Fountainhead, March 13, 1979






Circulation 10,000
East Carolina University
North
Vol
M
55, No. 4�T
13 March 1979
Med School construction to begin soon
B ROBERT M. SWAIM
dertising Manager
Dr. William E. Laupus, dean of the School of
Medicine, said recently that the Liason Committee on
Medical Education (LCME) has given the ECU
chool ol Medicine "continued provisional approval"
tor one year, and that construction will begin on the
- medical school building at the Pitt Countv
Memorial Hospital on March 15.
Laupus said that the LCME is scheduled to do
another "sight survey" during the ll)7Q-80 academic
year to evaluate third year programs.
Recording the Laupus, full approval and
creditation will come during the fourth year of
operation.
Laupus said that this is standard procedure for
an) medical school just starting up its operations.
Laupus said that S26 million in state contracts
have Leon given out for the construction of the new
medical building.
The new building, said Laupus, will contain an
auditorium, classrooms, administrative offices, a
health sciencevlibrary, research labs and offices of all
med -chool depts offices for consultative out-prac-
clinics will he included in the new building also.
rhe building will be 9 stories tall and will contain
160,000 square feet of floor space.
Laupus s-iid this is one of the largest construction
- ever undertaken by the state of N.C.
medual school facilities are presentlv
scattered around in the north tower of the biology
building, Ragsdale Hall, and the Pitt County
Memorial Hospital.
Laupus said that the new building should be
read in 24 to 30 months. At that time the med
school will vacate the north tower of the biology
building and Ragsdale Hall.
Since the med school opened its doors to the first
class ol students two years ago the school has
developed residency in a number of areas: family
med nine; internal medicine; obstetrics-gynecology;
pediatrics; psychiatry; and surgery.
According the Laupus the med school now has
about 34 people doing residency work at Pitt
Memorial Hospital.
Laupus pointed out that those who are doing
residenc) work are not students but are people who
have already finished medical school.
Laupus said that the med school plans to occupy
part of the old Pitt County hospital building until the
new med school building is finished.
On July 1 the A wing of the old hospital will be
taken over by the various med school departments.
"This will give us an additional 22,000 square
ieet ol lab and office space said Laupus. "We
need 25-30,000 more feet of space
Laupus said that the class that enters the med
school tins iall ujl have 40 students, all are N C
residents.
This is an increase 0f 2 students over the size of
I he tir-t class that entered two years ago.
Laupus said that five new ' faculty members will
oe added.
Students study in Costa Rica
ECU NEWS BIREAl
HEREDIA, COSTA
RICA- 15 ECU stu-
have begun a
semester of study at the
Lniversidad Nacional in
Heredia, Costa Rica,
through an arrangement
between the Costa Rican
campus and ECl.
The students are
living with Costa Rican
families, most of whom
do not speak English,
and are thus "provided
with a family-oriented
introduction into Latin
culture, "while improv-
ing their fluency in the
Spanish language said
Dr. RObert Cramer,
director of the program.
A variety of Latin
A m e rican studies
courses are offered,
including tropical bio-
logy, Central American
geography, Central
american history, socio-
logy of Costa Rica's
welfare system, field
studies and Spanish
language and culture.
Some students are also
engaged in independent
research in their major
fields.
This is the sixth
ear ECU students h
ave studied at the
Universidad Nacional,
under sponsorship of
the ECU Department of
Geog'raphy.
Among the locations
visited by students in
field study tfjps are the
Atlantic and Pacific
coasts, several volcan-
oes, cloud forests and
places of historical and
cultural interst. A recent
three-day trip to Manuel
Antonio National Park
on the Pacific coast
included nature study
with tropical biologists
from the Universidad
and a visit to a large
African Palm plantation
where palm nuts are
cultivated for commercial
use.
This semester's
group of students were
officially welcomed to
the campus by Dr. Jose
Andres Masis, acting
president of the Univer-
sidad Nacional, at a
luncheon hosted by the
university administration
and Student Federation.
IS ECl STl DENTS are studying
Costa Rica this semester. The
students are shown here
luncheon held in their honor.
at a
Transit discussed at SGA meeting
Tommy Joe Payne,
SGA president, spoke to
SGA members at Mon-
day night's meeting
about the veto on the
bill for "Appropriations
to Transit System
Fund
According to Payne,
the bill is aot one of the
best efforts the SGA can
undertake. The money
for buses he explained
should come from ano-
ther source, not set
aside SGA fund. Payne
stated that he had
talked with transit bus
managers who felt the
bill was not effective.
A motion to override
the veto of the bill came
from Charlie Sherrod, a
member of the Student
Welfare Committee.
Sherrod felt the final
veto would prove to
students that SGA is not
interested in a new
transit system.
Some members
agreed with Payne and
felt the bill should have
first gone to the Appro-
priations Committee as
all bills do concerning
monetary support. They
felt the SGA should be
spending summer fees
and the bill is really
ineffective. This year's
legislature can not be
positive that next year's
legislature will be con-
sistent in putting away
money for a new bus,
stressed the members.
Other members
agreed with Sherrod and
stated that no one had
made an effort to put
money into a transit
fund. They also stressed
the fact that the buses
are now falling apart
and at least three new
ones are needed.
The motion to over-
ride the veto the bill did
not receive a two-thirds
majority vote and failed
to pass by the members.
The appropriation to
Phi Nu Alpha Sinfonia
Music Fraternity was
passed by members with
an amendment of $100.
Ill
HI III
CONSTRUCTION OF THE ECU Med S3 B�iWi�g .Ml g �ndeny Mlh ,5.
Med and Nursing Schools
Bill could cut funding
By ROBERT M. SWAIM
Advertising Manager
A bill js pending
before the U.S. Con-
gress that would cut
and curtail funds to
educational programs in
the fields of health and
medicine directly af-
fecting the ECU Schools
of Medicine and Nurs-
ing.
According to Dr. Ed
Monroe, Vice-Chancellor
for Health Affairs, the
movement to cut federal
funds for health man-
power programs is being
spearheaded by HEW
and President Carter.
Monroe said that
HEW is arguing that
there is a surplus of
doctors and nurses in
the U.S however,
Congress does not agree
and in the past has
refused to cut those
funds.
Monroe explained
that the federal funds
come in the form of
formula grants; colleges
and universities receive
a certain number of
dollars per student.
Last fall a bill was
passed in Congress to
continue the funding of
health manpower pro-
grams.
Congress then ad-
journed and Carter re-
fused to sign the bill
allowing it to die.
L nder a "continuing
resolution" funds are
Mill being provided,
however funds under
this resolution onlv last
lor one vear.
Monroe said that
several weeks ago the
Carter administration
requested Congress to
rescind the health
manpower support.
This request was
made to the house of
representatives' approp-
riation committee.
Originally funding for
nursing programs was
S30 million, Carter has
requested a total cutoff
of these funds.
A house appropri-
ations sub-committee
refused the total cutoff
uggestkm and instead
deleted $10 million.
According to Monroe
the bill will now go to
the full house and then
to the senate.
According to Monroe,
both U.S. senators and
all congressmen from
N.C. were written to by
ECU asking that they
support full funding for
the health manpower
programs.
Lath one wrote
back and clearly indi-
cated their support
said Monroe.
The total appropri-
ations request for health
manpower program- was
1263 million, the Carter
administration asked for
a 3Ut of $168 million.
The house agree.) to
cut only $62 million.
Monroe -aid that if
I he cut- are made the
�dfcel would be felt next
fall at ECU.
Vordiug to Monroe
the school- of medicine
and nursing would be
hardest hit by the cut
The ECU school ol
medicine stands to lose
about $300,000, the
school of nursing would
lose about $280,000.
This money i-
presently being used to
pay the salaries for 14
nursing fatuity mem-
bers, 20 per cent of the
total nursing faculty.
Money" from the
manpower program- is
used in the medical
school lo pay -alarie-
and purchase- equip
ment.
Whatever they see
a nvvii for they can use
this money for -aid
Monroe.
Monroe said that
unless the state comes
through with mono to
replace the lost federal
funding the nur-ing
school face- two al-
lernalive 1) , ul ,u.
- �� "I the faculty or 2)
cut the number of
-ludeni- renrolled in the
-ehot nt nursing.
Monroe -aid thai the
federal government did
"�t Uive he Mate- or
the univer-itie- ,i;il ad-
vance notice t hat tin
tut- would he made.
It tlu- matter i- not
dean �: up by the tin
I he legislature (N.C.)
fiin-he- then it will be
hard to get the money
said Monroe. "Carter
hasn't given the schools
enough time to prt.
pare
Monroe -aid that
then i- an acute short-
age ol nurses in N.C.
Ho-pital -end re-
cruiter- i Canada lo
gel Canadian nurses to
tome to work in N.C.
ho-pitalaid Monroe.
I he -ituation in N.C.
i- typical ol the situation
every w here except in
the metropolitan areas
iik' New 11rk.
ilon i know nt a
-ingle hospital in N.(i.
thai i-n't aclhelv. dc
pi rately try mg In ret nut
iiur-e -aid Mouroe.
What's inside

DVandalism breaks out in men's
dormssee p. 5.
DSGA President reviews termsee
p. 7.
DMike Williams appears tonightsee
p. 8.
DPiedmont Chamber Orchestra per-
formssee p. 8.
? Bear Bryant to speak at ECU
clinicsee p. 11.
?ECU sweeps doubleheader over U
. Connsee p. 10.
Campus police report stolen
cars
By ROBERTAIM
Advertising Manager
Francis Eddings,
chief of campus police,
told FOUNTABNHEAD
in a recent interview
that two automobiles
have been stolen from
the parking lot at
Minges coliseum since
November.
'The owners of the
vehicles contributed to
the larceny of their own
automobiles by leaving
the keys in them said
Eddings.
According to Ed-
dings, an auto belong-
ing to a student was.
stolen on Monday from
the Minges parking lot,
but was recovered . by
policed Monday night
on Chestnut St. on the
west side of Greenville.
Eddings said that no
arrests have been made
in the recent theft or in
the theft of a university
staff member's car that
was stolen last Novem-
ber.
Eddings said that in
both cases the can
were found abandoned.
In other police
matters, Eddings re-
� ported that two males,
neither of whom are
students, were appre-
hended and arrested for
breaking and entering
into automobiles parked
behind the library.
One suspect was
also charged with
carrying a concealed
weapon.
Eddings said that
both defendants are
being given a prelim-
inary hearing ' in Pitt
County District Court
and will be bound over
for trial in superior
court on the breaking
and entering charges.
It
N
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,i
Dorm Rooms
Applications for resi-
de hall rooms for
Summer School 1979
and School Year 1979-80
be obtained from
Housing Office as
as an) one of the
hall offices as
March 13.
leposits for these
vmII be accepted
Cashier's Office
ing March 19.
uired deposit for
� S hool is $89.
;50 tor private
and for Fall
160. The
m u t b e
mied b) the
priate applica-
terms
v i 11 be
in the offices
respective resi-
halls according to
�wing schedule:
ruesday. March 20:
- who desice to
the room they
tor Fall
r will be assign-
wednesday, March
luates, rising
: rising junir-
Hiursday, March 23.
- phomores will
Contest
AKD is having its
annual paper contest
with cash prizes going
to the authors of win-
ning papers! Runners up
in each division (under-
grad and grad) will
receive prizes also. AKD
urges you to submit a
paper (in the field of
sociology). Submit
papers to Bobby Little,
sociology departmental
office, 4th floor Brewster
bldg.
Pageant
The Miss Black and
Gold Pageant will be
held March 22, 1979
from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
in the Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
Bowling
You can win 8 FREE
GAMES of bowling! By
being the champion of
Mendenhall Student
Center's Mini-Bowling
Tournament, you can
walk away with it all. If
you can bowl the
highest 3-game score
any time during one
week, you will qualify
for the roll-off on
Monday, April 9. Four
bowlers will qualify for
the roll-off and one of
them could be you.
Drop by the Bowling
Center for more details
and while you're there,
gie it a try.
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 13 March 1979
Seminar
GREENSBORO-The
22nd annual Seminars
Abroad-open to all
college students-will be
offered by Guilford
College beginning May
24 and ending July 29.
Members will be
introduced to people and
the places of the great-
est artistic, cultural and
historic importance in
Paris, Madrid, Pisa, Flo-
rence, Rome, Athens,
Bern, Wengen, Munich,
Vienna, Budapest,
Leningrad, Berlin,
Copenhagen, Amsterdam
and London.
Meetings with col-
lege students are held
in several cities, and
free time is scheduled
so that members can
pursue special interests.
Group leaders are
Claude Shotts, director
of Seminars Abroad
since 1957 and coordina-
tor of off campus
studies at Guilford, and
Ruth Rothe, a German
native who has planned
and led Seminars
Abroad's summer pro-
gram for 15 years.
Either may be con-
tacted at Guilford Col-
lege for more informa-
tion.
Scholars
The League of Scho-
lars will meet Tues. at
7 P-m. in rm. 247
Mendenhall. All mem-
bers should plan to
attend or see Dr. Ebbs
to sign up for Scholar-
ship Weekend. Final
plans for our sympo-
sium will also be discus-
sed.
Billiards
There will be an
Eight-Ball Billiards
Tournament on Tuesday,
March 27, 1979, at 6:00
p.m. in the Mendenhall
Student Center Billiards
Center. All ECU stu-
dents who are interested
should register now at
the Billiards Center. No
registration forms will
be accepted after Fri-
day, March 23.
Placement
Un Wednesday,
March 14 , the Socio-
logy-Anthropology club
will sponsor a special
presentation presented
by the ECU placement
office. This special pro-
gram will deal with
resume preparation, job
interviews, etc. A movie
entitled: "The Inter-
view" will also be
shown. All are welcome
and refreshments will be
provided. The program
will be held at 7:30
p.m. in room BD-302.
Interning Meeting
All students that are
interested in working
this summer with the
State of NC Internship
Program, please come
by the Co-op Office as
soon as possible. The
deadline has been ex-
tended from the 28 Feb,
to 6 Mar
The Society for the
Advancement of
Management will meet
Wednesday, March 14i
oo, 5 pm- in r�om
221 Mendenhall. Elect
tions of new officers will
take place. All interes-
ted persons are invited
to attend.
Seminar
Everyone interested
in applying the teach-
ings of Jesus Chirst to
their daily life is inivited
to participate in an
informal, direct Bible
study each Tuesday at
8:30 p.m. in Brewster
D-308 (sponsored by
students for Christ).
Cheers
Varsity Cheerleading
Try Outs open for guys
and girls. No experience
needed! All stunts and
cheers will be taught.
Everyone come out and
see what its like. Meet
at Minges-March 20th
5:00 p.m.
GRAND OPENING
PtiiyflpPicles
ATfCETTC cOOT-WEARaMXESSORES
Phldippldes Is Greenville's Resource Center
For Cardio Vascular Fitness
10 to 50 Savings During Grand Opening
MensWomens Running and Tennis
Shoe Specials
I Shoe Saver I SHOE PATCH SPECIAL
SHOE
PATCH
S�! PAISH eXte,XJS " ,rfe oW shoes bV f'thng ,n worn soots
patching holes and restoring the thickness o heets and sotes
Reg. '3.00 now 2.00
for patching
footwear by Adidas, Nike, Puma, New Balance ,
QrLPn!mV Etonlc ' Brook�. Converse, Tiger. Hours
mreonvme 10-9:30 Dail
EAST CAROLINA STUDENT UNION
PRESENTS

