Fountainhead, February 13, 1979






Circulation 10,000
East Carolina University
North
Vol. 55 No. ��
13Febr
uary 1979
Afro-American Center dedicated Sunday
Bj RICKI G LI ARM IS
News Editor
I he fro-American
Cultural Center at EGl
vsa- to Jl dedicated
Sun Feb. I The
it-ri nun dedicated
the cei lei to the late
Professor Ledonia Smith
Vv right.
Vv right, until her
death in June. I976,
was involved with coun-
seling minorit) students
on v ampus. During the
dedi at i n ceremonies,
an portrait of right
was unveiled bv her
son, Steven right. The
portrait was accepted by
ln Pate, Jr chairman
o the ECl Board of
Frustees.
mcellor Thomas
Brewer, Faye Elliott,
chairperson ol the cen-
ter's Vdvisorj Board.
and Kt. Kenneth Ham-
mond were also present
at the dedication pro-
im.
The principal speaker
program was
Dr. ndrew Best, ECl
trustee and Greenv ille
phv sician.
Best thanked former
chancellor Leo Jenkins
lor his help in the
establishment of the
renter and also thanked
the Board of Trustees
tor naming the center
alter Wright.
Best thanked the
Ad-hoc committee for
working to make the
memorial scholarship a
reality.
Best told the
audience that commend-
able leadership by the
administration at ECl
was a major influence
in the dedication ol the
center. He said that the
administration quietly
hut skillfull) accom-
plished its goal without
incident and this work
required courageous
leadership ot tin' high-
est order.
Best focused his
comments toward the
HEW -North Carolina
controversies and said
that these problems
underscore the impor-
tance ol leadership
necessary lor progress
in difficult time
The center for many
years has been known
as the "Y-Hut" and
was used for various
social and religious acti-
vities. For the past two
years, it was used by
ECU's black students as
a center for lectures,
meetings, and perfor-
mances.
Best said that the
center will act as an
inspiration to the unin-
spired and motivation to
the listless and uncon-
cerned. He said that
the center is to function
a- an integral part of
campus machinery for
the enrichment of aca-
demic process.
The dedication coin-
cides with ECU's annual
Black Arts Festival
which is held Feb.
II-17. So far, this is
the first center of its
kind and size.
Best stated that he
hopes the center will
stand as a blueprint for
other institutions.
Wright was a pro-
fessor in the School of
Allied Health and Social
Professions since 1974.
Before coming to ECU,
Wright taught at Bos-
ton, Harvard Universi-
ties and at Roxbury and
Simmons Colleges.
She was Chief of
Governmental and Pri-
vate Sector Relations
from 1970 until 1973 for
the U.S. Office of
Economic Opportunity,
New England Region.
Wright served on a
special committee
appointed by Massa-
chusetts Governor Pea-
body to evaluate the
effectiveness of the
State's Commission
Against Discrimination.
Best described
Wright as a prime
mover in the establish-
ment of the center.
"Ledonia Wright, affec-
tionately known as Le
Wright was a part of
the leadership responsi-
ble for the birth of the
center said Best.
"Seldom in our his-
tory has one individual
given as much to as
many as Wright
said Best.
4I like the job'
Prewett enjoys his job
By MIKE ROGERS
Assistant News Editor
Dr. Clinton R. Prewett. assistant to the
icellor-s assignments, says that lie is
enjoying his job.
In describing his job, Prewett said, "Em
assistant b chancellor lor special assignments.
Sometime- they're not so special in that they
involve collecting material.
Prewett added, "In athletic I've been appointed
chairman ol the athletic program. Also, I work in
area- concerning relationships between the university
and the NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic
sso iation.)
Prewett enjoys his job, but is impatient with the
�vness with which changes are brought about.
However, Prewett enjoys and respects the people he
work- with.
He explained that Chancellor Brewer works hard
and is an excellent scholar. He's oriented toward
improvement in all areas at ECU, academics,
student life, athletics, and alumni affairs.
as Athletic Director Bill Cain, University Attorney
David Stevens, Mr. Cliffmore, vice-chancellor for
business affairs, and Mr. Richard Blake, assistant to
the chancellor. All these people work hard and are
completely identified with ECU
Prewett also commented on his plans for the
future. "In the immediate future, we hope to clear
up our backlog of problems so that we can proceed
sensibly in our major responsibilities at ECU
Prewett's past record shows that he used to
teach science, was a principal of a junior high
school, a superintendent of schools, a chemical
engineer, and training foreman. He still teaches
applied psychology at ECU.
Prewett has also been active in various
professional associations. He is an Educational
Consultant for the American Psychological Associa-
tion at Appalachian State University and Goldsboro
Citv Schools. Prewett was also on the committee
that selected Brewer as Chancellor at ECU.
In closing, Prewett said, "I like the school. I
like Dr. Brewer. In general, I like the whole staff
and my job
He added, "I don't want this interview to end
without special notice being given to Kathy Jones
for being a most efficient and loyal secretary. Kathy
makes sure that visitors are always welcome in
He added. "I also work closely with such people Spilman 102 and 104.
SU applications being accepted
By RICKI GLIARMIS
News Editor
itions tor Student I nion committee
for the 1979-80 school vear will be
ppli
positions
accepted from Feb. 12 through Feb. 26 according to
Charle- Sune, Student Union president-elect.
CHARLES SUNE, STUDENT Union president-elect,
announced that applications for committee members
are being accepted. Photo by John H. Grogan
Sune explained one of his responsibility as
president-elect is to select committee chairpersons.
The people he selects will then be approved by the
Board of Directors.
Once the committee chairpersons are selected
and approved, they are responsible for selecting
committee members. The committee members will
be selected from the applications submitted.
The committee members, in turn, will be
approve by Sune.
The Student Union consists of 11 committees.
These include Art Exhibition Committee which
deals with art exhibitions in Mendenhall, and Artist
Series Committee which provides classical entertain-
ment.
The Coffeehouse Committee presents local
amateur acts in the coffeehouse room in
Mendenhall.
The films Committee schedules popular film
series which are scheduled every Friday and
Saturday nights and the special films which are
shown on Wednesday nights.
The Lecture Series Committee deals with
speakers generally for educational enrichment.
Major Attractions Committee present major
concerts of popular interest. Minority Arts
Committee programs functions geared for minorities
at ECU. For example, in the past, this committee
has sponsored Black and Jewish Arts Weeks
Special Attraction Committee bridges the gap
between Major Attractions and Coffeehouse. This
committee presents such groups as Nantucket.
Theatre Arts Committee presents theatre related
acts. The Entertainer Committee is responsible for
presenting the monthly guide to Student Union
entertainment.
Finally, the Travel Committe sponsors trips for
students and faculty at reduced prices.
"There are several broad areas of entertain-
ment said Sune. "Now when people want to get
involved in entertainment, they have many areas to
choose from
OFFICIALS UNVEIL THE portrait of the Late
Ledonia S. W right at the dedication ceremonies
Sunday for the Ledonia S. Wright Afro-American
Cultural Center at ECU. . Wright was a
professor of Community Health at ECU.
Vandalism, shoplifting
Participating in the ceremonies are. left to right.
Chancellor Thomas Brewer: Dr. Andrew Best, a
member of the ECU Board of Trustees: Steven
Wright: and Troy W. Pate, chairman of the ECU
Board of Trustees.
Honor Council busy
By CHRIS CACLE
Staff Writer
Two vandalism cases which occurred in the
men's residence hall and one shoplifting case which
occurred at the Student Supply Store came before
the Honor Council last week, according to Jim
Mallory, dean of men.
"When a violation of the code of conduct occurs
in the residence hall, the case is usually heard by
the House Council. In the two vandalism cases the
violation was so excessive that it was referred to
the Honor Council for dispostion stated Mallory.
Reports of violations ol conduct are submitted to
Dean Mallory and the Student Attorney General,
Kieran Shanahan, from the campus police, faculty
members and the Student Supply Store.
According to Mallory, he meets with Shanahand
and they look over reports that the office has
received and decide whether or not the report is
liegitimate.
Mallory went on to explain that the student is
allowed three days to obtain recommendations and
information for the Honor Council meeting.
Shanahan is the student's public defender. He
presents the facts to the Honor Council and sees
that the student gets a fair hearing.
The student is then charged with a specific
violation of the code of conduct and is called in for
a preliminary hearing. 72 hours are allowed to the
student before the Honor Council meets. The
student is told the charge- at the meeting and is
al-o given all preliminary information.
The Honor Council hears any case that is a
violation of the code of conduct. "The violations
mav range from anything to lying, -tealing and
cheating said Mallory.
The Honor Council is made up of seven students
and three alternates who listen to the evidence and
decide if the student is innocent or guiltv. It the
student is found innocent the case is dismissed. If
the student is found guilty, the Honor Council
debates the penalty for him. The penalty decided
may be a reprimand, a warning, or suspension from
school.
"If the Honor Council want- to suspend the
student from school, they can only recommend
suspension. The chancellor must suspend the
student. He has the final say-so stated Mallory.
"The students who serve on the Honor Council
are dedicated and sincere. They try to figure what's
best for the students and the university
commented Mallorv.
SGA approves Gay Community
constitution at recent meeting
Bv CHRIS CAGLE
Staff Writer
A motion to recon-
sider the appropriation
of $3,000 for SGA
Transit System was pas-
sed by SGA members
in i.ts meeting on Mon-
According to Wiley
Betts, member of the
Screenings and Appoint-
ment, "We are depriv-
ing students out of
$3,000 for this semes-
ter. The $3,000 will not
solve the problem for
new buses. We are
taking workable money
out of the hands of the
students Betts also
added, "It will take 7
and one half years to
pay for a new bus
Some of the mem-
bers felt that the buses
now being used will be
run down in a year or
two.
Tommy Joe Payne,
SGA president, spoke to
the members on behalf
of the needed $3,000
for a new bus account.
"Buses we have now
are made for highways,
they are not built for
starting and stopping.
The transit system is in
bad shape. The buses
are not going to all the
places to pick up stu-
dents
Payne stated, "I feel
it is good on the part
of the legislature to see
the need for a new bus.
We would be unable to
have classes at Minges
or Health Affairs if it
were not for the transit
system. $3,000 is a
good resolution for the
problem
The bill was tabled
by members until next
week's meeting.
"Approval of the
Constitution for East
Carolina Gay Commun-
itv was passed by SGA
members. According to
Jeff Triplett, chairman
of the Rules and Judi-
ciary Committee, "The
goal of our committee is
to pass the constitution
itself without any bias
against the club Trip-
lett also stated, "The
constitution came to the
committee, met all the
guidelines of a SGA
recognized organization
and passed favorably. It
was one of the better
written constitutions
received all
we ve
year.
The
val of
bill for "Appro-
SGA Elections
Chairperson Jeff Wil-
liams was passed by
members. Williams stat-
ed that he would try to
up student participation
in voting this year by
alloting two days for
the students to vote.
Two bills which were
voted out unfavorably
by the Appropriations
Committee, because
they regarded trips
were brought back for
SGA members to re-
consider.
One of the bills was
the "Appropriation to
ECl Medical Techno-
logy Club. Cathy Dixon,
a member of the club,
spoke on its behalf to
SGA members. "I feel
our bill i- just as
important as Team
Handball. We under-
stand why the travel
expense was cut oil the
bill, but the cause is
important to us
The other bill
"Appropriation
ROTC
Libby Lefler,
speaker said the
must receive two-thirds
majority vote to be
brought back on the
floor and be recon-
sidered. The bills did
not receive the majority
vote and were not
discussed by SGA mem-
bers.
was
to
SGA
bills
What's inside
Buckminster Fuller, . . . see p. 5
Halloween review, . . . see p. 7
Panhellenic officers elected, . . . see
p. 2
Calder says "no snowballs" . . .
see p. 3
Pirates rout USC-Aiken . . . see p. 8
Lady Pirates win Winthrop tourney
. . . see p. 8
HALLOWEEY
see p. 7
t
0- w m�.
im-0i-4m� �o ir ��f pr -t -�� � - �� -





Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAP 13 February 1979
Greek Furum
By RICKI GLIARMIS
News Editor
Panhellenic held
election of officers on
Thursday, Feb. 8.
These are the offi-
cers tor 1979-80: Eva
Pittman, president,
Sigma Sigma Sigma;
Sandra Moretz, vice
president, Alpha Delta
Pi; Diane Gray, rush
chairman, Alpha Phi;
Margaret Uhlig, record-
ing secretary, Alpha
0 micron Pi; Cathy
Swiggard, corresponding
secretary, Delta Zeta;
Tammy Whiteside, trea-
surer, Chi Omega; Lynn
Landough, parliamen-
tarian and Chujdain.
Alpha Xi Delta; Lihby
Lefler, public relations,
Kappa Delta; and Shelia
Mendoze, ex-officio
member. Alpha Kappa
Alpha. Congratulations
to all these girls and
good luck in the upcom-
ing car.
Announcements:
Kappa Alpha cele-
brated its Convivium on
Jan. 20 at the Ramada
Inn here in Greenville.
Convivium is celebrated
in honor of Robert E.
Lee's birthday and the
founding of Kappa
Alpha in 1865. Seven
other KA chapters in
North Carolina attended
the event.
Joni Wheeler was
selected as the KA
Rose for 1979-80. Whee-
ler is an Alpha Delta Pi
and succeeds Caren
Bills, who is a Delta
Zeta.
Spring rush was suc-
cessful for the KA s
while they inducted
eight new pledges. 18
new brothers were ini-
tiated on Feb. 4.
Tau Kappa Epsilon
will be holding their
Fourth Annual Boxing
Tournament on Feb. 20,
21, and 22 in Wright
Auditorium. A pre-
boxing tournament party
will be held on Tuesday
night, Feb. 13 at the
Elbo Room featuring a
goldfish eating contest.
Sigma Nu is plan
ning their formal at the
Holiday Inn in Kinston,
N.C. on Feb. 24. The
band for the evening is
Cleveland 0.
The car wash was
cancelled and has been
rescheduled for Feb. 17
on the corner of 14th
and Charles Streets.
The brothers and
pledges are selling
roses and singing
Valentine s for Valen-
tine's Day.
The Sigma Tau
Gammas are coming off
a successful rush get-
ting 15 new pledges.
The brothers would like
to congratulate last
semester's pledges and
welcome them into bro-
therhood.
The Sig Taus are
planning a trip to Ship-
pensburgh, Pa. this
weekend for a get-
together with the bro-
thers at Shippensburg
State University.
The Phi Kappa Taus
are presenting The
Dynamic Upsetters on
Feb. 17 at the Green-
ville Moose Lodge from
9 p.m. until 1 a.m.
Set-ups will be avail-
able. Tickets can be
purchased at the
Clothes Horse or from
any Phi Tau. Make
plans to attend and see
The Dynamic Upsetters.
Upcoming events sla-
ted at the Phi Tau
house are Little Sister
Champagne Breakfast,
Sat. Feb. 24; Alumni
Weekend, March 23-25;
Second Annual Lau
Party, March 30; and
Beach Weekend, April
20-22.
The Sig Eps are
having a Valentines Day
Party with their Little
Sisters on Wednesday
and their Valentines
Dance on Saturday.
Monday, the Sig Eps
visited all the sorority
houses to sing and wish
them a happy Valen-
tines Day. This Friday,
they will start remodel-
ing their kitchen and
later this month, the
pledges will be collec-
ting money for the
Heart Fund.
The Chi Omegas
would like to congratu-
late their new officers:

Cathy McLean, presi-
dent; Mara Flaherty,
vice president; Suzanne
Disher, secretary; Anne
White, treasurer; Debi
Gooder, pledge trainer;
Laura Hubbard, person-
nel; Molly Jordan, rush;
Tami Whiteside, house
manager; and Lianne
Ractliffe, social.
The Chi Omega fall
pledges are having a
Valentines Day Happy
Hour at Chapter X.
The Alpha Delta Pi's
are proud to announce
that they have four new
pledges.
The Alpha Delta Pi's
would like to congratu-
late Sandra Moretz, a
sister who was elected
vice-president of Panhel-
lenic last week.
Alpha Omicron Pi
elected their new offi-
cers on Jan. 31. The
new officers are Linda
Evans, president; Alice
Martin, vice-president;
Margie Uligh, treasurer;
Marcia Garrison, chap-
ter relations; and Debby
Cleek, recording secre-
tary.
The chapter sent a
rush team to Duke
University this weekend
to help set up an Alpha
Omicron Pi chapter
there. Another group of
sisters went to Raleigh
to install an alumni
chapter called Triangle
Chapter.
The Delta Zeta
Sorority has changed
their pancake dinner to
Feb 25. It will be held
from 4-7 p.m. Everyone
is welcome to attend.
Congratulations to
the 16 newly initiated
Alpha Phi sisters.
Spring rush begin
tonight at the Alpha Phi
house with a Valentine
Banana Split Party.
The Sigma Sigma
Sigmas congratulate Eva
Pittman, a sister, for
being elected Panhel
lenic president last
week.
Piraaiiuti
AMERICAS FAVORITE PIZZA

2�
fe�
PIZZA BUFFET
ALL THE PIZZA AND
SALAD YOU CAN EAT
Mon. -Frl. 11:30-2:00
�PMon. & Tues. 6:00 8:00
J
758 6266 Hwy 264 bypass Greenville , It. C.
1
L
Contest
If you are a full-time j
undergraduate at ECl .
you can now enter the
1979 Student Library
Competition to win a I
prize for te qualit) 0f
our personal library.
Three prizes will be
awarded: first. $75;
second,$50; and third,
$25. inner?- will be I
announced during Na-
tional Librar Week,
April 1-7. 1979.
Libraries will be
judged on quality of the
collection and on ima-
gination and intelligence
shown in creating the
collection.
Libraries of all types'
are eligible: collections
centered on one subject,
collections on a single
author or a few special
authors, or general
collections.
You may submit
your entire library or a
minimum of 15 books
from it. Even though
there is no upper limit,
quantity is secondary to
quality.
The committee of
judges will be composed
ol one board member
from the Friends of the
Library, one ECU
faculty member, and
one member of the
library faculty. The
competition is sponsored
by the Friends of the
ECU Library to en-
courage undergraduates
to creat good personal
libraries.
Requirements are:
an application, a list of
the books in your coll-
ection by author and
title (author's last name
first), and a statement
of between 350 and 500
words on any facet of
your collection (attach
jhis to the list and the
application).
Deadline for entries:
March 1.
LAE
The American Crim-
inal Justice Association,
Lambda Alpha Epsilon, I
is actively involved in
the constant improve �'(
ment and research in
the areas of criminal
justice. The ECU
chapter will be having
its installation banquet
Feb. 16, 7 p.m. at the
Ramada Inn restaurant.
There will be a guest
speaker and members of
LAE will be receiving
their certificates. All
persons interested in
joining LAE should get
their applications in by
Feb. 15. For more info,
call Mr. Campbell
757-6961 or Toni Dye
752-8501.
ACEI
The Association for
Childhood International
(ACEI) will meet on
Tues Feb. 13, 7:30
p.m. in room 103,
Speight. Dr. James
Wright, Associate Prof
Dept. of English, will
speak on "Black Dialect
in the Teaching of
Reading All members
and interested persons
are urged to attend.
Pti Chi
Psi Chi will have a
meeting Tues Feb. 13
at 7 p.m. in Speight
129. The guest speaker
will be Dr. Mike
Campion and the topic
of discussion will be
Behavior Modification in
Organizations. All
members and interested
persons are invited.
Refreshments will be
served.
Classifieds
Pi Sigma
There will be a
meeting of the Political
Science Honor Fraternity
Pi Sigma Alpha at 7
�ptH�t�n Fab. 13, m Rm
BC-105. All members &
new inductees are asked
to attend.
FCA
The Family Child
Association will meet on
Tues Feb. 13 in Rm
143, Home Ec bldg. All
majors and minors are
urged to attend.
Writers
The Writer's Guild
will hold a meeting in
Austin 207 on THurs
Feb. 15 at 7 p.m. A
reading is scheduled.
Official business will be
discussed. All members
are strongly urged to
attend.
ECGC
INDT
Anyone interested in
Industrial Technology is
invited to attend the
next Industrial and
Technical Education
Club meeting. The
meeting will be held in
Flannagan 104 on Turs
Feb. 15 at 5 p.m. Plans
for the spring semester
will be discussed.
Everyone is welcome.
Gamma Beta
Gamma Beta Phi will
meet on Thurs Feb.
15, 7 p.m. in Menden-
hall 244. .All members
are urged to attend.
Semester dues are
payable at this meeting.
Bodies
There will be a dinner
Tues Feb. 13, at the
East Carolina Gav
Community Discussion.
The discussion wrtlHwf"
held after dinner. All
interested people are
invited. Please bring a
beverage to drink with
dinner that will be
appropriate with spa-
ghetti.
Contests
White Hall Special
at Attic, Tues Feb. 13,
9-12 p.m. Free pinball
& footsball, beer
chugging contest and
other contests. Bring
your Valentine.
Phi Sigma
Phi Sigma Pi will
hold its monthly-
business meeting Wed
Feb. 14 at 5 p.m. The
meeting is at the
Mendenhall Multipur-
pose Room.The Spring
Smoker will follow the
business meeting.
Proper dress is re-
quired, and all brothers
�me urged to attend.
Bio. Club
The Biology Club
will meet Turs Feb. 15
at 7 p.m. in Rm.
BN-102. This will be
our first business
meeting. Business dis-
cussed will be projects,
pre-registration, under-
graduate research op-
tions, and committee
work. This will be a
short meeting. Plan to
be there! Everyone
invited.
The Sociology-An-
thropology Club will
sponsor a lecture pre-
sentation on Wed
Feb. 14, 7:30 p.m. in
BD 302. Dr. Paul
Tschetter will speak on
"Where the Bodies are
Buried: History of
Italian Cemetaries
All interested welcome.
Refreshments served.
Weight
Would you like to
lose weight and get in
shape for the warm
weather ahead? A class
of graduate and under-
graduate students are
conducting a weight
reduction class each
week for a nutrition
class project. Partici-
pants are needed.
Anyone interested is
asked to come to the
Infirmary on Sun 7
p.m. For more info, call
Joan at 752-1366. Only
a limited number will
be accepted, so call
now.
SOULS
There will be a
S.O.U.L.S. meeting
Thurs Feb. 15, 6 p.m.
at the Ledonia S.
Wright Afro-American
Cultural Center. We are
in the process of
planning activities and
cultural events for the
spring. If you have any
ideas that will be
helpful, please feel free
to share them with us.
It is very important that
you be present and on
time.
Bake sale
The Theta Alpha
Chapter of the Alpha
Kappa Alpha Sorority,
Inc. is having a bake
sale on Wed Feb. 14
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
in the lobby of the
Student Supply Store.
Come and get some
sweets for the sweet on
Valentine's Day.
Service
An Episcopal service
of Holy Communion will
be celebrated
tonight in the chapel of
the Methodist Student
Center, (Fifth Street
across from Garrett
Dorm). The service will
be at 5 p.m. with the
Episcopal Chaplain, The
Rev. Bill Hadden
celebrating.
A supper will be
served at 6 p.m. at. the
home of Eleanor Cole-
man, 1003 E. Fifth St.
(across from the main
gate). Bible study will
follow. All students
welcome.
Study
If your room is too
noisy or you dread the
long walk to the library,
don't despair. There is
a study area available
on the hill for any
students who wish to
take advantage of its
presence. It is located
�n the M.R.C. meeting
room in the basement
of Scott Hall. Enjoy a
quiet, supervised study
area on Sunday through
Thursday nights, 8-12
p.m.
torrent�!
needed; Responsible fe-
male roommate to share
2 B.R. apt. at East-
brook. Call immediately
758-5794.
ROOM F"R RENT in
big hous' blocks
from campus, 137.50
per mo. plus utilities.
Phone 752-9325.
FOR SALE: Plymouth
Sattelite, 2 doors, V-8
361 engine, in good
condition, has new tires.
3
vmmmtmm
j
mm �-
mm
$480. Call 756-2362 any
time.
FOR SALE: Pioneer
SX-550 Receiver, Pio-
neer PL-112D turntable,
1 pr. Craig Series 5000
speakers, S425; also
Pioneer Supertuner 8-
track with FM radio,
$125 or best offer; call
946-5356 after 5 p.m
ask for Henry.
fretsona�
STUDENT HELPERS
with an interest in
electronics and compu-
ters to assist in devel-
opment of an instru-
ment-computer system
for blind science
students, S3 per hour.
Contact David Lunney,
Dept. of Chemistry,
757-6713 or 757-6711.
SOMEONE NEEDED to
keep church nursery
(ages 1 12-4 yrs.)
every Sunday, 11-12.
$20 monthly. Call
756-3988 anytime.
TYPING SERVICE
term papers, resumes,
etc. Call Deborah,
752-2508.
BELLY DANCE classes
with Sunshine beginning
soon. Call 758-0736
(phone recently out of
order, call again).
YOGA classes be-
Greenpeaee
The next meeting of
Greenpeace will be held
Wed Feb. 14 at 7
p.m. in the Board Room
, ,af, Shepja9cU Memorial
Library " fifrrubwn -on-
Evans St.). Very im-
portant material about
upcoming harp seal and
whale action to be
discussed. Also, two
slide shows: Greenpeace
ConfrontationHistory,
and Greenpeace Whale,
will be presented.
Anyone may attend and
all members are urged
to attend this important
meeting. Much strategy
will be planned. For
more Information,
contact Jerry Adderton
at 758-6259 after 5 p.m.
on weekdays.
LTC
Eye Will
The Greenville
Lions Club will sponsor
an Eye Will drive in
the Student Supply
store foyer from 9
a.m3p.m. on Thurs
Feb. 15. Tables will be
manned by club mem-
bers who are on the
faculty and staff at
ECU.
There are over one
million visually handi- ;
capped persons in the j
U.S. today. You can !
help one or more of
these blind persons to
be as fortunate as you
are. The priceless gift
of sight that you can
give will cost you
nothing, and the eyes
that you pledge, to be
used after your death,
are given without
charge to a visually
impaired recipient. All
of the simple details
and a donor pledge
form are yours for the
asking.
ginning Feb. 27 at 7:30
p-m. Ail interested
persons are invited to
attend. Call Sunshine
758-0736 mornings &
evenings.
ANOTHER DISCO
CLASS - due to demand
will begin this Friday.
Still $10mo. AH levels.
Call 758-0736 mornings
Are you looking for
relief from all the
pressures of the week?
hy not come to
Leadership Training,
Class and not ualy -pel
that relief, but a!
learn how those pres-
sures can be taken
more easily. Come to
Brcwstrr-D, 311 on
Thursday night for
fellowship and plenty of
singing, too. It is held
from 7-9 p.m. and is
sponsored b Campus
Crusade for Christ.
Tutoring
Don't let a cloud
doubt about our
studies hang over our
spring break! If you
have or will declare a
major in a health re-
lated field (including
medicine, premedicine.
predentistr, nursing, or
allied health and social
professions), you mas
qualify for free tutoring
from the Center for
Student Opportunities.
For information about
tutoring, health careers,
counseling, test anxietx
assistance, lessons in
focusing or speed-
reading, and other free
professional services,
stop b CSO, Ragsdale
208, or call 757-6122 or
6075.
Bake tale
Sign Language Club
will have a Bake Salt
held at the Student
Supply Store Thurs
Feb. 15 from 1U
a.m3 p.m. Come over
and enjoy various
homemade sweets for a
very low price.
evenings.
w
WBWwliiai- imimt






Valentine's Day a boom for merchants
By KAREN WENDT
Staff Writer
St. Valentine's Day
Has been, as usual, a
financial boom to local
merchants. The buving
1,1 gifts tor loved ones
fnends, and relatives
Jas h'� fast and
furious.
JKLEebruary1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Paoe 3
News writers needed.
Call 757-6366
A wide
gifts have
variety of
been pur-
chased. Some of the
traditional and
most definitely unique.
alentine cards, of
course, have been the
m
some
biggest sellers. Card
counters have been
mobbed with sweet-
hearts, wives, and hus-
bands looking for that
perfect card.
From loving, to
comic, to cruel, the
cards express almost
everyone's feelings. And
if by some off chance
you can not find the
card which expresses
your feelings exactly,
then there are cards
which are blank on the
inside so that your own
message can be inser-
ted.
The traditional gifts
have been selling well,
too. Heart shaped boxes
of chocolates seem to
be a popular item for
both guys and girls.
Some shops have even
offered special prices on
these items.
Jewelry has also
been a big seller this
year. Shopkeepers say
that any kind of jewelry
that has to do with
hearts or flowers will
sell well. Simple gold
chains are a good item
to consider, too.
Local florists say
that flowers have been
a fast selling item.
Roses in groups of two
or throe, or up to a
dozen have been order-
ed lor the big day.
Specialty bouquets, us-
ing any and all types of
spring flowers have also
been popular choices
with both men and
women. Some girls are
also ordering green
plants for their boy-
friends. A few guys on
earn pus will be re-
ceiving red carnations,
too.
Girls have been
getting their special
guys a wide variety of
items. In one store,
contacted mobiles, were
the most popular item,
while another said that
wall hangings were the
best sellers. Pot candles
have also been a big
item in Valentine gift
giving.
One strange, but
popular, item is some-
thing called the "Horny
Toad I can not des-
cribe them fully in this
article (after all this is
a campus newspaper)
but let it suffice to say
that these are very
masculine little frogs.
two
has
B) Mark Jacobs
Staff Writer
I" the past
weeks, Greenville
received a considerable
amount of snow. Many
problems arise when the
Nmte blanket appears.
vet tlies, problems can
be solved with a little
Help from the ECL
Securit Police.
in
Ten windows
y-cock Hall were
ken due to the
n of a few
ts, said Calder.
He also stated that
i ases of broken
i ar w indshields and
dent. autos, caused b)
alls tossed at cars
re reported.
ing
w ing
men
"II top
� if
continued.
an leeball at
the same as
a rock ;�(
e. l e'll charge
with assault
reasoned that
are on dutj
of college hill,
no people are
damage
cars, how is
determine who
he to
actually
is doing the damage!
A
to
person may
the security
come
office
a damaged
but without
in
to report
windshield,
the identification of the
violator nothing can be
throwing snowballs at
By MARC BARNES
News Editor
Rumors which have
been circulating during
this past week concern-
ing a redesign of the
campus mall are un-
founded- at least for the
moment, according to
James Lowry, Director
of the Physical Plant.
Rumor had it that a
plan was afoot to create
little hills and valleys in
the mall by bringing in
fill dirta style reminis-
cent of New York City's
famed Central Park.
"Dr. Brewer has
done to assist.
Calder warns those
who enjoy the act of
target-snow ball practice
by adding, "at N.C.
State a group of college
students were tossing
snowballs at passing
cars and one ear was
hit. The driver jumped
untrue
been discussing the idea
(of relandscaping the
mall) Lowry said. He
added that someone had
come up with a plan of
building hills into the
mall, but the idea was
quickly shot down lie-
cause handicapped stu-
dents could not nego-
tiate land designed in
this way.
"We had a land-
scape architect to come
out and look at the mall
for a day or so Lowry
said, but there were no
definite plans made.
He added, "There is
nothing, really, to re-
port at this time
from his car, pulled ;
gun and shot into tin
group hitting one
student in the hip.
Think twice before
throwing your next
COUPON
SPECIALS
4 Howdy ECU Students "
Clip this coupon for
good Western Eatin'
WESTERN BIG
CHEESEBURGER
HOLSTER OF FRIES
MEDIUM DRLK
$1.60
offer good 'til 3 10 79
You almost have to see
them to believe them.
A lot of other, more
conventional stuffed
animals have been pur-
chased by the local
men. Small, fuzzy rab-
bits, bears, monkeys
and almost any other
animals that could be
named have been pur-
chased to warm the
hearts of the ECU
women. Many more
decorative items such as
ceramic hearts and
heart shaped candles
have also been pur-
chased for sweethearts
on Valentine's Day.
2to�20&,
cars
snowball at someone or
something, Calder
concluded.
10th & Evans Struts
Cm Of 1t Ox Cam
Budweiser, Schiitz. Miller, Strort's $7.88 j
Budweiser, Schtiti. Mtlter.StrohsKeos $39.00
50 Lbs. Ice $2.75!
OPtW 24 HAS.
3IL
faze.bo
i� having a.
vaU.ntin�.� cSate.
fox you
30 off cW ttfing
20 offcACEOtkx
C7� azdjo -downtown xzznviltz
itchell's Hair Styling
O x Chopping Cenrrr
-ICrccnv.llr North Clrohni 37S34
756-2950
CALL ONE OF OUR
HAIRSTYLISTS FOR A NEW
SPRING HAIRDO
756-2950
L'H'WKjG S
FOR ALL
PIZZA LOVERS
ON
VALENTINES DAY
LttiRNBH) S
Buy 2 pizzas and get
the third one of the same size FREE!
Free COKES to all the Ladies
DRINK
DINE IN AND DELIVERY
7587400
ifaafTftri
HAVE A
HEART!
MonThurs. 11:30-1:00
Fri. Sat. 11:30 2:00
Sun. 11:30 12:00
507 14th St
v
9
VY?9
Am r5� '��"��?'�'�"r .�- � w�





1
Pag 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 13 February 1979
Few suffer from
udden snowfall
Well, it was fun while it lasted.
Last week's snow storm, a blizzard
by eastern North Carolina standards,
slowed Greenville life to a crawl and
gave natives of the region a chance to
practice their latent talents for
snowman building and snowball throw-
ing. Northerners were happy to be
reminded of home and southerners
reveled in the alien precipitation.
For awhile there was even hope
that school might be closed for a few
days, giving everyone a chance to rest
up, catch up, or just enjoy the
weather, but those party poopers in
Spilman decided conditions weren't
hazardous enough to warant such
measures. Even the city schools only
opened later instead of treating their
pupils to a glimpse of snow while
they were still young to fully
appreciate it.
Countless snowballs were pitched
at helpless pedestrians and autos,
with no injuries reported. Icy roads
gave natives of the area a rare
opportunity to lose control of their
cars with some degree of regularity,
and many were forced to quickly learn
how to come out of a skid. Some
even tried skiing on a hill near the
river.
All in all, folks made the best of
it. Chimneys all over town were
busier than usual pouring smoke
plumes out over the neighborhood. It
was a time to slow down and take in
the activities going on around you and
enjoy life. Maybe we'll get lucky
again next year.
Greenpeace
American Journal
Seal massacres must stop
Chinese athletics differ from U.S.
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
Harry Edwards is a star athlete who left the
playing field a long time ago, but he is still not
through with sports. Now a sociologist and activist
whose speciality is the relationship between sports
and society. Edwards has recently returned from
2hina, where he found marked differences between
Chinese and American approaches to sports.
Those differences can be summed up in two
words, Edwards says: 'participant' and 'spectator
"China operates a mass sports program Edwards
explains, "whereby everyone is encouraged to
participate on one level or another in sports, games
and daily recreation
The U.S he says, despite the current boom in
recreational sports like running, skiing and tennis,
and the popularity of rec leagues and intramurals,
has essentially "an elitist program geared towards
the production of superstars for spectator sports and
the promotion of expensive sports equipment.
"In China Edwards observes, "you see people
on sidewalks, in the streets and in other public
places, in the pre-dawn hours before work, doing
Ta'i Chi and other basic exercises designed for
people of all ages and both sexes. No specialized
equipment is necessary, and no one thinks this is
weird, Here if you were out at that hour doing
pushups in the yard, folks would think you were
crazy-and you'd be lucky if you weren't mugged.
"The Chinese also do exercises during work
breaks, which is especially valuable for people with
rountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community lor ovor SO yoors
EDITOR
OOUG WHITE
PRODUCTION MANAGER
STEVE BACHNER
NEWS EDITORS
RICK I GLIARM IS
MARC BARNES
Assistant News Editors
Richy Smith
Mike Rogers
TRENDS EDITOR
JEFF ROLLINS
Assistant Trends Editors
Barry Clayton
Bill Jonas
SPORTS EDITOR
SAM ROGERS
Assistant Sports Editor
Charlas Chandlar
ADVERTISING MANAGER
ROBERT M. SWAIM
Assistant Advertising
Manager
Tarry Harndon
Advertising Salesman
Paul Lincka
Chief Ad Artist
Jana Walls
Proofreaders
Daidra Dalahunty
Su� Johnson
David MMsr
Typesetters
Jaanatt Coats-
Dabbia Nolaiing
Cartoonists
Sua Lamm
Barry Clayton
FOUNTAINHEAD la tha sludant
nawspapar of Eaat Carolina Unlvarslty
sponsors by tha Madia Board ol
ECU and Is distrlbutad aaeh Tuaaday
and Thursday during tha acadamic
yaar (weakly during tha aummar).
Editorial opinions ara thoss ol tha
Editorial Board and do not nseassart-
ly rafloct tha opinions of tha
unlvarslty or tha Madia Board
OMicas ara locatad on tha sacond
floor ol tha Publications Cantar (Old
South Building). Oar mailing
ECU, Oraanvilla, N.C. 27SJ4.
Tha phona numbara ara:
7S7-mt, �3�7 SJOt. Subscriptions
ara $10 annually, alumni � annually.
inactive jobs, like clerical workers. The body is
regarded as a tool and people have a responsibility
to keep it in repair. The Chinese refer to this as
physical culture and it's actively promoted, even
written into their constitution
Edwards' observations come from a tour of
several weeks' time that he, along with several
dozen American academics, athletes and sports-
writers, took at the invitation of the Chinese
government.
"You can analyze this thing for the price of a
ticket he says.
'You can walk into a stadium and you can find out
what is going on with women, with blacks, with the
working class. You can find out what is going on at
the top
If China's approach to sports reflects the
cooperative work ethic of its people, America's
obsession with stardom and victory at any cost
reflects our basic values of competitiveness and
individual achievement.
In our system, success is promised to all who
work for it, and the greatest success story of all is
that of the professional athlete. "The reality is that
there are only a few thousand individuals in this
country who are good enough to play professional
sports Edwards says, "and the rest of us are
relegated to playing increasingly prohibitive prices to
watch them do it
Speaking of millionaire club owners and
promoters, Edwards is openly scornful. "They'll see
you turn into a bag of pus, they'll see you turn
into an egg, as long as you go through those
turnstiles he says. Spectator sports, in Edwards'
view, reinforces a type of vicariousness, a passivity
"that is not only unviable, but malignant
Harry Edwards has the air of a person who has
seen too much pornography to retain much interest
in sex. "I lost interest in sports when I stripped off
my basketball uniform at San Jose State in 1964
he says. "I haven't thrown a ball or attended a
contest for pleasure since. I'm interested in society
not sports
Recreational sports in America are lucrative
sources of income for athletic entrepreneurs, as the
sales of new skis and running shoes, tennis rackets
and other products, attest. "It's a trendy thing in
certain circles to be into, let's say, running
Edwards remarks; "especially business and govern-
ment circles in the big cities. And having the
'right' equipment is a status thing. You'll notice
very few people doing things you can do alone,
without namebrand gear
A Super Bowl, a World Series or a Stanley Cup
final would be an anomaly in China, where, says
Edwards, sport-as-spectacle is down-played and the
motto governing athletics is "friendship first,
competition second This pacific outlook will be
tested, however, when the Chinese enter the
Olympics, as they may do for the 1980 Games.
"The Chinese may have a profound impact on
international sports, or the contact may change
them. It'll be interesting to see which way it will
go Edwards muses.
"You have to change society as a whole before
you can change sports Edwards says flatly. "If
you could change sports before you change society,
it would be the first time in history that the tail
has wagged the dog
David AraMttroag, a former editor of the Berkeley
Bat is a syndicated eaJaavaart hawed is Berkeley,
Ca.
By JERRY ADDERTON
Greenpeace Support of Greenville
It is approaching a grim time on the ice floes of
Newfoundland. Thousands of baby harp seals are
about to meet a cruel and senseless death so that
the world's affluent may flaunt their wealth under
the guise of "fashion
Protests of the hunt have become as much a
part of the spring ritual as the slaughter itself. Year
after year people stand by and watch in helpless
horror as the massacre of infant harp seals takes
In 1977 at least half of all pups born were killed
a frightening percentage of a species that has
been so heavily depleted. The 1978 kill quota was
increased over the '77 level by 10,000 and neither
me or 78 quotas were ever reached.
An argument raised by the Canadian government
officials is that the hunt is an economic necessity -
nothing is farther from the truth. In actuality, .1
percent of the Newfoundland economy is dependent
upon sealing and only .2 percent of the Province's
560,000 people are employed in the commercial
sealing industry.
Each spring since 1976, Greenpeace has sent
members to the ice floes off the coast of
Newfoundland to try to bring an end to the seal
hunt. By non-violently interfering with the hunt we
have attempted to save the seals, and at the same
time draw increased public attention to the hunt.
Our real successes have been in magnifying public
outrage. In the last year:
-The United States House and Senate passed a
joint resolution condemning the hunt.
-The governments of France and Italv have
banned the importation of harp seal pelts.
-The Frankfurt Fur Auction, the largest of its
kind, has now refused to handle harp seal pelts.
-Public demand for seal furs has decreased
considerably, as well as the price of the pelts
themselves.
We will again go to the ice this March.
Greenpeacers will again do their utmost to save the
seals and insure their continued existence. The
pressure is on those responsible for this outrage. It
is up to all of us to keep applying that pressure
until the hunt is brought to a halt.
Write letters to these people and let them knew
of your opposition to this senseless slaughter - let
your voice be heard so that the seals mav live:
Prime Minister Trudeau
House of Commons
Ottawa, Ontario Kla OA3
Premier Frank Moores
Confederation Bldg.
St. Johns, Newfoundland
A1C 5T7
Canadian Ambassador
Mr. J.J. Warren
1746 Massachusetts Ave.
Washington, DC 20036
Norwegian Ambassador
Mr. Soren C. Sommerfelt
4200 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20016
Forum
Society bans ECU for trangression
8
To FOUNTAINHEAD.
Day 4, Year of the
Sheep
East Carolina Univer-
sity Chapter, Secretary
American Horological
Society
East Carolina Univer-
sity
Dear Secretary:
The Executive Com-
mittee of the American
Horological Society re-
grets to inform you that
as a result of a vote of
the general membership
(215 2360 to 117 560)
the East Carolina Uni-
versity Chapter has
been put on probation.
The Committee on
Aberrations reported at
the Winter Soltice meet-
ing that a recent inves-
tigation of the docks on
your campus revealed
that:
1. Graduate students
in the Department of
Ecology had implanted
electrodes in several
large sea mammals and
that clocks in the
Speight Building were
then programmed to
indicate the local time
at the location of each
implanted organism.
2. The results ob-
tained by the proce-
dures indicated above
were almost useless be-
cause while data on
longitudes were good,
data on latitudes were
insufficient.
The Executive Com-
mittee of AHS suggest
that steps be made at
your institution to pre-
vent, in the future, the
use of clocks in poorly
designed studies.
The. duration of pro-
bation has been set at
eight lunar months, at
the end of which the
Committee on Aberra-
tions will re-evaluate
your situation. In the
meantime, you are in
structed to limit your
time-keeping mechan-
isms to sun duds (cali-
brated according to pro-
cedure 3Xi-009).
Any questions you
may have should be
directed to the Execu-
tive Committee hero at
the national headquar-
ters.
PS. This is in
reference to all the
operating but inaccurate
clocks .� the Speight
Executive Committee,
Chairkeeper
American Horological
it c � Society
-T-S. Naval Observatory
Annex
FOUNTAINHEAD
praised by Cole, Schti
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
We received a pack-
age from BUI Sheppard
�t week which �.
tamed an article entitled
The Roxy Books II
Cale and Don Schliti
Audie, ajraeif
�nd Don cannot eXprea.
The
ta'S!
�uVout
m" � by word of
Efts :� kTr
Cale anfj D�� ci
saufer
A�fce Aahworth
Terry Herb
J�J. Cak
� bbbSjB I
f






ww
13 February 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Pager 5
�B-
Cafe & Schlitz give
concert at the Roxy
Bv CHRIS FARREN
Staff Reporter
This past weekend, J.J. Cale and Don Schlitz
dayed tour shows to a packed and energy-filled
o rheater. The show was another in a series of
fine concerts tin- Roxy has been providing the
enville area lor the past few years.
Don Schlitz. a new name in the Nashville music
scene, opened the show, and while the majority of
audience had come to see Cale, Schlitz' bright
attitude and soothing voice were a pleasant surprise.
He moved through a thirty-five minute set which
included man) different kinds" of tunes, from country
lu - and even a 'gospel song for atheists
Playing acoustic guitar and accompanied by a
ami electric guitar, Schlitz's sound was diverse
yel perceptivel) affected by the rambunctious energy
rowd. He kept the majority of his tunes up
tempo arnJ dared to slow the pace down only once
for a beautiful song he had written while visiting
the Outer Banks of North Carolina.
He played with the kind of innocence that only a
new performer has, and gained the crowd's approval
it revealing he was born and lived for twenty
in Durham, North Carolina. Schlitz seemed
uineh excited to be playing in his home
for the tir- time, and told the crowd straight
i ii he a performer that they are
hear a lot more from. He ended his set
witl hit -ingle 'The Gambler a rambling
with thought-provoking lyrics.
Wl il the response to Schlitz was nothing
rwhelming, his job as an opening act was well
and he proved himself as a rising
songwriter. After all, the job of an opening
act for someone else is not an easy one, and the
vl was itching to see Hale.
After a brief intermission and numerous trips to
the Roxy's natural food concession stand, the crowd
got their first taste of J.J. Cale.
Dressed in jeans, Cale silently took the stage
followed bv his six piece band (including two girls
in sparkled silk pants). The group started straight
into a song and proceeded to move, rather
haphazardly through a show which contained all of
Cale's FlM hits, including "Cocaine "Magnolia"
and "After Midnight
Cale is truly a good songwriter and a very
creative guitarist; however, his singing is extremely
low-energy and practically non-melodic, which is
probably why other performers make out better
recording his songs than he does himself.
Cale and his band played no-frills music, and
while not as basic as traditional blues and played
with very little outward emotion, the songs seemed
to express his gut feelings.
The Roxy is an extremely unique place to see a
concert, because the traditional and typical mystique
between the audience and performer is broken
down. In other words, the casualness of the
atmosphere and the closeness of the surroundings
put the performer on more an even level with the
listeners, just as you might see a performer in a
bar. One gets the feeling that the artist is playing
and relating to real people in the audience and not
just a mass ot faces.
A lot deserves to be said about the intimacy and
air of a small and casual concert like those put on
at the Roxy; and even though J.J. Cale is a man of
few words, he let his guitar do the talking and the
bond he developed with the audience was more on
a musical level, which is probably the way it should
be, anyhow.
Cale performed steadilv for nearly two hours.
His guitar playing captivated many listeners, while
'One of the great minds of the century9
J. J. Cale
his refusal to really "boogie" dissappointed others
who had come to get crazy.
Still, the music was good and the sound
surprisingly consistent and clean. It was more a
concert to sit, listen and relax to, rather than one
to lose control at. Exemplary of this casualness on
stage was Cale's request to the band during his last
Don Schlitz
encore.
The request?
"Play something somebody
In the end, people were happy, and the Roxy
had succeeded in bringing another worthy and
talented performer to this area.
11J I U A U !�
Scholar Buckminster Fuller lectures at McGinnis
By WILLIAM JONES
ssistant Trends Editor
On Feb. lJ . ECU was priviledged to
host oi great minds of this century.
Dr Buckminster Fuller, at the invitation of
ECl - Visual Art- Forum, spoke to a ne-third
filled McGinnis Auditorium. Those attending had
braved roads ice-slickened by one of the area's rare
-now storms.
Dr. Fuller is, perhaps, best known as an
architect. His most famous design is the "geodesic
dome which received world wide recognition at
Expo '67. (Quite an accomplishment for a man who
at the age of 32, "lost his shirt" in the
run-1ruction business.)
Dr. Fuller has been granted 41 honorary
degrees. He belongs to far too many societies, clubs
and fraternities (serving executive functions in
manv) to elaborate upon. He has authored dozens of
book on topics ranging from physics to poetrv.
Despite his advanced age, the 84 year old
scholar manages to make public appearances on an
average of once every four days.
The McGinnis audience expressed their apprecia-
tion b) a standing ovation as "Bucky" came on
stage.
Dr. Fuller seemed warmed and grateful for this
reception. He asked that the house lights be turned
up or the spotlights dimmed so lie could see the
faces in the audience. Neither of these being
possible, he moved out of the brightly illuminated
area of the stage to establish eye contact.
This informal easiness pervaded throughout his
talk. The endeared audience listened, attentive and
respectful as the aged pansophist spoke; falteringly
at first, (Dr. Fuller prefers to deliver his speeches
impromptu) and then with such speed as to make
catching each detail difficult. Dr. Fuller's honest
modesty served to generate all the more respect for
the man.
Dr. Fuller began his speech with a short
autobiography. He was born in 18, the year
Marconi invented the wireless. He turned 8 the year
of the Wright Bros famous "first flight
The "horse and buggy" world into which Dr.
Fuller was born affected him with its" "limited
viewpoint" of reality. The same mentality which saw
steamships as the ultimate method of travel, while
viewing flight as impossible, could not conceive of
the technological changes to come.
To illustrate the inaccuracies held as truth when
he was voung, Dr. Fuller showed a slide of a world
map in common use during the early years of this
century. Among other proportionalities, the map
showed Greenland to be 3 times the size of
Australia.
This society, which held as truth what, today, is
known to be falsehood, discouraged individual
thinking and imagination. Children in particular,
were told, "what you think is not important Keep
your mouth shut and listen.
Dr. Fuller attended Harvard 1913-1917. After-
wards, during the first World War, he served in the
Navy.
Upon leaving the Navy, he went into the
construction business, using money borrowed from
friends as a stake.
After a short while, it became obvious to Bucky
that he could not honestly make a living in the
construction world. He could make a profit, or give
his clients their money's worth. Not willing to cheat
people, he chose to lose money.
Bv 1927, he was "busted
This marked the turning point in Buckminster
Fuller's life. The guilt he felt for having lost his
friends' money was intolerable. He was ready "to
do away with himself
To justify living, he decided to spend the rest of
his life serving humanity. He felt he could best do
this by learning from his mistakes, and most of all,
thinking for himself.
"Thinking for one's self trusting one's
intuition, is the foremost philosophy Dr. Fuller seeks
to convey. By propogating it, he believes we can
continue to see the tremendous increase in
technology that has marked the last 300 years.
Without it, modern world problems will continue
without solution.
As for the future, Bucky believes there must be
major changes within the next decade.
"Nature he says, "apparently wants us here
as local information gatherers and problem solvers
But, science is making this difficult for us by using
tools "indigestible" to humanity. The general
Sf Fl LLFR. p. 7
Fuller: 'not an optimist'
This is the first installment of a two part
interview with Buckminster Fuller. The remainder
will be published in the next issue of
FOUNTAINHEAD.
Buckminster Fuller
By BARRY CLAYTON
Assistant Trends Editor
After the lecture, I spoke to William Bream who
suggested that Dr. Fuller was exhausted, but said
that Dr. Fuller would grant an interview. I nodded,
and suggested that the interview would be brief,
and mentally crossed off about a dozen questions of
personal interest from my notes (after all, the man
is 84, had just spent nearly three hours lecturing
under hot stage-lights after a jet flight and a
gruelling car trip on icy roads from Raleigh).
I was led backstage, through a maze of small
rooms strewn with ladders and drop cords, and
finally to a room that looked as if it might once
have been a dressing room.
It was a sordid little box of a room with high
windows, and lit with a single electric bulb. la the
center of the room there was a table that looked as
if had been hammered together from salvaged
packing crates. Several mirrors were affixed to one
wall, and a shoddy make-up counter stretched out
beneath them.
Dr. Fuller sat wearily in a stiff-backed wooden
chair amidst all the flotsam, and I wasn't quite able
to swallow a vague sense of anger that a man of
Buckminster Fuller's calibre would be brought to
such a squalid scene to rest.
Mr. Bream made the introductions. I
seat and we began the interview.
FOUNTAINHEAD:
"First of all, I'd like to thank you for agreeing
to the interview. I know that you must be tired. I'll
try to be brief.
"I enjoyed your talk. I think the thing that most
impressed me was your sense of optimism I had
been reaching for the proper descriptive, and with
'optimism' I proved to have grabbed the wrong one.
'Positivism' would have been much better.
Fuller:
"I'm going to immediately interfere, because I
say that an optimist is a pessimist off center. I'm a
very hard mechanic, sailor, navigator. I don't tell
people I can take them across the ocean when I
don't know ray ship or my navigation.
"To know that we have an option is not to be
optimistic. When people didn't know we had an
option, they didn't know we had a boat. They
didn't even know we had an option to make it in.
They were getting more and more dismayed by the
news. So it looks very bad.
"So, when I tell themshow themso that they
are personally convinced by the way I'm talking that
we do have an option, they feel much better.
"You don't have to know a thing to be negative.
To be positive you have to know a whole lot. I
know exactly what I'm talking about. So my
positiveness and the fact that I know we can make
it, and my feeling of responsibility to let you know
that I know we can make it, is what you call
optimism, but it shouldn't be confused that way. I
find it amazing how many people-almost everybody-
call me an optimist. It's very hard, it's touch and
go, and I don't know we're going to make it. But I
can show you that we have the possibility of
making it
mmm
OT
mmmmmmm
���:





1
age 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 13 February 1979
Halloween is 'frightening9
B BARR CLAYTON
�i�iaiit (Vends Kditor
I, personally, have
r been a fan of the
movie genre.
I he reason tor this
more than anything
the penchant on
part ol directors
mo-t especially
Vmerican directors) to
their mater-
m problem
this approach i
tkes tiio thing
- supposed to be
isible, ami
I an see some-
it becomes less
ng. I he prob-
es ii h the recent
k I lie Muuitou
the audience
understand h
medi-
w as anxious
� into the twentieth
in When Fried km
l he Exorcist, he
heavil from
id it ion.
de Palma's
i arrie was jusl a re-
familiar
P; powers,
id about
menon? At
point that
familiar with the
11 what about the
X hat
things that
ler-
�ave
gore,
me
Ut
dark-
. -
e en
a

