Fountainhead, February 6, 1979






Circulation 10,000
East Carolina University
North
Vol. 55 No. Mr
"fjiC �'
6 February 1979
SGA Transit receives funds
By CHRIS CAGLE
Staff Writer
After several hours
of debate and discus-
sion, SGA members
finally passed the
Appropriation to ECU
Handball Team Club in
its meeting on Mondav.
The bill was passed
with an amendment of
$685 instead of the
requested $1370. This
amendment will permit
the team to purchase
new uniforms and
attend the West Point
Invitational Tournament.
SGA members also
passed four other bills
with amendments.
Appropriation to the
ECl LaCrosse Club was
passed with an amend-
ment of $270. According
to some SGA members,
lacrosse is a vital club.
Many people participate
in it and they need
support. The money
appropriated to the club
will be used mainly for
the purchase of new
equipment.
The Expansion of
the SGA Emergency
Loan was passed by
members with an
amendment of $500
instead of the requested
$1000. The Emergency
Loan frequently is out
of money before the
end of every semester.
Appropriations to the
League of Scholars was
passed with a amend-
ment of $50. According
to Linda Barber, a
member of the League
of Scholars, the group
plans a symposium on
tobacco this year, since
it has recently become
a controversial issue.
"We will have guest
speaker, Commissioner
Graham, commissioner
of Agriculture in
Raleigh this year. We
need the money mainly
for publicity she
added.
Appropriations to
ECU Law Society was
passed with an amend-
ment of $200. According
to Lynn Calder, treasur-
er of the law society,
the club will hopefully
have Sam Ervin as
guest speaker for Law
Day 1979.
Two new legislature
members were sworn in
and administered the
oath of office by John
Alder, member of the
Honor Council. The two
new members are Paula
Ratliffe, Tyler represen-
tative; and Beth Wofe,
Garrett representative.
Tommy Joe Payne,
SGA president, reported
on his talk with Dr.
Brewer earlier on Mon-
day. According to
Payne, he discussed
with Dr. Brewer the
towing procedures, the
handicap van and title
IX. Payne commented
that he made sugges-
tions to Dr. Brewer that
instead of towing cars,
wheel locks should be
used. Wheel locks keep
the car stationary until
police are notified. This
reduces accidents while
towing which ECU is
liable for.
Charlie Sherrod,
member of the Student
Welfare Committee,
made a motion of an
appropriation to a new
bus account. The bill
concerns the purchase
of a new bus for the
transit system.
"The buses now are
falling apart and I feel
we need to get money
into an account for a
new bus. Gas is going
up and we should look
into the future stated
Sherrod. $3000 was
appropriated by mem-
bers to SGA Transit
System to purchase a
new bus. This money
will go into a separate
account in addition to
the money already
appropriated.
$3000 WAS APPROPRIATED to the
SGA Transit System to purchase a
new bus. The motion which was
passed was made by Charlie Sherrod.
Law society meets
500-pint goal set
By CHRIS CAGLE
Staff Writer
John Matthis, special
Blood drive held
By RICKI GLIARMIS
News Editor
The ROTC Blood-
mobile was held at
Wright Auditorium on
Jan. 30 and 31.
According to a
bloodmobile spokesman,
a goal was set to collect
500 pints of blood. The
amount collected on
Tuesday was 268 pints.
On Wednesday, 75 pints
had been collected by
12 noon.
Once the blood is
donated it is sent to be
processed. In past years
the blood has gone to
the Tidewater Blood
Center in Norfolk. Va.
Thi ear the blood
will be sent to the new
sub-center which has
recently been estab-
lished at the Pitt Mem-
orial Hospital. The Tar
Rier Blood Sub-Center
will now be responsible
for processing a certain
quantity of the blood
which is collected. The
remainder of the blood
will be processed in
Norfolk.
Once processed, the
blood is sent to various
hospitals upon order.
The new sub-center at
the hospital will enable
people to donate blood
whenever they wish.
The center is open for
donations on Mondays,
Wednesdays and Fri-
days.
Before a person can
give blood he must go
through registration. At
this time, the donar's
temperature and pulse
is taken. The donar is
also asked for a brief
history of illnesses. The
entire process of reg-
istration and donating
takes approximately 45
minutes to an hour.
To give blood, one
must be between the
ages of 17 and 65 and
weigh more than 110
pounds. If a potential
donor is on penicillan,
blood cannot be taken.
Also, if a donor has
had hepatitis, he may
never give blood again.
If a person gives blood
and hepatitis is dis-
covered in the blood,
the blood center will
contact the donor as
to his illness.
The blood goes
through this type of
testing before it can be
processed and sent out
to the hospitals.
After giving blood, it
is wise not to parti-
cipate in any strenuous
exercise or lifting. This
may cause the arm to
start bleeding again. It
is good to drink liquids
for at least the next 12
hours.
ECU is the major
blood donor for Pitt
County. Because of the
large amount of blood
available to Pitt County,
all Pitt County residents
receive the needed
blood free.
What's inside
Jewish arts highlight weeksee p. 6
Why we love the BeeGee'ssee p. 6
ODU defeats ECU, 90-85see p. 8
ECU swimmers upset Dukesee p. 9
Panhellenic banquet scheduledsee
Panhellenic banquetsee p. 5
ECU Iranian disturbedsee p. 3
deputy to the attorney
general with Consumer
Protection, was the
guest speaker at the
Tuesday meeting of the
ECU Law Society.
According to Lynn
Calder, treasurer of the
law society, spring
semester is a busy time
for the law society.
"We have already
planned two activities
and we hope that inter-
ested students will come
out and participate
said Calder.
The two activities
planned include a trip
to Washington, D.C
and a law day.
The trip to Washing-
ton, D.C. is planned for
March 31 April 2. The
trip will be highlighted
by visits with Sen.
Robert Morgan
Sen. Jesse Helms.
an(
The law day is
planned for the last
week of April. Last
year's speaker for the
law day was Sen.
Robert Morgan, accord-
ing to Calder. Calder
added that the law day
will be held on campus
and is opened to the
public.
There are attorneys
and other legal profes-
sionals at the law
society's meetings on a
regular basis, Calder
reported. For the March
meeting, a LSAT panel
will be present at the
meeting. The panel con-
sists of attorneys,
recently graduated law
students and persons
now attending law-
school.
'Budget not lean and austere9
ECU professor discusses federal budget
By TERRY GRAY
Staff Writer
"President Carter
has presented this bud-
get as 'lean and aus-
tere but it is not. It
still contains many ex-
cesses
The speaker is Dr.
Jack W. Thornton, Jr
an Associate Professor
at the ECU School of
Business, who in a
recent interview ex-
pressed his reactions to
the new federal budget.
"The Selective Ser-
MendenhaU tournament winners to
ECU in International Regionals at
represent
KnoxviUe
Winners of the MendenhaU Student Center 1978
All-Campus Recreational Tournaments have been
selected and will represent ECU in the Association
of College Unions - International Regional
Tournaments in KnoxviUe, Tenn on Feb 8, 9 and
10.
Tournaments were held throughout fall semester
in the areas of bowling, billiards, chess,
backgammon and table tennis which resulted in the
selection of sixteen delegates who will participate in
the intercollegiate competition.
Jeff Seidenstein went undefeated in the
five-round Swiss Chess Tournament. The competition,
held over a period of several weeks during October
and November, involved 19 players. Jeff will be
returning to the regionals for a second time this
year. He represented ECU at the 1978 regional
tournaments held in Virginia.
Bill Collier and Cris Summey won the Men's and
Women's Table Tennis Tournament held Nov 7.
Collier went undefeated in "a field of 11 competitors
winning five straight games in the double
elimination competition. In the women's tournament,
Summey defeated all of her opponents to win the
championship, singico regional winners will be
invited to represent their regions at the International
Championships in both men's and women's
divisions.
Michael Kearns won the All-Campus Billiards
Championship held on Nov 13 and 14. Donald Mills
WINNERS OF THE MendenhaU All-Campus
Recreational Tournament have been selected and
will represent ECU in KnoxviUe, Tenn. on Feb. 8,
9, and 10.
placed second. Both will represent ECU in the
regional tournament in KnoxviUe. Winning the
championship, Kearns defeated Mills in the final
game after both had won one game each in the
final match. 13 players competed in the double
elimination tournament of 14.1 continuous billiards.
Regional billiard winners will be selected to
participate in the Intercollegiate Billiard Champion-
ships to be held at the Universtiy of Michigan-Ann
Argor in April.
Linda Lilley was the winner of the All-Campus
Backgammon Tournament held Nov 20. 20 players
participated in the double elimination competition in
which there was no separate men's or women's
division. Lilley, who was defeated in the initial
rounds, came back to beat the only undefeated
player in two successive matches.
Five of the high scorers from each of the men's
and women's divisions in the All-Campus Bowling
Tournament, held Nov 30, will represent ECU at the
regionals. The winners and their scores for the six
games bowled were: Mike Stancil - 1241; L
Huntley - 1178; John Arin - 1072; Gary Shaver -
1069; Bob Rumley - 1033; (Alternate) Tony Becton -
1029; Terri Lassiter - 981; Jean Pillsbury - 966;
Cathy Schnell - 956; Glenda Palmer - 868; Anna
Matthews - 857; (Alternate) Leonor Osorio - 680.
From each of the regional bowling tournaments,
the individual all-events champion (and runner-up
for the men) based on overall pinfall in nine games,
will qualify for the ACU-I National Intercollegiate
Championships to be held in St. Louis, Mo for the
men and Miami, Fla for the women.
Mendenahll Student Center, sponsor of the
tournaments, will send all tournament winners to
KnoxviUe. Champions from schools in Kentucky,
Tennessee, Virginia, South Carolina' and North
Carolina will be participating in the Region V
tournaments held at the University of Tennessee.
'The ACU-I sponsors 15 regional tournamets of nine
competitive events which are held for men and
women in over 500 participating schools.
vice, for instance. It
still has a director,
administrator, and sec-
retaries, all of whom
receive salaries
Dr. Thornton also
criticized the scheduled
increase for Housing
and Urban Develop-
ment, which he noted
"has a long history as
a dollar-waster Among
the less prominent ex-
amples of what he
considers questionable
spending, Dr. Thornton
cited the National Bee-
keepers Indemnity
Fund.
This fund, slated
to receive $400,000,
protects beekeepers ag-
ainst the death of their
bees , under certain cir-
cumstances.
Dr. Thornton ques-
tioned President Car-
ter's reliance on the
hospital-cost containment
bill as a means of
holding down federal
expenses. "He's ass-
uming that the bill will
pass and thereby reduce
Medicaid and Medicare
costs, but this bill met
some very still oppo-
sition in the Congress
last year, and there is
no guarantee that it will
pass this year The
cost containment bill
seeks to impose federal
regulation on hospital
rates.
However, Thornton
is not completely critical
of Carter's fiscal plan.
Concerning the contro-
versial cutback on fed-
eral job programs, the
professor said that "ec-
onomy is showing signs
of strengthening, or at
least is not going into
the tailspin that some
had feared, so the need
for these programs will
be less" in the future.
Dr. Thornton also
takes issue with the
contention, as voiced by
Senator Kennedy, that
the poor will bear a
disproportionate share of
the burden.
"It's not
a question
poor receiving
of the
any less Thornton
said, "but that thev
won't receive any more.
I wouldn't call that a
'burden The in-
crease in the Welfare
budget this year, $4.5
billion, will only offset
the effects of inflation.
"I believe that the
President is conscien-
tious in what he is
trying to do, but he is
politically handicapped
Thornton referred to the
traditional onslaught of
special interests that
inevitably find their way
into the budget.
"Every Congressman
and Senator will be
pushing for his own pet
projects so that he can
bring something tangi-
ble home come election
year The result,
Thornton noted, is that
"the budget will be
exceeded
Dr. Thornton favors
the idea of making a
balanced federal budget
mandatory.
"At least it would
give the politicians an
excuse to do what's
right he said.
Thornton is currently
teaching Public Finance,
. which focuses on state
and national budgeting.
T
��
��� �'� � 4g j0 .4 4T ��.�� �
" rw�j�,M�"r'w m"mr
-mm-ms 0 4
p
I -





PQ� 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 6 February 1979
Rho Epsilon
Rho Epsilon, the
Professional Real Estate
Fraternity, will meet
Thur, Feb. 8 at 4 p.m.
in room 221 Menden-
hall.
The speaker will be
Lee Ball of Blount and
Ball Realty. All inter-
filed people are invited
to attend. Other topics
to be discussed are new
members and the up-
turning Spring Banquet
and Symposium.
Pageant
anted - Young,
Beautiful Girls! For
Miss Black and Gold
Pageant in March. All I
young ladies interested
in participating please
contact: Michael Harri-
son, Pat Simmons or
Anthony Richmond.
Tickets arc now on sale
for the Alpha's Black
and Gold Ball March
2 k ll)79. Contact any
Alpha member.
Darlings
There1 will be an
organizational meeting
"f the Diamond Darlings
for the 1979 Baseball
Season on Wed Feb.
7. 7 p.m. in classroom
142 Minges. All
attractive, interested
females who want to
support ECL Pirate
Baseball are urged to
attend. If unable to
aitetiil meeting, please
i alT 752-9989 weekday?
alter 5 p.m.
LTC
The Lord provides us
vith ways to learn and
grow in Him. As He
ha- promised us in
Psalm 32:8. "I will
instruct thee and teach
thee in the way which
thou halt go; I will
guide thee with mine
eye Receive this
promise and come to
Leadership Training
Class. There is also
rejoicing in song and
good fellowship. It will
be Thursday in
Brcwter-D, Rm 311
from 7-9 p.m. It is
sponsored by Campus
Crusade for Christ.
Services
An Episcopal service
of Holy Communion will
Ik- celebrated this even-
ing in the chapel of the
Methodist Student
Center (5th St. across
from Garrett Dorm).
The service will be at 5
p.m. with the Episcopal
Chaplain, The Rev. Bill
Hadden celebrating.
A -upper will be
served at 6 p.m. at the
home of Coleman, 1003
e. 5th St. (across from
the main gate). Bible
study will follow. All
students welcome!
Racquetball
There will be r
Racquetball Club meet-
ing Wed, Feb. 14, at
6:30 p.m. at 105 Mem-
orial Gym.
Law Society
There will be a Law
Society meeting Feb. 6
at 7:30 p.m. in Rm 221
of Mendenhall. The
speaker will be John
Matthis, Spcial Deputy
Attorney General with
the Consumer Protection
Agency. This meeting
should prove to be very
interesting and all
students are invited to
attend.
Gamma
Theta
The Geography
Honor Society, Gamma
Theta Upsilon, will be
having its first meeting
of the semester on
Wed Feb. 7, 1979 at 7
p.m. The meeting will
be held in Brewster
C-206. Our guest
speaker will be Dr.
Edward Leahy of the
ECU Geography
Department. He will be
giving a slide presen-
tation entitled
"Mountains I have
Known A business
meeting will follow the
presentation. Anyone
with an interest in
feography is welcome
o attettd. Refreshments
will be served.
Pledges
Spring Smoker,
Wed Feb. 7, 9 p.m
Aycock Dorm Basement.
For all young men who
are planning to�pledge
either spring or fall
1979.
Phi Alpha
There will be a
mandatory meeting of
Phi Alpha Theta (His-
tory Society) on Thurs
Feb. 8 at 7:30 p.m. in
the Richard Todd room
in Brewster.
Plans for the Feb
March and April speak-
ers will be made at this
meeting.
Psi Chi
Skiing
All persons interest-
ed in joining the Ski
Club are invited to
meet Thurs. Feb. 8 at 7
p.m. in Rm 104 of
Memorial Gym. Plans
for upcoming ski trips
will be discussed. If
unable to attend, please
call 758-5375 and ask
for Jeff or Rick.
Lecture
On Wed Feb. 7,
7:30 p.m. in BD-302,
the Sociology-Anthro-
pology Club will sponsor
a lecture program
presented by Dr. Paul
Tschetter entitled:
"Where the Bodies are
Buried: A History of
Italian Cemetaries All
interested are welcomed
and urged to attend.
SCEC
The Student Council
for Exceptional Children
will meet Wed Feb. 7
at 5 p.m. in Rm 129
Speight. All interested
persons and members
are urged to attend.
Psi Chi, the National
Honor Fraternity in
Psychology, is now
accepting applications
for membership. The
requirements are as
followsf"J you must be a
psych major, minor or
graduate student with at
least 8 semester hours
in psyc. A 3.0 average
must be maintained in
PSYC courses. Being a
member of Psi Chi is
a good way to
participate with others
in academic and social
activities within the
psyc department. All
applications should be
turned in by Feb. 16.
You may get an
application from the
main psychology office
in Speight Building.
Rush
Sigma Gamma Rho
service sorority is
having a spring rush
Tues Feb. 6, 7 p.m.
in Mendenhall Student
Center. This rush is
open to all interested
students.
Dance
The Mens Residence
Council is sponsoring a
Valentines Dance on
Mon, Feb. 12th at the
Greenville Moose Lodge.
This event is open to
any of the men on the
hill and their dates.
Tickets can be pur-
chased for $5 from any
MRC member or dorm
official. Tickets may
also be purchased
during office hours in
the MRC office located
in the Scott Hall lobby.
The Embers will be
providing the enter-
tainment from 8-12 p.m.
The dance is open to
couples only.
Graphics
Andrew Stasick,
Director of Pratt
Graphics Institute in
New York, will be here
Feb. 20 & 21. He will
speak in Jenkins
Auditorium, 7 p.m.
Tues Feb. 20 and
discuss his prints with
students in printmaking
Wed. morning, Feb. 21
in Jenkins, Rm 1103.
Fellowship
A soul talk is an
informal, directed Bible
study in which spiritual
matters are examined in
relation to our everyday
lives. Everyone is en-
couraged to participate
in this discussion each
Tues. at 8:30 p.m. in
Brewster D-308. Spon-
sored by Students for
Christ.
Workshop
Kenneth Kerslake,
from the Univ. of
Florida at Gainesville,
will conduct a two day
workshop in Photo
Intaglio Feb. 26 & 27.
His slide lecture will be
on Tues Feb. 27 at 7
p.m. in Jenkins
Auditorium. The
workshop will be held
in Jenkins, Rm 1103.
Resumes
SENIORS, resume
preparation is the key
factor in job placement.
National Printing Com-
pany is offering resume
preparation to seniors.
You merely submit the
information and we
provide the resume.
Photographs can be
included. Low prices.
For more information,
contact Richard Cole at
Office 758-2486 or
Home 752-1662.
Beer
peftAFrs
AM AvaILAIU TO AU ��, MOT.TT AXP STATf UPOH PATfCST OF A t 10.00
SQC8TER CKArrt CESTO rSKDSHIF FEE. MCISTHAT10B IS WQU1FED AKD EHWIUJCTT IS
LIMITED. M FEES WILL BI HEFMTOED ART THE MDKS80P KCISTHATIOK DEADLXHE.
�BBSS
laalc Instruction In darkroom techniques.
Student will develop and nrlat their own
black sad watte flla.
A. 6m-PM (Tueeoav.) Fh. 6 - Mar. 20
�. 6FH-9FH OJeoaeaaave) Fab. 7 - far. 21
FLOP UMH MtAVIHC
Learn to uaa a four-harness floor loon. A
variety of technique of waving will ba
sememe t rated.
A. 6F?�-W (Tans. A Than.) Fab. 6-15
I. 6FM-9PH (Twas. A Thars.) Far. 13 - 22
"ASIC FU11EW
Baalc Inunction In wheel-throwing and
hand-buildtut technteaes, elating, and
firing of clay. (Lab fea - $2.00)
A. 6FM-9FM (Monday.) Fab. 5 - Mar. 19
1. 6m (Thursdays) Fab. S - Mar. 22
MjHjjj WOBWWCTJtC
Technique, with handtoola. Ins tract Ion
will Include various construction proces-
ses, finishing and atalnlaf of wood to
aaabla students to produce a variety of
projects.
�rrt - � (Thursdays) Feb. 8 - Mar. IS
�JPfflWMgg EASSETUT
Create beautiful baskets and other lteas
by using a variety of techniques and
aatarlala.
7FM - Wrt (Mondays) Feb. - Mar. 12
EHAMELEP MIFJOTS
Basic enemaline aethoda will ba used to
create beautiful mirrors in a variety of
designs.
FM - Wrt (Mondays) Fab. 5 - Mar. 12
QPILTTMC
Basic techniques for drawing end assem-
blinr quilting designs Including appli-
ques, log cabin, mosaic, stars, and cath-
edral window. Method need will be
qullt-aa you go.
7FM - 9FM (Mondays) Feb. 5 - Mar. 12
BEGDC��C JEWELRY
Design and make year own jewelry. Tech
nlque used will allow for a number of
possible projects each as sliver rings,
brscslets, dey.chains, necklaces.
pendents and earrings.
Fr! - 9PM (Tuesdays) Fab 6 - Mar. 13
SITE BmWmm
a Renaral introduction to the history
and types of kites will ba followed by
methods of kite construction Including
surface decorations. A fly-In with
finished kites will conclude the
workshop.
7PM - 9PM (Wednesdays) Her. 1 - Apr.
MmsWHS
Linoleum cat, wood cuts, and cellographs
will be asad to enable individuals to
print stationery, greeting cards, fine
art prlnta or designs on fabric.
(Lab fee - 52.00)
6PM - 9PM (Wednesdays) Fab. 7-28
LEATHER CRAFT
Laern the aethoda of creating year own
beautiful leather articles. Belts,
wallets, handbag: the possibilities
an endless. (Lab fee - $1.00)
3PM - 4:30PM (Thrnndays) Pe. �
22
�baWwiL Student CehtbR OWD (hNTEP
3fH-l0pM MON-FRI lO�M-3PM5ffl
LflST Dft) TO rlE&tSTER -5flT FEB 3
Classifieds
rent�!
NEED: A responsible
female roommate to
share a 2 bedroom apt.
at Eastbrook. Call
immediately 758-5794.
Would like to sublease
2 bedroom duplex 3
blocks from campus -
call 752-1792.
Room for rent in nice
big house very near
campus, $80 per mo.
plus 16 utilities, share
kitchen, bath and
living room with 3 other
people. Call 758-3545
after 5 p.m.
pgrare($)l
If you are going to
work while in school,
why not try a job with
guts! Reall business
experience and good
income. Call North-
western Mutual Life for
an appointment.
752-408
Student helpers with in
interest in electronics
and computers to assist
in development of an
instrument-computer
system for blind stu-
dents, 13 per hour.
Contact David Lunney,
Dept. of Chemistry,
CHUGGING CON-
TEST - Fun and prizes
down at the ELBO
ROOM. To be held
Thurs Feb. 8,
7:30-9:30 p.m.
Sponsored by the ECU
Student Speech and
Hearing Association.
Art
Friday, Feb. 16, is
the fourth Business of
Art Seminar at 11 a.m.
in Jenkins Auditorium.
Dr. Laao and Dr. Davis
from The ECU
Environmental Health
Dept. will discuss
health hazards in the
arts and particularly
safety measures art
students need to prac-
tice. This is information
essential to continued
good health and should
not be missed.
Phi Beta
There will be a Phi
Beta Lambda meeting
Mon, Feb 12 at 4 p.m.
in Rawl 130. All mem-
bers are asked to at-
tend.
Lecture
The East Carolina Gay
Community will present
Claude and Carol
Andrews from Creative
Living Associates who
will discuss relationship
counseling on Tues
Feb. 6, 5 p.m. at 608
E. 9th St. Anyone
associated with East
Carolina is invited to
attend. Regular meet-
ings of the East
Carolina Gay Commun-
ity are "on Tuesdays at
5 p.m. at 608 E! 9th
St.
Movie
Fritz Lang's Metro
polis will be shown
tonight at 7 p.m. in the
Jenkins Fine Arts
Center Auditorium. It
combines elements of
social comment within a
science fiction format
creating an entire,
comples, futuristic city,
it is a tour-de-force of
special effects. Metro-
polis is Lang's most
famous silent film and
will be presented free
to all ECU faculty and
students. Chapter 3 of
Dick Tracy will also be
shown.
Reading
If you are studying
toward a career in a
health-related major, th
Center for Student
Opportunities wants
to know about ne-
opportunities to lear
specdreading, effective
organization of lectun
notes, and Active
Reading-knowing mor,
about what you read, i
a shorte time. You
course notes and
textbooks will be used,
so time spent devel
oping these skills will
also serve as coursr
study! For information
about individual or
small group sessions,
contact Beth Stephen-
son, 208 Ragsdale1, or
call 757-6122 6081 6075.
Science
The American
Chemical Society is
having Dr. Adler
Physics Professor speak
on "Relativistic Space
Travel The meeting i-
in Flanagan 202, Feb. 7
at 7 p.m. All
interested are invited to
come.
Quality � Competitive Prices e Service
"Sinrh.1 firtuviiii Fir tor 35 fears Eftrjiay Of Tie Yiar
No. 1
911 Dickinson Ave.
Phone 752-7105
8a.m7:30p.m.
No. 2
6m St. & Memorial Drive
Phone 758-4104
8a.m10 p.m.
Candies by:
Russell Stover
Whitman
Pangburn
(Jorcourcakntme
W�J 3d. m
757-6713 or 757-6711.
Male (Un-neutered)
Siamese cat wanted for
stud. Preferably
chocolate or seal point
no larger than 15 lbs.
(Queen is under 7 lbs.)
Please call Michelle
758-7044 to discuss
arrangements.
to
return
Dept.
752-0667.
Ceramics
Holly at
sketchbook. Very ;m
P�"�nt to me. ff foun
Jr�st- Black and white
eI'i-romih �d ��
tnfl�H sheepdog, �.
ers to 'Luke � "�
�� 756-1766 if fauai
Reward offered.
I
�aVr � �
����-





No migration
6 Fabruarv 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Pw 3
Blacks stay in N.C
university
By MARGARET BUNCH
ECU News Bureau
farming� Nmh Carolina's predominantly tobacco
arming country may be unique in the South in that
black, not experience an extreme out-migration of
blacks after World War II, two
researchers suggest.
nK?nk j reaso,n' according to the researcher's
published study may be the uniqueness of the
tobacco farm economy itself.
'Trying to find other or all of the reasons is
trustratmg says Dr Ennis L Chestanfi professor
oi geography at ECU, who with Dr. John Fraser
Hart, professor of geography at the University of
Minnesota, explored this question as a part of a
study conducted while Dr. Hart spent a year at
tLU as a Distinguished Visiting Professor.
Both professors put their farm background to
good use trying to discover the cause and effect
sequence of this stay-at-home attitude that came
trora the interwoven technological and industrial
changes that had taken place in the eastern part of
the state.
According to Hart and Chestang, "The
traditional techniques of flue-cured tobacco pro-
duction required large numbers of farm workers,
mostly balck people, but farm mechanization has not
triggered a massive out-migration of displaced
farm workers. The availability of a large labor force
emancipated from the land by the new farm
machines, has attracted many new factoried to the
tobacco districts, and eastern North Carolina has
made the transition from an agricultural to a mixed
economy
s described by the study, the modern tobacco
farm no longer resembles the small homestead farm
of the 1940's, it consists of many parcels of land
that are scattered over an area of ten miles or more
and the labor is not done with mule and plow, but
Situation in Iran
with monster machines costing many thousands of
dollars. Human hands have been replaced by
mechanical hands that can do the work of many
humans in a day.
Heavy labor requirements of old time farming
kept large numbers of black hands on the land until
the mechanization of the farms and the
industrialization of the area took place at
approximately the same time over a long period of
time.
According to Hart and Chestang, the black
population in North Carolina east of the Yadkin
River increased steadily from 1890 until 1960 and
did not start to drop off until after 1960. The
growth of the balck population had begun to level
off half a century earlier in the cotton south
This is not to say that black people have not left
eastern North Carolina. They have. But not in the
large numbers of other regions. HArt and Chestang
say, "Eastern North CArolina probably is the only
part of the United States where a large native black
population had been integrated inthe same situation
in which they previously lived. Blacks native to
other areas in the South were not integrated until
after they had been uprooted by migration to cities
either within or without the region.
A boom in manufacutring employment in eastern
North Carolin coincided with the mechanization of
tobacco in the area. The number of workers
employed in manufacturing in the counties of Pitt,
Nash, Edgecombe, Wilson, Wyane, Lenior and
Greene skyrocketed from 24,700 in 1963 to 50,606 in
1976, while the number of employed in agriculture
dropped by half.
Hart and Chestang surveyed the companies in
the seven county area and the spokesmen boasted
that the proportion of blacks in their labor forces
was quite close to the proportion of blacks in the
local population, about 37 percent. The Hart-
Chestang study is reported in their article, Rural
Revolution in East Carolina, in the Geographical
Review, October 1978.
Iranian student speaks out
Byt MIKE ROGERS
Assistant News Editor
Mohammad Solaman
is an Iranian student
here at ECU. For
months, Soloman has
been disturbed about
his country's problems.
Solaman related
some of Iran's political
history, "For almost
3,000 years, Iran has
been a monarchy, or a
kingdom. Most of the
time, it has been ab-
solute monarchy �
ruled by one person
Solaman explained
how the Shaw stayed in
power, "The Savak,
which is the secret
police of Iran, was
formed with the aid of
the CIA and the secret
police of Israel. Savak
was responsible for
controlling the opposi-
tion to the Shah, and
arresting and impri-
soning the Shah's well
known enemies
"According to sta-
tistics, until last year,
the Savak had 100,000
political prisoners. And
according to the various
western human rights
committees, the Savak
has used torture as a
means to force the
Shah's enemies to
change their positions
Unfortunately, for
the past few years, Iran
has been going through
some political problems.
Mohammad Reze Phal-
avi, the Shah of Iran,
has been the center of
this trouble.
According to Sala-
mon, the Shah came to
power at the end of
World War II. In 1953,
the Prime Minister,
with the help of the
Iranian people, sent the
Shah out of the country.
The CIA overthrew the
Prime Minister and put
the Shah back into
power. And he has
been in power ever
since
Solaman added,
"Some torturing me-
thods used were: Burn-
ing the body with an
iron, and raping men as
well as women in front
of other prisoners are
examples. In one case,
they raped a woman in
front of her husband to
make him announce on
television that he had
lied about the Shah
when he actually told
the truth
"In some other ca
se the Savok tortured
some children in front
of their parents to make
them do the same thing.
The record of the Savak
is clear. Anyone can
ask a human rights
committee about the
Savak's torture me-
thods
Solaman explained
that the Iranian people
merely want America's
support. "There is a lot
of pressure on the
Carter administration
that they should prevent
the Communist's take-
over of Iran. Some
people advised Carter to
send American military
to crush the opposition
to the Shah.
In the first place,
to the best of my
knowledge, the number
of communists in Iran
are less than the num-
ber of cummunists in
the US, and because of
Iranian hostility toward
Russia, the Iranians
have fought the Rus-
sians and lost much of
their land.
There is no possi-
bility of Communist
takeover in Iran. Third-
ly, because of the
geo-political location of
Iran, any kind of war in
that part of the world
would have miserable
consequences for the
Iranian people as well
as the rest of the
world
"What the Iranian
people are asking is for
the Americans and
other people in the
world to lend their
moral support so that
Iran can have a demo-
cratic type of govern-
ment said Solaman.
SAAD SSHOE REPAIR
113 GRANDE AVE.
at
COLLEGE VIEW
- CLEANERS
Energy wasted
By DENISE KINLAW
Staff Writer
Did you realize that
regulating room heat
and the excessive use
of plug-in appliances
are two major energy
conservation problems
on campus?
According to Reese
Helms, Greenville Util-
ities Commission Energy
Conservation Manager,
heat is difficult to
regulate in dorm rooms
so students should look
beyond central condi-
tions.
"The use of win-
dows to regulate room
temperature is a
waste said Helms.
Whenever possible
students should avoid
open windows and keep
room and entrance
doors closed.
"The first thing that
comes to mind is the
judicious use of plug-in
appliances, especially
hot plates said
Helms, when he was
asked for tips on cam-
pus energy conservation.
Having one hot plate
per room would cut
energy waste consider-
ably.
"A color television
consumes more electri-
city than a black and
white model said
Helms. Leaving a tele-
vision on when it isn't
necessary wastes elec-
tricity. He added that
the "instant-on" televi-
sion sets use an excess
of electricity even when
not in use. Unplugging
these sets as well as
some other appliances
when they are not in
use is a good method
of energy conservation.
Helms concluded
that refrigerators con-
stantly use energy and
one method to cut
waste would be to cover
liquids. The moisture
from uncovered liquids
makes the refrigerator
more difficult to cool
and leads to more
frequent defrostings.
Undergraduate
Graduate
Students
Looking for � port-tHno
Job with good income,
flexible houre end reel
experlenoe In the buM-
neee world? CeN NORTH
WESTERN MUTUAL UFE
INS. CO. for en appoint-
752-4080
HOLD ON TO your hats, folks. The weatherman is
predicting a major winter storm may hit North
Carolina this week. Photo by Kirk Kingsbury
Blake speaks in Ayden
ECU News Bureau
AYDEN - Vast chan-
ges in all fields of
learning and a fastpaced
society exact strong de-
mands on higher educa-
tion, an official of East
Carolina University said
Thursday night.
With society moving
at 10 times the pace of
a few decades ago,
"World events and im-
portant knowledge fade
in history much sooner
than in previous time
said Col. Charles R.
Blake, Assistant to the
Chancellor of ECU.
Blake noted that 69
percent of Americans
"are not old enough to
remember Pearl Har-
bor and 50 percent do
not recall Sputnik and
30 percent "aren't old
enough to remember
our first landing on the
moon, less than 10
years ago
There is, Blake told
the Ayden Rotary Club,
"a magnificent chall-
enge and wonderful op-
portunity" for universi-
ties today and in com-
ing decades.
Blake predicted that
ECU, having achieved
most of the educational
programs of a multi-
purpose university, "is
embarking on the most
enlightened period in its
history He said that
ECU's new chancellor
Thomas B. Brewer "is
setting exciting goals
for the University" in
his role as chief exec-
utive.
Blake cited two pri-
mary reasons that ECU
is one of the very few
universities in the
SoutheasternU.S. projec-
ting growth in enroll-
ment over the next
several years. First,
ECU is a popular insti-
tution with excellent
programs, well known
regionally and emerging
nationally, and secondly.
North Carolina will be
closing the gap in its
low ranking of percen-
tage of college-age chil-
dren enrolled in higher
education.
He said that in
order to pursue the
programs outlined by
Chancellor Brewer,
ECU's development
program will be stren-
Alpha Xi Delta
"Brew Blast"
8:001:00
EVERY TUES NIGHT
FREE Draft for the Ladies
Your favorite golden
beverages
8:00-9:00 $.35
9:00-11:00 $.45
11:00-1:00 $.55
Admission $.50
OPEN
�7
PtllejjnPICl
ATHLETES9 FOOT-WEAR & ACCESSORIES
RUNNING - TENNIS - BASKETBALL - RACQUETBALL - SOCCER
Over 100 different
styles of footwear.
Specializing in
Nike Footwear
and Accessories
jiwffU
Pitt Plaza
Greenville
756-0309
10 OFF all equipment with this coupon QOOD THROUGH FEB. 14.
gthened greatly, relying
on vital support from
the corporate and pri-
vate sectors.
"The goals of ECU
over the next 20 years
will be met by inno-
vative leadership on the
campus, strong support
from the 40,000 ECU
alumni and the under-
standing and generous
help of the people and
our corporate friends
Blake said.
The speaker said Dr.
Brewer "sees growing
service to North Caro-
linians and National
prominence as compli-
menting commitments
"Under Dr. Brewer's
leadership, the univer-
its
new
sit) is intensifying
efforts to achieve
dimensions in academic
excellence Blake said.
"There will be in-
creased opportunities for
our faculty to conduct
scholarly research and
participate in projects
which enhance their
professional develop-
ment. Also, we will
strive for more oppor-
tunities for our students
to develop their talents
through scholarship pro-
grams
10th Evans Streets
CaaaOf ttOLCwi
Budwetsw. ScMrtz. Moier. Stroft s $7.88
Sudan,ScNfelffar. SWi stop $39.00
50 Lbs. Ice $2.75
OPCNMMRS
FRIDAYS
1890
Seafood
Special Features
Sunday-Couples Night: 2 delicious
seafood platters of Shrimp, Oysters, Fish,
Cole Slaw, French Fries and our Famous Hush
Puppies.
Only $7.99 for 2
Monday-Shrimp-A-Roo: a delicious
entre' of Calabash Style Shrimp with French
Fries, Cole Slaw and Hush Puppies.
All For Only $2.99
Tuesday-Fish Fry:Aii the Fried Fish
(Trout or Perch) you can eat with French Fries,
Slaw, and Hush Puppies. No takOOUt
Only $2.25
Wednesday-Fried Oysters:Goiden
Brown Fried Oysters with French Fries, Cole
Slaw and Hush Puppies.
Only $2.99
Thursday-Family Night: Great
Specials on Shrimp. Oysters Trout Or Perch,
No Takeout
Shrimp$4.25
Trout Or Perch$2.25
Oysters$4.25
Flounder$3.95
"All You Can Eat"
Hours: Open 4:30 P.M. To 9 P.M.
Sundsy-Thursdsy
4:30 P.M10 P.M.
Friday and Saturday
Located On Evans Stroot
BoWnd Sports World
1
� �� t
rm
� �
� � ; -� - .
- - - -
V





' 1 �
l
Pg 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 6 February 197S '
SU needs involvement
The Student Union is once again
getting organized for the upcoming
year, and, as always, there is a need
for enthusiastic workers.
Committees such as Major Attrac-
tions and Films generally receive a
number of applications, because every-
one apparently wants a voice in what
concerts will be held or what movies
will be shown on campus. Naturally,
the most popular areas of entertain-
ment would interest the most people.
But there are nine other commit-
tees that need that support as badly
as or more than Films and Major
Attractions, and these committees
often suffer because qualified students
are usually snatched up by the more
popular committees. With student
interest in almost all organized
activities on the decline, the Student
Union needs every student it can get
in order to maintain and build upon
the high standards of programming
which have been established over the"
years.
The Student Union is the largest
programmer on campus and the
largest student-controlled organization.
It has the highest budget of any
student organization on campus.
During its eight year history it has
rarely failed to provide the students
of ECU with diverse and renown
talent in fields ranging from theatre
productions, educational lectures, rock,
jazz, and classical concerts, not to
mention student oriented trips to New
York, Hawaii, and the Bahamas.
If you're dissatisfied with the
entertainment offered on campus, or if
you see areas that need improvement,
don't hesitate to get involved with
your Student Union. The deadline for
committee applications is Feb. 26.
Drop by Mendenhall and pick up an
application, and do yourself and your
fellow students a favor.
Forum
Greenpeace
Reader tires of SGA vs. media
� To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Greenpeace philosophies
By JERRY ADDERTON
Greenpeace of Greenville
Todav's article contains a statement of the
philosophies and goals in Greenpeace's ecological
mot ement.
A better understanding of our world and its
nature is vital in our campaigns for this planet's
survival and 1 hope this message can convey both
the sense of respect and urgency that draws the
bottom line of expanded ecological consciousness.
We have arrived at a place in history where
decisive action must be taken to avoid a general
environmental disaster. With pollution growing and
over 900 species on the endangered list, there can
be no further delay or our children will be denied
their future.
The Greenpeace Foundation hopes to stimulate
practical, intelligent, non-violent actions to stem the
tide of planetary destruction. We are "rainbow
people" representing every race, every species,
every living creature. We are patriots, not of any
one nation, state, or military alliance, but of the
entire earth.
It must be understood that the innocent word
"ecology" contains a concept that is as
revolutionary as anything since the Copernican
breakthrough, when it was discovered that the earth
was not the center of the entire universe. Through
ecology, science has embarked on a quest for the
great systems or order that underlie the complex
rountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over SO years
"
EDITOR
DOUG WHITE
PRODUCTION MANAGERADVERTISING MANAGER
STEVE BACHNERROBERT M. SWAIM
NEWS EDITORSAssistant Advertising
RICK 1 QLIARM ISManager
MARC BARNES
Terry Herndon
Assistant News EditorsAdvertising Salesman
Richy SmithPaul Lincke
Mike RogersChief Ad Artist
TRENDS EDITORJane W ells
JEFF ROLLINSProofreaders
Assistant Trends EditorsDeidre Delahunty
Barry Clayton Bill JonesSue Johnson David Miller Typesetters
SPORTS EDITORJeanett Coats
SAM ROGERS Assistant Sports EditorDebbie Hotaling Cartoonists
Sue Lamm
Charles ChandlerBarry Clayton
FOUNTAINHEAD Is the student
newspaper of East Carolina University
sponsored by the M edla Board of
ECU and is distributed each Tuesday
and Thursday during the academic
year (weekly during the summer).
Editorial opinions ara those of the
Editorial Soard and do not necessari-
ly reflect the opinions of the
university or the Madia Board.
Offices art located on the second
floor of the Publications Center (Old
South Building). Our mailing
address Is: Old South Building,
ECU. Greenville, N.C. 27834.
The phone numbers ara:
757-6366, 6367, 6309. Subscriptions
art $10 annually, alumni SB annually.
flow of life on our planet.
This quest has taken us far beyond the realm of
traditional scientific thought. Like religion, ecology
seeks to answer the infinite mysteries of life itself.
Harnessing the tools of logic, deduction, analysis,
and empiricism, ecology may prove to be the first
true science-religion.
As suddenly as Copernicus taught us that the
earth was not the center of the universe, ecology
teaches us that mankind is not the center of life on
this planet. Each species has its function in the
scheme of life. Each has a role, however obscure
that role may be.
Ecology has taught us that the entire earth is
part of our "body" and that we must learn to
respect it as much as we respect ourselves. As we
love ourselves, we must also love all forms of life
in the planetary systemthe whales, the seals, the
forests and the seas.
The tremendous beauty of ecological thought is
that it shows us a pathway back to an
understanding of the natural worldan understand-
ing that is imperative if we are to avoid a total
collapse of the global ecosystem.
Ecology has provided us with many insights.
These may be grouped into three basic "Laws of
Ecology" which hold true for all forms of life-fish,
plants, insects, plankton, whales, and man. These
laws may be stated as follows:
The First Law of Ecology states that all forms of
life are interdependent. The prey is as dependent
on the predator for the control of its population as
the predator is on the prey for a supplv of food.
The Second Law of Ecology states that the
stability (unity, security, harmony, togetherness) of
ecosystems is dependent on their diversity
(complexity). An ecosystem that contains 100
different species is more stable than an ecosystem
that has only three species. Thus the complex
tropical rain-forest is more stable than the fragile
arctic tundra.
The Third Law of Ecology states that all
resources (food water, air, minerals, energy) are
finite and there are limits to the growth of all living
systems. These limits are finally dictated by the
finite size of the earth and the finite input of
energy from the sun.
If we ignore the logical implications of these
"Laws of Ecology" we will continue to be guilty of
crimes against the earth. We will not be judged by
people for these crimes, but with a justice meeted
out by the earth itself. The destruction of the earth
will lead, inevitably, to the destruction of ourselves.
So let us work together to put an end to the
destruction of the earth by forces of human greed
and ignorance. Through an understanding of the
principles of ecology we must find new directions
for the evolution of human values and human
institutions. Short-term economics must be replaced
with actions based on the need for conservation and
preservation of the entire global ecosystem.
We must learn to live in harmony, not only
with our fellow humans, but with all the creatures
on this planet.
For more information about Greenpeace, contact
Jerry Adderton at 758-6259 after 5 p.m. on
weekdays.
I am submitting this
letter due to the fact I
am sick and tired of the
SGA-Media Board con-
troversy. Mr. Jeter's
letter to the editor in
the Jan 23 edition on
"facts' about Bretr
Melvin and the SGA is
only partially true.
I do not know where
Mr. Jeter got the idea
that the SGA does not
care for the student
body. Brett Melvin is
Chairman of the SGA
Appropriation's Commit-
tee, and because of the
financial situation facing
the SGA this year, it
has become of even
more importance. Since
Mr. Jeter dwells on
"facts let me give
him a few about Mr.
Melvin.
Since taking on po-
sition as chairman, he
has spent probably a
minimum of 30 hours a
week working to do a
good job for his fellow
students in a non-pay-
ing job. The only
thanks that Mr. Melvin
has received this year
has come in the form of
threats from a student
group because they felt
they were not going to
get enough money.
You may ask,
"How do you know
this?" I know it be-
cause I was a member
of the Appropriations
Committee.
Another "fact is
that every member of
this year's legislature is
there to do what they
were elected to do, the
best job possible for the
student body. As far as
I am concerned, thev
have not failed in their
responsibilities.
Two years ago I ran
for office because I
wanted an honest SGA.
I was tired of reading
one opinion in FOUN-
TAINHEAD and hearing
a completely opposite
one from members in
the SGA. I most cer-
tainly did not run to
neglect my responsibi-
lities to fellow students.
I believe that stu-
dents tend to forget
that the only payment,
with the exception of
two postions that mem-
bers in the student
legislature receive, is in
knowing and hoping
that a good job is being
done for the students
and the university.
In the two years I
have spent in the legis-
lature, I have learned
on thing. The admini-
strators are the source
of some problems for
the students. For ex-
ample, consider Wright
Annex.
This was paid for by
student money to be
used by the students.
Student publications ori-
ginally had it for their
use; however, the ad-
ministration jumped in
and moved them out.
Now, it is occupied by
ROTC and the Student
Counseling Center. I
have wondered how
much the Air Force is
paying ECU for this
space intended for stu-
dent use.
Another example oc-
curred in October of
this year. I attempted
to go through the past
records of the SGA to
learn how long certain
groups have been re-
ceiving funds from
SGA. Mrs. Joy Clark of
the Student Fund Ac-
counting Office informed
"me that in order to get
access to their books, I
needed Dean Tucker's
permission.
My understanding of
this is that the infor-
mation in these books
is public information;
thus, not requiring his
permission. I then
called Dr. David Ste-
vens, the university att-
orney, to fully under-
stand the situation. Dr.
Stevens informed me I
was correct but should
see Dean Tucker just
the same.
When I arrived at
Dean Tucker's office,
his secretary was out
and he was on the
phone in his inner
office. Dr. Stevens had
already called before I
arrived. I could hear
Dean Tucker telling
Mrs. Clark over the
phone that "Steven had
called and said Walters
legally had the right to
the information
Dean Tucker told
Mrs. Clar, in his opin-
ion, I wanted to use the
information to under-
mine the Media Board.
I left and came back
later to get his permi-
ssion. He never knew I
was outside while he
was on the phone.
The reason I wanted
the information had
nothing to do with the
Media Board. This is
just an example of how-
hard it i to get
anything done in the
SGA. The reason being,
every time the SGA
tries to do something,
the administration thinks
they are somehow try-
ing to "undermine" the
Media Board.
As far as I am
concerned, the political
issue of Media Board
vs. SGA is going to
continue for a long
time. Also, I think that
politics are always
going to stand in the
way of progress for
these two groups. The
only way to alleviate
the problem is to elimi-
nate petty politics.
In my opinion, the
best alternative would
be for Dr. Brewer to
abolish the Media Board
and SGA. Then bring in
an unbiased official to
allocate monies for stu-
dent functions. My def-
inition of an unbiased
official would be one
who has never been in
student politics or pub-
lications, has never att-
ended this university,
nor worked here.
I am sure I will hear
numerous comments
concerning my state-
ments. However. I have
sat back and listened to
others' opinions, so I
feel entitled to vent
mine also. And for Mr.
Jeter, "Ad Inferous
Tecum likewise!
Steve Walt
ers
SGA could never get WECU started
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Well, it looks like
the few honchos who
have benefited from the
Media Board have cir-
cled their wagons for a
last fight. It is my hope
that the board's death
is quick and painless.
The station manager
for WECU (is it pos-
sible to have a station
manager for a station
not on the air?) tried to
attack "SGA dema-
gogues" who have, over
the years, questioned
the need of an on-
campus radio station.
I remember when
WECU got all the
money it needed from
SGA � salaries, new
equipment, replacements
for stolffl "TllBVlms, FCC
attorney fees � and it
still never worked.
Those SGA people who
complained wanted a
radio station as badly
as anyone, but not one
that the students
wouldn't listen to.
Why didn't John
Jeter mention that, year
after year, WECU's re-
gular listeners couldn't
fill up a good lecture
room, or that students
used to laugh at a 'sta-
tion' that couldn't give
away free prizes at
night because no one
was listening. Free con-
certs that the station
used to sponsor got
good respnse, but it
never rubbed off on the
station's popularity.
Yes, there wouldn't
be a WECU if jt
weren't for the Media
Board, because the stu-
dents - who have
WOOW, WRQR, tnl
WITN for Vfree �
wouldn't support it. The
fact that the Media
Board saved Mr. Jeter's
nation from ce
death and has kept it
�float without any stlr
dent support campus-
wide is just one more
reason to get rid of the
board.
By the way, we
know that Mr. Melv.n,
cnanman of the SGA
Appropriations Commit-
tee, gets xero dollars
,or his services; how
4much does Mr. Jeter,
m�nager of a non-
existant radio station,
get paid by the Media
Board? 1 cm trust a
Person who fights for
no Pay a hell of a lot
more than someone who
attacks on a salary.
Tim Merts
wKMMh
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmWmW
-
��"�ssssessaaafi
y
� �?
? ,a'� en� �





6 February 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
Greek Forum
i
Hv HICK! GL1ARMIS
eu s Editor
Panhellenic
Banquet will
i Feb 15 at
Lodge, rhis
"�'1! has be
among
- be aus
itement of the
- which arc pre
Pledge Class is
exciting
I sororitv's
hard
in hopes
,i
awards
; aver-
with the
point
I! I
ich
I .
- V i
H ra vn �
This
the
alumni
sume
Pan-

Announcements:
The Pi Kappa Phi's
are sponsoring a happv
hour at Blimpies on
rrdu from 3 p.m.
until 6 p.m Free I
shirts will be given to
winners o the
ihugging contests which
vvi11 be held throughout
the afternoon.
Pi Kaps are also
having a rattle for a ski
weekend al Beech
Mountain. The weekend
will include accomoda-
tions lor three davs and
two nights, and spend-
mone) The benefits
�ni the raffle will
apped children,
Pi Kap's national
lanthrop.
During rush week,
the ma Nu's go
tit pledges. Hush
week at the Sigma Nu
ded on I'tinr-
night with a luau,
ed the
�M't the
Nu chap
EC! has been
�d thf be hap-
15th District
Sigma Nu na-
idquarters. I
LCI hapter is also a
the im
I chapter in
I S
car i 11Ian-
this Saturday,
� Texa
1 1th and
Streets.
Ph Epsi-
ntl) initiated
�thers. Con-
uilatiun- to the new
Sig Ep also
� i r i n g

I ongratulations to
Joe Kasmark and Ja
Downie, graduating bro
thers, on their senior
recitals for the School
ot M usic .
I'he Fall Associate
Member (das- success
lull) held a spaghetti
dinnei and a happ)
hour with the little
sisters.
rhe Alpha Delia Pi's
recent 1 installed then-
new officers. The new
president is Jill Norris
president is Nell
Eason; pledge vice-
resident is K.C. Need
ham; rush i- Joni
In � recording
secretan is Beth Wil-
letts, responding
set retan is Kath Small;
treasurer is Dathy
Stcpp; and reporter his-
tn is Nan Potter.
I he Alpha Delta Pi's
awa tree
'��- t" all males
"ii Friday, Feb 9
' p.m. until 7 ;
the Chapter . Even
one i- pi
come and sta the
weekend with a good
Kappa Delta-
hold tin nual hite
Formal this
month. fhe pledges
Were plesenteij
awards given out.
im Shelton, i
al chaptei director, visi
led Kappa Delta chapti i
this week. Officer M
ing tm'k dace.
(!ongi atulations
new officers. Liz li
b). president; (Iretchen
1' ahrenluin h,
president; Toni Trenda,
secretary; Jenn
Spann, treasurer. H u
bara Krnuse, assi
treasurer; Man ia
vens, editor; and
Prc ette, rush
I he K.ippa I '
v. new

ted it- 20th yeai
at .i pai i
Minges. fhapt
I wa
Monday. !
Sigmas
part)
a ill b

planning their -ring
iiiitiiiiitiiiurt, u,

ent
formal
: 9

CUSTOM MADE
T-SHIRTS AND
SPORTSWEAR
Let our professional art
department develop
your seal, crest, design,
logo or idea into popular
T-shirt or sportswear
Telephone 758-0517
P.O. Box 7$Z Dudley U legion Str.
"� Greenville, N.C.
cTIpthi

i )�
.seek until
ed that
t had
led. Yes,
lark ol
Ml
it) and



















DANCE
featuring
THE DYNAMIC UPSETTERS"?
at
The Moose Lodge
Sat. Feb. 17th
9:001:00
BYOB
Set-ups Available
$2.50 In advance $3.00 at the door
Tickets may be purchased at the Clothes Horse
or from any Phi Rappa Tau brother or pledge
or call 752 4379.












formal I'oi March 24 at
' I � Greenville Countr
I.
1 he IIta Zeta soro-
pleased to
I lie ev o
f�i l'7' Carolyn
l�" -idem; Trac
veil, lir.st v ne
I " - idem ; Jan (!ookerl ,
president; Toni
Krul, r ording secre
Kath) Mi Dermott,
in Linette Dowe,
manager; and
kath S I, corres-
ponding i r v.
I
SIGMA NU FRATERNITY has been
named best chapter m their district
and has also h
national honoi -
iHfM&B 5
The ! � � . Zetas are
id) for
will he
March 24 in
'A .i dit-viii, Beach. The
getting
pancake
h will be
Fel 24 at 11
lor .(ii
n in this
Forum.
Ills .1(1
the
- - Keep
rk and
t.xl kveek's
I i urn will be
ter.
v
Had a piece Lately?
CHANELO'S PIZZA
sandwiches spaghetti
pizza lasagna
BREAD AND PIZZA DOUGH
MADE FRESH DAILY
FAST FREE DELIVERY
758-7400
Why you should buy your ring now!
1. You deserve it.You've accomplished a lot
2. Save $15 on any 10K gold or Siladium ring instead of the
5 or $10 you might get from any other company.
3. Different Rings! The largest selection to choose from.
Over 20 different ring designs! See traditional and con-
temporary men's designs and beautiful fashion rings for women
IRORVED
REBATE CERTIFICATE
GET A $15 REBATE ON ANY ARTCARVED COLLEGE RING WITH THIS CERTIFICATE
Valid on any ring in the ArtCarved Collection (even gold) Choose from a wide variety of
traditional, contemporary, or fashion rings, custom made to your individual taste
How to get your $15 rebate by mail after purchase
1. This coupon must be presented with your order
2. Limit one refund per purchase Purchaser pays any sales
taxes
3 Otter valid only on rings ordered during this sale
4 Rebates can be issued only after tinal payment on your ring
has been made
5. At that time of order your ArtCarveo Represent.r .
give you a Rebate Request Certificate This
mailed, along with proof of full payment to ArK
three months after you order your ring Rebate void atte-
period Allow tour weeks for rebate processing
An ArtCirved Representative will be at
ECU Student Supply Store
OFFER EXPIRES F�b. 9, 1979

m
z?
f





� I
WM U
arrat
Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 6 February 1979
Union 9s Jewish Arts highlight the week
Films, lectures and
m ovies comprise
this week's Festival
Ktl Student Union and Mendenhall Student
the 1979 Jewish Arts Festival. An
ling variety ol events has been planned for
Fel) 4-10 for the purpose of
awareness and appreciation for the rich
ritage. Events for the week are being
i bv the Student I nion Minorit) Arts
with support and assistance from other
mmittees and Mendenhall Student
- ival begins on Mon Feb 5, with
gel and Lox Mixer at 7 p.m. in the
Multi-Purpose Room of Mendenhall Student Center.
p.m Rabbi Max Selinger of Temple Israel
B'Nai Sholom will deliver a lecture on Jewish
The lecture will be held in the Hendrix
The Rabbi's appearance is under the
The Jewish Chautauqua Societv.
Wil Stockdale will present a film-lecture on
6. at 8 p.m. His travelogue is
Israel and the Sinai This fine film offers
into a country that is a unique blending of
modern cultures. Stockdale's
ir enchances his enlightening film.
b) ID and Activity Cards for ECU
MS Membership Card for ECU
d staff, Admission for the public is
purchased from the Central
lenhall Student Center
edn movie double feature. Hest �
' Dudd krm uz
� i ' s - Stn ' ; is the
anization of a newh immigrated
" pting to American customs,
'Old rid' t uit him. The
Kane. Steven Keaths, and Dorrie
h begins at 7 p.m. At 9 p.m "The
ship of Duddy Kravitz will be shown.
" -tar- as an irresistable young
a never-ending drive for success.
by man) different value- and
which on are his. Admission to
) ID ami Activity Cards for students
MC NI p Card for ECU facultv and