STUDENTS
$4.00 (in advance)
PUBLIC
$6.00
with
Thurs
March 22,1979
8:00 p.m.
Minges Coliseum
for sale
1976 500cc Kawasaki for
sale, excellent condition
has carry-all rack and
back rest, also Hi-way
foot rests, 2 new tires
go with it - 1800. Call
758-0962 after 7 p.m if
you call earlier leave
name and no. with ans.
service.
Stereo equipment avail-
able thru College Dealer
Check prices before you
buy elsewhere. Call
Michael, Stereo Consul-
tent for Krasco, 7522601
FOR SALE: 4 F-78 15's,
GOodyear, Steel-belted
radials. Have approx.
15,000 miles on them.
Call Laura at 758-6592.
grMH Eetsona�
MALE OR FEMALE
Housemate needed -
comfortable 3 B.R.
house 1 mi. from
campus. Pets are fine.
Rent $58 plus 13 util.
Call 758-6715 or
752-2164 after 5 only.
Ask for Bob.
SUMMER JOBS 9
counselors, asst.
waterfront Director,
Music Director, Arts &
Crafts Director, and a
Dietician are needed at
Camp Leach, Episcopal
Camp near Bath, June
17-Aug. 14. Call Rev.
n
ri�.r�-rs?�'i� �-�����
Bill Hadden at 758-2030
if interested.
WANTED: Responsible
person willing to ex-
change barn work for
horseback riding
lessons. Own transpor-
tation required. Call
756-7941 between 7-9
p.m.
WANTED: Part time
help, Putt-Putt golf
course. 2 jobs available.

I in Greenville, 1
Rocky Mount. Call
758-1820 after 2 p.m.
Spring is here! Time for
that portrait you've been
thinking about. Have it
done OUTDOORS. (Ml:
758-0962, portraits by
Pete Podeszwa also
resume pictures in black
and white, weddings
and all types of group
shots.
SENIORS - resume
preparation is the kay
factor in job placement.
National Printing Co. is
offering resume prep-
aration to seniors. You
merely submit the in-
formation and we pro-
vide the resume. Photo-
graphs can be included.
Low prices. For more
information, contact
Richard Cole at Office
758-2486 Tues. &
Thurs. from 2-5 p.m. or
Home 752-1662.
LOST: Small black
puppy wearing white
flea collar. Lost on 10th
St. near College Hill
Dr. If found, please call
752-4227.
- �





CHANELO
PIZZA �P SPAGHETTI HOUSE
' 507 E. 14th St. Greenville
CALL - 758-7400
:���KQS
HAS WEEKLY BARGAINS
TUESDAY DINE IN SPECIAL
SPAGHETTI AND MEAT SAUCE
STEAMING HOT AND PILED HIGH
WITH MEAT ON A 11" PLATTER
ONLY � A PLATTER
EVERY TUESDAY , NO COUPON NECESSARY
�,�
&-�
YOU CAN'T EAT THIS
CHEAP AT HOME!
AND VALUABLE COUPONS
CUP HERE
5.95 VALUE
FREE CHANELO'S T-SHIRT
IHftKKB 5
& NAME:
P PHONE:
This note is legal tender for
a free Chanelo'sT-Shirt with purchase
of any party size pizza with one or
more toppings.
CARRY-OUT OR DINE-IN ONLY
-�COlTPON EXPIRES MARrii ia-
EXPIRES MARCH 19
2 FREE
TWO 13 OZ. COKES
.W-Nftjfl'S
NAME:
PHONE:
This note is legal tender for 3 free
12 oz. cokes with purchase of any footlong
sandwich, yonr choice of meat.
CLIP HERE
2 FREE
TWO QUARTS OF COKE
rfi i
: w-W&b s
NAME
PHONE:
This note is good for 2 free qts.
of coke with purchase of any large
or medium pizza.
COUPON EXPIRES MARCH 19-
FREE
COUPON
FREE
�ffrlNfciJS
NAME:
P PHONE:
This note isn't good for
anything. Its just free!
COUPON EXPIRES MARCH 19
.COUPON EXPIRES MARCH 19-1984.�J
-
� 4 ��-�.��
� "� i - �
(t � - X
mHi sMN��iwWi.�Wi' �U(2
'�xs





P�9 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 13 M.rch 1979
Carter's cuts unfair
DR. PtfluiPS?
There is a bill pending in
Congress which could cut funds to
health and medicine educational pro-
grams (see story, p. 1). it should
come as no surprise that this move,
which would seriously limit the
programs offered and the students
enrolled in our nursing and med
schools, is being spearheaded by
HEW Secretary Joseph Califano, never
a friend of this state, and President
Carter.
Carter's reasoning is, at best,
uninformed, since he and HEW claim
there is a surplus of doctors and
nurses in the U.S. Congress,
fortunately is more in touch with the
needs of its constituents and has
refused to cut off funds entirely,
although they have proposed reducing
the appropriation from $30 million to
$20 million. Our president and his
advisors have obviously never been to
northeastern North Carolina, Appalach-
ia, or any of a dozen other
predominantly rural areas and seen
first hand the virtually non-existant
medical facilities.
Many residents of these areas are
forced to travel several miles, often to
the next county, in order to reach a
physician or nurse. Even more urban
areas such as Raleigh and Greenville
have felt the nurse shortage. Both
Pitt County Memorial Hospital and
Rex Hospital in Raleigh have been
forced to close entire wings and limit
patient admissions because they were
understaffed.
The med school would lose about
$300,000, while the School of Nursing
would lose about $280,000. This
money (in the form of grants) is
currently paying the salaries of 14
nursing faculty members, 20 percent
of the entire nursing faculty.
ECU has contacted North Caroli-
na's representatives and all have
pledged their support for full funding
of the health manpower programs.
OHIACKV0U0W6 me ft
STAAT. CotfCMTUUlTiONS-
I �CC you fflAMftfrED TO FlMO YOUft
WAV BACK.
HuM?OMycH.

