURDAY NIGHTx
the bluegrass sounds of the
HOMETOWN BOYS
DON'T FORGET
FRIDAY AFTERNOON
a
a met
i tough Carolina
o lost the
es set 6-3, but
take the
6-2, never-
. � , went down
defeal losing the
6-2. The
laining Pirate- lost in
sets by the
wing -run Sing-
Love (EC) vs.
(1 NC) 6-1, 6-0;
5ter (EC) vs.
1 NC) - 6-3, 6-3;
mpbell (EC) vs. Fen-
(I NC)-6-0,6-2;
EC) vs. Potts
NC) -6-2,6-2; Zengal
irs. Ruford (UNC)-

In doubles eompeti-
the Pirate also
suo essive sets
l all three matches.
Now offering FAST FREE pizza delivery
in our portable ovens. Call and check
out our special introductory offer.
CALL 756-7300
open 4:30pm - 11:30pm
PAISANO PIZZA
� i
Where the price Is right
VI
The
H ore
ove(EC)
' .tt-
were
. Tax-
l NC) 6-1,
Campbell-Edmund-
(EC) vs. Fenichell-
i(l NC) - 6-1,6-0;
heater-Cunningham
(EC) vs. Disco-Carl
i 6-2,6-3.
gainst Atlantic
ristian College, the
was much the
same as the Pirates
:re overpowered losing
IT straight sets before
wing 9-0.
In singles competi-
tion, the scores were
Love(EC) vs. Attlered
(AC)- 7-5,6-0; Winches-
ter (EC) vs. Alvarez
(AC) - 6-2,6-3; Campbell
(EC) vs. Morris (AC) -
6-1,6-1; Byrd (EC) vs.
Aldridge (AC) - 6-0,6-0;
Zengal (EC) vs. Staub
(AC) - 6-3,6-1; Bloro-
gren (AC) vsl Cunn-
ingham (EQ-6-4, 6-2.
In doubles competi-
tion against the Bull-
CANDIDATES'
DEBATE
presented by
ECU LAW SOCIETY
Oo
steady improvement he
hopes to demostrate
again on the final day
of his fourth national
collegiate meet.
In all, Tudor has
covered 12,900 miles
while swimming, rough-
ly two round trips to
San Francisco and a
jaunt to Cleveland, but
with the same scenery
on every stroke.
"I want us to make
the top 12 in the
relay Tudor said, a
sharp business manage-
ment major. "That's
all-America level, some-
thing that has been my
goal for a long time
"I was a walk-en
when I came to East
Carolina, and not very
good when I got here
either. But coach (Ray)
Scharf gave me a
chance and worked with
me and I started dropp-
ing my times signifi-
cantly
"I wanted to make
the travelling team
when I saw all the fine
swimmers here, and I
was fortunate to make
our first trip
Scharf wouldn't think
of leaving his prize
swimmer home any-
more, and regrets that
he won't be available
next winter.
"John has meant a
lot to us because he
has done so much to
improve himself
Scharf said. "At one
time or another he has
held school records in
every stroke except the
breaststroke. He works
hard to improve every
day
For the average man
12,900 miles would be
more than enough, but
for the resilient Tudor,
like a good set of tires,
he has plenty of tread
left.
"My college career
is over Saturday he
explained. "But I plan
to go to California to
train for the summer to
make the cutoff stand-
ards for the Olympic
trials. If I can make
that meet we'll just
hope for the best
"I've gotten a lot
out of swimminghe
said. "It kept me busy
and out of trouble
during the trouble years
of youth. It helped me
with my attitude. It
has given me a compet- '
itive mind, showing me
things I have yet to
achieve, new goals. I
hink this will carry into
later life and help me a
lot
"I have thought be-
fore about what it
Aould be like when it's
finally over. I don't
really want to give it
up. I guess it won't
really hit me until my
swimming career is fi-
nally over
Tudor is just one of
many who will be
ending college careers
Saturday, but for the
well-travelled East Caro-
lina product, the past
has been rewarding and
the future is probably
even brighter.
STUFFY'S
GOOD STUFF
7536130
Geortfetown8hoppes
COUPON
SALAD BAR 79
OFFER GOOD THRU 3 29 79
TAKE OUT OR EAT IN
TIPPY'S
Greenville, N.C
756-6137
UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
PERSONNEL INVITES YOU
JTO THEIR
GRANP OPENING
Friday March 23, 1979
WRQR will broadcast live from Tippy's
Fri. nite from 7-9
Authentic Texas Style
Zesty Mexican food
cialties &'Tippy-Chick'
fried chicken
DINE OR TAKE OUT
t 10 oo Discount (Friday only)
New Shipment Just Arrived
I Clip this coupon for extra 20 savings on j
1 any Nike shoe through March 31. I
i
.L. H0DGES COMPArfa
JHE SPORTS STORE
Room 221
Mendenhall
Mon.
Mar. 36
8:00 p.m.
Li
8GA Candidates Answer Questions
Find oat what they'll do for ECU
5fe
A Stroh's long-neck bottle
was recently hidden on our
campus. Located on the
bottle is a certificate good
for 1 FREE KEG OF
STROH'S BEER
CLUES as to the location
of the lucky Stroh's bottle
will be given weekly in
FOUNTAINHEAD, but
be careful, after this week
the clues will be hidden
somewhere within
the newspaper.
SUDS SEARCH
The boundaries for the great
Stroh's Suds Search will
include the ENTIRE campus
of ECU.
When you find the Lucky
Stroh's bottle, take it imediately
to the FOUNTAINHEAD
office during office hours for
comfirmation of your find.
FROM ONE BEER LOVER
TO ANOTHER GRAB YOUR
FOUNTAINHEAD IN ONE
HAND AND A COOLER OF
STROH'S IN THE OTHER
AND HEAD OUT ON THE
GREAT
STROH'S SUDS SEARCH
THE FIRST CLUE I&
THE HIDDEN BOTTLE B LOCATED
EAST OF THE RAILROAD TRACK
t
rr:r0
0��tff-Vff
� -�-��
'
� 0 � 4
0
- 41 5
� -t
M vw; -d'vte fe -