l�P

aum, Rabbi and ECC faculty
liver a lecture in the Hendrix
irs Feb. 8. at 8 p.m. His topic
f � ol Judaism There is no
: the lecture.
md Saturday nights at 7 and 9 p.m
THIS IS 1 Jewish-ghetto street, vendor ca. 1905,
the period in which the movie "Hester Street"
a Neil Simon Comedy, A, Heartbreak Kid will
shown. The film is the stor of a young Jewish
couple who rush too quickh into marriage. When
the wife gets sunpoisoning on their hone) moon, the
husband fall- in love with a beautiful shiksa.
dmission is by II) and Activity Card- for ECU
students or b MSC Member-hip' Card to the ECl
takes place. 'The Apprenticeship of Duddy 'Kravitz'
completes Wednesday nights d . featun Thi
fa, nit) and -tail.
Throughout the week there will be a new exhibit
from the Jewish Museum on display n the
Mendenhall Callerv. The exhibit consists
series ol photographs -elected from one of the
museum's new exhibits, "The Lower ha-
Portal to American Life In the downstairs asi
Phenomenally bad' authors bungle
marvelous atrocity of modern fiction
enter.
S
r e m 1 e I s ra
h art i
ommunities
ami
tg : attend and enjov.
iTCWi'HlayiI.Wd
By BARRY CLAYTON
Assistant Trends Editor
many benefits to reading over other
media based entertainment. A book will
p ou painlessly occupied longer than a
for less expense, too. Also, you can put
and pick it up again at your own
is portable, you can carry it with
i
Hoi
b
perhaps the most rewarding benefit of the
I word i- that you can usually pick
iseful from reading.
up
For example, having just Finished the Bob
Stickgold-Mark Noble novel Gloryhits, I have learned
to never read a novel written hv scientists.
Gloryhits is an "explosive new novel It -av- so
right on the cover.
I m not going to go into the story in detail.
because when you whittle the novel down to the
bare essentials there not much of a story at all.
I he idea is that our government ami that of the
Soviet- are in a race to develop a new type of
biological weapon. Also being tested is an agent to
-tart a line ol human being- with a potential for
greater intelligence.
� alle,
One of these agent- is added to
Glorvhits and then is allowed to
some LSD
be spread
around on the streets of certain towns in New
England that have been chosen as test sites.
One young married couple who work in a
scientific capacity take some of the acid and then
begin an investigation of where it has come from
and what has been added to it.
Could be a nice story. Then
potential in this sort of dot.
But, unfortunately, none of it i realized.
Stickgold and Noble are bad writers
5ee
is
plenty
I
7 XPLOSH I EU OFEl "is
GLORY7UTS, p. 7
Bee Gees release 'Maalox - flavored candy bar'
By DAVID MILLER
Staff U riter
Bee (,ees 'Spirits Having Flown'
A shrill, pre-pubescent, girlish murmur, a
ne like flat-four drum-beat, sleep inducing
strings, Darvoned imagery, Quaaluded similesEven
the Brothers Gibb are imitating the Bee Gees these
lav- Yes they're back - with their first album
since Saturday Night Fever and the cliches and
ambiguous lyrics fly again. Too bad the spirits
evoked bv thi- album can't fly; they can't even
bourn e.
Thi- set costs $8.98 (can you believe it?! And
tor a -ingle Ip at that!) It is a saccharin-sweetened,
Maalox-flavored candy bar. It was shipped in a gold
wrapper, arrived platinum, and every $3 Juliette,
Elect rophonic, and Mayfair cartridge in town will be
� ating it up bv next Friday night.
So, I can't help but wonder why so many people
find the Bee Gees' music so damned appealing,
(despite the fact that I know it is trash, I enjoy it
myself)- Harmonically, melodically, and lyrically,
they emplov devices that are not just old-they're
dead. lhe Bee Gees passify, they lull, they
lobotomize us and to understand why one must
keep in mind that this is the late 1970's. Most of
the arts in this period are reactions to and
antitheses of the general social upheaval of the late
'60's and early 70's.
We are all mass-media manipulated children, and
it is the media that fermented the Bee Gees. In
this case, we were assaulted not just bv one media,
but bv a multitude the radio and television
programmer- and the film industry -the particular
film being Saturday .ight Fever.
Fever (aught fire commerically and it didn't
matter what particular music it showcased as long
as it mesmerized anil dulled us sufficiently. It could
have been anything short of Dung Between the
Toes and, as long as it was acceptable in the
next-door neighbor's sight, the rest of us had to
have it, too.
This is the reas()n that nearly all college girls
seem l dress in the same look-alike
paper-doll-chain manner, wear the same gold-plated,
'Add-A-Bead' necklaces, the same monogrammed
crew-neck sweaters. This fad is called 'prep' and it
is still another throw-back to the abysmal '50's.
Perhaps what bothers me the most about all this
is that I am just as susceptible to the same form of
social coercion that others are. I still listen to some
music, watch a few films, try to see something in
art that I do not enjoy just because someone else
thinks it is good or sometimes to impress others
with my taste. (I even write weekly record reviews
partially for this reason.) Many times in an attempt
to tight this coercive force, 1 try to enjoy a film or
record just because no one else does.
And I know that the fact that I care at all what
Others think means that I am just as ignorant as
everyone else. That scares Hell out of me and I
find myelf wishing for a world without social
coercion, a world where we could be free just to be
ourselves.
We are all idiots for being manipulated bv
others. It is much wiser to listen to what we as
individuals feel.
Marshall Tucker's Greatest Hits'
I am not very fond of "greatest hits" collections.
Typically, they are commercial mishmashes which
have been laid-out about as carefullv as a
ioV
collision between vour 5-vear ,M P
Pinto and a utility pole ' h
J: ttr -
knowledgi d!l worldlj
I here ha e been i i� . i
I g�z r;
Simon - GreaU U Hits Etc j Faul
'� - series). Marshall Tucker r Mol�wn
however, not one ol these latest Hits,
"Marshall Pucker" is probabh the bes. �
group that is presentl) recording an C01un,r5r-ro
� 'op five bands. 0f arn so7and �lso one ol
this decade. ' hin' emerged in
Vou would never know j, ,l .
mat, rial presented on this ,jlM. e un- b) 'he
eight selection- n the album' wh? k " �nlv
"� such as "Ramblin" been , a weaker
expense ol forsaking strong � at th
"Desert Skies Virginia" aL T8 ��� a
r� ��) hear "TuTerV b W'?
ol their first album The 1 ?,�P" UP a �OPJ
their fourth lp Searchin' for LTucher Ban
last collection of new material r �U and the�r
"enal, Caroilna Dreams
- N.





8 February 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Paoe 7
Wind recitals highlight Music School
Two seniors and a inn.� . n
on Feb. 8 in the A I ffi u u ?resent a recital
Carolina University Redtal Hal1 at E.st
Richard Michael F,�� �
Joseph Kincaid saxonho- ttr�m0mSt' and Michael
P.m Eurv will ShXOphomst' w" Perform at 7 :30
Glenn Johnson Michel LlTl' Vl
Dave Albert. y' Rlck Vlzachero and
H,ndemithWF P60�three classical Pies by
w II be t's AUHVnK wVLS0,n and the ,as se,ecti-
Kincaid I KlgHt WUh Me" Cole P"er.
Piano and LaCCOmPa� by Anne Gunn,
pujno and ass,sted by Dave Albert His program
"Sonata" by Handel "Leende
will
Hebraique" by V. Dyck and end with "At
Seventeen" by Ian.
Kathryn A. Law, piano, will present a
performance at 9 p.m. which will include selections
by Haydn, Schumann, Chopin and Bartok.
The recital is open to the public.
Saxophonist
Randall Bryant, alto saxophonist, will perform a
recital for a Master of Music in Performance on
Feb. 6 at 7:30 p.m. at the A.J. Fletcher Recital
Hall on the East Carolina University campus.
Bryant, whose applied teach is James B. Forger,
will be assisted by George M. Stone, a graduate
student in piano.
Ramp
'fairly leaps out of the
Bryant's program will include "Sonata No. 6" by
Bach. "Duo for Alto Saxophone and Piano" by
Walter S. Hartley, "Improvisation No 1" by Ryo
No.da' Chanson et Passepied" by Jeanine Rueff
and Sonata for Alto Saxophone and Piano" by
Paul Creston.
The recital is open to the public.
High School Day
The Keyboard Department of East Carolina
University's Music School will host its third annual
"High School Day" on Feb. 16.
The high school students will be given lessons
by the keyboard faculty members and will have the
opportunity to attend discussion sessions on various
Gloryhits
degree programs in music as well as discussion on
career opportunities.
The ECU keyboard majors will present a recital
for the high school students.
Interested persons should contact Dr. Charles
Bath, Chairman, Keyboard Department, School of
Music, East Carolina University, Greenville, N C
27834. Applications for the "High School' Day"
should be received bv Feb. 8.
Paul Tardif
continued from p. 6
simple as that.
Or perhaps it is not as simple as that, for
they are not just bad writers-they are phenomen-
ally bad writers. It is difficult to believe how bad
they are.
Very early into the novel I began to realise that
had stumbled onto something special. A book that
had managed to get into print and yet was
obviously vastly inferior to the great bulk of poorly
written novels.
That was four pages into the novel.
By the time I had reached the end of the
chapter, my suspicion had evolved into an excited
revelation, and the thought occurred to me that this
just might turn out to be the single worst piece of
writing I had ever seen. Gleefully, I finished
reading this marvelous atrocity of modern fiction,
and now, without (of course) having even begun to
scratch that great bulk of material that sums up all
that has been published, I am firmly convinced that
Gloryhits may well be the worst piece of writing
ever to be printed in the English language.
It would be difficult to choose any one of the
novel's basic flaws as being more outstanding than
the others, but at first glance the problem of
stereotyping fairly leaps out of the pages to take
the reader bv the throat.
Everybody talks the same.
Everybody.
AH the women use the same voice and diction
that the men use. They exhibit the same attitudes,
the same approaches, the same sense of misty-eyed
altruism and paranoic distrust of anything that lies
outside their own concept of what society ought to
be. That is to say, a nationwide culture of
acid-gulping, wide-eyed hippie turned scientists. But,
of course, not everyone is cast in this mold in
Gloryhits� just the good guys. There is another mold
for the baddies.
But perpetuating stereotypes is not the only
purpose Stickgold and Noble had for writing
Gloryhits. They also manage to do a lot of
proselytizing. Their favorite issue seems to be social
reform and the dangers of the perilous experiments
of unscrupulous scientists (i.e borderline baddies,
non-acid-gulpers).
A writer can occasionally get away with a little
of this sort of thing, but these writers insist on
approaching their arguments with the "as we all
know attitude, when in fact the issue hasn't
even been properly defined much less resolved.
Another problem that proves too much for the
reader to get around is that the writers often tell
the reader what the characters seem to be doing or
thinking rather than telling him what the characters
Keller exhibits 27 sculptures
Twenty-seven sculp-
ture by East Carolina
University sculptor Nor-
man Keller are current-
1 on exhibit in the Svlv
Tower Gallery, Ruston,
La sponsored by the
School of Art and
Architecture, Louisiana
Tech University.
The one-man exhibi-
tion of Keller's works
opened Jan. 3. The
artist presented a gal-
lery talk about his work
during the exhibition.
Keller, associate pro-
fessor of sculpture in
the School of Art,
joined the ECU faculty
in 1965.
Literary association has contest
American Literary
and Creative Arts Asso-
ciate Inc. is sponsor-
ing national contests for
amateur poets, prose
writers, photographers
and artists.
Dr. Hubert M. Cle-
ments, President of the
non-profit organization,
said an amateur is
defined as one whose
total income from his or
her talent area has not
exceeded $1,000.
Ten cash prizes will
be awarded in each of
the four areas: First
place $200; second place
$100; third place $50;
fourth place $25; fifth
place $15; and five
honorable mentions $10
each.
Multiple entries in
one or more talent area
are invited. Entries
must be postmarked on
or before midnight
March 31, 1979 to
entries can be in any
medium including pen-
cil, charcoal, pen-and-
ink sketches or draw-
ings, lithographs, and
etchings.
Contestants should
put their full name,
address, telephone num-
ber and title of work on
each page of poetry and
prose.
Mail entries to:
American Literary and
Creative Arts Asso-
ciates, Inc P.O. Box
three-dollar
accompany
said there
qualify. A
fee must
each entry.
Clements
are no limitations on
style or subject matter.
Works must be original
and never before accep-
ted for publication or
entered in a contest.
Poems may not ex-
ceed 300 words and
prose entries may not
exceed 1,000 words.
Two copies of each
poem or prose entry are
required. These should
be typewritten and
double spaced on one
side of 8Vfe" X 11"
paper with multiple
page entries stapled in
the upper left corner.
Only black and white
photographs and art
may be entered. These
should be no smaller
than 5" X 7 and no
larger than 8" X 10
Each work must be
permanently mounted on
an 8" X 10" mat. Art
21641, Columbia, South
Carolina 29221. Enclose
a self-addressed, stamp-
ed envelope for return
of entries and with
requests for additional
information. Telephone
requests after 6 p.m. to
803781-0496.
itchell's Hair Styling
x-NjPitt Plaza Shopping Cftei
-ICrccnv.lle North Carolina 27&J4
756-2950
I, ' CALL ONE OF OUR
HAIRSTYLISTS FOR A NEW
SPRING HAIRDO
756-2950
Piraa inn.
AMERICAS FAVORITE PIZZA
PIZZA BUFFET
ALL THE PIZZA AND
SALAD YOU CAN E
$ ��Q
Mon. - FrL 1130 200
fiPMon. fiP Tues.
758 6366 Hwy 864 bypaM Greenville , Jf. J,
are actually doing or thinking. The first impression
this leaves with the reader is that the style of
writing is novel and innovative, but after a few
pages it becomes tiresome and difficult to negotiate.
There is no background information about the
characters. They are introduced as the novel opens
and nothing about their personalities is ever told
to the reader. Nor do they behave like individuals
who have" real lives. Instead, they act irrationally,
moving from tranquility to flashes of anger with no
indication as to the cause of the change.
The setting of the story is never exactly tied
down. For example, it is more than half way into
the book before we realize that it is set in the
future, and we know that it is set in the future
only because the price of gas is mentioned.
Perhaps the least forgiveable of Stickgold and
Noble's literary transgressions is that they let the
reader down in the very purpose of the novelto
entertain. A novel should be written in .such a
manner that the reader can put together the
information placed before him and solve the story's
mystery by himself. That is to say, he can if he is
sharp enough.
But the writer who can figure out Gloryhits is
sharp indeed. The authors withhold information until
the last, and the end product is about as satisfying
a story conclusion as one in which the little boy
falls out of bed and wakes up.
With those things that I have pointed out above,
I have just scratched the surface, believe me.
Suffice it to say that both of the authors have
advanced degrees in neurobiology. And they write
like it.
Paul Tardif, a member of the keyboard faculty at
East Carolina University, performed a solo recital of
19th and 20th century French music at the Kress
Gallery at the North Carolina Museum of Art
Tardif joined the faculty of ECU in 1971 after
residing in Washington, D.C for three years
During this time, he was invited to perform at the
Peabody Conservatory, the Phillips Gallerv and the
University of Maryland Summer Piano Festival.
Originally from Buffalo, N.Y. Tardif received his
lormal p.ano training from the Eastman School of
Music.
SEND LI VING
VALENTINES.
FTD LoveBundle Bouquet
FTD Valentine
Bud Vase
O
Those FTD Florists really
get around for you!
FTD LoveBundle Bouquet, usualy available for less than $17v
FTD Valentine Bud Vase, usually available for less than $10.00. As an
Independent businessman, each FTD Florist sets his own prices. Ser-
vice charges and delivery may be additional Most FTD Florists accept
jnajor credit cards.
� 1979 FVitttts- ���M Datowy
BEST EATIN'All AROUND!
Next time you get hungry for some-
thing really good to eat, head for
Hardee's. And bring a friend and
this coupon with you. It'll get you
the best eatin' in town, up n
down, all around. And lots of it.
Hardee's Best Eatin' Special.
Two of the biggest, most
special tastin' sandwiches you
have ever sunk your teeth
into. And at a price that's
real special, too. So special,
you're gonna think Hardee's
is downright crazy to charge
so little for so much fine eatin.



v
X&r,
jv
,v


s

THE BEST EATIN' SPECIAL:
TWO DELICIOUS BIG ROAST BEEF
SANDWICHES FOR ONLY'1.99
Good at all participating Hardee's. Please present this coupon before ordering
One coupon per customer, please. Customer must pay any sales tax due
on the purchase price. This coupon not good in combination with any other offers
'J 'A
Coupon expires
March 5, 1979
t

1





ODU defeats ECU, 90-85
Monarchs win in 2 OT
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
It was almost as if someone had rewritten the
script from Tuesday night's ECU-William and Mary
game. The Bucs had a substantial halftime lead, yet
blew it in the second half. And there were
numerous chances for the Pirates to seize control
� luring regulation and win it. And on top of that,
two more overtime periods were included.
Except this tune, ECU simply couldn't emerge
with the victory. Led by Ronnie McAdoo's 26
point eight which came during the two overtime
periods, Old Dominion topped the Pirates 90-85
Saturday night in Minges Coliseum.
McAdoo's two free throws with 2:47 remaining
in the second overtime gave Old Dominion a slim
83-82 advantage and the talented Monarchs never
trailed after that. Old Dominion improved its record
Simply Sports
Sam Rogers
Bryant to visit ECU
ALABAMA HEAD FOOTBALL coach Paul
"Bear" Bryant will visit Greenville Saturday, March
17 to speak at an ECU coaching clinic. Bryant, the
winningest active coach in the collegiate ranks today,
will lecture to area high school coaching staffs. The
Crimson Tide captured the top spot in the
Associated Press wire poll last season with a 14-7
victor) over Perm State in the Sugar Bowl. Pirate
head coach Pat Dye served as an assistant under
Bryant lor nine years at Alabama before coming to
ECI Dve now has an impressive 41-15 record at
EC! The Bucs. who defeated Louisiana Teeh 35-13
in the Independence Bowl last season, open their
-print: practice drills the weekend of March 16.
ALTHOUGH THE 1979 FOOTBALL schedule
hasn't been released yet, at least nine of the 11
date- art- already set for next season. The Pirates
will face Big Four schools N.C. State, Duke, Wake
Forest and North Carolina on the road while
estern Carolina. The Citadel, VMI, Richmond and
North Texas State are scheduled to make
appearances in Ficklen Stadium. Negotiations are
currently underway for a possible road game with
Southeastern Conference school Florida. However, if
Pirate officials can't schedule the contest, Appala-
chian State and William and Mary will probably get
the Bucs other two road games. Once again, tickets
for the N.C. State and North Carolina games will be
sold on a limited basis, but there will be plenty on
sale for the Duke and Wake Forest contests.
THE PRO FOOTBALL DRAFT is currently
scheduled for May 2 and 3. At least four Pirate
players have seriously talked to pro teams and will
probably go in the draft. Halfback Eddie Hicks and
tackle Mitchell Smith are the top two offensive
perfumers while defensively the scouts are eyeing
safety Gerald Hall and end Zack Valentine.
Valentine was voted the top defensive player in the
Independence Bowl while Hall was among the
nation's top punt returners all season long.
SINCE GUS ANDREWS was named the executive
director of the Pirate Club, ECU supporters have
raised $681,000 and are shooting for a goal of
$550,000 in the coming year. The Pirate Club will
kickoff its annual membership drive this weekend.
This ear's membership slogan is "The Purple Push
Blitz Tom Fields, the highly successful director of
the Maryland Terrapin Club, will be th featured
speaker at the meeting. Pirate club members are
pushing for 800 new supporters in the new
campaign. There are currently 2,049 members in the
Pirate Club.
OLIVER MACK'S 25 points in the Bucs 90-85
loss to Old Dominion Saturday night, moves him
into eighth place on the Pirates top ten scoring list.
Mack, a senior from New York City, now has 1,063
career points which puts him ahead of Tom Miller
and just 35 points behind Bill Brodgen who has
1,098 points. With a strong finish, Mack could
climb as high as fourth on the scoring list. Jim
Gregory currently occupies that spot with 1,193
points. Bobby Jodges is the all-time leading scorer
with 2,018 points followed by Sonny Russell who
has 1,653 and Bill Otte who scored 1,368. Mack still
holds the school's all-time scoring mark in a single
game with 47 against South Carolina-Aiken last
year.
OBVIOUSLY, FEW ASSISTANT coaches at ECU
have been very happy under Larry Gillman. Herb
Dillon, who annouced his resignation last wee,
became the second assistant in as many years to
leave the Pirate coaching staff. Dillon announced he
will return to graduate school this summer to
complete requirements for his doctorate. Bill Lee,
resigned at the end of last year and is now the
head coach at Pembroke State University.
AND FOR THE umpteenth time this season,
Gillman closed the Pirate dressing room to writers
after ECU's 90-85 loss to Old Dominion Saturday
night. Funny how, Gillman's name is constantly in
the news, yet the Pirate boss always makes it
difficult for writers to talk to his players after a
game.
to 15-3 this season while the loss ended a three
game winning streak for ECU. The Pirates are now
9-11 overall.
"Old Dominion has an excellent ball club and I
thought we played well against them said Pirate
coach Larry Gillman afterwards. "This game was
very similar to the Virginia Commonwealth game
earlier which also went into overtime. But 1 thought
McAdoo killed us tonight. His play was the
difference in overtime. He's going to be a great
college basketball player. He just seems to get
better and better every game
In addition to McAdoo's game high 26 points,
the talented freshman from Mebane also grabbed 12
rebounds. McAdoo's second half scoring spree along
with Ronnie Valentine's brilliant outside shooting
kept the Monarchs in the game when the Pirates
seemed on the verge of breaking ahead for good.
Although Valentine spent most of the second half
on the bench with four fouls, he still scored 25
points and grabbed eight rebounds. Valentine scored
six straight points on two free throws and a pair of
field goals inside the last four minutes of regulation
to give the Monarchs a 69-67 advantage with 1:43
remaining.
But Pirate forward Herb Krusen tied the score
at 69-69 on a long jumper and Oliver Mack swished
an 18 footer with just six seconds remaining in
regulation to send the game into the first overtime.
"When had a small lead late in the game, I
thought maybe we should have pulled back, but I
remembered against William and Mary we lost our
aggressiveness that way explained Gillman. "We
ran our pattern offense again and didn't get
anything, and they went down and scored. I guess
hindsight is 20-20. Maybe we shouldn't have done
that, but I had to make the decision.
Bobby Vaughan scored a bucket while McAdoo
added a field goal and two free throws as the
Monarchs assumed a 77-73 lead in the first
overtime. But Krusen's 15 footer and a pair of free
throws by Al Tyson tied the score at 77-77 with
2:21 still remaining.
However, both teams blew two scoring
opportunities in the last two minutes and Vaughan's
long jumper from the corner bounced off the rim at
the buzzer which sent the game into the second
overtime.
ECU moved ahead 81-80 on another Tyson free
throw with 3:36 remaining, but after McAdoo's free
throw the Monarchs outscored the Pirates 7-3 to win
the game.
"It was a real gutty performance by our team
said Old Dominion coach Paul Webb. "We started
the game playing smoothly, but ECU came at us
really hard and physical and took charge of the
game. Ronnie Valentine helped us a great deal in
both scoring and rebounding despite his louls
Winning despite his fouling out and playing so little
in the second half proves once again that we are
not just a one-man ball club.
"There was a time in the first half, late, when
ECU could have hurt us really bad. It was a tribute
to our young players that they stayed in the
game
Old Dominion jumped out front early in the first
half and led by as many as seven points, before the
Pirates came charging back. With several starters in
foul trouble, the Monarchs switched from a
man-to-man to a 2-3 zone and the Bucs quickly took
advantage of the strategy.
Mack, Maynor and Krusen all began to warm up
and the Pirates outscored Old Dominion 16-5 to take
a 37-31 advantage with 4:20 left in the first half.
And the Bucs continued their hot outside shooting
in the last four minutes to take a comfortable 48-41
halftime lead.
"We had to use the zone most of the game
because we had so many people in foul trouble
noted Webb. "ECU hit well from the outside a
couple of times, but in the long run I believe our
zone was as responsible as anything for Old
Dominion winning
Mack led the Pirates with 25 points while
Maynor added 15. Krusen scored 11 and reserve
David Underwood had 10. Mack and Frank Hobson
each had eight rebounds to pace the Bucs in that
department.
ECU travels to Richmond, Va. to face Virginia
Commonwealth Wednesday. The Pirates return home
Saturday night for a game against South
Carolina-Aiken.
Clarence Miles works inside for position against ODU defender
Photo by John . Grogan
But lose to Va. Tech, W&M
ECU wrestlers top ODU
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
The ECU wrestling team finally snapped its four
match losing streak Saturday with a 24-12 victory
over Old Dominion, but the Pirates still dropped
duals to Virginia Tech and William and Mary in a
quad meet held in Williamsburg, Va.
The" Pirates won four of their five matches in the
upper weights against the Monarchs to post their
first victory of the season against four losses.
However, ECU lost back-to-back matches against
Virginia Tech and host William and Mary which
dropped the Bucs overall mark to 1-6 this year.
"Overall, the event went pretty well for a
change said ECU head coach Bill Hill. "We
finally got some people healthy and they all had
fine performances. Tom Robinson and Vic Northrup
wrestled well and they should really be ready by
the time the Eastern Regionals get here
Robinson, who has missed most of the season
with a leg injury, edged Virginia Tech's Tom
Chamber 9-8 and pinned William and Mary's Eric
Vince in 5:10. Robinson lost in the Old Dominion
match.
"I really didn't think he would be ready to go
by this weekend, but I still wanted to take him
noted Hill. "He came through for us and I think
his leg is bothering him less and less. It was
certainly his finest performances of the season
ECU's 167-pounder Vic Northrup, who has also
been plagued throughout most of the year with a
torn knee cartilage, also won all three of his
matches. Northrup won by forfeit against Old
Dominion and then came back to take a 10-4 decisio
decision
over Virginia Tech's Joey Oslewski and then topped
William and Mary's Andy Mika 7-3.
Butch Revils won all three of his matches while
heavyweight Mindell Tyson also defeated all three
of his opponents in the quad meet.
Reals dumped his Old Dominion opponent and
earned a hard fought 8-5 decision over Bob Reisch.
He also topped William and Mary's Tom Dick 10-6.
Tyson won by forfeit against Old Dominion and
held Virginia Tech's Bill Toreman scoreless in a 5-0
decision. He also topped William and Mary's Neil
Morrison 7-0 and certainly made a bid for one. 0f
one
the top heavyweight seedings in the upcoming
Eastern Regionals.
"We're still hurting in our lower weight classes
and with a little more strength there we probablv
could have won all three matches noted Hill.
"Mindell Tyson wrestled well and continues to
improve with each match. We certainly looked good
in our upper weights, but our lower weights are
still extremely weak
Other than Robinson's two victories at 142, the
Pirates only other wins in the lower weights came
from Jim Osborn at 134 and Frank Schaede at 150
against Old Dominion. ECU was forced to forfeit all
three of its matches at 118 and David Jerose lost
all three of his matches at 126.
"We've got most of our regular people back
healthy now and I think we should be in good
physical shape for our remaining dual matches
said Hill. "Jay Dever's back may require surgerv.
but the rest of the team is in fairly good shape
The Pirates return to action Wednesday night
when the Bucs travel to Norfolk. Va. for another
dual match against Old Dominion.
Wolfpack women blast Pirates 94-58
By JIMMY DUPREE
Staff Writer
Junior forward Rosie
Thompson notched her
' 15th1 career point, but
Lady Pirate Partisans
had little else to cheer
about Friday evening,
as ECU fell 94-58 at
the hands of N.C. State
University.
The milestone came
with 11:08 left in the
game.
Athletic director Bill
Cain presented Thomp-
son with the game ball
during a break in the
action.
"Rosie had a lot of
pressure on her
tonight commented
coach Cathy Andruzzi.
"She got two fouls
driving the baseline and
she was a little hesitant
after that
"She didn't realize
how close (to 1500) she
was until this week
when everybody started
telling her
State combined a
tight zone defense and
excellent outside shoot-
ing to build to a 45-26
halftime margin. For-
ward Ronnie Laughlin
provided inside strength
with 13 points and
guard Ginger Rouse dis-
played an excellent out-
side touch to pace the
Pack offense.
Rouse had 10 on the
night but only saw 14
minutes of action. She
left the contest after the
First half d le to a
recurring back injury
which her coach, Kay
Yow, describes as
"similiar to a slipped
disk Yow also report-
ed that after it has
happened in the past,
she usually returns to
action after several
days.
The Wolfpack suffer-
ed another big loss with
3:43 left in the game
when potential ail-
American center Genia
Beasley sustained an
ankle injury.
Beasley had 15
points and eight re-
bounds in the game.
She had sat out a major
portion of the second
half before being insert-
ed into the State lineup
with 4:38 left to bolster
the reserves offensive
attack.
Reserve Connie
Rouse came on to lead
NCSU with 18 and 6'5"
June Doby had 15 and
nine rebounds.
"We only had four
turnovers in the first
half commented Yow.
"For us, that's amaz-
ing. I thought we play-
ed our 1-3-1 defense
very well, also
For ECU, center
Marcia Girven provided
inside shooting worth 15
points. She also grab-
bed nine rebounds.
Seniors Gale Ker-
baugh and April Ross
poured in nine each for
the Lady Bucs.
"I think they were a
little hesitant out there
at first stated An-
druzzi. "We kept down
the people we thought
we had to keep down;
Beasley only had 15
and (Trudi) Lacey five.
"We lost by a
bigger margin than the
first time (we played
them), but we have a
lot of youth out there.
We were able to hit the
boards; against a team
like that, ' it has to be
an accomplishment
NCSU maintains its
unblemished 7-0 mark
in NCAIAW standings
and stands 16-4 overall.
ECU drops to 6-3
NCAIAW and 11-8 over-
all.
NSCU (94)
Laughlin 6 1-3 13,
Lacev 2 1-2 5, Beaslev
1-1 14, Rouse 4 2-2 10,
Earnhardt 6 0-0 12.
Fielden 2 0-0 4, Owen
0 2-2 0, Rogers 4-4 18,
Dobv 5 5-6 15. Totals
39 16-20 94.
ECU (58)
Thompson 3 5-6 11,
Emerson 2 0-0 4, Gir-
ven 7 1-2 15, Kerbaugh
4 1-1 9, Rountree 4 0-0
8, Barnes 1 0-0 2
Howell 0 0-2 0, Ross 2
5-5 9, Versprille 0 0-0
0. Totals 23 12-15 58
Halftime NCSU 45
ECU 26. Fouled ou
Laughlin (NCSU), Gir-
NCSU 10, ECU 19
A-1000. '
r
T
��V'V5' �-�.