Vbu DwJ'T SOUMDTO� �NTjUiiASTiC
DiO you FiHO TMC uSM��om?
I tioPC So.
How C YOU HoLDiMft UP?
IT'S B�CH aoirc A UHiLt
Pont ftfmiNp wc. we oetn
AFRAID To roovr AAoond Too
fUoCH r TRY NOT To TilireX
AftOUT IT.
SoftVD�CSN,T HCLP
mocH,DOCS IT?
HoT fltocH.
Viewpoint
Forum
Gay leader rebuts letter
'Sinful'gays need 'compassion'
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
I would like to
respond to the conserva-
tive view and liberal
mouth of Neil Johnson
in the Feb. 27 edition
of FOUNTAINHEAD. I
was surprised that such
a "God fearing" person
as he made himself to
be has such a hard
heart and condemning
attitude.
I agree that student
funds should not be
allocated for sinful acti-
vities which not only
overs homosexual coun-
sellors I ut a score of
other things also. It is
prett) evident in the
Bible that homosexuality
is siqful. The apostle
Paul vsrote in his letter
to the Romans (chapter
1, verses 18-32) about
thi subject and others.
In speaking of man
he said, "For even
though they knew God,
the) did not honor Him
as God, or give thanks;
but they became futile
in their speculations
and their foolish heart
was darkened.
"Professing to be
wise, they became fools
. . . For they exchang-
ed the truth of God for
a lie . . . For this
reason God gave them
over to degrading pass-
ions; for their women
exchanged the natural
function for that which
is unnatural, and in the
same way also the men
abandoned the natural
function of the woman
and burned in their
desire towards one ano-
ther, men with men
committing indecent acts
and receiving in their
own persons the due
penalty of their error
of God is eternal life in
Christ Jesus our Lord
Yes, homosexuality
is sinful, but so is
gossip, lying, cheating,
stealing . . . and even
condemning. In looking
at adultery, Jesus Christ
gave a good example
Reader is
irritated at
editorials
Later, Paul speaks of
what the penalty of sin
is and also the cure of
man's sinful condition
(Romans 6:23): "For
the wages of sin is
death, but the free gift
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over SO years
EDITOR
DOUG WHITE
PRODUCTION MANAGER
STEVE BACHNER
NEWS EDITORS
RICK I GL1ARM IS
MARC BARNES
Assistant News Editors
Richy Smith
Mike R og a r s
TRENDS EDITOR
JEFF ROLLINS
Assistant Trends Editors
Barry Clayton
Bill Jonas
SPORTS EDITOR
SAM ROGERS
Assistant Sports Editor
Charlat Chandler
ADVERTISING MANAGER
ROBERT M. SWAIM
Assistant Advertising
Manager
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FOUNTAINHEAD la tha student
newspaper of East Carolina University
aponsorad by tha Modi Board of
ECU and Is distributed each Tuesday
� nd Thursday during the academic
yootr (weekly during the eMmm.r)
Editorial opinions are those of the
Editorial Board and do not necoeeari-
y reflect the opinions of the
university or the Media Board
Office or located en the second
Hoor of the Publications Center (Old
South Belldlns). Oer mslllna
addrae. la: Old South Bulldlno.
ECU, Greenville, N.C. B7S14.
.��, 0�ene numbers are:
� re 110 annually, alumni SB annually.
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Week in and week
out, I pick up a
FOUNTAINHEAD and
go straight to the hu-
mor (editorial) section,
for that week's laughs.
I did the same as usual
this week, only to find
myself quite irritated.
First off, I read of
all the gay's problems.
My education here at
ECU in classes of
sociology and pyscholo-
gy has taught me that
homosexuality is caused
from the lack of devel-
opment within the
mind.
They say that great
amounts of exposure to
violence on TV leads to
violent acts. What
about homosexuality?
If we don't stand
"P. perhaps we all
should bend over and
give it a try. It's
something that's unnat-
Iural and belongs in the
closet, next to the dirty
shoes.
The second thing
that truly amazed me
was all the controversy
over Mr. Larry Gillman.
The way I see it, he
brought a good schedule
to ECU.
I would rather lose
respectively sk to a
good team in basketball
than win humiliatingly
against any of the
second rate football
teams we played this
year, with the exception
of N.C. State or maybe
Carolina.
If ECU isn't even
going to try to run with
the big dogs, why even
try to think we can?
Dave Anderson
A heterosexual realist
for us to apply to our
own lives.
In the same way we
who believe in and
follow Jesus should
show compassion and
care for homosexuals
(and gossips and con-
demners) but not accept
their behavior.
And lastly, in refer-
ence to Luke Whis-
nant's rebuke of Mr.
Johnson, you only suc-
ceeded in lowering
yourself to the level of
the person you consider-
ed so low proving
yourself just as cruel
and hard hearted.
Angelo Candler
By MICHAEL LEE
Co-Chairperson
East Carolina Gay
Community
In the SGA meeting
of Feb. 26, I presented
an explanation of bill
LB-18-1 "Appropriations
for the East Carolina
Gay Community and I
remained to wtach and
listen with great interest
to the proceedings that
followed. I find it
difficult to believe that
Mr. Charlie Sherrod, in
his letter to FOUNT-
AINHEAD, March 1,
would atempt to legiti-
mize what happened in
that meeting.
The bill was favorab-
ly reported to the floor
by a unanimous vote of
the appropriations com-
mittee, but for the sum
of 1200, not $250. Mr.
Sherrod also knows as
well as I and anyone
else in the meeting that
at least 80 percent of
the time used in nega-
tive debate was devoted
to degrading the mor-
als, aims and purposes
of the group sponsoring
the bill and to ominous
warnings about the
consequences of subsidi-
zing those "abnormal
deviants and not to
any discussion of the
merits or lack of merit
in the bill.
One member even
proposed as a scare
tactic that the role call
vote be printed in
FOUNTAINHEAD. The
display was so embarr-
assing to some memb-
ers of the legislature
that the president of
our group and I have
received calls from them
apologizing for the ac-
tions of their colleagues.
I view, with greatest
contempt, Mr. Sherrod's
reference to the efforts
of the East Carolina
Gay Community to esta-
blish a peer counselling
group, as recruitment.
The leadership of our
organization is well a-
ware, thanks to many
painful experiences of
the past, that the mor-
als of gays are often
questioned simply be-
cause we are gay and
therefore, we have
made every effort to
conduct the activities of
the group with unquest-
ionable integrity.
Our group was start-
ed and every meeting
conducted with the aid
and constant guidance
of the Sisters of the
Immaculate Heart of
Mary, an order of the
Catholic Church.
Does Mr. Sherrod
Greenpeace
"Cut their hands off?"
Protesters chain
By JERRY ADDERTON
Staff Writer
With shouts of "Cut their hands off ringing in
the air, five vessels departed from St. Johns,
Newfoundland, March 4.
The shouts were not in reference to the seals,
but to the half dozen young men and women from
Greenpeace who had chained themselves to the
sealing vessels in an effort to stop the ships from
leaving port.
Morrissey Johnson, captain of the "Lady
Johnson who had earlier accepted the blessing of
i j CLUrch in behalf of the sealers, used a
sledgehammer to break the chain one woman had
used to attach herself to the ship, although police
were approaching with bolt cutters. Annie Linton, 25
of Boston was kicked by Newfoundlanders who
darted out of the crowd as she was carried down the
gangway. The Newfoundland police stood by.
"They would have killed us if the police hadn't
rescued us said Greenpeace representative Dr.
Patrick Moore. Dr. Moore had responded to the
blessings of the sealers by asking for a blessing of
the seals.
The protest was intense and short lived. Jeffrey
Kunz, 18, of Fort Wayne, Indiana, jumped off the
dock and attempted to chain himself to the rudder
cage of the "Lady Johnson Five Zoniac inflatable
boats tried to stop the vessels, but were seized by
the Coast Guard.
A total of 12 Greenpeacers were arrested. None
were injured. The vessels have left to begin the
annual harp seal slaughter off Newfoundland.
Greenpeace is saddened by the violent turn of
events in St. John's. However, Greenpeace continues
tirm in its resolve to seek a solution to this tragic
selves to seal ships
tt�SZ.f93�VSr both ou�
In Alesund Harbor, Norway, volunteers from the
Greenpeace vessel, "Rainbow Warrior" chained
themselves to the deck and crow's nest of "he
Norwegian sealing vessel, "Vesla Mari "
Police removed seven Greenpeacers from the
deck with boltcutters but three more in the crow's
nest refused to come down, and flew a flag at the
top saying "Save the Seals" in Norwegian
tfcJ?T P AleSUnd at 5:15 Pm- 'hat with
three Greenpeace protestors on board
They were later forced from the ship and let off
at an island 30 miles offshore. All protestors were
released from custody, but more were battered From
angry crowds who also attacked independent �e�
photographers on the scene. ews
Talks were held March 2 between r�-
official Allan Thornton and ThorwaTd" �SE?
Norwegian secretary of state, on NoiDi
involvement m the decimation of harp and horded
seals of Newfoundland and the Jan Mayen are.
(known as the western ice.) Thornton iskL T
withdrawal of Norway from the annua massacre "
in raris, a banner of protest of the hare .e.i
hum was hung from the Eiffel Tower by dSuS?
Allen and Greenpeace Paris, bringing renewed
.nternationa publicity to the slaughter.
th- � uMt th ycar8� Greenpeace has gone to
the ice to bear witness to the injustice of th?!
by non-violentlv placing ourselv u he h"nt
hunters' dubs and bX seals w! L thc
only our commitment to life"itK .bnng with us
behind .11 ill Vti �-e
hunt. Greenpe.ce wUl be on Z � TatV" '
working towards the day that snri� H�L ��.
�ight again be a time of reneZTL? ' floe�
it ahoulJ be. Save Uw �b �nd �Iebr�km as
honestly believe that the
ECU Counselling Center
would send a letter of
support for our efforts
to the SGA, signed bv
all five members of the
staff, if we were estab-
lishing a recruitment
center? aWe know,
probably better than
straights, that homosex-
ual feelings and even a
homosexual experience
does not make anyone
gay. Contrary to some
popular beliefs, nobody
has ever made anvone
else gay and we have
no intentions of trving.
Everyone who has
gone through the exper-
ience of coming out
knows the pain, fear
and incredible loneliness
it can bring and how-
desperate the need is
for someone to talk to
who will understand and
not condemn.
When we contacted
the Counselling Center
about the idea, the
professionals who staff
the center felt the idea
had merit and even
offered the use of office
space in the center, if
we could staff it with
trained people. The
Counselling Center is
cooperating with our
efforts to obtain such
training and will work
m close conjunction with
the Rev. and Mrs.
Claude Andrews, who
have demonstrated a
competence in training
peer group counsellors.
The Rev. and Mrs
Andrews have broad
experience in the estab-
lishment of this type of
service at the University
of Georgia. If the
Counselling Center is
willing to go on record
�n'their letter to the
A, supporting the
peer counselling group
as a valuable addition-
al aid" then why does
Mr. Sherrod feel that it
would be "like sending
a friend who has suicid
at tendencies to a
f-rson standing on .
Mr. Sherrod's attem-
pt to deny that the
M,A defeated bill
LB-18-1 because of the
group who sponsored it,
falls woefully short.
The SGA was aware of
all the facts mentioned
n this letter and more,
and they still chose to
ignore the obvious qual-
ity and need of the
project.
t
- -
� -����?.