"
NCAA tourney down to Final Four
H WIM I- K
'� Sports t tlitor
'fie I in a I Finn
Mi� higari Slate was
�� : al the starl id
' �esn'i mhi thai the
tif title come next

11it111 i11g to n
during the

I I
-
H

n the
Student Union
Coffeehouse Committee
presents
Chuck Ball
Laurie Loftin
along with
John Benson
Fri. & Sat
March 23 & 24
Shows at 9 & 10 p.m.
Room 1 5 Mendenhall
Admission 50 cents
hukc in North Carolina, the latter 1 which was
defeated l the (Quakers in second round action.
Hut despite the fact thai Penn is a hie
underdog, the) do meril recognition. After .ill thr
,n possess .i 25 5 record.
It Penn is to win Saturda) it must control the
�oi K ei combination It ihe Quakers ran pla
a light enough zone, the) ma) jut be in ihe
itnpionship game come Mondav night.
Who will make it to the finals on Monday?
W II, there are two matchups thai would prove
delightful. Il DePaul and Penn were to reach the
finals, the game would sel precedent, as both teams
are i inderella n ies in the lourne .
Should Indiana State am) Michigan State reach
the final garni . ,i supei matchup between possiblv
the two besl players in tin- countr vMiuld be ih��
highlight. Hud and Johnson would be aide to
showcase then greal passing and scoring brilliance
with the national championship on the line
)t course, -IiiuiM Indiana State meel IVnii nr
Michigan State meel DePaul
-till be wlth
forementioned mat hups
Realist i all) . li
should reai h lhal till
matchup would b i i � ;
would win? I hough al
Spartans get th i dg i
d 111 � � r i � 1111 if: 'ii' ��� 'fid.
X
STEVE
For SGA Treasurer
1) Steve O'Geary will work for and support an increase in the
SGA s emergency loan program.
2) Steve CTGeary will work for and support on-campus sales of
beer.
3) Steve CTGeary will insure that the students are informed of
what monies are available to meet their needs.
4) Steve CTGeary stands for sound financial management,
something SGA needs.
Paid Political advertisement)
1





Title
Fountainhead, March 22, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 22, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.552
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy