Fountainhead, February 20, 1979






Circulation 10,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
Vol.
55 No. -98
20 February 1979
Trustees plan to renovate three dorms
i
Bv MARC BARNES
News Editor
Plans to renovate Jar vis, Cotton and Fleming
Dorms, and reaction to a tentative 24 per cent
ise out o state tuition costs, highlighted last
iv's Board of Trustees meeting.
Chancellor Thomas Brewer told the board that
ceiling fell at Jarvis Dorm recently, and he
commented that the seventj year old structure
be renovated before September. Brewer
outlined a plan for renovating Fleming and Cotton
r the next two years.
The Chancellor was opposed to a tentative 24
per cent increase in out of state tuition. "The
public education is to keep tuition as low
le1 Brewer commented. He added that
students who come to ECU from out of
find both the area and the state to their
and decide to make North Carolina their
Brewer said that the Mate should encourage out
people, so they could become productive
North Carolina.
wer also stated that housing and parking fees
soon for the corning academic year,
� that a Raleigh firm has been engaged to make
a st ! the traffic patterns and parking around
to make recommendations to the
The meeting opened with approval of the
ard chairman Troy Pate expressed
to member John Minges for
Citizen oi the Year Award by the
hamber of Commerce.
; ressed his appreciation to former
K. Edward Creene. Greene, an
' ECl and a past Student Government
ss resident, resigned his position because
named a District Judge. State
ibit a trustee tor a constituent
holding another position with the
��ed its sympathy to Dr. Marie
Dr. John Howell, Vice Chancellor for Academic
Affairs said that just over 6,000 students are
projected to apply for admission for next year.
He went on to say that of these 6,000, 4600 will
be admitted and 2480 will actually enroll. Howell
stated that 1280 freshmen will carrv over from this
year. A total, then, of 3760 freshmen is expected,
according to Howell.
Dr. John D. Bridgers stated that one of the
biggest problems facing North Carolina was the
development of language. "Many of our children go
?i �
to school with no proficiency in spoken language
he commended. "I would like to see ECU set up an
institute lor language development in children
Bridgers said that no other campus in the UNC
system had taken a look at this problem, 'it's
difficult to teach a child to read when he has only
a 200-300 word spoken vocabulary He added,
"ou, have to have a way to let oft tension. A
tremendous part of discipline problems, take place
because students must act out their problems,
instead of talking about them
Dr. Edwin Monroe, Vice Chancellor for Health
Affairs reported that a planned PhD program in
about
Administra-
manpuvst-r
)hn Davis, who died Januarv
r of mathematics.
the attention of the Board to a
� ail signees, and he encouraged the
gft in touch with the prospective
:ncc rage m I ne : i ECU.
changes were made in the Bylaws of the
Tru- ���� -
THE ECl BOARD of Trustees met Saturday and
made plans to renovate Jarvis. Cotton, and Felming
Dormitories. A resolution was also passed to rut
student fees b $8.50. Photo by Chap Gurley.
Contracts awarded for Med School
B RI M GLL4RMIS
ew Editor
i tor con-
struction of the $26
medical educa-
. ility for ECU
of Medicine,
have been awarded,
rding to Dr. Wil-
liam E. Laupus.
Laupus, dean ol the
school, said
that the contract nego-
tiations were awarded
is the result of efforts
b university and state
administration officials
� duce the amount of
ruction costs to fit
available funds.
Laupus said that the
ol administra-
was very pleased to
such fine support
from the university and
state in order to have
the contracts awarded.
w rv.
James J. Lo
director of maintenance
and operations at ECl
said that a letter of
intent has been sent to
the contractors but it
will be approximately
three to four weeks
re the awarding of
the contracts will be
completed.
Lowry further ex-
plained the paperwork
that is involved in the
contracts has to be sent
to the State's Propert)
and Construction office.
Then the work ha to
be approved bv the
Attorney General's
ottice.
Laupus said that the
contracts will be signed
sometime in the near
tuture. Laupus also said
that the building of the
complex should get
under wav in March.
The ground breaking is
expected to take place
irl March with the
work beginning soon
atter. Completion of the
building should come in
about 30 months.
"V e're elated and
excited by the prospect
that building will get
under way in March
said Laupus. "Most
people thought we
couldn't do it
The construction of
the medical facility is
expected to be comple-
ted in 1981. Laupus
expressed hopes that
the building will be
ready to accomodate
students in the late
summer of early fall of
1981.
The Medical Science
Building will be located
on a 40-acre tract adja-
cent to Pitt County
Memorial
building
school's
Hospital. The
will house the
departments,
classrooms, laboratories,
and all support facili-
ties.
Included in the nine-
floor building will be
administrative offices
and a library which will
be located in a two-
story wing at the front
of the building. An
auditorium will occupy a
one-story wing to the
left of the medical
building.
The utility plant and
animal research facility-
are under construction
at the health campus
site.
Bids for the 451,000
square foot medical
building were received
in December and were
higher than funds bud-
geted for the project.
Laupus said that efforts
by the university and
-tate administration offi-
cials to negotiate with
the contractor- were
concluded last week
when agreement was
reached.
The contracts hae
been awarded to D.R.
Allen and Sons of
Fayetteville, general
contractor; Poole and
Kent Corp. of l ashing-
ton, D.C plumbing;
W.H. Sullivan Co. of
Greensboro, heating,
ventilation and air con-
ditioning; Richards and
Associates of Carrollton,
Ga electrical contract;
High Point Sprinkler
Co lire protection con-
tract; and West brook
U.S. Elevator Corp. of
Danville, Va.
Laupus said that he
is very pleased with the
project and
the medical
a big step
universitv.

said that
milding is
f
or
tht
medical services had passed another hurdle with the
I NC Board of Governor Monroe also -aid that a
master's program in social work has been included
in a new, revised five year plan for the UNC
-v-tern.
Monroe said that bid- lor the construction of the
new Medical School building had been let out. He
stated that base bids were $4 million over budf
and that plan- had been cut back to bring it into
line. He added that contract- would soon be
aw arded.
Construction is -lated to begin in
month
Monroe also stated that the Carter
tion might cut all funding for Health
"It a serious problem for our nur-ing scho he
said. "22 percent of our instructor- in the basic
courses are supported by these fui Monr �
urged tru-tee- contact their Congressmen to opi
this plan.
He also reported on the progress of the C
Planning and Placement office, stating that thev
added one person to their -taff. and they plan l
hold seminars soon in career plann;ng and
searching -kill
He also -aid that the Alumni Fun had ra
over $88,000. a- compared to $24,CX0 luring the
same time last year.
Gift Moire. Vice Chancellor of Busine Affa
stated that the university is making preparations
finish the snack bar in Wright Annex, and pave a
parking lot nearby. Moore commented that the
snack bar would cost $125,000 to complete, and the
parking lot would cost $230,000.
Bill Cain, Athletic Director -tated that Title IX
compliance would come up soon, and he -tated that
the university wouldn't know tor -ure how mu
money it would have to spend until after April 1.
We want to have a program here for both n
and women that we can be proud of Cain said.
The trustee- passed a resolution to red
student activity fee by $8.50 and transfer
amount lo the athletic fund. This does not in
any increase in the amount of fees thai
w ill hav e to pa .
. cording to ECU Chancellor Dr. Thoi
Brewer, student activit) fees have been us I
lasl several years to pa oti the debt on the W
Annex.
Brewer said now that the bond is being retired
on that debt the money can be used for an'
purpose.
Brewer explained that the total activity fee has
not been rai-ed or lowered, but that the $8.50
portion that was previous!) used to pa lebl
on Wright Annex is going to athleti - sfy title
nine obligation
Brewer -aid that the universitv has alreadv
"paired" eight womens1 and men sports, including
all -port- except football.
What's inside
Panhellenic Banquet heldsee p
Georgia
Pirates lose
82-68see p.
to
Tech,
Lady Pirates split games
Bruce Lee's (lame of Death
5
see p
.see p.
KKI (III! sn.
A FIRE AT COASTAL
Chemical Co. on Tar
Road just south of the
Greenville city limits
was reported today at
about 4 a.m. The fire
caused the evacuation of
several Greenville and
Winterville subdivisions.
The fire was still eating
away at the building at
noon today. Firemen
from about 13 fire
departments in the
county were called in to
assist in the extinguish-
ing of the blaze.
Photos by John H.
Gorganl.
CORRECTION
IIS THE FEB. 15 issue
of FOUNTAENHEAD, a
picture of Mike Cross
appeared stating that he
would appear in Hen-
drix Theatre on Feb. 25
at 8 p.m. Mike Cross
will not appear on Feb.