13 March 19?9 FOUNTAINHtAD Page 5
Greek Forum
e
9
By RICKI GUARMIS
-Vws Editor
Well, another spring
break has slipped � away
It s funny how ten davs
of class, tests, and
lectures seem to drag on
wh.le ten days of sleep,
sun and fun seem to
quickly pass us bv.
It's over though and
now it s time to pull out
all ot the text books
nieh vse carelessly
crammed under our bed
and read those five
books which should have
been read over the
holidavv.
It will take us about
a week to recover from
the shock of once more
attending classes and
taking pages of notes.
But once we get in the
swing of things again,
mabe we can write all
those termpapers which
aren't due for another
month, or read those
nocls which will only
tested on the final
U!11.
It has been the
experience of many stu-
dents that to leave these
long term projects un-
done until the last
minute is a very unwise
decision. The reason
being that in about
three weeks, fraternities
and sororities will begin
the biggest time of the
year.
Happy hours, field
days, dances, and that
irresistable urge to for-
get present commit-
ments and play in the
sun, often get in the
way of term papers and
books.
March 31, Greek
Week will begin with Pi
Kappa Phi Field Day
and the fun will not
stop until one week later
at Moser's Farm. It
would be nice, for once,
to be able to attend all
the functions and not
have to worry about
school work. If we catch
up on our work that we
missed during break, we
may consider writing
tnat paper, even if we
will have to hand it in a
month early!
Announcements:
Six members of
Sigma Phi Epsilons
attended the regional
convention last weekend.
The convention was held
in Atlanta, Ga.
Tuesday, the Sig-Eps
will have a happy hour
at Pantana Bobs with a
raffle and reduced prices
on all beverages.
The next Grubb
Party will be this Satur-
day, March 17. The
party will start at 9
p.m. Everyone is invited
to attend.
The Alpha Xi Deltas
are having their Pink
Rose Ball Formal on
March 23. The formal
will be held at the
Bogue Banks Country
Club.
The weekend of
March 30-April 1, the
Alpha Xi Deltas will
host Epsilon Province
Convention which will
be held at the house
and at the Holiday Inn.
The Delta Zetas were
very pleased with their
Pancake Dinner. It was
a big success. They
would like to thank all
the independents and
Greeks for their support.
The Delta Zetas are
now getting reading for
Dreamgirl, which will
be held on March 23
and 24.
On Sunday, March
18, the Alpha Omicron
Pi Sorority pledges will
have their first annual
swim-a-thon for arth-
ritis. Every house will
be asked to put up a
swimmer and as many
monetary pledges as
possible.
The organization
raising the most money
will win a trophy.
The swim-a-thon will
be held at the Memorial
Gym Pool from 1 p.m.
until 3 p.m. on Sunday.
For more information
call 758-7788.
The spring formal for
the Alpha Omicron Pi's
will be March 23 at the
chapter house. It will be
in the form of a
Hawaiian Luau and the
spring pledges will be
presented.
Sigma Sigma Sigma
Sorority is proud to
annouce that they have
two new spring pledges.
The pledges were induc-
ted Monday night.
Tri Sigs are having a
Taco Dinner on Monday,
March 19. For more
information about
tickets, call 752-1349.
Tri Sigs are holding
an all day rush work
shop on April 1. This
day will be in prepara-
tion for formal rush in
the fall.
The Sigmas are
holding their spring
formal at the Greenville
Country Club on March
24. Several alumni
members will be attend-
ing and the pledges will
be presented.
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re
quired to be readily available for sale
at or below the advertised price in
each A&P Store, except as specifi-
cally noted in this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT, MARCH 17 AT A&P IN
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48,398 CASH PRIZE WINNERS
OOO00 WINNER
Recent vandalism in male dorms costly
s1000�� WINNER
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CHINA GROVE, N.C. CAROLINA BEACH, N.C. ABBEVILLE, S.C. RALEIGH, N.C.
ODDS CHART EFFECTIVE MARCH 11, 1979
By ROBEhT SWAIM
Advertising Manager
According to James
B. Mallory, dean of
men. approximately
$700 has been collected
from male dorm stu-
dents during the past
three weeks in restitu-
tion for vandalism in
the dorms.
Mallory said that
recently he has been
meeting with residence
hall directors, officers of
the MRC. and indivi-
dual house councils to
formulate plans to
combat vandalism in the
dorms.
"These people have
done a good job
publicizing the fact that
students have to pay for
vandalism said Mall-
ory. "This has been a
good campaign
Mallory said that
ninety per cent of all
dorm vandalism occurs
on weekends.
"This year we have
had an epidemic of
people breaking out and
stealing fire extinguish-
ers said Mallory.
"Windows and screens
art the main things
being damaged
Mallory attributes
much of the vandalism
to alcohol consumption
and in same cases to
students 'rom other
universities who are
visiting ECU on week-
ends.
"We get them from
all over, Carolina. State,
and Wake Forest. They
come down here and
get to raising hell on
the weekends and have
too much to drink
said Mallory. "It is a
rare mvassion that a
student vandalizes who
has not been drinking;
alcohol is the prevailing
factor in vandalism
Mallory said that
most of the time
students vandalizing are
caught by the campus
police or by the hall
advisor.
Mallory added that
more and more students
are coming forward and
reporting acts of van-
dalism and turning in
those responsible.
According to Mallory
the punishment for
vandalism on the first
offense is restitution;
second offense - restitu-
tion plus a fine levied
by the house council,
loss of campus parking
privileges, suspended
suspension and possible
removal from the dorm.
Mallory said that
removal from the dorm
is used as a last resort
because many students
who want to get out of
a dorm contract would
commit acts of vandal-
ism in order to get out
of the dorm.
Mallory said that
discipline matters have
been minimal this year
except for those cases
of vandalism and thefts.
"We've had wonder-
ful cooperation from the
MRC and the house
councils this year, they
have done a fantastic
job in combating this
problem of vandalism
said Mallory.
59,572
FOOD PRIZE
WINNERS
Number 0'Wtnn.ngOaai �Oads 13Oaa� 26
WinnersAmount-� - a�'M1Total
�-� -
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1 -
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2 IN A BAG
LIMIT 2 BAGS.
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U.S.D.A. INSPECTED FRESH 2 IN A
WHOLE-
FRYERS
LB.
French student assists in teaching
HOLLY RIDGE � CHUNK
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SWIFT'S
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4"c'annd$7
Limit one with $50 order
B CHRIS CAGLE
Staff Writer
A native of Nancy,
200 miles east of Paris,
Ben.ut Herique works as
a french assistant in the
Foreign Language
Department at ECU. He
a Senior majoring in
English and assists in
ten hours of french
class
Herique describes his
home as, "A university
town with 220,000 inha-
bitants "I enjoy assis-
ting the classes because
I can see both parallels
of civilization and also
the students' reactions
to what I say said
Herique.
He stated that it was
very hard to get this
type of job. "A lot of
students are eager to go
to the United States,
but approximately 60 or
100 students get to
go commented
Herique.
Herique explained
the applying procedure
for students who want
the job. A student must
fill out numerous appli-
cations. There are 300
applications sent
through the university
in Paris and then are
sent to the International
Institute of Education in
New York. In New York
approximately 80 appli-
cations are picked, how-
ever, stated Herique,
this depends on the
demand of the universi-
ties. The student must
sign a statement that
requires him to go
wherever there is a
place in the university.
Herique describes
GreenvUle as a quiet
place. "French people
lie quiet places. We
are used to villages in
the middle of which is
the church � ���
He went on to state that
everything �s typical in
Greenville, For exam-
ple in France you
wouldn't see pink and
green houses, or red
brick houses, except in
Europe "I don't feel
homesick at all because
1 am used to traveling
and enjoy it very much.
I began traveling at the
age of 14 as french guys
usually do all over
Europe remarked Her-
ique.
Herique commented
about the American TV
shows that can be seen
in France. "You can
usually see at least ten
good movies on TV, and
shows like Kojak,
Starsky and Hutch are
translated in French
He spends his week-
ends traveling a lot.
Herique explained that
he would like to take a
lot of pictures back
home and he uses the
time on weekends to
photograph pictures
about American life.
To attend a univer-
sity in France is very
cheap, according to
Herique. He stated that
he paid $14 for tuition
and registration for one
year. "Students usually
pay $40 a year, this fee
is for everybody french
or nonfrench. It is not
like here in the U.S.
where a different fee is
required for in-state and
out-of-state students
said Herique.
He went on to ex-
plain that in the dormi-
tories a student has a
single room. "All dorms
and individual depart-
ments are located far
away from each other
A student usually tra-
vels by mopeds. Accord-
ing to him, second hand
mopeds are easy to find
and very cheap. A
student can buy one for
$100 and he usaully has
at least one moped. In
France you are able to
travel by mopeds at the
age of. 14 and drive a
car at the age of 18.
Before one can get
his driver's license he
must take lessons.
There are usually 20
required lessons, accord-
ing to Herique. "You for getting vour
pay approximately $500 license he said.
COUPON
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" Howdy ECU Students "
Clip this coupon for
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Limit one with this coupon and ���"�111�
additional $7.50 order Good thru Sat March 24 at A&P
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The Student Union
Coffeehouse Committee
presents
Joe Collins
with
Shelly Lang
Fri. & Sat, March 16 & 17
Shows at 9 & 10 p.m.
Free snacks
Room 15, Mendenhall
Admission is 50 cents
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i -
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� -� ��





u�c " ' mMtnncMu 13 iwarcn i�9
ECU program helps students get money
By MARGARET BUNCH
ECU News Bureau
Tragedy strikes and a
young man
who lias a bright future
in almost any field that
he chooses, must inter-
rupt his education and
go to work to pay off
family debts. Will he
get the chance to be all
he is potentially capable
ol being in life?
A bright high school
senior is a member of a
large family. The
mother and father never
finished grade school
and there are several
children to feed, clothe
and send to school.
How does this senior
get the chance to be all
lit' or she has the
potential to become?
The eldest daughter
of a $27,000 a year
family has a great skill
for medicine or teach-
ing, but one of the
family members sudden-
ly becomes ill with a
long, debilitating and
expensive disease. How
does this young woman
get the chance to be
the doctor or teacher
that she is potentially
capable of being?
Help for all these
people and others like
them-the details might
vary some, but the
bottom line is the
same-is available
through financial aid,
the touchstone of many
modern Horatio Alger-
like stories.
But there are prob-
lems. Where to
go:
Who to see? How to fill
out the forms. Who is
eligible? Financial aid,
for all its benefits, can
be a financial jungle.
ECU has a program
to clear up this perplex-
ing maze through the
Financial Aid offices
headed by Robert Boud-
reaux, director, and
staffed with three other
officers; Doris Lamm,
Karen Barbee and Ken-
neth Wheeler.
At request of princi-
pals or counselors, some
of the financial aid
people will go out to
local high schools and
give workshop cr,r stu-
dents and parents, offer-
ing guidance sessions
and explaining fife com-
plexities of loans, grants
and scholarships, and
the best and easiest way
to go about getting what
you need to go to a
college, technical school
or university.
The forms necessary
for financial aid require
much information that
some families are reluc-
tant to give, such as
information about family
income as reported on
the last income tax
form, indebtedness and
other details of the
family finances. After
some assurance that all
the information on the
application is confiden-
tial, most parents are
willing to help their
children get financial
help, Boudreaux says.
The directions on the
forms sometimes need
clarification. The unini-
tiated, not used to the
terms used, find filling
out all the answers quite
difficult in terms of
understanding exactly
what information the
question is requesting.
Boudreaux explains
that at most schools of
higher learning, at least
50 percent of the enroll-
ment has some type of
financial aid. Overall,
enrollment would be one
third less if all financial
aid programs were stop-
ped.
He and the ECU
financial aid officers
point out that there are
many loans, scholarships
and grants available to
students. The basic
problem seems to be
that the students are
reluctant to apply, do
not know how to apply
or think that they are
not eligible.
The terms for eligi-
bility, according to Bou-
dreaux, are becoming
more lenient as the
definitions of minimum
income becomes a high-
er figure.
A recent change in
the federal student aid
program increases the
number of students eli-
gible for help-both in
the group that is still
dependent on family and
the group that is living
apart and independent
of family.
A student may be
eligible for a Basic
Educational Opportunity
Grant (BEOC) even l(
the family income is as
high as $25,000 or more
if the family has several
children. The old ceiling
was around $15,000.
Boudreaux and his
staff spend their time
trying to match up
students who need funds
with the money that is
available.
This winter they
have traveled to 11 high
schools, held 15 work
shops and talked to 780
students and parents.
Every one of the 780
was an individual case,
each one with special
needs and each one was
counseled on the chance
to become all that he or
she is potentially capa-
ble of being.
Spring break at bad time
B KARlWENDT
Staff Writer
The differences be-
tween the spring breaks
ol the past and those of
the present are evident
in in any ways. Perhaps
most evident is where
students spend their
i acations.
In the past, as many
ol the seniors will
remember, ECU was on
the quarter system. The
spring break normally
occurred in late April or
early May or wherever
hater happened to fall.
I sually the weather was
jut beginning to warm
up and the beach was
the most popular place
to spend the holidays.
(with the exception of
nursing majors who, I
am told, spent most of
vacation typing up
ipers.)
But at present, ECU
is on the semester
system. This means that
if the spring break were
going to fall around
Easter, then it would
come almost directly
before final exams. So
the break was moved up
to late February or early-
March. ,
Unfortunately this
meant that the weather
was less than perfect for
going to the local
beaches. Students were
left with the dilemma of
"Where can I go for
break?"
Quite a few ECU
students decided to keep
the tradition of going to
the beach, which is
exactly what they did.
But the beaches they
went to were in Florida,
not in North Carolina.
Some students had
hoped that the weather
would be cold enough to
go skiing. The physical
education department
even had a class going
to Snowshoe, W. Va.
over the break to
practice their classroom
training. Skiing was
beautiful at Snowshoe.
But it appeared that
the majority of students
were going to spend a
long peaceful holiday at
home, with the major
activities being, "Sleep,
eat and sleep some
more
Catching up on
studies did not seem
high on anyone's list of
things to do.
Many students
seemed unhappy with
where the break occurs
during the semester.
They expressed a desire
to have the break a few
weeks later in the
semester so they could
take advantage of
warmer weather.
Graduates take exam
B RICKI GLIARMIS
News Editor
The Graduate Record
Examination (GRE) and
the Law School Admis-
sions Test (LSAT) have
been scheduled at ECU
according to John S.
Childers, director of the
ECU Testing Center.
The GRE will be
offered at ECU on
Saturday, April 28,
1979.
Applications are to
be completed and
mailed to Educational
Testing Service, Box
966-R, Princeton, NJ
08540.
Late registration
deadline is March 28.
The applications for
the GRE can be
obtained from the ECU
Testing Center located
in room 105, Speight
Building.
The LSAT will be
offered at ECU
Saturday, April 21.
on
Applications are to
be completed and
mailed to the same
address which is listed
above for the GRE.
These application blanks
can also be obtained in
room 105, Speight
Building.
ARMY-NAVYSTO��
1501 S. Evans
B-15 Vxnbor, field.
deck, flight, morke jackets
Beck Pecks
SAAD S SHOE REPAIR
'113 GRANDE AVE,
at
COLLEGE VIEW
CLEANERS
RICGA.VS
SHOE REPAIR
AND
LEATHER SHOP
Nw leather pocketbooks
belts, and belt buckles.
Shoes repaired to look
like new.
Ill W. 4th St.
Downtown Greenville
SPAGHETTI
Shoney't Real
Italian
ghctti with iu-
P�rb, tasty,
meat sauce,
Parmesan
Cheese, Hot
Grecian
Sherlock's
Restaurant
On 5th St. across from
the Book Barn.
Good Food
& w
Good People
Vegetarian diets
respected.
MonSat. 1 la.m. -9p.m.
SHONEYS
Located b�sM
the Ramada Min,
264 By-past,
SAUI
$2&9
Freshman admissions coming in
By ROBERT M. SWAIM
Advertising Manager
Freshman admissions
applications are "run-
ning about the same as
last year according to
Dr. John Home, dean of
admissions.
"And last year we
had the highest number
of applications we've
had in years added
Home.
So far this year the
admissions office has
.accepted about 3,500
freshmen, 5400 appli-
cations have been re-
ceived.
Of those accepted,
1340 were in-state men,
176 out-of-state men,
1,829 in-state women,
and 374 out-of-state
women.
The average SAT
score for incoming
freshmen is 875, ac-
cording to Home.
Home estimates that
about 55 per cent of
those accepted will
actually come in the
Fail.
Home said that
approximately 50 per
cent of those enter as
freshmen will drop out
or transfer before their
class graduates.
Home said that
despite nationally de-
clining enrollments ECU �
has leveled off and '
remained steady with no
decrease.
th.
'We've been
admissions
luckv,
office
ii r
TRAFFIC FICFF
50 OFF
SALE
Ladies and Mens Sweaters
now as low as $10.00
reg. up to $32.00
HIS Cords $12.50 were $25.00
WRANGLER Cords $7.50
were $15.00
HIS, MALE, FRENCH AND
SEDGEFTFJ D Jeans now as
low as $8.00 were up to $28.00
Ladies Light Weight Wool Slacks
$16.50 were $33.00
Flannel Shirts $7.50 were $21.0(
Satin Slacks $12.50 were $25.00
All scarves , jewelry, vests, shawls
50 off
Plus 10 to 25 off on certain
new Spring Merchandise
Sale good
Wed. 3-14 through Sat. 3-17
1MX)-9rf)0p.m.
limited supply so hurry
THE
I 4IIH HCIHF
Pitt Pl�zi
has done a good job of
promoting ECU to the
public said Home.
Home said that his
recruiters work primarily
the two Carolinas and
Virginia.
In S.C. ECU re-
cruiters visit Greenville,
Columbia, and
Charleston; in VA. they
work the tidewater area
of Norfolk and VA.
Beach, Richmond, and
northern VA and the
Washington, D.C. area.
Home said that the
admissions office is
beginning to send re-
cruiters to the north.
Home said they are
now recruiting in parts
of N.J. and New York.
ror the first time
we went to a high
school college fair in
Long Island, N.Y
said Home. "We're
going to another college
fair in Boston
"I'd be surprised if
we get two students out
of that trip to Long
Island, but what we're
doing is making contacts
for 1980 said Home.
Dorms will be filled
by June, according to
Home.
"TIm'v would have
been filled earlier if it
hadn't been for the
computer changeover
said Home.
Home noted that
admissions standards
have changed some over
the last two years.
The class of 1980
that entered as fre-h
men in the fall ! '76
had to have a projected
rade point average ol
1.6; the class ol 1982
that entered as fresh-
men in the fall ol '78
had to have a projected
grade point average ol
1.8.
Home estimates that
one third of the entering
freshmen class will come
Irorn five C counties:
Wake, Guillord. Forsyth,
Cumberland, and Meck-
lenburg.
These counties
include the major met-
ropolitan areas ol N.C
Raleigh, Greensboro.
w insion-Salem, High
Point, Fayetteviiie, and
Charlotte.
Student Supply Store
now has
Rexall BRAND VITAMINS
�&�' ONE TABLET DAILY
Family Vitamins
Here's an ideal multivitamin supple-
ment tor the whole family! Vitamins
are essential for the health, growth
and survival of all living things. If
you're not sure you're eating food
with the correct balance of nutri-
ents, you owe it to yourself to take
REXALL ONE TABLET DAILY Family
Vitamin supplements.
100TabletsREG. 2.30
PLUS IRON 100's. . REG. $2.55
YOUR CHOICE "J 99
LOSE WEIGHT!
The non-habit
forming way fth
jpexa
PERMATHENE-
12
WITHOUT
CRASH DIETS
Of
TORTUROUS
EXERCISE'
$9 99 REG
�� 4.00
�Rexaf High Potency
STRESS
FORMULA
VITAMINS
This supplement is specially
formulated for "today's woman
pressure and stressful situations can rob your bodv of
important vitamins. REXALL STRESS FORMULA VITA-
MINS work fast to replace water soluble B Complex
Vitamins as well as Vitamin C and E. So when a hectic
day starts to get you down�remember to reach for
REXALL HIGH POTENCY STRESS FORMULA VITAMINS
60 TabletsREG. M.05
PLUS IRON 60V REG. M.55
YOUR CHOICE
TPexa
VITAMIN C
I 250 mg 250's s �
5? REG.�3.25 2.
500 mg 250's $
REG. �5.55
399
CHEVVABLE 250 mg - fto
250's REG. �2.15 J
CtMEGA)"
00SE.
1000 mg 100's
Texal! TREOFER
IRON TABS
325 mg.
Ferrous Sulfate.lOO's
REG.
�1.85 t
DICALCIUM
PHOSPHATE
with Calcium Gluconate &
Vitamin D
100Capills 4 19
REG.�1.45 '
m VITAMIN
P E 200 I.U 250's MUM)
- L.REG. 7.15 lp
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
tm m Store Hours
Fri- fr3O-5:0Qi
t
� im� , �
��





id ivtarcn ia� ruUNfAlNncAU rage
Steering Committee meets
Kn RICKI guakhos
News hditor
Steering Com-
the Put
5 un Monitor-
g Program met Wed-
21. The
� '��'� members
the Court
Program's
1 Ml' it cm cut of
i headed up
responsible
nitor's training,
volunteers,
Pitt Count)
Monitoring Pr
Sram is a program
which through a team
�t trained observers,
will monitor the Pitt
County courts over a
designated period of
time. The Monitoring
will take place in order
to recognize and docu-
ment possible inade-
quacies, recommend
remedies to the prob-
lems, and to promote
improved understanding
01 the system of justice
by the general public.
The program's state-
ment ol purpose which
ro-
was reached
at
th
recent meeting is "To
promote swift, sure, and
fair disposition of justice
ter every defendant by
working with the judi-
ciary and the public
toward improving the
court system.
The Court Monitor-
ing Program will main-
tain a speakers Bureau,
according to Wendy
Gronert, publicity chair-
person for the program.
Gronert states that any-
one wishing to contact a
speaker with CMP
should call Mary Coch-
ran at 756-3863, or Rov
Schaal at 758-4895.
Gronert also said
that anyone wishing to
be a volunteer with the
program or anyone de-
siring more information
about CMP should con-
tact Carroll Webber,
coordinator of volun-
teers, at 758-4906.
The next meeting of
the court Monitoring
Program will be held at
7:30 p.m Tuesday,
March 27, at the First
Presbyterian Church on
14th and Elm Streets.
All interested members
of the public are invited
to attend.
Payne reflects on term
By MIKE ROGERS
distant News Editor
rn Joe Payne, SGA president, recently
his term which is reaching a close.
ave learned a bunch about dealing with
I've learned about the Board of Trustees
ancil. I've really enjoyed it
the Board of Trustees has taught
nt: different channels. For example,
meious with their decisions like the
I �� said Payne.
mtact with a lot of people in
good, some bad. But by attending
mncil meetings, I've learned things I
hae learned otherwise said Payne.
- as chairman of the Media
� isked if he ever had problems with his
loyalty to one or the other, he
when I'm in the Media Board, I don't
SGA; the opposite is true
hat the Media Board takes up more
'We had to try and get a broadcasting license
WEC1 ide what to do about the Buc, and
grip on the money
explained the Board's difficulty concerning
illy had two choices; either print the
the money. However, the Board was
awkward position when we were asked
the money back into the
lecision wa alreadv made tor
some of his regrets about the
inizations feel that if we tund them
should fund them every year. The
expected to fund everything. For
recent ga bill issue. 11 that bill
had come across my desk, I would have vetoed it.
Not because it had to do with homosexuals, but
because all to the SGA's money comes from the
students, and it's not their responsibility to fund
counseling said Payne.
Payne added, "I'm not surprised at what some
people in SGA will do. Some enjoy playing politics.
The only difference between us and the city council
is the amount of money involved and the feedback
from the public. Some members of the SGA treat it
a an end rather than a means
Payne went on to say that, "there are some
problems with the school. For instance, if you are
ticketed three times for being in a incorrect parking
place, the police can tow you anytime they want,
even if your car is in a legitimate parking space
Payne added, "The transit and security systems
need refinement
"However, my main regret is that if we fund an
organization once, they expect it every year. Drama
and marching band get credit; we shouldn't give
money to them. Each case should be dealt with
separately. There should be exceptions, but the
exceptions should not be precedents said Payne.
Payne, "Alot of SGA members take the attitude
that all of this year's money should be spent this
year, but I feel that it should be spent responsibly
Pavne also commented on student attitude.
"Many people complain about the things that the
SGA does, but they never come to the meetings and
speak, they probably won't even vote next term.
They really should come to the meetings if they're
dissatisfied said Payne.
Payne concluded, "Sometimes this job is a really
hair-raising experience, and other times, it feels like
a token position-really needless, but the experience
one gains is really worth it
Blake out of hospital
BKK1 M SWAIM
rhertising Manager
� Blake,
chan-
ge -
I inty
H -
. I rwenl
pancrea-
: the
15 after
itreme dis-
- stricken
i virus that in-
, tn reas and
hi is entire
major problem
a- a gastric illness that
i ompletely paral) zed my
stomach and abdomen
said Blake.
According to Blake
he ha not had a
physical in five year
this a.� only the second
time he has ever been
hospitalized.
Blake was hospital-
ized for 10 days.
Blake said that his
absence from the uni-
er-it did not cause
an major problems or
the need to reassign his
usual duties
"We have a fine
team here in Dr.
Brewer's administration,
a fine inter-office team
and secretarial stall
said Blake.
'If
anv
us are
laid up, the team picks
up the slack and ol
course we are able to
communicate by tele-
phone
Wed. PINNACLE
"SSFnderswitch
Afternoon Delight
co-sponsored
by TKE
Sat. PEGASUS
Sim. EAZE
(dlivviiil rnrc 4 i u . i-i he stepping off into nowhere, but is only a few feet
GRKKNMLLh (,IhS A muted, ehost-like appearance , JV-i � l- u � j
r � . r.�i � from hi.I s high-rise dormitories,
to familiar surroundings. Ihis K(.l student seems to
If someone cares for your children
while you work, you may have a
tax credit of up to $800 coming
to you. Check your tax
instructions for details.
internal Revenue Service
fflcialECUClassRlng
20
On sale are our men's
traditional Siladium� rings and
selected women's 10-karat
gold rings. These rings are custom-
made individually for you. They are an
exceptional buy at the price of $59.95. You get your
choice of many custom features. Come see them today.
Large Selection of Gold Rings Available
March 14, 15, 4 16. Student Supply Stor.kobby RT(7IRyLD
Deposit require Ask about Oaster Charge or Visa. 'Savings vary slightly from style to styW. COLLEGE F0NGS
3 days only!
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
Wright Building
� .
- -





r
rat:
Page 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 13 March 1979
5
Piedmont Chamber
Orchestra appears
On March 15. 1979,
�it 8 p.m. the Piedmont
Chamber Orchestra will
present a lively and
diversified program con-
ducted by Nicholas
Harsai The perfor-
mance will be held in
the Hendrix Theatre in
Mendenhall Student
Center an) is sponsored
the Student Union
rn- � S ries Commit-
ert will utter
vari tlette of
and -tie
� � for
orchestra,
tra, ami
The
am will be the "La
Seta Overture"
by Ha "Svmphony
H flat
k Mozart;
�n and Alie-
Orches-
E gar; "Con-
E flat Major,
Horns and
5 xlet Op.
Beethoven; and
Suite, Op.
ak
Fr - Bergstone,
principal
assistant,
the
Beethoven
Mr. Bergstone
kground
i y e r. He
rincipal horn
" sas City
performed
with the New tork
Philharmonic, the Pitts-
burg Symphony, the
New York Opera, and
has been soloist with
the Cabrillo Music
Festival. Mr. -he,
since graduation from
the North Carolina
School of the Arts, has
been principal horn of
the Birmingham and
Santa Rosa Symphonies,
has performed with the
San Francisco Symphony
and Opera, and was a
member of the
Piedmont Brass Quintet.
Nicholas Harsanyi,
the dynamic conductor
ol the orchestra, has
made distinguished con-
tributions to American
musical life as conductor
of the Princeton Cham-
ber Orchestra, conductor
ol the Bach Aria Croup,
Director of the Inter-
lochen Arts Academy
Orchestra, and Dean of
the school of Music of
the North Carolina
School of the Arts.
Harsanyi has continually
added to his reputation
as a conductor with
appearances ,� (u
ork, Canada, through-
out Europe and the
Eastern Seaboard. He
has also made extensive
recordings for Decca and
Vox
The entire 22 mem-
ber orchestra is one ol
rare spirit. It counts in
its number a former
concertmaster from the
Orchestra de la Sutsse
Romande, a winner of
the prestigious Naum-
burg Competition, prin-
cipal players from major
symphonies, and the
nationally known Clarion
Wind Quintet. The
Piedmont Chamber Or-
chestra is a professional
affiliate of the North
Carolina School of the
Arts in Winston-Salem,
NC. The orchestra was
established in 1968 by
the Rockefeller Founda-
tion and the Foundation
tor the School of the
Arts. It received national
recognition after its
performance at the
inauguration of Kennedy
Center. At a time when
the beauty and flexibility
of the small orchestra
are recognized and in
great demand, the
Piedmont Chamber Or-
chestra is being ac-
claimed as one of
America's finest ensem-
bles.
Tickets are now on
sale in the Central
Ticket Office in Men-
denahll Student Center.
Tickis are S2 tor ECU
students and $5 for the
public. All tickets at the
door are $5. For further
information contact the
Central Ticket Office at
757-661S. ext. 266.
k
Nicolas Harsanyi conducts the Piedmont Chamber Orch
estra
The Outlaws and The
Molly Hatchet Band will
perform here at Menges
Minges Coliseum on
the campus of East
Carolina University will
be the site of a major
concert featuring Arista
recording artists The
Outlaws. Special guest
appearing on the concert
will be Molly
Hatchet. The
concert, which is under
the sponsorship, of the
ECU Student Union
Major Attractions Com-
mittee, is scheduled for
March 22 at 8 p.m.
grew
Forida,
The Outlaws
up in Tampa,
and carved out a
reputation as a burning
live band, playing the
usual rounds of bars
and clubs. Up from this
grass root circuit the
band went on to
develop near legendary
local stars. Their
musical mentors were
fellow Floridians Lynard
Skynard who gave them
their first lug break.
In 1974 the band
signed with Arista
Records and released
their first alburn.
"Outlaws The album
was released to coincide
with a concert by the
band before 100,000
people in Central Park.
From this auspicious
beginning, the band has
been constantly on the
run. They toured with
The Who in Euorope,
opened for The Rolling
ton�. and played tor
audiences all uer the
country.
Ticket- for the
concert are priced at $4
for F.C.I students and
$6 tor the public.
Tickets may be pur-
chased from the ECU
Central Ticket Office. In
addtion, public tick. -
may be purchased from
Apple Rerords. School
Kids Records, ami The
Music Shop.
Guitarist Mike Williams appears
tonight at 8 p.m. in concert
The Outlaws
The Student Union
Special Attractions Co-
mmittee will present
another free concert
tonight in the Hendrix
Theatre, Mendenhall
Student Center. Fea-
tured for the 8 p.m.
show will be Mike
Williams.
Mike Williams is an
entertainer's entertainer.
He is one of the
strongest solo perform-
ers in the country
today. He has toured
with 25 nationally known
acts and appeared at
numerous colleges and
clubs.
Primarily known for
his mastery of the 12
string guitar and his
story-telling ability,
Mike has been favorably
compared to such artists
as Leo Kotke and Mike
Cross. In fact, he ha
written several songs
recorded by Cross and
other artists including
John Derner. His muu.
has a country flavor and
Iks have a tendeno to
sing along or shout vMth
Ne X illiams. p. 9
Fingers is a 'strangely un-put-downable9 novel about Viet-Nam
By WILLIAM JONES
Assistant Trends Editor
The Five Fingers, by
Gayle Rivers and James
Hudson, is a "one of a
kind" book.
First impressions
might easily cause this
novel to be mistaken for
a glorified, double-issue
version of Sgt. Fury and
his Howling Comman-
dos. It is packed with
more violence, death,
blood and guts, than,
possibly, any other book
in print. Yet, one reads
this bellicose adventure
with the gruesome,
everpresent knowledge
that such horrific events
actually took place. The
story is true, but as the
novel's cover puts it, it
is "a story that can only
be told as fiction
The Five Fingers is
about guerrilla warfare,
specifically, that of the
Vietnam theatre, 1969.
It recounts a top-secret
assassination mission
launched by Allied
Forces in South Viet-
nam. The cover oper-
ation's objective is to
infiltrate southern China
via Laos and North
Vietnam, then 'hit' 11
Chinese and North
Vietnamese military
leaders.
Code named The
Five Fingers Exercise,
the seven men who
make up the furtive
mission are crack
special forces operatives
from five countries.
Each man is a
specialist, the best of
his kind in at least one
facet of military opera-
tions.
Gayle Rivers, who
co-authored the book, is
from New Zealand. He
was the youngest team-
member, but second in
command. Rivers is as
close to being fighting
machine as you can get.
His instinct for survival
in second to none.
Other members of
the force include Maj.
Toliver, American Green
Beret, commanding offi-
cer; Lt. Tan, a Korean
Ranger and communica-
tion specialist; Master
Sgt. Jackson, U.S.Green
Beret, a demolitions
expert; Cpl. Barry
Wiley, an ustrailian
explosives wizard and
all-around superb sol-
dier; Pfc. Morrosco, a
Green Beret medic; and
finally, Regimental Ser-
gent Major Prather, a
British "observer
Gayle Rivers (a
pseudomny) and James
Hudson effect The Five
Fingers with an en-
grossingly piquant style
of writing. Their subject
matter is the most basic
and animalistic of
human drives pure,
untoward survival in the
most uncivilized of
settings, leech-infested
jungle and swamp. Their
technique is necessarily
graphic and point-blank
(how could one 'cheer-
fully' describe the
explosion of blood and
bits of bone resulting
from one man's blowing
another man to half by
shotgun?). And it deals
most effectively with the
circumstances of the
novel.
Rivers and Hudson
carry the reader along
on this clandestine
adventure, viewing the
action first-hand through
the eyes of Gayle
Rivers. The reader
quickly becomes a
member of the mission,
reacting instinctively,
killing as a .matter of
course, planning each
encounter with calcu-
lating cold-bloodedness.
Always with the single
purpose in mind of
survival to achieve
mission completion.
Until eventually ma-
king it to Ta Shu Tang.
China, site for the
mission's execution.
And then revenge
becomes the single
purpose in mind. Rev-
enge alone drives you
back toward yOUr
superiors against incal-
culable odds and un-
bearable hardship.
Five Finger8
The Five Fingers is a
ftrangely un-put-downa-
t book. The authors
aw the reader inl0
intimate proximity of the
ry with such Sk1 ,ha
,hl T hard-put to ieave
h's comrads' alone ln
battle.
While a work of
"J-Kl'gible importance,
FeT"8'
rest,r -�e
concerning th ,�
1 . � ine inner-
h7:hk'ngs or ��.
for rS' h"nd deling
Ior what a ;� 1
Forces - Special
'?s suicide"
search-and-destrov miss.
,on must be like
for those who can
mach the reafism i"
8,ves a raw taste of
erillasurvival of
� ����-� m. m
;� , . �
: : :





IP HgrtMJI IJJ i .tfLa-LfcLLLI-L-LgJ ' "VP �
Young Artists Competition winners
to perform in recital in April
Carol Wolfe, Sheila
� rooks, Jim Poteat and
Ben Leaptrott, winners
of the YOung Artists
Competition at the East
Carolina University
School of Music, will be
presented in recital in
April.
All juniors, seniors
or graduate students
were eligible to enter
the competition spon-
sored by the Student
Forum of the ECU
music school. Judges for
the competition were
faculty members of the
music school.
Carol Wolfe of
Orlando, Fla is a
graduate student in
piano under Henry Dos-
key. She was declared
the overall winner for
her performance of the
second and third move-
ments of Mozart's
"Sonata in B flat
Major" and "Jeux D'
Eau" by Ravel.
A Glen Alpine, N.C.
native, Jim Poteat, who
studies oboe with David
Hawkins, was winner of
the instrumental divi-
sion. He performed the
first movement of "Con-
certo in C Major" by
Haydn and "Romance"
by Schumann.
Mezzo-soprano Sheila
Brooks of Wilmington,
N.C, winner in the
vocal category, is a
graduate student study-
ing with Gladys White.
Ms. Brooks selections
lor the competition were
"Immer leiser wird mein
Schlummer" by Brahms
and
Va! laisse couler
mes larmes" from
WERTHER bj Masse-
net.
Pianist Ben Leaptrott
ol Statesville, N.C. a
junior studying with
Paul Tardif, won the
keyboard competition
with "Intermezzo" b
Brahma and "Capriccio"
bv Dohnanvi.
IKr WHI.IWIS IS an entertainers entertainer.
i- one ol the strongest solo performers in the
tod.iv. He bas toured with 25 nationally
Esther Rolle brings
tie-worn an show
to campus March 19
known acts and appeared at numerous colleges and
Hubs. Williams is primarily known for his mastery
of the 12 string guitar and his story-telling ability
-ion
R
tyal
r
M .
in
E V
ader
� ima n
tty, not
Senior
show
on display
a comedienne are
known to television
audiences throughout
the nation. and the
women she portrays
were able to laugh at
themselves and others.
M- Rolle was
trained in New York and
has performed on stages
and ofi Broadway. At
present she is dividing
her t line bet w een
: vision and lour
performances of her
rent presentation, in
which she plays two
men oi contrasting
natures one white.
e black; one educated,
one illiterate; one
middle class and one a
treed slave but both
lividuals of strength
mrage.
Public tickets for the
Esther Rolle perform-
ano are Si each and
are available at the
EC! Central Tickel
Office in Mendenhall
Student Center.
Iff it's sick to love a pen,
then the world's going crazy.
People are fanatics when it comes to their Pilot Razor Point pens.
They're reluctant to give them up And when someone borrows one,
what happens is inevitable
First, they love the way it writes Really smooth and extra-fine. They
go wild over its clever metal collar that helps keep the point from going
squish Naturally they "forget" to give it back, although it's only 79tf.
This can be very embarrassing when they're caught in the act.
Others have pocketed Pilot's Fineiiner pen. The one with the slightly
less delicate stroke. It's only 69c.
So if you bor row someone's Razor
Point o' Finelinei pen
you'd berte'
be prepared
to pay the
consequent-
But. for much e t!
dollar.you d besr-
to buy your cv.
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itchell s Hair Styling
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WILLIAMS
continued from p. 8
Mike on several ot the
i horuses
Mike ha- two
albums to his credit,
'The Radio Show and
"Free Man, Happy
Man Both albums
tot.prd b a mane of
red hair, with a
looming fuss-baritone
voice and a big 12
-tring guitar, he fills the
stage all by himself. His
Mono- and songs flow
out naturally and easily,
and Mike has the
uncanny ability to keep
his audience in stitches.
For an evening of
enjoyment you will not
want to miss Mike
w illiam-
Pizza Ixixi
AMERICAS FAVORITE PIZZA

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-� r .�
. '
mm"





M
1
? -
� �V
Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 13 March 1979
3mSSikh
i " ��
ECU sweeps doubleheader over UConn
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Assistant Sports Editor
The East Carolina baseball team swept a
doubleheader from Connecticut yesterday afternoon
to run their season record to 4-4.
Parker Davis hurled a two-hit shutout in the
opener as the Pirate offense exploded in the third
inning for four runs and five hits en route to a 5-0
w in.
Bobb) Patterson and Earle Mobley combined for
et another Pirate shutout in the second game,
while the Pirate offense struck for all their runs in
the first three innings in the 6-0 win.
Pirate head coach Monte Little noted after the
second game that the sweep was just what his club
needed to get on track. "This should get our
fellows believing in themselves again he said.
"To have a good year he continued, "we'll
need to have a couple of winning streaks of nine or
10 in a row. I hope this is the start of a string
here.
Davis, a junior from Williamston, held the
Huskies without a hit for five innings. An infield
hit to open the sixth broke up his bid for a
no-hitter.
The third inning Pirate explosion in the first
game began with a single by outfielder Billy Best.
Butchdavis followed with another single as Best
moved to third. Davis stold second just before
Macon Moye slashed a two-run double to right
field.
Moye then scored on single down the left field
line by Raymie Styons. Bob Neffs two-out single
scored Styons to complete Pirate scoring in the
inning the Huskies would probably like to forget.
Max Raynor had two RBI and scored once to
lead the Pirate attack in the second game.
Pirate pitchers Patterson and Mobley held the
Huskies to only five hits, three of which came in
the sixth inning when the game was virtually sewn
up.
Pirate pitching in the doubleheader drew raves
from Little. "Our pitching was just great he
said. "But it has been all year. We have four or
five guys who we feel can do the job. I guess our
earned run average is below one now
The sweep followed a 4-0 victory over the same
Connecticut team on Sunday. Pirate pitcher Mickey
Bntt allowed only four hits in that game.
The win Sunday over the Huskies broke a four
game losing streak for the Pirates, the last three of
which were one run decisions.
Two of those one run losses came at the hands
of ACC and national power Clemson. The Pirates
dropped the two games by 2-1 and 1-0 scores.
"We just couldn't get the hits when we needed
them at Clemson said Little. "But our pitching
and defense was great. Besides, losing two games
that close at Clemson is nothing to be ashamed of.
Ihose losses won't hurt us at all
Little did not seem concerned that his club had
but two home runs after its first eight games.
The power will he said. "We should start
hitting much better as the weather breaks. We
have plenty of big guys who can hit the long ball
Little said he was optimistic about Pirate chances
this season.
ECU baseball coach Monte Little
A COACHES GRAVEYARD
The East Carolina basketball program
Former ECU coach Larry Gillman
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
"A coaches graveyard
That's the way former Marshall coach Frank
Ellwood described the Thundering Herd's football
program last fall when he was fired after four
seasons with one year still remaining on his
contract.
And the East Carolina basketball program- is
quickly developing a similar reputation.
Larry Gillman became the third Pirate basketball
coach to leave East Carolina in six years, when he
submitted his resignation to ECU Athletic Director
Bill Cain two weeks ago.
In a statement released by the athletic
department, Gillman cited "the university failure to
extend him a long term contract to continue the
development of the program" as the reason for his
resignation.
The former San Francisco assistant's resignation
came as no surprise. East Carolina alumni and local
supporters screamed for Gillman's job after just one
season when he finished with a poor 9-17 record
even though he boasted the Pirates would win as
many as 17 or 18 games and appear in a
post-season tournament.
Although the Pirates won 12 games and lost 15
this year, many observers still felt Gillman would be
released at the end of the year because of the
endless amount of bad publicity the university has
received along with the alleged NCAA recruiting
Dye announces
football signees
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
Doug Smith, the most valuable player in the
1978 Shrine Bowl game, heads a list of 27 high
school players who have signed grants-in-aid with
East Carolina for the coming season.
The group, which includes six members of North
Carolina's '78 Shrine Bowl team, is dominated by
North Carolina natives with 18 players in all.
"I'm very proud of this recruiting class and I
think we had a good year by our standards East
Carolina head coach Pat Dye said. "We signed a
lot of kids in areas where we lack depth right now
md they should help us in the near future
"Pm really excited about our interior linemen
and several others who should help us out in the
secondary Dye continued. "It's hard to tell right
now who will be able to help out immediately until
the fall pre-season drills. But it's been a good
recruiting year so far on paper
Smith, a 6-5, 255-pounder from Bayboro, was
named all-conference and all-state and was recruited
by all the major football powers this year.
"Individually, Doug Smith has to rank as one of
East Carolina's top signees ever, along with Mike
Brewington who will be a- senior and an
All-American candidate next fall and Carlester
Crumpler, the school's top all-time rusher. He
should be a great one before he leaves East
Carolina
Maury Banks of Thomasville, Lloyd Black of
Sanford, Mark Ervin of Morgantown, Gary Gambrell
of Goldsboro, and Mike Meads of Elizabeth City
were all Shrine Bowl linemen who will join the
Pirates in the fall. Meads, one of the most highly
sought after linemen two years ago played iri the
1977 Shrine Bowl game and transferred from Duke.
He had already enrolled in school and will be
eligible as a sophomore for the 1980 season.
Tony Elliott of Tabor City, a 2,000-yard rusher,
is the only running back who played in the Shrine
Bowl that signed with East Carolina this year.
Jess Eberdt of Rocky Mount, is the only other
East Carolina signee who did not come directly from
the high school ranks. Eberdt was a walk-on last
fall, but did not see any action. He will be a
freshman for the 1979 season.
Head coach Pat Dye
The 27 East Carolina signees hail from only
three states. Eighteen are from North Carolina, five
are from Virginia and three are from Georgia where
Dye played his collegiate ball.
"We lost several top prospects to North
Larohna, N.C. State and other schools in North
Carolina, but overall we had a pretty good year
Dye said. "I'm very encouraged about our upcoming
season and the players are really looking forward to
East Carolina finished last season with an
impressive 9-3 overall record including a 35-13
victory over Southland Conference champion
Louisi-
ana Tech in the Independence Bowl in Shreveport,
La. Dye's five year record at East Carolina now
stands at 41-14.
The Pirates top defensive performers who
finished their career last fall were: Gerald Hall
Zack Valentine, Vance Tingler, Oliver Felton
Tommy Summer, and Fred Chavis. The top
offensive players lost were: Terry Gallaher, Steve
Greer, Mitchell Smith, Nelson Smith, Sam Harrell
and Eddie Hicks.
Although the 1979 East Carolina football
schedule hasn't been announced yet, the Pirates are
expected to open Sept. 1 against Western Carolina
which will be followed by road games against
Atlantic Coast Conference teams N.C. State, Duke
and Wake Forest.
The 1979 East Carolina signees: Backs - Moe
Bennett, 5-11, 205, Lexington; Melvin Brown, 5-10,
180 augusta, Ga Jesse Eberdt, 6-0, 165, Rocky
Mount; Tony EHiott, 6-1, 175, Tabor City; Reggie
5-10, 175, Franklin, Va Michael McNeil, 6-0, 190,
Launnburg; Carlton Nelson, 6-1, 170, Portsmouth,
Va ; Greg Stewart 5-11 175, Middlebrook, Va
Wilhe Swmson, 5-11 215 Kinston; Randy Turner,
o-l, 190, Augusta, Ga Norwood Vann, 5-11, 185,
See FOOTBALL, p. 11
violations.
�n2e despite Gran's resignation, which will
undoutedly set the program back another three or
u0nUsrolveydearS' nUmer0US P"Mems still remained
rnJrh�' T!e t0tal basketba11 bget, which includes
coaches salaries, equipment, along with recruiting
and travel expenses, totals only $140,000 per Vear
with just $13,000 set aside for recruiting
According to the latest figures in a story
released by the Atlanta Constituional, Atlantic Coast
Lonierence schools spend a minimum of $225,000 a
ycir.
Item. Over the last five years, East Carolina has
nad just one winning record. During the last 13
seasons, only six teams have finished with winnin
records and three of those teams were just one
game above the .500 mark.
Item. More than a dozen players have quit, left
school or transferred during the last five years at
Last Carolina.
One glimpse at just a few of those statistics
would make any potential player or coach cringe
and certainly think twice before coming to East
Carolina.
However, several area collegiate coaches, who
asked not to be identified, insist a winning program
can be developed at East Carolina. And the coaches
interviewed also agreed money is certainly the key
factor.
"Money is the major problem at East Carolina,
but the universtiy simply has to sit down and
decide whether they want a first class program or
just do enough to get by one coach said. "If they
want a competitive program which can compete with
the top schools in the country, they're going to
have to decide what they exactly want. Right now
the football program is really making progress, but
basketball is also expected to make monev and
basketball is certainly the most popular ' sport
through most of North Carolina
"Whoever the university names as the new head
coach will be the one instrumental in building a
solid foundation underneath the program another
coach said. "Everyone loves Pat Dve down there
and the basketball coach needs the same tvpe of
support Dye's received. The coach will need that
type of image which will be popular among the
alumni players and the fans.
"It was pretty obvious after Gillman's first vear
that none of the players or manv of the alumni
were getting along very well 'with him " he
continued "Larry Gillman's image just didn't 'fit the
Carohna program and thing just never worked
out. Who knows? If he had been able to get the
support of the alumni and the community he could
have built a winner there
The proper image, money, alumni and
community support - they're all vital factor in
building a competitive program at East Carolina or
any school. (
And until the university and
decide to build a quality basketball
Carolina will continue its reputation as "a cc
graveyard
its supporters
program. East
Search begins for new
ECU basketball coach
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
The East Carolina athletic department announced
last week that a selection committee has been
formed to begin screening applicants for the
basketball coaching vacancy. The committee will
advise the chancellor and the athletic director in the
selection of a new coach.
The vacancy was created two weeks ago when
Pirate coach Larry Gillman resigned under pressure
after two years at East Carolina. Gillman, a
30-year-old native of Mount Vernon, N.Y compiled
a 12-15 record this season and had a two- vear
record of 21-32. 7
Although the search for a new coach has been
underway for just over a week now, several reports
indicated at least three candidates have been
interviewed for the job although no names were
mentioned. Athletic department officials said
Monday afternoon that no deadline has been
established for the naming of a new coach although
it is believed one may be named as early as next
week.
Terry Kunze, as assistant under Gillman this
season and a former assistant coach at Minnesota
Appalachian State's Bobby Cremins and Wake
Forest assistant David Odum head the list of
candidates for the job.
Kunze has already received favorable reports
from the players and right now is considered the
leading candidate for the vacancy, according to
several reports.
Cremins a star player under Frank McGuire at
South Carolina, has enjoyed winning seasons for the
last three years at Appalachian State. The
Mountaineers defeated Furman this season for the
Southern Conference Championship but lost in the
first round of the NCAA playoffs last weekend to
Southeastern Conference member Louisiana Tech
Odum was the head coach at Durham Senior
High School before he joined the Wake Forest
coaching staff. He was largely responsible for the
Deacons big recruiting season last year when Wake
Former ECU
Assistant Coach
Billy Lee
irddMike,VHSe,mRs0ger' " J�' uy Morga
JlrsE Sr d1 pattrnm- tr? rch
withdrew his name from cons dera.fnn I' Car�hna'
head coach at Pembroke State nn U?' n�W the
finished his first year x PembrJfcT'
co-coach of the vear in ih? r tnd Was voted
along with PfeifU: Tom ��
h in the
"I just finished one year hereTp ZT M�nday
re-lly happy with L station wj
entire starting lineup coming back 1" T �Ur
top recruits and I just can't �� J g, W,th some
program after they've re.uV .u?� . ,eVin? the
the past year. The East Carolina oK me durin�
but just csn't leave at tCtfme' " ' ���d one.
Lee, who served primarily
coordinator for one year under P S , defensive
to a third place finish in thi C �v' led Pe�broke
The Braves LshedThe "e. 0 w
mark and 13-14 overall. a 66 inference
F�?XhCT imeS Which are bei�g linked with .u
East Carolina post are Maryland assf.n, h Jhe
E�. CMv Md JoC H�"ing7on? � and V
East Carolina assistant coacl Butch Estr!?
coach Jack Jensen and former Wet Jf"
coach Fred ConnaUy Western Carolia,
f
i
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f
- . �
- � ���rn�m�.i� I
p3PP�'