i
i v o r s
: is
ime
Direi lor John Car-
lerstands this.
� the less
-ar is,
a person
with it.
a chair
� � i- a
in the
a
Halloween n
-� �
film
genen
a - u 'A' 1
v 11 h a
than you
kely I
a
ill) -talk high
girls � Hallo-
ght.
iii' ol a
in the
a pleasing
I I a knife ami
hing the
will walk a
avoid. But
i new one.
the best
e insane killer
Roger Corman's
Silent Niuht. Evil Nijjht
: babbling
� �- a soro-
lialloween is
-(��( ial.
ot the
- i- that we don't
� i er in the film's
ourse do we
know the killer's
tor the murders
n mits. Instead, ve
an asked by the direr
tor to accept the art oi
iolenl death as the
' r the killer
Students
share
recital
Timothy W. Love
and Meggi Louise
James will share a
recital on Feb. 15 at
7:30 p.m. in the A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall at
ECU
The recital is open
to the public.
Thi- flies in the face
ot all human reason,
and since the movie-
goer cannot make the
necessary connection in
term- familiar to
humanity, he is forced
to regard the killer as
something outside that
realm.
v hen done well,
this is terrifying. And it
i- done magnificently in
Halloween. It i rein-
forced b the bone-
scraping musical score
(also by Carpenter) and
the uncanny and innova-
tive cinematography.
1 he film opens with
a tracking-shot of some-
one peering in through
the parlor window ol
the Myers house. In the
parlor, we see, looking
through thekiller's eyes,
a young couple necking.
As they get up and
begin to climb the
stairs to the girl's
bedroom, the camera
move- to enter the
house through the back-
door. A hand open- a
i utlery drawer and with-
draws an over-sized
butcher knife. In the
parlor. the camera
pauses to watch the
boyfriend leave through
the front door. and
then silently makes its
way up the stairs where
it pauses momentarily
while a hand picks up a
clown mask and affixes
it to the lens.
Now we watch the
progression through the
upstairs rooms through
the twin slits of the
mask's eve Inexpli-
cably, the expectation
has increased, the inevi-
table ha- become more
terrible.
Through these same
lits we -ee the Myers
girl slashed to death.
I hen the camera dashes
down the stairs and out
ol the house to stand
motionless while a car
Hills up to the curb
and an adult couple
climb out.
I he tracking-shot
breaks and the camera
picks up tht" image of a
young child standing on
the trout lawn of the
Myers house. He is
full) outfitted with a
clown suit, an empty
-tare, and a long blood-
caked knife. Just the
proper image. Alter all,
it Halloween. 1963.
I he scene lade- out
t" be flicked up fifteen
Mir later. Halloween
1978. Young Michael
Myers who has spent
the last fifteen years of
his lite in the Illinois
Hospital tor the Crimi-
nally Insane has escap-
ed, driving a car that
he could not possibh
know how to drive back
to his home town to
celebrate Halloween in
hi- own terrifying fash-
ion.
I'm not going to go
into the plot of the
story because anybody
who seeks out horror
films already knows the
�lot: oodles people
die, but the heroine
survives.
FEBRUARY
1979
ATTIC
FEBRUARY
1979
N.C. No.
Nightclub
13 TuesWhite Dorm Special
14 Wed Super Grit Valentines
15 ThurSuper Grit
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18 SunSidewinder
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Wet T- Shirt Contest
16 Fri
17 Sat.
18 Sun.
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26 MonJesse Bolt Free Concert
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Manager's
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Tues. and Wed
Feb. 13th and 14th
No. 1- 8 oz.
Chopped Sirloin includes
baked potato
or
french fries
and toast.
$1.89
TRY OUR SOUP, CHEESE,
AND SALAD BAR $2.29
3005 E. 10th St.
An especially nice
touch comes at the end,
however, when an
occult theme that has
been kept lm-kc
throughout the film i
finally laid hare.
But that would reall
he giving it away.
It you like shockers,
and espe(iajy if you
like to he scared into a
high blood-pressure con-
dition, see Halloween.
t a big o�
SUB SHOPS n GREENVILLE and NAGS HEAD NORTH CAROLINA
Wed. is
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V Sub for Si.oo
with purchase
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13 February 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
Dinner Theatre features Black Comedy
B JEFF ROLLINS
Trends Editor
The Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center Dinner
l heatre was every bit a
success this year, as
the sell-out crowds can
lil attest. After
lhe dined, the au-
dience was treated to a
sparklingly witty and
just down-right funny
play, Peter Shaffer's
Black Comedy, adroitlv
directed b Mane f.
K.irr.
Ms. Farr chose a
perfect ola for a din-
ner theatre, and she
had a powerfully talen-
ted cast to work with.
Black Comedy is a
comedy of errors with
sight gags, overlapping
dialogue and stichomy-
thic dialogue that all
demand precision tim-
ing. In this perfor-
mance, the characters
ran and knocked each
other around the stage
with an impeccable
sense of spontaneity.
The can
Marvin Hunt, as
Brindsley Miller, played
with much ability a
young sculptor for
whom everything goes
wrong. He managed to
look totally scared out
of his wits and hand-
some at the same time,
the combination of
which made for an
appealingly comic
character.
Phyllis Kivett was
excellent as the frivo-
lous daughter of a
commanding Colonel.
She was amusing and
lovely and portrayed a
woman who used words
like "screamingly" and
"Daddy-peggs" with
disarming believability.
Karen Baldwin was
delightful as the old
maid who spouts reli-
gious cliches while shp
ful. She possesses a
strong stage bearing as
well as a remarkable
ability to act.
Lee Baker had the
Theatre
covertly imbibes gin.
Ms. Baldwin delivered
her dialogue with fine
insight into the charac-
ter and her facial ex-i
pressions were wonder-
Roy Ayers album 'rejectable
Angela Bo fill 'delectable'
By DAVID MILLER
Staff Writer
R,
vrrs You Send Me
len years ago Roy Ayers played the xylophone
as well as anyone in the world. Later, Roy Ayers
became renowned for playing a fair facsimile' of
commercial jazz. Today, Roy Ayers has decided he
wants to play plastic disco (Is there anv other
kind?).
Imitation jazz is slick as suntan oil; imitation
i- as unpalatable as castor oil. Listen to
yers' voice long enough and you'll begin to
believe George Benson can sing. This album was
mixed a-la-letsgetaquikdiscosmashmakeamiltodaylay
backwithprettyladeestomorrow.
u Send Me sent mestraight to the turntable
I -witch.
Avers should go back to playing vibes. That is
the one thing he can do very well.
D-minus
Angela Bofill-Angie
Angela Bofill sends me, too�straight into a big
city, slick, jazz dream. She brings me gold light in
a world of black rainbows. She brings me visions of
the soft, dark wood of banyan trees and river reeds
towering high under an afternoon topazine sun. Ms.
Bofill's music is so many things.
Even though I've never liked to compare one
artist to another, this woman possesses the most
innovative, the most phenomenal new voice I've
heard since Phoebe Snow's debut disc.
Over the Moon and Under the Sky is magical,
mystical and it gives me chills every time I hear it.
The girl is a female Stevie Wonder-
The album was arranged by Dave Grusin (who
also works with Earl Klugh and Noel Pointer). His
lush, layered instrumentation works beautifully not
only to back-up, but also to accentuate, Ms. Bofill's
vocals. Great support from session players Eric
Gale, Ralph McDonald, Dave Valentin, Francisco
Centeno, Steve Gadd and Grusin.
Every cut is extraordinary! This is the album of
the year!
A-plus
FULLER
continued from p. 5
populace i baffled rather than inspired by science
luse it is presented as a complicated, confusing
enigma.
Dr. Fuller has made effort to help rectify this
problem by writing books on such topics as
'Synergetics Synergetics is "the coordinate
system of the universe It makes physics easily
understood, simple enough for children.
Dr. Fuller has based his projections for the
future on large "patterns" in human history.
ccording to the patterns of scientific discovery, we
arc due lor another major technological break-
through around 1985.
Eventually, there will be a one-world govern-
ment, whose economic system will not be monitarily
based. It will, rather, have an economy based on
rgy; "the economic system of the universe
But. b) tar. the single most important change,
which mut take place if we are to survive on
this planet, i- a change in conciousness.
s the doctor puts it, "When I was young,
reality was everything you could see, smell, touch,
and hear We must realize reality is "like the
spectrum Only what we can see is not all that
exists.
"Conditioned reflexes" keep us from new
knowledge. Because we have been taught what
reality is, we need to "dare" to see for ourselves.
If we can learn to think freely, to respect each
other as individuals, (dare I say love each other?)
we will survive as a species, and prosper.
For example, if all the nations of the world were
to take the money alloted for defense and turn it to
constructive purposes, we could easily achieve a
tremendously high standard of living world wide. At
the same time we could become completely
independent of fossil fuels for energy within ten
years.
Dr. Fuller believes our survival or destruction is
our own choice. We have the potential for both.
The younger generations are "doing their own
thinking They are "in love with the truth An
eight year old, for instance once asked Dr. Fuller,
"if we can send men to the moon, why can't we
solve the problems here?"
If enough people come to see things in such a
light, perhaps we'll make it.
At the close of his talk, Buckminster Fuller
again received a standing ovation. He seemed
genuinely moved by the audience, and said, "I
appreciate your standing because by it you are not
so much saying 'I agree with you as, 'I even want
to let the other persons in the audience know I
agree with you
I am convinced that Buckminster Fuller
wholeheartedly believes his ideas to be well-founded
and very important to the human race.
We might do well by lending an ear to his sage
advice.
Bradley-
appears
this week
Ed Bradley, anchor-
man lor CBS News, will
appear in the Hendrix
Theatre on
Thurs Feb. 15 to
explore 'he impact of
television on world
events and American life
The lecture, which is
under the sponsorship
of the ECU Student
Union Lecture Series
Committee, will begin
at 8 p.m.
Ed Bradley was
named CBS News White
House Correspondent
and anchorman for the
Sunday evening news in
November, 1976. During
the 1976 presidential
campaign, Bradley was
assigned to cover the
activities of Jimmy Car-
ter. Prior to joining
CBS News, Bradley was
a reporter for WDAS
Radio in Philadelphia. A
native of Pennsylvania,
Bradley received his
degree from Cheyney
State College.
10 Discount to all ECU Students - Greenville Store Only
Excluding Contact Lenees and Oscar Specials
3AAD SgT REPAfrf
113 GfUKDJE AV�,
COLLEOC VIEW
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GREENVILLE, N.C. 752-1446
PHYSICIANS QUADRANGLE
OFFtCC HOURS
� A.M1:30 P.M.
WON. TUE8. THUB8. FPU.
Wmmm'
91
BUILDING A
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o
114 E. Walnut
looks and the manner of
a no-nonsense military
Colonel. His confronta-
tions with Brindsley
Miller are some of the
funniest scenes in the
play. Baker handled his
part with a capability
that was more than
adequate.
Roberson
Bill Roberson played
the gay proprietor of an
antique shop with
finesse. He didn't camp
it up too much, as
actors are tempted to
do, and yet he was not
too understated either.
His character and that
of Ms. Baldwin were the
two funniest in the
play.
McCutcheon
Bob McCutcheon's
Schuppanzigh was ano-
ther appealing charac-
ter. Mr. McCutcheon
delivered his lines with
a little more reserve
than we would like to
have seen, but then,
much of the role's
humor stemmed from
his straight faced,
understated delivery.
McLeod
Sue Ellen McLeod
played a lovely Clea. In
one of the funniest
scenes Clea is in the
room, unseen by the
other characters, listen-
ing to them talk about
how ugly she is, an
imprecation that could
not be farther from the
truth. She was a deci-
ded asset to a strong
cast.
Although Gregory S.
Smith had little more
than a walk-on part as
the millionaire, Gerog
Bamberger, what he did
he did with a marvelous
comic flair. Dana Mills
deserves credit for
designing a simple, yet
effective stage.
Comedy
Take a talented cast,
a hilariou plav and a
good director to put
them together uell and
you have a wonderful
evening's entertainment.
And that is exactly
what Black Corned
va
This week's
Free Flick
is Conrack
at Hendrix
Auditorium.
Shows begin
at 7:00
and 9:00
On Friday
and Saturday
nights.
CASINO PARTY
at ECU's own DELTA HOUSE
Feb.13,1979
8:30-until
Enjoy "Hairy Buffalo"
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Admission 25 4
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at
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Sat. Feb. 17th
9:00 1:00
BYOB
Set-ups Available
$2.50 in advance $3.00 at the door
Tickets may be purchased at the Clothes Horse
or from any Phi Kappa Tan brother or pledge
or call 752-4379.
























Pirates earn rout of
USC-Aiken 103-72
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
fter tour straight overtime games, even ECU
h Larry Gillman admitted it was nice for a
change to -it on the bench and relax while the
Pirates coasted to an easy victory for the first time
more than a month.
W ith -i players scoring in double figures led by
rge Maynor's 18 points, ECU cruised to a
2 victory here Saturday night over a hapless
I SC Viken team.
iv i- really the first time all year that I
-it on the bench for 15 minutes and relax
tn said afterwards. "1 think we're improving
We're back on our feet now, but we
il have much time to relax. We have to go to
I NC W ilmington Tuesday and they're always a
team tor us
Fortunately, however, one team which certainly
sift rank among the nation's elite was the
from Aiken, S.C. With sharpshooting forward
Herb Krusen, Oliver Mack and freshman Al Tyson
from everywhere in the first half, the
opened up a comfortable 51-35 halftime
Pacers pulled with five points at 16-11 in
earh stages on Zaeh Norris' bucket, but
g lumpers and the inside play of Tyson
the Pirate- a 37-21 lead just five minutes
Vnd after that the outcome was never in
Ma 'rod ten of the Bucs first 16 points in
half to give the Pirates a big 67-43 lead
� 54 remaining and Gillman unloaded the
ifter that.
ight that our defense after the first two
second half was good Gillman
ive a tendency to relax some when you
id. But we went out in the second half
iea to work out our defense and we
ur match-up ahm' to their patterns real
well. 1 hope we can continue to apply that to the
other teams we've got coming up in the next few
game
Following Maynor in the scoring column were
Greg Cornelius with 17 points while Mach had 16.
Krusen and Tyson scored 14 points apiece while
Mo-elv had 10. Cornelius was the top rebounder for
the Bucs with 13.
Once again, the Pirates 1-2-2 zone worked
extremely well in stretches. The Bucs forced a
whopping 21 turnovers and also outrebounded the
much -mailer Pacers 51-44.
ECU also had several players who came oft the
bench and played well in the second half. Walter
Mo-elv scored 10 points and handed out five assists
while seldom used forward Marc McLaurin chipped
in with six point
"We got to use a lot of players tonight
Gillman noted. "March McLaurin for example has
been playing well in practice and tonight he had a
chance to play. You don't want to be greedy. I
think players like Mack and Cornelius and the
other- enjoyed being able to sec some of the others
play, too
"I thought we shot the hall well, and we had
some nice assists he continued. "Walter Mosely
came in and played real well. And our open court
game worked well against them. But, again, it's
just nice to be at home
ECU outshot USC-Aiken from the field 57.2
percent to 38.6 percent while the Pirate- also had
11 free throw- to the Pacer- four.
alker Keefe was I SC-Aiken's top scorer with
14 points while Rob Matwich ami Dennis Seiple had
10 points apiece. Keefe was also the Pacers top
rebounder with 13.
The Pirates are now 10-12 overall while
USC-Aiken fell to 13-12.
Lady Pirates uin
Winthrop tourney
Bv JIMMY DUPREE
Staff W riter
HOCK HILL.S.CThe Lady Pirates ventured to
i and brought back first place honors
nnual Winthrop Invitational women's
tournament.
opened the tourney against defending
College of Charleston. The Lady Bucs
i 74-67 victorv in that contest.
Li.I never trailed, as Charleston kept the game
R - � Thompson led the attack with 19 points
unds, followed by Gale Kerbaugh with
14. Lydia Rountree 12, April Ross 11, and Marcia
10.
I Connie Culbreth and forward Jane West
Charleston with 15 and 14 points, respectively.
�h pulled down 10 rebounds.
"We did a super job in the second half said
mentor Cathy Andruzzi. "All six of the girls
ed hit in double figures
md round action pitted ECU with Francis
Mari liege. The Lady Bucs struggled to a 99-97
n.
ECl led by up to 21 points at one stage in the
ond half, but fouls plagued the Lady Pirates'
efforts. Thompson, Girven, Ross and Lillian Barnes
all disqualified in the second half.
The two team- combined tallied 59 personal
an unusuallv high total for women's
ketball.
Thompson led ECU with 38 points and 12 grabs.
Lvdia Rountree followed with 30 points and 10
rebounds. Kerbaugh poured in 14.
� big -lory of the game came from Francis
M Pearl Moore, who pumped in 52 points to
id all scorers.
"April Ross played tough defense in the first
half and held Moore to 14 points said Andruzzi.
- last five that were in there had more
pressure on them than any other time this year.
Lynne (Emerson) didn't start but she came in and
played very well on defense. Lydia was a real key
thai game
Alter two hard-fought victories, the Pirates faced
the tournament host in the finals and came away
with a victory, 76-63 over Winthrop, and the
irney trophy.
Thompson again paced the Bucs with 25 points
and I 1 boards. Rountree poured in 17 and Girven
13 with nine rebounds.
"Lynne started this game and gave one of her
best performances of the season praised Andruzzi.
"Her numbers (10 points and 10 rebounds) weren't
all that high, but all of her baskets came at critical
stages of the game
"Our offense was run really well. They were all
three pressure games. They proved to themselves
that all the training is paying'off
Region II AIAW statistics for games through
February 2 show that Lady Pirate Rosie Thompson
leads the regional scoring race with a 24.5 clip. She
also stands in second place in rebounding with 12.7
per contest.
ECU stands in second place for team rebounding
with 49.8 per contest.
The Lady Pirates travel to High Point
Wednesday before closing out their home slate
Saturday at 6:30 against Appalachian State.
ECU FORW RI HERB
KruM-n puts up a shot
in the Pirate- 103-72
rout of USC-Aiken la-t
Saturday night. I he
6 5 junior from Stiver
Spring. Md. tallied 1
points for the name,
krusen's hot outside
shooting of late ha-
been a big plu- for
Larrv Cillman - Pirates.
Photo bv
Grogan
John H

Tough road games in
sight for pesty Pirates
Marcia Girven makes her move
Photo by Chap Curley
Host Pirates tonight
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
The final horn sounded in Minges Coliseum
Saturday night and tor the first time in four games,
the ECl players headed straight for the locker
room.
Fortunately, not one overtime period remained,
and more importantly the Pirates managed a
v ictory.
something sorely needed before the Bucs begin a
crucial five game stretch Tuesday night against
I NC-v ilmington.
Many Pirate basketball observers still feel Larry
Gillman's job may be in limbo at the end of the
season. The Bucs have five games remaining, three
which are on the road, and they may determine
whether the talkative New Yorker will be around for
another year.
UNC-W awaits rematch
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
ECU coach Larry Gillman has pulled more than
a few hairs from his head lately with four of the
Pirates last five games decided in overtime. And
UNC-Wilmington head coach Mel Gibson can
certainly sympathize with him.
Gibson's Seahawks have dropped two of their
last three games in overtime periods and will trv to
snap out of a two-game losing streak tonight when
UNC-Wilmington squares off against ECU at 8:00 in
Trask Coliseum.
The Seahawks, now 15-7 overall, lost to Southern
Conference front runner Appalachian State, 62-60, in
overtime Saturday night and also dropped a 75-57
decision to UNC-Charlotte last Thursday.
However, Gibson is anxious for the Seahawks
rematch against the Pirates. Gary Cooper,
UNC-Wilmington's big forward, who suffered a
broken bone in his foot in the ECU game earlier
this year, is expected to return to the lineup after a
six game absence.
Before Cooper was injured, the 6'6 210
pounder from Merritt, was averaging 14.3 points per
game and was the team's second leading rebounder.
"We're a. close knit group and losing Gary in
that game was a traumatic experience for us
Gibson said from his office Monday afternoon. "His
loss in the first half against ECU bothered us
because we needed his scoring and rebounding
strength inside
After Cooper left the game early in the first
half, the Pirates quickly took control and opened up
a big 16 point lead at the break.
Although ECU eventually went on to win the
gam�, 92-79, the Seahawks badly outrebounded the
Gibson
Wolff
Pirates 51-39. The Bucs 1-2-2 zone proved to be the
key factor in the game, forcing numerous turnovers
while the Seahawks could manage only 39.5 percent
from the field.
"We had seen the zone before, but they
matched up well against us and we didn't make the
proper adjustments Gibson noted. "But give ECU
a lot of credit. They've played a tough schedule this
season and they've gotten some big wins.
"Probably the biggest thing they've got going
for them right now is the play of George Maynor
he continued. "Maynor's the catalyst. He takes a
lot of pressure off Oliver Mack which make ECU a
much more dangerous team. Herb Krusen has really
gone on a tear with his outside shooting over the
last few games
W'ith Cooper out of the lineup, sophomore Danny
Davis has emerged as a capable inside scorer and
rebounder Davis who played with Cooper at Pamlico
High School , has been averaging 14.3 points per
game while veteran center Dave Wolff has been
getting 16 points and 6.9 rebounds per game.
After the UNC-Wilmington contest. ECU returns
home to face Tennessee-Chattanooga and Georgia
Tech before concluding tis season on the road
against Old Dominion and the top ranked Fightii
Irish of Notre Dame.
"Everybody out there tonight wa real unselfish
and believe me we're going to need that team
effort with the tough games we've got remaining on
our schedule Oliver Mack said after ECl - easy
103-72 win over USC-Aiken Saturday. "It- nice
win and be able to relax for a change. But the
last five games are going to be tough ones
"If we win four of the five games we can finish
14-14 he continued. "And to me that will be like
a pretty successful season especiallv after la-t vear.
We've been in some awfully frustrating game- this
year and maybe with a few breaks we could have a
better record. But sometimes you just have to take
what you can get
Mack, who set a school scoring record agains
USC-Aiken last year with a 47 point barrage, scon
just 16 points against the Pacers. However, the
Pirates had five other players in double figure- led
by his running mate in the backcourt, George
Maynor, who had 18 points.
"A win like this helps the team more than
anything Mack explained. "The overall attitude i-
better when everybody gets to contribute ami we
still played as a team out there
The win over USC-Aiken snapped a two-game
losing streak for the Pirates and also ended a
stretch of four consecutive overtime games. ECU i-
now 10-12 overall and has an outside chance ol
finishing above the .500 mark with a strong finish.
"It's always nice to have a couple of ea-v ones
like this forward Herb Krusen said. "But 1 would
rather play the tough ones all the time. It is nice to
get a win without playing overtime, though. We ran
the break a lot better tonight and looked a lot
better on defense than we have in the la-t tew
games
Krusen, the sharp shooting forward from Silver
Spring, Md. has now scored in double figure- in
the last nine games and gunned in 14 points
against USC-Aiken, 12 which came in the first half
"It's all just been a matter of confidence over
the last few games he said. "The guvs are
confident in me and are looking for me when I've
got the open shot. I'm hoping 1 can contr.bute more
to the team as the season finishes
Lady Pirates lose
Old Dominion's top-ranked
women s basketball team defeated
ECU s Lady Pirates 95-70 last night.
ECU's Rosie Thompson was the
game's leading scorer with 28 points.
Old Dominion never trailed en
route to their 24th consecutive wln
this season against no defeats The
loss dropped ECU to 15-9.
t
.





t f
f r
r r f
I I
13 February 199 POUNTAINHEAD Page 9
Smith heads impressive list of Pirate grid recruits
this
have
who
h CHARLES CHANDLER
Vdistant Sports Editor
rhough the national
signing dav is not until
February 21, the ECU
tball coaching staff is
pleased with
ing lor the fresh-
lass of 179.
ate assistant coach
Ken Hutcherson savs
s tnaj be the best
�up ol freshmen ECl
has ever had.
' e wont after the
'lasers this year
Hutcherson.
e've had to compete
with some of the larger
But we are
II pleased at
int.
Though they
signed six players
rtieipated in the N.C.
Ml-Star Came,
Pirate coaching staff
: about to let up
in their efforts to
the best talent
a ailable.
W c' e signed some
standing players
i Hutcherson. "but
we hope that national
ning day will be a
day for us and
ise that total. Even
that day doesn't go
as planned, I'll still feel
we've had a great year
� iiiting
1 among the
Pirate signees is Doug
a 6'5 255
noseguard from
Pamir. C unty High in
Bayboro. Smith was
named to the All-South
tm, was named the
tnding player in
the Shrine Game, and
generally considered
best graduating
lineman in the state.
Smith will play in
the East-West all-Star
ime this summer. His
aeh in that game.
Roanoke's Nolan Re-
pess says Smith runs
like a sprinter and has
tremendous upper-
body strength.
"We've made Smith
the nucleus of our
defense Respess said
proudly. "We have to
play the 50 defense and
he should be very
effective at noseguard
The Pirates have
also signed another All-
South performer, quar-
terback Tol Avery from
South Johnston. But the
Pirates will have to wait
until national signing
day before they can be
sure Avery will don the
purple and gold for the
next lour seasons.
Avery signed letters
of intent with both ECU
and N.C. State in order
to slow down the mass
recruiting problems that
have beset the talented
high school senior.
Avery will sign with
either the Pirates or the
Wolfpaek on February
21.
An All-East perform-
er of local interest who
has signed with the
Pirates is Willie Swin-
son, a super-swift run-
ning back from Kinston.
Swinson became the
first player in his
school's history to gain
1000 yards in a season
this past year. He
gained an amazing 277
yards in a game with
Goldsboro this past
year.
The graduation of
Terry Gallaher brings
about a wide opening in
the Pirate receiving
corps. The ECU coach-
ing staff hopes they
have compensated some-
what for that loss iwth
the signing of Lloyd
Black, an All-East
receiver from Lee
County Senior High in
Sanford.
Other than Swinson,
Hutcherson mentioned
two other backs signed
by the Pirates thus far.
Tony Elliott from Tabor
City, and Norwood Vann
from James Kenon High
were both spoken of
highly.
Elliot was selected
All-State this year after
accounting for nearly
2,000 yards for Jack
Holley's club at Tabor
City. '
Though Smith has
received the most publi-
city of the Pirates'
recruited linemen
Coach Pat Dye and his
staff have several other
men who will probably
see much action for the
Pirates during the next
four seasons.
Anthony Robbins
from Bertie, Gary Gam-
brell from Eastern
Wayne, and Kenneth
Brown from Tarboro are
all Pirate signees.
Hutcherson noted
that the Pirates have
also signed three play-
ers who participated in
the Shrine Game for the
West squad. Tight end
John Robertson from
Eden, defensive tackle
Maury Banks of
Thomasville, and defen-
sive tackle-offensive
guard Mark Ervin from
Morgantown have all
signed with the Pirates.
Hutcherson also cited
the signings of split end
Keith Cowell of Pam-
lico, and Linebacker
Robert Boyette of West
Carterett.
Hutcherson noted
that the Pirates have
also signed several out-
standing players from
Virginia, some of which
will play in the Virginia
East-West All-Star
Game.
"We've signed a
couple of real 'supers'
from Virginia said
Hutcherson.
One of the Virginia
signees is James Bar-
ren, a tackle from
Virginia Military Aca-
demy.
A complete list ol
Pirate signees will be
available after the Feb-
ruary 21 national sign-
ing date.
A
TERRY'S
HAIR FACTORY
Beauty Salon
Pectotua Highway
Greenville
758-7815
OWNED AND OPERATED BY
TERRY MOZINGO
FORMERLY with La Koametique
SPECIAL ON PERMS $20.00 thru Feb. 15.
Opon Men. thru Frt. 1:00 to 9:00pm
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f'
r
"N
e�
itt�
THE FINALS OF ECU'S
STROH'S� HALLOW
DISTRIBUTING CO.
CASE STACKING CONTEST
will be held during HALFTIME at the
ECU
CHATTANOOGA Basketball Game
February 15
te'
CHI OMEGAs VS. P.A.S.T. of Cotton hall

�,
ECU RUGBY TEAM VS. ELIMINATORS
g
1st PRIZE � $200.00 & TROPHIES
RUNNERS UP � PLAQUES








1
1
1 1
rage iu rumt M.mriCMu �� ��wiu�i) .��
Monarch wrestlers upset Pirates 20-19
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
Just when the ECU
wrestling team appeared
on the verge of break-
ing out its season long
slump. Old Dominion
suddenly popped up and
upset the Pirates 20-19
in Norfolk, Va. last
ednesday night.
The Bues had just
snapped their four
match losing streak last
weekend against the
Monarchs and were
favored to pick up their
second dual victory of
the early season. But
Old Dominion seized
control of the match
with three straight wins
in the lower weights
and held on in the
upper weights to cap-
ture its fifth victory of
the season.
The Monarchs
improved their record to
5-6 overall while the
Pirates fell to 1-7.
"It was another
tough loss for us
Pirate coach Bill Hill
said. "Those lower
ueight classes really
hurt us, but I thought
we might have been
able to pull it out near
the end. If Mindell
1 -on had been able to
pin his opponent we
would have won, but he
still wrestled a fine
match.
After a double forfeit
at 118, Old Dominion
reeled off three straight
victories to grab a 14-0
lead before the Pirates
could register their ini-
tial win in the match.
Old Dominion's
Wayne Martin pinned
David Jerose in 4:46 at
126, while Ed Carlson
and Buddy Lee both
earned major decisions
at 134 and 142. Carlson
topped Jim Osborn 12-4
and Lee decisioned Bob
Harris 15-7.
Hill moved Tom
Robinson to 150 before
the match and the
strategy paid off.
Robinson, who has mis-
sed most of the season
with a knee injury
pinned Tim Davidson in
6:07.
But the Monarchs
came right back when
Arturo Holmes upset
ECU's Steve Goode 10-6
at 158. Tom Braine won
by forfeit for the Pirates
at 167. but ODU's John
Nowland captured a
hard fought 10-5 victory
over Vic Northrup at
177.
Pins in either the
190 or heavyweight
matches would have
won the match, but
neither Butch Revils nor
Tyson could pull it off.
Revils, however,
came close with a 17-6
major decision over Pat
Ryan and Tyson conclu-
ded the match with a
3-0 win over Frank
Nowland. Nowland
defeated Tyson last year
in the finals of the
Virginia State High
School championships.
"I didn't count on
some of those losses in
either the lower or
upper weights Hill
explained. "I knew the
match was going to be
close because we just
got by them last week-
end in the quad. We
still got great effort
from several individuals.
Want to write SPORTS?
757 6366
757-6309
Call 757-6366 or 757 6309
Pirate track team gets
divided weekend results
East Carolina split
its men's track team
this past weekend and
came up with similarly
divided results.
The sprinters and
hurdlers dominated the
group sent to N.C.
State's indoor invita-
tional which left with
some good performan-
ces, while the quarter-
milers had a disappoint-
ing trip to Delaware.
In Raleigh Saturday,
high jumper Russell
Parker won with a 6-11
effort, while Marvin
Rankins was second in
the 60-yard high hurdles
in 7.46 seconds and
teammate Valentino
Robinson was sixth in
7.58 seconds. Bobby-
Phillips was clocked
7.66 seconds in heats.
All three hurdlers
won heats, as did
Anthony Fields, who
heat of the
dash in 6.52
but did not
won a
60-yard
seconds,
place.
In
Antoine
events,
other
Holloman won
his heat of the 440 in
54.1 seconds but did
not score, the same fate
which struck Tony
McCoy in the 600
despite a 1:14.7
ing.
LaMont Bvrd
third in the 1,000-yard
run in 2:16.91, the
same place earned by
clock-
was
Jim Dill in the three-
miles at 14:30.2. Darryi
McKoy placed fifth in
the long jump at 22-9
'4- Charlie Powell was
limed in 14:59.2 in the
three-miles.
In Delaware Sunday,
Calvin Alston was
second at 48.6 seconds
and Otis melvin fourth
in 48.9 seconds in the
quarter-mile, but an
injury to James Fields
and an illness which
finally sidelined Melvin,
aborted the Pirates'
attempt to qualify for
the NCAA meet in the
mile relay.
Bill Miller ran well
in the mile, taking
fourth in 4:12.4.
RIGGAN'S
SHOE REPAIR
AND
LEATHER SHOP
New leather pocketbooks
belts, and belt buckles.
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Ill w . 1th St.
Don't miss the
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B-15, bomber, field,
deck, flight, snorkel jackets
Back Packs
by Thomas Patterson
A startling new play for mature audiences
�ased on the life and work of Emily Dickinson.
Studio Theatre
East Carolina Playhouse
$2.50 (ECU Students SI)
Call 757-6390 tor reservation-
EatlisWk
CrttmtilU, I. C.
Valentine's Day
Special
Wed. Feb.14 4-8p.ni.
Ladies tap free
Door prizes
Gents discount
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2 Oausage
3) Sausage, �leppes, Onions
With Potato Chips, Pickle
Cold
1) 3iam, Salami, �Povolone
2 3am and cheese
3) Roastbeef
.� r, w' &���� a, sttt '75
with Cheese
25
Spaghetti
y?lam Sauce 95
zuutleX Sauce95
Jrleat Sauce2.35
Unushtooms2.50
uneatballs2.65
Sausage2.65
Uxny Jtwo Sttms3.
'�95
00
Zui
zclain Sauce
jjutte Sauce�� 95
Jrleat Sauce2.35
Jrlushtooms2.50
urleatoallsa. 65
Sausage9.65
lny -iuw Stems3.00
SFetticini Jllfudo
Spinach Jllfudo.
Golden egg noodles smotheud with ou special butteiu cxeam sauce and pamesan cheese
JUsh spinach sauteed in ou special buttety cuam sauce ana pamesan cheese.
2.50
2.50
Vitiq !Roma j Special Pizza Subs . . $3.
Rolled and $aked m ouX own fusk pitta dough
t) Cheese, $eppeis, Onions, 3Latballs, Sauce, Spices
) Cheese, QeppeU, Onions, Sausage, Sauce, Spices
3) Cheese, Peppeu, Onions, Cqgpil, Sauce, Spices
4) Cheese, QppeU, Onions, Spinach, Sauce, Spices
5) Cheese, Peppeu, Onions, Sausage, Meatballs, geppeiom .w, ?
X) (X 0 �L Of C I � -Ltppexoni, Oauce, Spices
6) Cheese, XeppeKs, Onions, J(am, Salami, Sauce, Spices
7) Ckeese, Peppeu, Onions, SRoastbtef, Sauce, Spices
8) 3Ueaulld cheeu, 9licotta cheese, SToatoes, Onions, �
25
'PPets, Spices
Subs mtth mushtoom J5, i
Jlo Substitutions





Title
Fountainhead, February 13, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 13, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.543
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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