25. Instead he will
appear in Hendrix on
Feb. 26.
t





Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 20 February 1979
Pageant
Alpha Phi Alpha
wants ung beautiful
iirls for its Miss Black
and Gold Pageant,
coming up in March.
All young women
interested in participa-
ting should contact
Michael Harrison, Plat
Crafts
Minmons
or
Anth
onv
Richmond.
, Tickets are now on
sale tor The Alpha's
Black and Gold Ball
March 21. 1979. Contact
an Alpha member.
Rho Epsilon
Anyone interested in
real estate or who plans
lo bu a home one dav
might find it wise to
attend Rho Epsilon
meetings. Rho Epsilon
- the Professional Real
Estate fraternity on
i ampus.
Meetings include
loeai and state speakers,
plus discussion, in the
fields associated with
real estate and involves
man) valuable and use-
ful aspects and areas of
information of the
industry.
The next Rho Epsi-
lon meeting will be
Wed Feb. 21, at 4
p.m in 221 Menden-
hall.
Workshops in Pot-
tery, Floor Loom Weav-
ing, Woodworking, Lea-
ther Craft, Enameled
Mirrors, Printmaking,
Kite Making, and Con-
temporary Basketry are
now available at the
Crafts Center at Men-
denhall Student Center.
All full-time stu-
dents, student spouses,
and staff and faculty
Mendenhall Student
Center members are
eligible to join the
Crafts Center. A semes-
ter membership costs
S10. and includes work-
shops, tool check-out,
use of library materials,
and aid of experienced
supervisors. Personal
supplies and supplies
furnished by the Crafts
Center must be pur-
chased by the partici-
pant.
Crafts Center mem-
berships are available
during regular operating
hours, 3 p.m. until 10
p.m Monday through
Friday, and 10 a.m.
until 3 p.m Saturday.
The last day to
register for these work-
shops is Sat March 3.
Persons must register at
the Crafts Center and
class space is limited.
No refunds will be
made after the work-
shop registration dead-
I i n e.
Earned
Income
Under
$8000?
If you did, you may be
eligible for an earned income
credit of up to $400. Call the
IRS toll-free number for
details.
Internal Revenue Service
Photography by
JOHN H. GROGAN
STERLING SILVER
monogram filigree
jewelry: rings, pins,
pendants, earrings &
tietacks for him or her;
one or three interlocking
initials. $10-70. Fast
service. Call Pam
756-6 100 after 9 p.m.
weekdays, all day
Sunda
FOR SALE: Combination
turntable-receiver, GRC
Stereo, good condition,
'ills $75 or best offer,
iml a Davis 'Lady Elite'
liimis Racket, very
g�od condition, $30.
Call: 756-8994, ask for
Dina. tall after 5 p.m.
� �i keep trying.
FOR SALE: 1976
Mu-l.tng , I iv 4
-peed -M FM digital
i �" k. siher with Idue
'��nor. $2600.
i2 i��5.
Chess
Classifieds
forrer4f)
Need Responsible,
settled female lo share
- B.R. apt. at River
Bluff Apts. Call Jan,
Has - 752-2531, nights,
752-1167.
WANTED: Female
roommates needed to
share 2 B.R. apt.
The ECU Chess Club
is open to anyone who
is interested in playing
chess. Meetings are
held every Monday at 7
p.m. in the Coffee-
house, room 15, Men-
denhall.
Study
If your room is too
noisy or you dread the
long walk to the library
don't despair.
There is a study
area available on the
hill for any students
who wish to take advan-
tage of it. The study
area is located in the
MRC meeting room in
the basement of Scott.
The study area is open
Sunday through Thurs-
day nights from 8 until
midnight.
Prayer
There will be an all
campus prayer breakfast
Sat Feb. 24, at
Shoney's on Greenville
Boulevard.
Wayne West is the
speaker and there will
be singing.
For rides or informa-
tion, contact David at
756-9608 or Mark at
752-0270 or Wanda at
758-8665.
Art
ACS
Bible
The public is invited
to the weekly Bible
study sponsored by Stu-
dents for Christ.
The emphasis is
exploring God's word as
a personal guide for
life. The club meets
Tuesday at 8:30 p.m. in
Brewster D-308.
The ACS will meet
on Wed Feb. 21, in
room 202 Flanagan at
7:45 p.m.
Owen Kingsbury will
demonstrate and speak
on glassblowing.
Journalists
The Society for Col-
legiate Journalists will
meet Tues Feb. 20, at
6:30 p.m. at Parker's B
ar-B-Que.
All members must
attend. ECU Journalism
Instructor John Warren
will present a slide
program. Dues must be
paid at this meeting.
February is Peace
Corps Month and in
conjunction with this the
Peace Corps office at
ECU has a display of
African art, jewelry, and
masks in the glass
cases in Joyner Library.
The public is invited
to come by and see
some original African
art. Over 6,000 Peace
Corps volunteers are
serving in over 60
countries the world over
helping people meet
their basic needs.
I.N.D.T.
The I.N.D.T. Club
will sponsor a tune-up
Clinic on Feb. 27, 28 &
March 1. The cost is
$10, plas parts.
A Sunn Engine
Analyzer will be used to
check your car. For
further details and
appointments, call David
Barbe at 758-6605.
ECGC
Corso
The next meeting of
Corso will be Thurs
Feb. 22, at 4 p.m. in
Belk 101-A.
Corso is an organiza-
tion open to anyone
interested in social work
or correctional services.
This is the first meeting
since elections.
Bowling
Every Sunday from 7
p.m. until 10 p.m. at
the Bowling Center in
Mendenhall, when you
make a strike with the
red pin as head pin,
you'll win a free game.
On Tues Feb. 20,
the East Carolina Gay
Community will hold a
workshop for anyone
willing to work in the
peer counseling office
the Gay Community is
setting up through the
ECU Counseling depart-
ment.
Anyone interested in
working in, and staffing
this office is asked to
come to the meeting.
The workshop will be
held at 608 E. Ninth St.
at 5 p.m.
Circle K
Circle K meets every
Tuesday from 6:30-7:30
p.m. in Rawl 130. The
public is invited to
attend.
Lecture
On Wed Feb. 21,
in BD-302 at 7:30 p.m
the Sociology-Anthro-
pology club will sponsor
a lecture presentation
entitled: "Can a Socio-
logist Go Home Again?:
Notes on an Ethnic
Study
The lecture will be
by sociologist Gladys
Howell of the Sociology-
Anthropology depart-
ment of East Carolina.
Refreshments will be
provided. All interested
people are welcome and
encouraged to attend.
Plans for the club's
field trip to Washing-
ton, D.C. will also be
discussed at this meet-
ing.
cso
If you have or will
declare a major in a
health related field
(including medicine,
premedicine, predenti-
try, nursing, or allied
health and social prole-
sions), you may quality
for free tutoring Irom
the Center for Student
Opportunities.
For information
about tutoring, health
careers counseling, t-
anxiety assistance, l
sons in focusing or
speedreading, and other
free professional ser-
vices, stop bv CSO.
Ragsdale 208, ' or call
757-6122 or 6075.
Careers
Furney James, direc-
tor of the ECU Career
Planning and Placement
Center, will speak on
job outlooks at 7:30
p.m. Tues Feb. 20, in
the basement of Scott
dormitory.
Other topics include
interviews, resumes,
and services offered by
the center.
Games
All persons intere-
ted in playing Backgam-
mon are invited to m-
each Monday at 7 p.m.
in the table games area
of Mendenhall Student
Center. Bring your set
and join in the competi-
tion.
Ping pong
The ECU Table Ten-
nis Club meets ever)
Tuesday at 7 p.m. in
the Table Tennis rooms
at Mendenhall Student
Center.
The Student Union Coffeehouse Committee
presents

Fri. & Sat Feb. 23 & 24, at 9 & 10 p.m.
Room 15, Mendenhall
Admission is free
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER PRESENTS:
he First Annual Crafts Center
lEtries: PHOTO CONTEST
Entry Dates - March 12 - 26 Show Dates - April 2-6
Entries turned in at the Crafts Center During Regular
operating hours (3:00-10:00 M-F, 10:00-3:00 Sat.)
General Rules:
Open to all full time ECU students
Black & White entries ONLY
Entries must be rigidly mounted, not to exceed 16"x 20"
Work on entry must be performed completely by student
Students must show a valid I.D. and Activity Card
Entries will be Judged on: Originality, Creativity and
Craftsmanship
Entries can be flush or bordered mounted(NO frames)
Prizes for 1st - 2nd - 3rd places with 10 4th places
CALL CRAFTS CENTER FOR FURTHER DETAILS
Pizzainxi
AMERICAS FAVORITE PIZZA
PIZZA BUFFET
ALL THE PIZZA AND
SALAD YOU CAN EAT
MonFri. 11:30 2:00
�PMon. �P Tues. 6:00 8:00
758-6866 Hwy 364 bypass Greenville , It. c.
located on 3rd St. 2
Mock from campus and
across from Overton's.
$56.67 mo. plus 13
utilities. Call 758261
in.I ak for Bobbi.
ROOM FOR RENT in
I'ijl house, few blocks
'nun campus, $37.50
er inn. plus utilities.
T52�)325.
LARCE FURNISHED
bedroom with linens.
Across from ECU. Some
kitchen privileges,
758-2585.
FEMALE needs room-
mate lo share nice 2
bedroom apt. Share 12
expenses. Call Marsha
at 758-2081.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED to share 2
br. apt. at College
ns Apts. S58 per mo
and 112 utilities. Call
758-6639.
TWO FEMALE ROOM-
-MATES to share large
house 2 blocks from
campus with private
bedrooms. Available
March 1. 758-1610.
FOR RENT: Private
room, 4 blocks from
campus. Male, call after
1 p.m 752-4006.
tostm
LOST: Black puppy with
a white flea collar and
5 stitches in head. If
imuid, call Randall at
738-0367. $25 reward.
LOST: Broun Wallet, at
Minges Thursday, Feb.
15. 11 found, please
contact 752-5845 any-
time. Reward offered.
LOST: A 1979 NCS
C.la ring with the
� engraved name Donald
Nelson Reeves. BS
' Degree in Engineering.
II found, please contact
Susan Oglesbv,
756-9843.
Ereono�l
MAMMOCK WEAVERS
wanted - no experience
necessary, will train.
Apply in person. Hat
i- i- ILimiu.icks. 1 1 (h
Clark St 758-06H
ANTED: Bicycle
Mechanic and salesman
lull-time, preferably
part-time. Applications
accepted. Call 752-1640
or come by the Bicycle
Shup.
NEED A RIDE to Ft.
Lauderdale for spring
break. Call Greg
758-0195 anytime
)GA classes beginning
Feb. 27 at 7:30 p.m.
All interested persons
are invited to attend.
Call Sunshine 758-0736
mornings and evenings.
STUDENT HELPERS
vith an interest in
electronics and compu-
ln a-ii
��� I�lit a�
finiiiuiii-compuler
i� m for blind science
�ludc�K $3 pr hour.
��la, i DavM Unocy.
nn of Chemiir, "
17-6713 or 757-6711
.HMORS & SENIORS
��� for a part time
job Get a jump on a
ummer job with good
'�u�me, flexible hours,
and real experience in
lhe business world. Call
Northwestern Mutual
Ho tiS!n aPP�in�"�ent
� oJ-4080.
BELLY DANCE classes
with Sunshine beginning
�m. Call 758-0736
(phone recently out of
order, call again).
V au,l
r! rb. If Slj,
�� Ml i.vrU.
�7(. morning
�. . resume
l i the kv
r �' H' Placemen
����"Mwi i oOrrim
"u,u- Karal,on
- iiior .
lou rnerelv
Yr' fh" rmation
�4 vv l�nn,de .he
����� Photographs
,JM Uv "Hluded. low
price FOr �,
r,�r more iB-
�'n�at.o� contact
Hjchard Qmk al Qfm
I nur 2 S
'
MM MM

.�.����g.���)���� 'iv. jiy.���
fciWMlMtflUMlM
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'





20 February 1979 FOUNTA1NHEAD Paoe 3
t
Greek Forum
B WCW (.LIARMIS
News Editor
s , r.he Panhellen.c
l?rt"P Banquet was
a' the Moose
, on Thursday
n,Rnt, Feb. 15.
1)liri"K the banquet
awards were presented'
Chancellor Thomas
r was the guesi
Brewer spoke on the
Ranges that take place
,nB 'e transition
,r"m high school to
e8e He said that
in -indents face
ntal freedom, rigor-
"ij- educational expecta-
-� and an ocean of
amiliar faces and
He -aid that these
arc a profound
:r -hock to many
lents. H
these
tragic to some
The changes
d cause lonliness,
oholism, and delin-
Bfuer said that
"ntitc and fraterni-
ties have been most
'Ipful during the past
i decades when help-
now students deal
these changes. He
that happiness is
anced vith moments
that can be shared with
friends; friends that
ieve in vou.
Brewer said that the
IBM card ha- now
me a way of life at
�r colleges and uni-
also said
changes
versities and he believes
'his to be a very
impersonal way of life
in college.
Brewer spoke on the
apathy which is spread-
ing over campuses all
over the United States.
Our grand enemy is
apathy said Brewer.
How many students
vote in campus elec-
tions? How many
students attend univer-
sity sponsored
concerts?"
Brewer also said that
apathy is eident on
many phases of campus
life. For example,
Brewer said that the
campus publications are
screaming for help and
nobod) listens.
Brewer -aid that
apathy moves in a
contagious-like manner
and it stays with us
once we acquire it.
Brewer thanked the
fraternities and sorori-
ties lor providing lea-
dership.
The leadership that
Greeks show in SGA.
student activities, am)
tor people less fortunate
is a great cure lor
apathy according to
Brewer. Brewer also
-aid that Greenville and
ECU would be the
lesser without fraterni-
ties and sororities.
He also said that
whether the school has
excellence is up to the'
amount ot students
pride. It sororities and
fraternities can establish
pride in the university,
FRIDAY'S
1890
Seafood
Special Features
Sunday-Couples Night: 2 delicious
seafood platters of Shrimp, Oysters, Fish,
Cole Slaw, French Fries and our Famous Hush
Puppies.
Only $7.99 for 2
Monday-Shrimp-A-Roo: a delicious
entre' of Calabash Style Shrimp with French
Fries, Cole Slaw and Hush Puppies.
All For Only $2.99
Tuesday-FlSh FryiAII the Fried Fish
(Trout or Perch) you can eat with French Fries,
Slaw, and Hush Puppies. No takOOUt
Only $2.25
Wednesday-Fried Oysters:Goiden
Brown Fried Oysters with French Fries, Cole
Slaw and Hush Puppies.
Only $2.99
Thursday-Family Night: Great
Specials on Shrimp, Oysters Trout Or Perch,
No Takeout
Shrimp$4.25
Trout Or Perch$2.25
Oysters$4.25
Flounder$3.95
"All You Can Eat"
Hours: Open 4:30 P.M. To 9 P.M.
Sunday-Thursday
4:30 P.M10 P.M.
Friday and Saturday
ft VI
Located On Evans Strest
Bahind Sports World
all the students will
profit, even the grad-
uates.
"W e want our
school to be a beautiful
place said Brewer.
"We want the will for
excellence
Following Brewer's
address, awards were
presented by the out-
going officers of Panhel-
lenic.
The Panhellenic
Scholarship trophy was
presented to Kappa
Delta for upholding the
highest grade point
average. The most im-
proved sorority scholar-
ship was also awarded
to the Kappa Deltas.
The Highest Overall
Sister Average award
was presented to Shelia
Craddock of Alpha Phi.
Doreen Rountree.
Alpha Phi. and Hope
McMillan. Alpha Delta
Pi; both received the
Highest Overall Pledge
verage award.
The Best Pledge
Class Award was pre-
sented to the fall
pledge class of Alpha
Xi Delta.
Lisa Herr, Jr. Pan-
hellenic president, was
supposed to present the
Most Active sorority in
Jr. Panhellenic Award.
Instead, the award will
be presented in the
spring in hopes of
keeping all sororities
interested in Panhellenic
during the entire school
year.
The Lise Turner
Award was awarded to
Lisa Herr, Chi Omega.
The Jr. Panhellenic
Scholarship Award was
presented to Elizabeth
Rose, Alpha Xi Delta,
treasurer of Jr. Panhel-
lenic.
The Philanthropic
Award was presented to
Kappa Delta for excel-
lence in their field of
philanthropic work
during the vear.
The Most Outstand-
ing Greek Woman was
awarded to Sue Lutz,
Alpha Omicron Pi. Lutz
has served ECU Panhel-
lenic for the past two
years as rush chairman.
The Hera Award, for
outstanding alumni, was
awarded to Gay Blocker,
Alpha Phi. Blocker is
associated with the Phy-
sical Education depart-p
ment at ECU.
Artemis Awards
were presented to one
girl from each sorority
for the service shown to
the sorority, Panhel-
lenic, and campus. The
winners of the Artemis
Awards are Jean New-
man, Alpha Delta Phi;
Margie Uhlig, Alpha
Omicron Pi; Kim Doby,
Alpha Phi; Sharon
Huchenberry, Alpha Xi
Delta; Myra Flaherty,
Chi Omega; Carol Per-
kins. Delta Zeta; Lisa
Hopkins, Kappa Delta;
Sarah Casey, Sigma
Sigma Sigma; and
Jennifer King, Alpha
Kappa Alpha.
Following these indi-
vidual awards, Greek
Hall of Fame and Rho
Lambda were presented.
The installation of offi-
cers closed the banquet.
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Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 20 February 1979
Goodbye ghetto dorms
The women's dorms on the mall,
perhaps better known as the ghetto
dorms, are finally receiving the
repairs and renovations they have
needed for years.
Never mind that it took a
dramatic (and possibly dangerous)
event to draw attention to the
problems. Never mind the inconven-
ience Jarvis residents put up with
during the upheaval from their home.
Never mind that it should have
been renovated 10 years ago.
The important thing is that
renovations are finally underway.
rortunately, Jarvis is still structurally
sound. The wiring will be replaced,
new lights will be installed, new
a ndow screens, and, if the money
holds out. carpet in the hallways.
The other dorms on the mall are
slated for similar improvements.
Horror stories have circulated for
years about how bad conditions in
the ghetto dorms were, from roaches
to wiring to pacing off the distance
from your room to the nearest fire
extinguisher.
The queation remains, however, of
what condition other dorms are in.
What potentially dangerous conditions
are unnoticed? Slay dorm was built
after the older women's dorms, and
is, in many ways, as bad or worse
than its predecessors. Must the
ceiling crash there too, before a
thorough inspection is conducted?
Umstead, Jones, almost any low-rise
dorm could probably benefit from
such an inspection.
The majority of dormitories at
ECU are safe, at least as far as
anyone knows. The university must
take the necessary steps to insure
that a disgrace such as the Jarvis
incident does not reoccur, and should
begin with a comprehensive inspec-
tion of al! older dorms.
mate! -rm vfs rut last Jixrusror
r� uviuetSAL ujrtire-oor Deutce
ought to ojoaj, fjouj� Tfaoa4 x
&2?f�2r r7'r rT TO T��r
CMzy freer s upjb. tr to�j rfc 3,trct,
QfAYj �nows soog-h" mews
Hrrtte wrcv. TT's Go& rtru-ocj.
IT'S HOT fvwi
AD�Ari- jcfa'TSee-
toiu- ioo, ��& �
American Journal
ajBW
Forum
New computer brings headaches
To FOL'NTAINHEAD:
It is a well-known
fact, here at East Caro-
lina, that automated test
grading is a widely
used computing method.
No one that enters
these hallowed halls
may leave without
experiencing this mira-
cle of modern technol-
ogy.
It has many advan-
tages over hand grad-
ing, such as speed, the
ability to compute var-
ious percentages and
curves, as well as an
overall convenience to
help keep out invaluable
instructors from working
or thinking too hard.
Automation also has
had the advantage of
economy.
Many teachers are,
for some unknown rea-
son, unable to appro-
priate the required com-
puter answer sheets to
administer examinations.
What this unknown rea-
son is, I am at a loss
to say, as I do remem-
ber paying my tuition at
the onset of the semes-
ter. Nevertheless, the
instructor then requires
the student to purchase
their own computer
sheet. Fine.
The student recalls
doing the same thing
last semester. Buying a
red answer form was no
great expense at a mere
four cents. The student
then proceeds to the
infamous Student Supply
Store (or should that
read the Student Mono-
poly Store) to purchase
the required paper.
Upon his arrival, he
notices three things.
Number one, the sheets
have miraculously chan-
ged color from red to
green. Number two, the
student now has circles
to darken, rather than
small lines, obviously to
break the monotony.
Founlqinhead
Serving the East Carolina community lor ovar 50 yaars
EDITOR
DOUG WHITE
PRODUCTION MANAGER
STEVE BACHNER
NEWS EDITORS
RICK I GLIARM IS
MARC BARNES
Assistant News Editors
Richy Smith
Mike Roger,
TRENDS EDITOR
JEFF ROLLINS
Assistant Trends Editors
Barry Clayton
Bill Jonas
SPORTS EDITOR
SAM ROGERS
Assistant Sports Editor
Chariaa Chandlar
ADVERTISING MANAGER
ROBERT M. SWAIM
Assistant Advertising
Manager
Tarry Herndon
Advertising Salesman
Paul Llncka
Chief Ad Artist
Jana W alls
Proofreaders
Oaidra Dalahunty
Sua Johnson
David Millar
Typesetters
Jeanatt Coats-
Oabbia Hoisting
Cartoonists
Sua Lamm
Barry Clayton
FOUNTAINHEAD Is tho studsnt
nowspapar ol East Carolina Unlvaraity
sponsorad by tha Madia Board of
ECU and Is distributed aaeh Tuasday
and Thursday during tha aeadamic
yaar (waafciy during tha summsr).
Editorial opinions ara ihosa of tha
Editorial Board and do not naeassarl-
ly rahact tha opinions ol tha
univarsity or lha Madia Board.
Olllcas ara loeatad on tha sacond
floor of tha Publications Cantar (Old
South Building). Our mailing
addrass Is: Old South Building,
ICU, Oraanvilla, N.C. 27134.
Tha phono numbars ara:
757-8386. 8387, SJOt Subscriptions
ara 810 annually, alumni 88 annually,
And last, but more
importantly, the price of
these stamped out,
mass produced pieces of
extremely thin sliced
wood has increased by
100 percent.
Most students would
cast this off, as it is
now a pittance of eight
cents to take a test.
But when you think of
the price as doubling, it
casts a different sha-
dow. I admit, with
inflation up at around
eight or nine percent,
prices will rise.
But what possible
advance in technology
of machines for grading,
or printing process, or
ink price, could cause
something to double in
price in a matter of
days? I understand
there is a new computer
for grading. When I
hear "New that
generally implies a
more efficient improve-
ment over the old as
technology generally
advances.
If this were true, it
should be less expen-
sive to grade tests than
before. So what does
the Student Store do? (I
apply "student" very
loosely.) They slide in a
new revenue method
double the price of a
four cent item on the
studentsthey won't no-
tice. Well, my fellow
"students what are
we to expect in the
future? How about al-
ready extravagantly
priced $18 text books
running for $36?
Hoping you will notice,
Kyle S. Inman
Croat an suffers
from card players
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
This letter is my
reaction to the article in
Thursday's FOUNTAIN-
HEAD about overcrowd-
ing at the Croatan. I
would like to voice my
opinion and mention
that I know quite a few
other students who
agree with me.
First of all, I try to
stay away from synthe-
tic crap "food" as
much as possible (thank
you for at least fruit
and yogurt to balance
the hundreds of candy
bars, cookies, cupcakes,
and synthetic sand
wiches). But when I do
go to the "Cro" it's
not the overcrowding of
students in general, or
the faculty dining that
bothers me.
It is the group of
loud fellows who mono-
polize a table or two
and half the chairs in
the place for their card
games that last hours.
Is this an eating place
or a gambling casino?
Though some people
read and study while
they eat, no one needs
to maintain a library
atmosphere, but come-
on! How about a half-
way normal atmosphere
in which to relax and
digest one's food? If
these guys have no
classes to go to, are
they even students?
The Croatan is a
studentfaculty dining
facility. And, if they are
students that don't need
to worry about studying
or homework, at least
they could be consider-
ate and not monopolize
the place for so long. I
suggest they take
advantage of the card
tables and other game
facilities at Mendenhall.
So, if you're going
to complain about over-
crowding how come this
was not mentioned? I'd
also like to thank one
of the people who was
interviewed for last
week's article for their
generosity of spirit-
thank you Henry
Doskey!
Michele Mennett
Autos keep the air dirty
By DAVID ARMSTONG
The last scientifically pure air in the United
States disappeared in 1963, chased from the
mountains near Flagstaff, Arizona by pollution from
California.
Since then, clean-up campaigns have come and
gone, but this fact remains: The majority of
Americans breathe polluted air hazardous to their
health, courtesy of timid government regulators and
foot-dragging corporate polluters.
The lethal effects of air pollution are well
known. Crops are destroyed, vistas blotted out,
people sickened with lung and heart disease.
Children and elderly people are particularlv
vulnerable. Air pollution kills, usually gradually,
but sometimes suddenly. One of London's famous
pea soup fogs felled 4,000 people in 1952, before
the city cleaned up its act.
The Clean Air Act of 1970 was supposed to
return clean air to American skies, and some
progress has been made. In February, the
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) said that
sulfur dioxide air pollution was down 27 percent
since 1970. Smoke and dust particles decreased 12
percent. Even so, the agency conceded, nearly all
major metropolitan areas where most Americans
live violate national air quality standards.
The Clean Air Act was amended in 1977 and
strengthened on several counts. The revamped law
tightens air quality regulations in wilderness areas.
It also stipulates that for every pound of pollutants
created by new industrial projects, a pound must be
eliminated from already-existing sources.
More ominously, deadlines for cleaning up the
nation's air were pushed back. The automobile
industry, for example, was originally given until
1976 to reduce auto emissions in new cars to safe
levels. Under the amended law, however, the
industry will have until 1981.
Even this target date is somewhat misleading,
because it takes 10 years for a complete turnover in
the automotive population. Thus, it will be 1991
before most cars on the road meet 1981 standards.
Other deadlines have also been stretched.
Heavy industry was given until 1980 to meet air
quality standards originally set for 1975. The states
were given until 1982, and heavily polluted cities
chiefly those with serious auto pollution problems
like Los Angeles and Detroit have until 1987.
Through the haze hanging over legislative
attempts at reform, the heavy hand of the auto
lobby can be discerned. Automakers, who pack one
of the most powerful political wallops in
Washington, have howled since standards for
reduced emissions were first proposed, that they
were too expensive and complicated. Time and
again, government has obligingly granted extensions
- even though Jspanese and some European
manufacturers who sell cars in the U.S. have met
the new standards on schedule.
Private cars cause nearly half of the air pollution
in the U.S. Auto exhaust has been cleaned up
somewhat in the 1970s by mandatory smog control
devices, but the effectiveness of the controls still
leaves much to be desired. And what gains have
been made have been partly offset by the increase
in the number of cars and the increasing number of
trips made per car.
In the meantime, America's mass transit system
�� once one of the world's finest continues to run
downhill. In the past 30 years, trains, trolleys
femes and buses have fallen victim to the
sophisticated hard sell that equate cars with luxury
freedom, even patriotism (buy big, buy American)
Auto manufacturers haven't yet come right out and
said smog is good for you, but doing so wouldn't
be entirely out of character.
Kicking the car habit would go a lung u
towards clearing the air. So would switching
clean, renewable sources of energy, like solar
wind power. Despite Jimmy Carter -unnv x
on behalf of solar energy, however, hi- long-stal
energy program put its heaviest emphavj. on coal
While coal hasn't the awesome potential
destruction of nuclear power, it is a tar
satisfactory "alternative" energv source. (The �
ingredient in London's "killer fog" was coal sm -
Eastern coal, even when used in power pi
with improved control technology, -till burns
because of its relatively high' sulfur conti
western coal, with its lower sulfur content, is
focus of Carter's plan. But much of that would
stnpmined in the high plains states, often
Indian land.
Moreover, damage would not be limited to
sparsely populated points of production ,r
pollution ,s an intersecttonal, even internatioi
problem. Smoke from power plants in the 1
drifts eastward, where it fouls the air in Vu N,
and New Jersey Air original!) polluted in -
Britain and the Soviet Union causes "and ram-
ocandanavia.
whTrPrOClivit f�r Uk,n avd �"� � "�nd
�rnJIU adm,n,stra,lon � g�ng wi,h the other has
earned him a spotty reputation among environm,
loril" J" 3 rar,er rLep�n Crd" P�blished in the
Apart Friend fZ 7 m"i� N�� "
Apart, rr.ends of the Larth observe:
prog?; ZJTSStS Z ,mPra"n� '
11 nas also been -
transportation and clean a.r
coordination is essential " ,u
"�o implementing r�i�,In "T' "
pollu.ion in our chin " J rn
?Ztt j�v 2c
-you should. h SL?
"�5� a�y?: �f "W �f as.
Berkeley (T Snd" co.umriiM b in
pressures from the energy
illustration
coordinating
Such
slow in
policiei
report
!
I
r
hr�5Pjtt
I
��ii nit-linn.
limn w mWiH�iBwinrnr
��





1
vv
uu
1
20 February 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
ljuteand Game of Death
:?P:
Two new films will feature the 'real'Bruce Lee
� D Mil IKK
Staff Writer
en ��H "the world's best-conditioned
McQueen and James Coburn
matter-of-facth that he "was one
�"�" who has ever lived Academy
screen-writer Stirling Siliphant (In
M-� �( Vht. The Poseidon Adventure) has
1 non-idiot I have ever known "
referring to his friend, as mam
present tense.
II assimilate itself into Chinese
ited -�- "the greatest warrior of all
I in London and Paris; damn near
India, Lebanon and Thailand; his
mudhuts in Central frica; the
vagueh in Moscow and whispered
n Mainland China.
He is one of the five most famous men of the
20th Century.
But, in the States his name is regarded as a
J0. Yes, in America, the name has become
cliche-Bruce Lee�words often spoken, yet seldom
understood�a pseudonym to be tagged onto even
side-kicker in ever) dojo, arena, gym, kwoon, or
back-alle).
And Bruce Lee, in death, has unknowingly
spawned a generation of quasi-Orientai clone as
well-Bruce Lis, Myron Bruce Lees, Horace Bruce
Lee Sonny Bruces, Bruce Tees, Bruce Quees,
Loose Leaves, Spruce Trees�the list goes on.
And now. vet another obscure film has been
released by yet another store-front "film company"
(Head Gorilla, Inc.). This time, however, the film is
tint Chinese-it is advertised as American and it is
called Bruce Lee Strikes Bark From the Crave
starring (even though the name is not to be found
on the press material) a fellow kr
Bi
La
I he publicity posters and television trailers
showfCan you believe it?) a sketch of Lee's likene
exploding out of the ground in front of a tombstone
with letter, which read "Bruce Lee 1940-1973
And even the local theatre operators who were
playing this trash last week told me on the phone
thai it -tar. the "real" Bruce Lee, even though
onlv lour Lei films have ever been released with a
fifth, and final, one wrapped and ready for
distribution late this spring.
According to the press book, which provides a
synopsis ol Strikes Bark From the Grave, Bruce Lee
ha- .truck a bargain with "The Black Angel of
Death' to return from "beyond the grave" after
live vear. it he will only do battle with this same
'Black Angel" 'to the finish1 after hi return to the
world ol the living.
I .ecu a lot of excrement passed-off as
pertaining to Bruce Lee, hi reputation, his legend,
or his life over the past couple of years. In fact, I
leel that Lee (along with Elvis Presley) must be the
most prostituted dead man of all time.
I vc seen a phenomenal artist reputation
destroyed b) a fast-food genre of Ronald
Wong-Donald feature flicks that can be served up
on corporate lunch money.
I ve seen Bruce Lee, a man who was as fine a
poet, with his body, as Jame. Dickey is, with a
pen. become regarded a. a slapstick clown because
of bamboo .creen. rice-paddy brained, five and
dime, chopping center, box-office ogre
But, hopefully, this water buffalo-dung is more
than anyone can tolerate. It is not onlv disgusting;
it i. also illegal. Why doe.n't Bruce widow, Linda
Lee, seek an injunction against this film? After all,
as executrix of the estate, she own. sole rights to
the use of the Bruce Lee name and likeness. Last
vear. -he was awarded$25,000.00from a .uit brought
against two films Bruce Lee. Superdragon and
Goodbye. Bruce Lee.
How can Warner Brother Columbia Picture
Sand) Howard Production and Golden Harvest
Studio- allow this filth to be shown when thev all
own genuine Bruce Lee properties?
In order to write this piece, I was forced to .it
through a. much of Strikes Back From the Grave as
could. I was startled to discover that no Br
LeeSecond Coming manifests itsell in the movie,
no "Black Angel of Death" appear either It i
all a promotional ru designed to make a very few
fast bucks ofl a film property that would otherwise
ii- iinrtrirli.t-iLL.
be unmarketable
� uiiuuii fit i a l J H .
Ihe onlv reference made to Lee in the fil
jtsell is in the verv first halt vhere
indeed see a fellow who . ,�- some minu.
resemblance to Bruce Lee spring foi what
we are supposed to regard as an open tomb
After this opening shot, the film metamorpho
sises into another feature altogether, one
immediately recognized as a Korean karaK
filmed over three vear- ago -tarring a youthful,
fairly muscular genl named Chun Jong wh
resemble Bruce Lee ever so slightly in man.
and physical appearance. Jong is a wn,
lower belt practitioner of the Korean art ol ! a
Kwon Do from Southern California whi
fighting or acting abilities to speak of.
This Korean quickie is onlv American in the
sense thai it was .hot in Los Angeles b) oul
"l"1 crew that latei dubbed it into English
vpicalU terrible fashion I the Ii
jenre
I left the theatre onlv a minutes
second reel more out of bon I 'ban anger.
Heller movies
r
or th u- interested
irl perfect martial displavs,
genuine Bru e Le vehii les tl
completed and art
released
Silent Flute wa- written b 1 , Stii ng Si
and Jam Coburn. It starts David Carradine,
Wallach, Christopher Lee, Roddv McDowell,
Jeti Cooper
Siliphant ha- - i .
Silent Flute is a fat
Ihe
e. I V - . -�
i i inn i- .i laiuiiui. unique, n - avssev
I here ha- never been anything like Flute. It isn
typical martial art. film. It isand I'm telling
a- Bruce Lee friend, 90 pet
� . til IM (,
I HI- HI I BRICE Lee in a scene from the
upcoming film "Game of Death
LEE VPS KAKFFM Abdul Jabbar with flying side kick in Game of Death.
Guitarist Parkening and Gordon Stout highlight music agenda
Parken-
m-
: ar.
2
under
I the
1 nion
� - iinni
ed for 8 p.m.
v. I heat re
nhall Student
hlic n� kets
$5 and can be
purchased at the
-tudent center Central
Ticket Office.
Parkening. a Cali-
fornia-born artist, took
u(i the guitar at the age
ol eleven. Hi. first
tea hers were Spanish
i oncert guitarists w ho
re ognized the boj 's
affinit) tor the instru-
ment. Bv age 12, after
onlv a vear ol lessons,
he gave his first recital
"1 Bach, Scarlatti, and
Mbeni and wa.
greeted with critical
acclaim.
Since hi- teen
Parkening has become
A great artistone ol
the most brilliant
guitarists in the world
says Andre- Segovia,
the master guitari.t ol
the century.
Parkening i- cur-
rent!) concentrating on
college and universit)
date He i- verv
popular with .Indents
and i- modifying an
extensive European tour
in order to include m e
universit) date, in t e
United State
His international
celebrity has been
greatlv increased bv his
Mi ordings tor Angel
Record All have joined
the lists of best-selling
clan al recordings.
Like an) young artist
"I note, Christopher
Parkening stresses that
he j. not only a
musician, but a per.on
ol man) interests. He is
an accomplished
ti-herman and horseman
who also skis and scuba
dives.
(wordon Stout
Percussionist-composer
Gordon Stout will
appear in rectial at Eat
Carolina University
Wed Feb. 21. ' per-
forming his own work,
for marimba as well as
those ol other com-
posers.
Appearing with him
is ECl faculty pianist
Donna Coleman. The
program is et for 8:15
p.m. in the A.J.
Fletcher Rectial Hall.V
K ith Ms. Coleman.
Stout will perform the- �
Musser Prelude in CM i
Major and a Green. ,
arrangement of FritzR .
Kreisler's "TambourinDai .
Chinois
He will also be
featured in a marimbaM
version of the J.S. Bach; - '
Sonata No. 6 in F. �
Major, his transcription
of Alec W ilder's Suite� �-
"Two
-
orded on
�ii
This is Craig Russell this is Craig Russell this is Craig Russell and this is Craig Russell
and they're all appearing in Outrageous at Hendrix Theater, Thurs. Feb. 22 at 8 p.m.
-
�v � H I





Hage 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 20 February 1979
Trends editor responds to criticism
B WILLIAM JONES
Wistant Trends Editor
The Trends section
oi your i -idem news-
paper is under fire.
We're being repriman-
ded and, in short, told
off b) some of you, the
student-readers.
And we love it!
Reader reaction is
indicative that ECU stu-
dents are not only
reading what we print,
but also considering it
carefully. We are
engaged in meaningful
communication.
The main purpose of
GAME OF DEATH
'111 III IK 11 Irtltll ). �);
to ay in terms of spiritual values.
'Lee sought self-understanding as the (primary)
step in gaining an insight into the meaning of life,
and taught that all life is sacred.
"Ho believed in the corollary that those who
slavishly folio one martial arts style (or any style
m any an) can never attain the high physical and
spiritual peaks the arts offer. As an individual, Lee
was an innovator who utilized an eclectic approach
sharpen his fighting skills
Pretty esoteric stuff for a guy whom the vast
majority ol the American public deems deserving
respect than a Saturday morning cartoon
character.
Very little is known of the film's plot. Silent
Mute is presently being test marketed in select
theatres in L.A. and New York under the
unfortunate title of Circle of Iron. When it is
released for general theatrical booking, it will be
eated a a major cinematic event because it is the
serious film with a martial art format.
Game of Death is the title of the other Bruce
Lee property. Lee was attempting to gradually
ate the general Chinese movie-going public and
Game was to have been his first venture with any
th. He had been filming Game at the time of
his death and it has recently been completed
without him. It is doubtful, however, that whatever
rice the film was intended to have has been
lined. Instead, Game of Death has a Bondian
story-line and a 7 million dollar budget. It stars
Lee, Academy Award winners Gig Young and Dean
Jagger, Hugh O'Brien (he of Wyatt Earp fame who
n time was also a very successful professional
boxerl ami it features fight scenes between 57"
L( and 7"v" Kareem Abdul Jabbar. Dan Inosanto,
was Bruce prize martial art pupil, and
� degree Tae Kwon Do black belt Chi Hon
are also featured in fight sequence- with Lee.
- ore has been composed bj John Barry, who
- also written the soundtracks for Midnight
owboy. The Lion in Winter and all but one film in
- Bond -eric
h ol these features will be released late this
They should be treats for the average
i- well as the avid martial arts fan.
Don't be ripped-off by self-parodying Bruce Lee
androids. Save your $3 for the real thing.
Wilier is in the process of writing a book on
hi- experiences in the martial arts and on Bruce
Lee which he hopes to have published in hardback
thi- summer.
the Trends section is to
critique currently popu-
lar art, literature,
music, and films.
I, for one, have
always felt that critics
should keep their opin-
ions to themselves, and
just give basic informa-
tion about a movie or
play, and just the
storyline of books,
since becoming
critic myself,
seen that another
But,
a
I've
per-
son s opinion can in-
deed be useful.
Critical evaluations
can especially be a
boon to those with
limited time andor
money.
One can make great-
est use of "reviews" by
choosing a few critics to
read regularly. In a
short while, one can see
how these critics' opin-
ions compare to his own
and thus may be used
as a general guide to
where one's time and
money might best be
spent.
Any good critic will
substantiate his opinions
as much as possible.
Whether or not a read-
er agrees with what is
said is not the point. If
we said the sky is
green, someone would
probably and should
demand that we qualify
the statement.
What is important is
that the students of
ECU are thinking about
American culture.
Pianist True appears here
Pianist Nelita True,
noted artist-teacher, will
isit East Carolina Uni-
versity Feb. 27-28 to
perform in recital and
conduct a master class
lor piano teachers.
Her recital, which is
Iree and open to the
public, is scheduled for
8:15 p.m. Tuesday in
the A.J. Fletcher Recital
Hall.
V iirks to be perfor-
med are two Domenico
Scarlatti sonatas (F
Minor, K. 481; F
Major, k. 182); the
Robert Schumann "Car-
nival Opus 0;
Chopin's Mazurka in E
Minor, Opus 17, No. 2,
Mazurka in F Minor,
Opus 68, No. 4 and
Polonaise in F sharp
Minor, Opus 44; and
Profofieffs Sonata No. 4
in C Minor.
The master class will
run from 10 a.m. until
noon Feb. 28, and will
be followed by a peda-
gogy lecture, "Some
Aspects of Piano Tech-
nique from 1 to 3
p.m. Both of these
events will be held in
the Recital Hall.
Now a member of
the University of Mary-
Travel in Europe
Eurail Youthpass
-Anyone under 26 yrs. old.
-2 months rail travel in I 5 countries
$260
Eurail Pass
1 5 days unlimited rail travel
in 1 5 countries.
Get one before leaving.
Passes are not available in Europe.
QUIXOTE TRAVELS , Inc.
Q 319CotancheSt.
T I Greenville, N.C.
S Phone 758-3456
land's artist faculty,
Nelita True has appear-
ed as soloist with the
Chicago Symphony, the
National Symphony and
the Baltimore Sym-
phony.
This week's Free
Flick is F.M.
to be shown at 7
and 9 p.m. at
Hendrix Theater.
Friday and
Saturday nights
�th Evans Struts
nOiCM
r. ScMitz. Mi!i�. stroti'i 17.88
Miller Kegs $29.00
f�lb�.tee 52.75
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March 5, 1979
t
- -
� - I �





1
Brown, Drum
20 February 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
mer star
Georgia Tech wrecks Pirates
K SM ROGERS
sl�rt Editor
ill prognosticators insist Georgia
- light years away from competing
N rth Carolina's and Wake
tiaiitu Coast Conference.
fans in Minges Coliseum were all
the Ramblin' Wreck could head
VCC rournament next week after an
lory over East Carolina here
Moccasins
dump Pirates
U H Kl.hHANDLER
Assistant siort� Editor
1
about ECl 's 7H-77
hattanooga Thursday
tor anyone, especiallv ECI
tns.
was marred by 33 turnovers
- pp) play that was so
terrible on both sides of
t over Y2 percent from
of the game
king at both the half time
ates led 40-30 at the half
margin.
juick 1 1 point lead, at 15-4
. ening half, the Pirate- were
kind of organized attack
and thereby avenge an
le to go into the locker
� � load.
much danger a of the
when the Pirates
M asin forward
I lead to only four
new ball game.
th Moccasin players.
� a disaster in store tor the
maintain their lead until the
tion period when Moo center
gave Chattanooga a 69-68
ex hanged baskets and set
iting flurries "of the season
Pirates had possession of the
eft on the clock. A short delay
- followed by a missed shot
� the i s nd mark.
fought furiously for the
tnt few seconds lett on the
How -hots by Frank Hobson
: missed. Oliver Mack then
fouled as he missed a shot at
� with no time remaining
md I hattanooga holding a 71-70
the second of the two free
. trded and the Pirates were
tor the sixth time this season.
�od in the overtime but fell
: 77-73 on James Jones' two free
17 seconds left to play,and
on the short end of a 78-77
ived well at 'all in the first
ach Ron Shumate. "It was
. : il with all the turnovers
it both clubs played better in
i W e did for sure
omeback of Chattanooga was
lames Jones and Norm Anchrum.
ounted for 37 of Chattanooga's 48
Jones alone scored 20 after
. is definitely a big factor for us
Shumate. "He hit the shots we
eded them
med to be open a great deal. 1 think
that was the shooting of Anchrum.
irjy in the second half. When they
on Norm, James was left open.
. h Larry C.llman expressed much
in the Pirates in the contest,
, . on his team s loss.
lfter the game that we had too
said C-illman. "We made some
I told them that there was not one
Dlayed that did not make a mistake.
I didn't have it in critical situations. We
C very much poise out there tonight at
mCnted (Mll?rm that I was still proud of
T �t r we got into a running game.
tLt well early and we got somewhat
gr�
iff t
leSS . make the pass that 'might' be
We heean to maKe i�r v ,
� b,r r saw-��
lhe SeaS�n' .� led bv Anchrum with 27 points
Chattanooga w� ledjr down ,6
id Jones wim ��
bounds. . , i Greg Cornelius with 21
The Pirates were led oy b . JQ
i ih rebounds, unvci
tints and 1� ,r"
itnts tor ECU-
Saturday night.
Led by hot -hooting guard Tiko Brown and
forward Sammy Drummer the Engineers shot a
blistering (8.l percent from the floor to avenge an
earlier overtime loss against the Pirates.
The win improved Georgia Tech's record to 14-9
while Past Carolina dropped its second straight
game and fell to 11-14 overall.
"W e moved the ball extremely well as a team
on the floor and when you do that, you shoot
well Georgia Tech coach Dwayne Morrison
explained afterwards. "We just got the shot- we
amid liit and we hit them, i think we're a much
better team than we were in that tirst game
Once glance at the final stat sheet and even
Prate coach Larry Gillman was amazed with
Georgia Tech -hooting percentage. "That 68
percent from the field tells the whole story
Gillman said. "Samm) Drummer and Tiko Brown
.re just tremendous players and they really hurt us
tonight. We played aggressively, but you just can't
shool the way we did and expect to win
Brown canned an incredible 12 of 13 shots from
the floor and added -i free throws to lead all
scorers in the game with 30 points. Drummer
followed Brown with 25 points while forward Lennv
llorton added 13 points and a game high 10
lebounds.
After the lead see-sawed back ami forth for the
ir-t 15 minute three straight jumper- bv Brown
ut Georgia Tech out front to staj at 26-25 with
kl2 remaining in the first half. And the Engineers
increased the margin to five at 56-31 at the break.
iul the Engineers continued their hot -hooting
earl) in the second halt, with Brown -coring on a
variety of shots. Georgia Tech moved out trout by
3B-45 with 12:13 remaining before Kat Carolina
inallv called timeout.
Slowly, but surely, the Pirates kept chipping
ava) at the Georgia lech lead and finally got
within tour point- at 65-61 on two tree thrown by
Qiv t Mack.
Bat Brown hit another long range bucket and
Hllv Smith added a tree throw and the Engineers
were neverthreatenedafter that.
W e had a chance to catch them when we
c'oed within tour, but we just missed the key
4ot- Gillman -aid. "We looked awfully tired
tin bout most of the game. After Monday's game
again-i Old Dominion, we will have plaved six
games m nine days which i- certainly a lot.
"But I'm proud ol our kids he continued.
'We've won and lost a lot of close game but
the) ve always hung in there when it got tough.
We're re.illv going to miss Oliver Mack next year.
11 certain!) the greatest basketball player in East
Carolina history
Mack, win. played his final home game, led the
Rrates with 22 points while forward Herb Krusen
wit- the only other player in double figure- tor ECU
with 12.
"Oliver's a great player and we certainly
couldn ! find a wav to stop him Morrison
admitted. "But I was pleased with the wav we ran
oir offensive pattern- which really kept Easl
Carolina off balance defensively.
"We didn't do anything differently, it ju-t
viien you -hoot like we did tonight they aren't a lot
dt teams who are going to beat you
I
Greg Cornelius moe on Ga. 1 i
Pilot b Peti �mJi -
Lady Pirates overcome loss, whip ASl
Lady Pirate coach Cathy Andruzi instructs her troops
! Photo b Chap Ourlev
Home career complete
Fans say goodbye to Mack
B SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
The) cheered him when he swished his tirst long
lumper in Minges Coliseum a year ago, and the
1,000 tans on hand Saturday night gave Oliver
Mack a standing ovation during pre-game
ceremonies before his final home game against
Georgia Tech.
nd even after the Pirates' 82-68 loss to the
Engineers, dozens of well wishers ami autograph
hounds waited for the personable New york native
to emerge from the Pirate locker room for the last
time.
"Yes, it certainly would have been nice to finish
our home season with a victory, but that's the way
thing- go Mack said while dressing. "1 thought
we looked pretty sluggish out there tonight and with
all the games we've had lately it's pretty tough for
any team to get up every night.
"I think we really needed a longer break after
the loss to Tennessee-Chattanooga he continued,
'but the schedule this year just hasn't allowed us a
bit of rest. We've hustled all along but we just
haven't gotten the right breaks when we needed
them"
Much like Thursday night's game against
Chattanooga, the Pirates played well in the first half
before tiring in the second period. East Carolina
trailed by only five points at the break against
Ceorgia Tech, but the Engineers continued their
blistering shooting pace in the second half to defeat
the Pirates.
Tiko Brown and Sammy Drummer had little
problems with the Bucs 1-2-2 zone and man-to-man.
Brown drilled in 30 points, 21 in the second half
while Drummer added 25.
"Both of them are great shooters Mack said.
'They both had bad games in our first game down
there, but we couldn't stop them with any type of
defense tonight. Georgia Tech is a real tough team
when those two players are scoring
Mack turned in another workmanlike performance
against Georgia Tech. He hit eight of 16 shots from
Mark
the field and canned all six of his tree throws for
22 mints.
We had a chance there in the second half
when we cut the lead to four, but we just couldn't
take advantage of some of the opportunities they
gave us Mack explained. "Maybe we forced some
of our shots, but give them a lot of credit. Georgia
lech has a line team and we had to play well
down there to win
Although the New York City native will leave
Easl Carolina as the school's third leading scorer,
he's heard more than his share of criticism this
season. The victories and tournament bids East
Carolina coach Larry Gillman promised when Mack
arrived have never developed and for the fourth
straight ar, the Pirates will finish with another
losing record.
"I've never played on a losing team before, but
I think I've learned to accept the winning and
hping Mack said. "Everybody likes to win, but
sometimes things just don't work out that wav.
"I'm glad 1 came to East Carolina and 1 don't
have any regret about making the decision he
continued. "I just wish maybe we could have won a
few more
And Gillman told the small press gathering after
the game something not many Pirate basketball fans
will argue tor main vears to come.
'Oliver the greatest player fans have ever seen
here and next year we've got some awfullv big
shoes to fill
Bv JIMn 1)1 PKKf
Naff W riter
Alter a disappoint
. i-6 loss at the h i
AIA W
Division 11 nal
impion High P
i ge earlier in the
k, the Lad) Pirate
basketball -quad put
an impressive
91 trouncing
Appalachian vr Satur-
day night.
I � were few
bright aspects of the
Wednesday loss to High
Pomt. Senior guard Gail
Kerbaugh added her
name to the list ot Ladv
Pirate- who have scored
1,000 career points.
Laurie Arrants,
ordinator of women's
athletics, presented Ker-
baugh with the game
ball.
S hi m rt guard
Lydia Rountree posted
her name in the record
book- bv establishing a
new -ingle a-
assists mark, surpassing
the old record of 78
held bv Sheilah Cotton
in 1975.
Kosie Thompson had
25 pomts and 13 re-
bounds, followed bv Ker-
baugh with lc points.
Center Andrea Blan-
chard led High Point
with 28 points and 1�
rebounds.
"They kept using
Blanchard and we didn't
den) her said ECl
coach Cathy Andruzzi.
"High Point had a lot
of intensity and we just
didn't have it
In the opening game
oi Saturdav's double-
header at Minges Coli-
-eum. the Ladv Pirates
had one ot their best
offensive ettcrts ot the
Kerl . .
15.
� � �

� Mar i G .
Apj
b) Nina r isl
-
19, fiana M
Higi
Hu
i
als
rebounds-
The) hav,
tasl kids
h

1 v dia ha I
good game
brought
and broke thi
We
� il
tonight -
The La
enter the V l W
tournament
w i t h a :
regional lounn v
Knoxville, lenn ii
gratis.
Pirates win
The ECU Pirates defeated Old
Dominion 99-84 last night behind
Oliver Mack's 25 points.
Mack was followed in the scoring
column by Greg Cornelius with 20
points, George Maynor with 19, and
Herb Krusen with 18.
The win pushed the Pirates to
12-14 on the season.
The Pirates now have a week to
rest before taking on Notre Dame
Monday night.
t





FOUNTAINHEAD 20 Febfuary 1979
George Mavnor lavs one in
Photo by Chap GarleyJ
Pop A Top, Jaguars
among unbeatens
still 18
u i i n
i . . sketball.
r
ami
v Ita are the
- teams
men's un-
i -am- include
- Jaguars,
ssocia-
t
rviTt'al it in
na
ami
i ini
league
Rehabili-
a n i i
ts are
also undefeated. This
late in the season, there
arc always teams that
lorfeil out and as a
result two teams have
already clinched league
titles - the Jones
Jaguars and the Belk
St) Ions.
Over in the women's
.petition. Tyler
Pop-a-Top ha won
their league even
though they -till have
one game remaining.
Everyone else in the
league has lost at least
two games. The other
league leaders have all
ensured themselves of
at least a tie when the
final games have been
completed.
SAAD'S SHOE REPAIR
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34 W. Dudley Greenville, N.C. 1
ACC tourney next in line
Tar Heel grapplers down Pirates
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
The North Carolina wrestling team
tuned up for this week's Atlantic
Coast Conference tournament with a
solid 33-14 victory over East Carolina
in Chapel Hill Saturday night.
The Tar Heels captured all five of
the lower weight classes to build an
early 25-0 lead and coasted the rest
of the way home. The win improved
North Carolina's overall record this
season to 14-1 while East Carolina
finished its dual season with a
disappointing 1-8 mark.
"From top to bottom their
probably one of the best balanced
teams we've faced all season long
Pirate coach Bill Hill said. "We just
don't have the strength in the lower
weights to stay with them. But give
them a lot of credit. Bill Lam's got
outstanding individual talent on this
squad. They should do well in the
Atlantic Coast Conference tournament
this year.
North Carolina's Dave Cooke won
Bird, Ruland head of
ECU 'All-Opponent team
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Assistant Sports Editor
Each year at the end of the
basketball season, there are numer-
ous "AH" teams. There are All-Con-
ference, All-America, and All-Pro
teams to name just a few.
But for the ECU Pirates and their
followers, it would be easy to pick an
All-Opponent team as to pick an
All-America team.
For the Pirates have certainly
played against their fair share of
players who will comprise many of
those "All" teams once the current
season is concluded.
Next week's matchup with Notre
Dame is the last game of the year
for the Pirates. And what a way to
tap off a schedule.
The Fighting Irish were ranked
number one in the country for much
of the regular season and are
currently ranked third. The Irish
boast of probably the best depth in
the nation.
That tough Pirate schedule has
brought Larry Gillman's club face to
face with many outstanding basketball
players.
Foremost among those is Larry
Bird of Indiana State. Bird is the talk
of all the pro scouts. He has been
called "without a doubt the premier
player in the country by one
national publication. Few others
disagree.
Bird leads the nation in scoring
with an average of well over 30
points per game. He is also among
the national leaders in rebounding.
In next week's game with Notre
Dame a main concern for GillmSn
will be sophomore Kelly Tripucka.
The 6'7" All-America forward was
the Irish's most effective performer
last year in the NCAA tournament
and has continued as team leader
this season.
Tripucka combines finesse and
power in a fashion rarely seen in
such a young player.
Charles "Hawkeye" Whitney and
Clyde "the Glide" Austin of North
Carolina State played big roles when
the Wolfpack disposed of the Pirates
104-88 earlier in the season. Both are
expected to receive much considera-
tion when the time comes to choose
an All-ACC team.
Also under much consideration for
the All-ACC squad will be Albert
King and Ernest Graham of the
Maryland Terrapins, a squad that
disposed of the Pirates 82-71.
And last, but certainly not least,
among the better players the Pirates
have faced is Jeff Ruland, the super
sophomore center for Iona. Ruland
has almost singlehandidly turned the
program around at that small
northern school.
Ruland is regarded by all as one
of the top centers in the nation.
Also, Gillman says he was more
worried about facing Ruland than any
other player the Pirates have went
up against this season.
That certainly speaks well for the
burly Ruland considering the Pirates
have faced the likes of Bird,
Tripucka, Whitney, and company.
Certainly Gillman would love to
have all four of these collegiate
greats playing for him.
Give him his choice of the players
his team has went up against this
season and he might just find it hard
to lose.
by forfeit at 118 while Bobby
Monoghan took a 11-1 major decision
over East Carolina David Jerose at
126.
UNC's CD. Mock followed with a
pin in 3:53 over Jim Osborn and Joe
Galli decisioned Tom Robinson 15-8
in the 142 weight class. Dave
Juergens concluded the Tar Heels
sweep in the lower weights with a
quick pin over Frank Schaede in just
1:08 at 150.
Steve Goode improved his overall
record this season to 11-4-1 with an
8-4 win over UNC's Greg Duke while
ECU's James Ellison battled highly
touted Mike Benzel to a 8-8 draw at
167.
East Carolina's Butch Revils
topped Charlie Quail 10-3 at 177, but
UNC's Dean Brior bounced back to
pin Brian Merriam in 5:33 at 190.
East Carolina heavyweight Men-
dell Tyson pinned North Carolina's
Tom Rohrbacher in 3:58 in the
evening's final match.
Tyson finished the dual season
with a 6-0-1 mark while Revils has a
13-3 overall record this year.
"Mendell has shown steady im
provement all season long and did
another fine job for us Hill noted
"Butch Revils has also shown
improvement since his injury and I
hope he will really begin to peak
when the regionals roll around
East Carolina travels to Williams
burg, Va. this weekend for the
Eastern Regional championships,
which is the qualifying test for the
NCAA Tournament. The NCAA
Championships will be held March
8-10 in Aimes, Iowa.
A total of ten qualifying spou
along with one wildcard berth will be
on line in the regionals. Ea
Carolina will have nine wrestlers
entered in the two-day tournament.
"We've had some pretty tough
luck during the regular season with
all the injuries we've had, but we've
got several wrestlers who can win
their weight classes Hill said
SPAGHETTI
Shoney's Real
Italian Spa-
ghetti with su-
perb, tasty,
meat sauce,
Parmesan
Cheese, Hot
Grecian
WITH
SALAD
$299
SHONEYS
Located beside
the Ramada Inn,
264 By-pass.
COUPON
SPECIALS
1 Howdy ECU Students "
Clip this coupon for
good Western Eatin'
WESTERN FRIED
CHICKEN
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MEDIUM DRINK
$1.60
offer good 'til 3-17-79
THE kNIGHTS OF
COLUMBUS
arc sponsoring a
Blood Pressure Clinic
Feb. 21 & Feb. 28
at St. Gabriels School
1100 Ward St.
From 4:00 to 8:00
Undergraduate
�nd
Graduate
Students
Looking for a pert-time
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PARTY FACILITIES AVAILABLE
FOR UP TO 125
758-2713
2903 E. 10th St.
TMf STROM BREWERY COMPANY, DETROIT, MICHIGAN C 171
"s that cash or charge?"
,m v. � ���
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Title
Fountainhead, February 20, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 20, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.545
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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