Bryant to speak at ECU clinic
spring
football
clinic
Legendary Alabama football coach Paul "Bear"
Bryant will be the featured speaker at East
Carolina's annual spring football clinic to be held
Mar. 16-18 on the campus.
Bryant, who has led the Crimson Tide to five
Rational championships and bowl games each of the
past 20 years, will address the group on Sunday,
while members of the East Carolina staff and several
outstanding high school coaches will hold sessions
the first two days.
The clinic, scheduled to coincide with the opening
of spring practice for the 1978 Independence Bowl
champions, will offer on-the-field instruction as well as
lectures.
It is open to all high school and junior high
school head coaches and their staffs. The registration
fee of $15 per person includes a Friday night social
hour and pizza party, and a Saturday night barbecue.
"I couldn't be happier that Coach Bryant has
accepted our invitation to come to East Carolina for
this clinic said Pirate coach Pat Dye who has
completed five seasons himself with a fine 41-15
record. "Coach Bryant has meant so much to the
game of college football through the years
Bryant, with a career record of 284-77-16, has
averaged 8.4 wins per season for 34 years. Only two
college coaches have won more games, Pop Warner
at 313, and Amos Alonzo Stagg at 314. In
comparison, Stagg averaged 5.5 wins per season for
57 years.
"We have the most successful college coach
ioday at this clinic and our staff will be available
the whole weekend as well Dye continued. "But
one of the important things about this clinic is that
high school coaches will be able to learn from other
successful high school coaches as well. It is 48
hours of intense football
"Any young coach,
anything necessary to
once in his lifetime. I'm
head or assistant, should do
hear Coach Bryant at least
glad we are able to bring
him to Greenville for this clinic
Two Alabama assistants, Mel Moore and Bill
Oliver, will join Brvant for the clinic.
Moore, the
quarterback
Tide's offensive coordinator, was a
on the 1961 national championship team
at Alabama and has served there since 1965, which
was also a national title season.
Oliver is a 1962 Bama graduate and works with
the defensive backfield. He joined the current Tid
staff in 1971. He lettered three times and
starter on the 1961 national champions.
blems
in NCAA Indoor meet
By DAVID MAREADY
Staff Writer
After qualifying for the nationals in the one mile
relay at the Last Chance Invitational in Murfreesbo-
ro, Tenn. earlier this month, ECU track coach Bill
Carson, and his four sprinters were confident of a
high finish in last Friday and Saturday's NCAA
National competition in Detroit, Mich.
However, disaster struck Saturday when ECU
sprinter Terry Perry collided with a University of
Indiana runner and fell down.
The mile relay team qualified for the event on
the 280 yard indoor track at Murfreesboro when
they ran a blazing 3:12 flat, seventh best in the
U.S. at the time. Their semi-final qualifying time
in the nationals placed them at fifth best in the
country.
Despite the hard luck suffered by the relay
team, Carson was proud of the superior effort put
forth by his sprinters leading to Saturday's mishap.
"They gave it their best shot" commented
Carson, "I'm very proud of them. All we had to
do in the mile relay was finish the race and all four
of our guys would have received All-America status.
Calvin ran a good first leg in the race. In fact,
his 49.1 leadoff was the fastest in the field. We
had a good chance at fourth in the event and
possibly third. As for Terry's collision with the
Indiana runner, I think it was just a trick of fate -
something you try your best to avoid, especially in
the national competition
Perry described his view of the events leading
up to the accident, "We made a good handoff with
the baton noted Perry, "and I was running fairly
well. I had a lot of momentum going into the turn.
I could see the Indiana guy out of the corner of
my eye as I began to move around him. While I
was making my cut towards the inside, he was
running
moving outside from the inside lane something
which most sprinters don't do. The last thing I
remember was when he hit. It was the only
collision I've ever had since I've been
track
According to Carson, who has attended the
NCAA's for the past 12 years, the track officials
called the accident the worst one of its kind in the
last 15 years of competition. Perry was knocked
unconscious after hitting the ground and sustained
several cuts and abrasions, including a sprained
arm.
Indiana's runner wasn't as lucky. He suffered
one sprained and one broken leg as well as seven
cuts and bruises over his back and arms.
In addition to qualifying the relay team, ECU's
freshman jumping sensation, Russell Parker also
qualified in the high jumping event. In the quarter
mile event, the Pirates had two sprinters competing
including Calvin Alston and Otis Melvin. Alston
failed to qualify for the finals. However, Melvin
did qualify with a 3:18.77, fifth best out of a field
of 16.
While running in the finals, he was disqualified
after he stepped on the line. Bill Miller reached
the semi-finals and recorded a very fast time of
4:09 in the mile run, yet he too failed to make the
final selections.
Parker reached Saturday's finals out of a field oi
27 when he jumped seven feet Friday, March 8;
nevertheless, according to Parker, he could not
"psych myself out enough" to clear the mark after
reaching Saturday's finals.
However, he did finish a remarkable eighth in
the U.S. in the indoor high jump. Parker reflected
his feelings about his performance at the
prestigious event, "I guess you could say I just
didn't have it together. I didn't get a chance to
practice until the day of the competition, but it was
a great experience just being there.
Softball season begins next week
e
was a
East Carolina's sec-
ond softball team will
open its season March
20 with a doubleheader
at Pembroke State.
The Pirate women
will play a schedule this
spring which lists 24
games plus three tourn-
aments.
On March 23, North
Carolina A and T opens
an abbreviated home
Players selected
for all-star game
schedule which also fea-
tures visits by St.
Augustine's on March
29, North Carolina on
April 4, Campbell on
April 9, and N.C. State
on April 10, each for
two games. All home
games start at 3 p.
The
ule:
March 20 at
Pembroke State (2); 23
complete sched-
tt KHINGTON (AP)
Twenty of the nation's
o 11 e g ia t e women
players have been
named to the 1979
All-America Basketball
ClaK to be held in
Greensboro on March
31, the Association for
Intercollegiate Athletics
Women announced
lay.
The all-star game,
matching East and West
-tt tor 8 p.m. in the
Grccnhoro Coliseum.
Named to the East
team were: Genia
Beasley, sophomore cen-
ter, N.C. State; Cindy
Brogdon, senior for-
vsard, Tennessee; Pam
Chambers, junior for-
ward, Tennessee Tech;
Carol Chason, senior
forward, Valdosta State;
Kris Kirchner, sopho-
more center, Maryland;
Trudi La try, sophomore
forward, N.C. Sate;
Nancy Lieberman, junior
forward, Old Dominion;
Inge Nissen, junior cen-
ter, Old Dominion; Hol-
ly Warlick, junior
guard, Tennessee, and
Annie Laurie Withering-
ton, sophomore center,
Stephen F. Austin
State; Denise Curry,
sophomore center,
UCLA; Sharon Farrah,
senior guard, Missouri;
Julie Gross, junior cen-
ter, Louisiana State;
Brenda Martin, senior
forward, California State
-Fullerton; Anita Ortega,
senior guard, UCLA, Jill
Rankin, junior center,
Wayland Baptist; Linda
Waggoner, junior for-
ward, Texas-Austin; Ro-
sie Walker, junior cen-
ter, Stephen F. Austin
State, and Lynette Woo-
dard, sophomore for-
ward, Kansas.
Beasley, Brogdon,
Lieberman, Nissen,
Women's tennis schedule
East Carolina's wo-
men's tennis team will
pla s� dual matches
prior to the state tourn-
ament this spring accor-
ding to the schedule
just released.
Coach Barbara
Olschner's team will
open its slate on March
16 against High Point,
playing its only home
contest.
The state AIAW
tournament will be
played at Wake Forest
on April 19-21.
The complete sched-
ule: March 16 - High
Point; 23 - at N.C.
State; 24 at Appala-
chian State; 28 Har-
vard at Duke; 29 at
High Point; April 12
at Old Dominion; 19-21
NCAIAW Tournament in
Winston-Salem.
Warlick, Witherington,
Curry, Gross, Ortega,
Rankin, and Woodard
are repear performers
from last year's Classic
teams.
Nissen will be una-
ble to play for the East
in the all-star affair
because of an earlier
commitment to compete
in Sweden that week-
end. Her place will be
taken by Katrina Ander-
son, senior center from
South Carolina-Colum-
bia.
The East team will
be coached by Chris
Weller, head coach at
Maryland assisted by
Sylvia Rhyne, head
coach at Maryland,
assisted by Sylvia
Rhyne, head coach at
Francis Marion College
in Florence, S.C.
The West team will
be coached by Jody
Conradt, head coach at
Texas-Austin, assisted
by Sonja Hogg, head
coach at Louisiana Tech.
The Classic is spon-
sored jointly by the
AIAW and Hanes Hos-
iery Co.
SPECIAL ON
STROH'S BEER
SIX PACKS �12 OZ CANS
12 PACKS-12 OZ CANS $3.78
24 pack Strohcase $7.51
Available at all Harris Supermarkets.
Check our prices on domestic and
imported wines and beers.
Large selection
of cheese and party supplies.
SUPER MARKETS, INC.
"Where Shopping Is A Pleasure"
located in Greenville on
10th St and Greene St.
Drive,

FOOTBALL
continued from p. It
Magnolia; Linemen - Maury Banks, 6-2, 250,
Thomasville; Rick Barnes, 5-11, 245, Newnan, Ga
James Barron, 6-2, 230, Wilson; Lloyd Black, 6-3,
195, Sanford; Robert Boyette, 6-0, 215, Morehead
City; Kenneth Brown, 5-11, 230, Tarboro; Mark
Ervin, 6-2, 230, Morganton; Gary Gambrell, 6-2,
220, Goldsboro; Mike Meads, 6-4, 240, Elisabeth
City; David Niemeyer, 6-3, 220, Raleigh; Anthony
Robbins, 6-2, 220, Windsor; John Robertson, 6-5,
220, Eden; Will Saunders, 6-2, 190, Franklin, Va
TVnig Smith, 6-5, 255, Bayboro.
ATTENTION
STUDENTS
You may be eligible for a two-year Air Force ROTC scholarship. The scholarship includes full
tuition, lab expenses, incidental fees, a reimbursement for textbooks, and $100 a month tax free.
How do you qualify? You must have at least two years of graduate or undergraduate work remain-
ing, and be willing to serve your nation at least four years as an Air Force officer. Scholarships are
available to students who can qualify for pilot, navigator, or missile training, and to those who are
majoring in selected technical and nontechnical academic disciplines, in certain scientific areas, in
undergraduate nursing, or selected premedical degree areas. Non-scholarship students enrolled in
the Air Force ROTC two-year program also receive the $100 monthly tax-free allowance just like the
scholarship students. Find out today about a two-year Air Force ROTC scholarship and about the
Air Force way of life. Your Air Force ROTC counselor has the details.
ROTC
Gateway to o great way of!
CONTACT:
Allen T. Tinkham, Captain, USAF
Recruiting Officer
Wright Annex 757-6597
- North Carolina A and
T (2); 24 - at UNC
Greensboro (UNC-Green-
sboro, North Carolina,
Appalachian State); 27
at N.C. State (2); 29
St. Augustine's (2);
31 at UNC-Greensbo-
ro (UNC-Greensboro,
Western Carolina. Appa-
lachian State).
April 4 North
Carolina (2); 6-7- at
N.C. State Invitational;
9 � Campbell (2); 10
N.C. State (2); 18 - at
UNC-Wilmington (2);
frimys
1890
Seafood
Special Features
Sunday-Couples Night: 2 delicious
seafood platters of Shrimp, Oysters, Fish,
Cole Slaw, French Fries and our Famous Hush
Puppies.
Only $7.99 for 2
Monday-Shrimp-A-Roo: a delicious
entre of Calabash Style Shrimp with French
Fries, Cole Slaw and Hush Puppies.
All For Only $3.50
Tuesday-Fish Fry:ah the Fried Rshi
(Trout or Perch) you can eat with French Fries
Slaw, and Hush Puppies. No takOOUt
Only $2.75
Wednesday-Fried Oysters:Goiden
Brown Fried Oysters with French Fries, Colel
Slaw and Hush Puppies.
Only $3.75
Thursday-Family Night: Great
Specials on Shrimp, Oysters Trout Or Perch,
No Takeout
Shrimp$5.50
Trout Or Perch$2.75
Oysters $4.95
Flounder$4.50
"All You Can Eat"
Hours: Open 4:30 P.M. To 9 P.M.
Sunday-Thursday
4:30 P.M10 P.M.
Friday and Saturday
fi I
Located On Evana Street

�p





' "�
t
�-�
, I ��
. � t "� 1 I
Our Once-a-year
V
Northern Connection Sale
o o
?l

&

o
A
9"
vvV
o o
000
�c

I
$�? of Dollars in
stereo components at
ridiculously low prices
Below are just a few examples:
r
�ee
.� rrr cr �

SANYO
DCX 3300 (4 chaneli)$156.00
PIONEER SX 535$147.00
SHERWOOD S 7050$98.00
SHERWOOD S 8900A$194.00
SANSUI 771$182.00
TOSHIBA SA 620(Demo)
$249.95
TOSHIBA SA 775(New) 75 watts $375.00
per chaneli
SONY STR 7800(New) 75 watto$399.oo
per chaneli w�
SONY STR 1800(Demo)
JVC 5525
$131.50
$131.00
BSR 710X
BSR 350 SX(new)
BSR 400(new)
BSR 200S(new)
$59.95
$80.44
�$85.89
$61.94
SCIENTIFIC
ACOUTIC (12" 2 way).
PIONEER CS 05
CRAIG 9431
BOSE 601
(Demo-1 pair only)
BOSE 301
� $96.44 pr.
$99.95 pr.
� $39.95 pr.
$510.00pr.
301 $198.00pr.
(New but scratched I pair only)
CRAIG H260
(8 track recorder � playback)
SONY TC 353D�
(reel to reel)
TEAC A420
(cassette)
TEAC A 4300 Creel to reel)
ACCESORIES
DISC WASHERS
SOUND GUARD
�$77.00
� $169.95
$199.95
$399.95
$9.50
$9.95
COMPACTS
TOSHIBA AmFm8TTurnatable-
With speakers $139.95
PANASONIC AmFm8t4 chaneli
wlth speakers$149.95
HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH
On the Mall - Downtown Greenville
7523651
t
��-�� .





Title
Fountainhead, March 13, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 13, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.549
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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