Purple Push Blitz i� �- � .u
� z is new campaign theme
irate Club prepares for new mem
6 February 1979 FOUNTAINHEAO Peoe 9
BY SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
Over the last two years tk- m
universities fund raisin1 � PIrate CIub th
department, has TaL f mZat,�n for the �hletic
S68l 000 for ECU athletes astoundng total of
1349,000 during the 1978 79 XTve "l
� Erector Gus And� " Calender ?
?Plus and other LuS nal�ng with the
otner members w be striving to
find even more members anA driving to
ing ear. membe� and money during the
fTroxirnatelv 250 members will gather at the
Building on the ECU campus Saturday
le exe'r "V� ��� ideas "
knit the exciting future of Pirate athletics.
Most of the people on hand for our kickoff
meeting Saturday will be community leaders from
North and South Carolina and Virginia said
Andrews, now in his third year as the executive
director. "We'll supply them with all sorts of
materials, and printed information which will help
them start fund raising in their local communities.
Last year's meeting went well and I know we'll
accomplish even more this year
Tom Fields, the head of the Educational
Foundation at the University of Maryland, will be
the guest speaker. Pirate football coach Pat Dye,
chancellor Dr. Thomas Brewer and athletic director
Bill Cain will also address the meeting. The
meeting is scheduled to begin at 10:30.
This eyar's new campaign slogan will be "The
Purple Push Blitz according to Andrews.
"The Purple Push idea worked so well last year
that we wanted to use it again this year because so
many of our fans could identify with it explained
Andrews. "And the Blitz idea is designed to attract
more alumni, supporters and friends of the
community so they will join the Pirate Club. It's
always a good idea to have a catchy theme for the
new membership drive.
"We've really had a substantial growth in the
Kirate Club over the last two years and I hope we
can continue to get all the cooperation we have
received from everyone
A total of 1,497 people joined the Pirate Club in
'77-79 and last year the figure reached 2,049 which
marked an increase of 552 members. Each member
gave an average of $214.00 which exceeded the
'77-78 figure of $162.00 per person.
This year, the Pirate Club will be aiming at a
$550,000 goal with 800 new members expected to
join. Andrews has also initiated a new membership
program for graduating seniors at ECU.
"We want to raise as much money and use as
many people as we can to do it noted Andrews.
To be a strong fund raising organization we need
a stronger program which means more members
and more participation. Some schools can raise
plenty of money with just a few numbers, and here
at ECU we want to accomplish the same thing. We
just have to do it with more members
ECU students who graduate in the spring or
summer will receive honory memberships. The
$30.00 membership fee will be waived and seniors
will receive all benefits Pirate Club members
currenlty get including tickets to the N.C. State and
North Carolina football games as long as they are
available .
"This is another new membership idea and we
hope it will be successful said Andrews. "We
want our students to become involved even after
they leave the unviersity and we feel this is a good
opportunity. They will be figured on the priority list
after their first year so the year's free membership
will certainly help them in the future if they want
to continue as a Pirate Club member
Action in Saturday's Duke -ECU swimming meet
Photo by John H. Gro
ECU upsets Duke
By DAVID MAREADY
Staff H'riter
The men's swimming
am closed out the
7() wimming sea-
wit h a bang Satur-
a they whipped
the visiting Duke Blue
Devils 68-45. The Lady
Pirat- - were less fortu-
nate as they were
humbled by the Duke
men's team 92-30 in
final swim meet action
in Minges Natatorium.
Although the men's
im won nine of the
rteen events accord-
to Pirate Coach,
Hay Scharf, thev
weren't overly confident
the win until the last
two events.
"We won nine out
thirteen events
igainst Carolina earlier
this season noted
sari. "but we still
31 b) one point. It
ua- certainly a good
victory. We were
pleased with the total
performance and atti-
tude. It seemed like we
had the intensity it
takes to win a meet
against a team like
Duke
Several Pirates were
double winners in the
individual events. Jack
Clowar took the top
spots in the 200 yd.
individual medley and
the 200 yd. backstroke.
Ted Nieman won the
500 yd. freestyle and
set a new record in the
200 vd. freestvle with a
time' of 1:41.88. Tom
Bell swept both diving
events with a score of
271.15 in the one meter
dive and a score of
268.10 in the three
meter diving competi-
tion.
John Tudor and Bill
Fehling were the other
Pirate individual event
winners. Tudor set a
new meet record in the
100 vd. freestyle with a
time' of 46.18. Fehling
also set a meed record
with a time of 21.35 in
the 50 yd. freestyle.
The nationally ranked
men- 400 freestyle re-
lay team consisting
Ft'�' ing, Nieman,
var and Tudor broke a
meet record as they
shaved nearly four
seconds off the old
-d to 3:07.45.
"I was extremely
happy with Tom's div-
ing continued Scharf,
"he did a tremendous
job on the boards for
us.
Despite their low
score, the women also
made a respectable
showing as they broke
three varsity records.
"I was real proud of
the girls said Scharf,
"they really swam hard.
Since we only have six
girls in thirteen events,
it makes it tough for
them to stay in the
meet, expecially against
a team as strong as
Duke
Karen Davidsen
shattered the varsity
record in the 200 yd.
backstroke by ten
seconds with a time of
2:23.03. Julie Malcolm
broke the varsity record
in the 200 yd. breast-
roke with a time of
2:40.625.
Another varsity
record was broken by
the 400 yd. freestyle
relay team of Karen
Davidsen, Paige Lang-
ston, Cindy Sailer, and
Sharon Burns. Their
time of 3:53.66 topped
the old record of
4:25.85 by nearly thirty-
two seconds.
Saturday's dual meet
was the last of the
season for the Pirate
Swim Teams. For Coach
Ray Scharf, the men's
win marked his twelfth
consecutive winning sea-
son as his men's squad
finished at 5-3. Duke
fell to 4-5. The Lady
Pirates dropped to 3-3
while the Lady Blue
Devils advanced to 3-4.
On Saturday and
Sunday, February 9 and
10, the Pirates will host
the 24th Annual Atlantic
Seaboard Championships
featuring top high
school teams from
throughout the East
coast. Both squads will
also participate in the
UNC-W Invitational in
Wilmington ThursSat
February 22-24.
ipexai says
Be Mine
so well!
Valentine's
Day is
February 14!
Qualify � Competitive Pricms � Service
fmHc tmnm hr tar � Tnrt Emyfe; If Tto Tur
No 1
rllOtckinaonAve
Ptmw7&-n�S
8 a.m7 20 p.m
No. 2
�n St. I Memorial Drive
Phone 75t-4)Q4
8 a.m10 o.m.
HEYLOOK US OVER
WE HAVE
A NEW LOOK
"IN STORE"
FOR YOU
COME SEE FOR YOURSELF
SAVE UP TO 75
ON ALL
rALL & WINTER FASHIC
'ELING SALE
mS
T.AMi
THIS FRIDAY, AND SATURDAY
OPEN TIL 9:00
EVANS ST. MALL
GREENVILLE
TERRY'S
HAIR FACTORY
Beauty Salon
Pactolus Highway
Greenville
758-7815
OWNED AND OPERATED BY
TERRY MOZINGO
FORMERLY with La Kosmetique
SPECIAL ON PERMS $20.00 thru Feb. 15.
Open Mon. thru Frl. 8:00 to 6:00pm.
of
Clo-
SPAGHETTI
Shoney's Real
Italian Spa-
ghetti with su-
perb, tasty,
meat sauce,
Parmesan
Cheese, Hot
WITH
SALAD
$299
SHONEYS
Located beside
the Remade Inn,
264 By-peee.
ALL GOLF SHOES 25 OFF
ALL GOLF BALLS $12.00 a dozen LARGE BARREL OF H&B DRIVERS LEFT and
Air THnnRFN i7nn cnrATirDC ix c o RIGHT HAND MODELS IN ALL FLEXES &
to 20 SWEATERS, Vt price Sizes 2 WEIGHTS Reg $44 50 N0W pR1CE
40 OFF ON All iiraG ccmv amh paqttai ALL TENNIS EQUIPMENT, BALLS, SHOES.
PANTS CASUAL ACCESSORIES AND APPAREL Va off
AFI CHIinRFNS rnir sitts r � eon vnw �� on AU Ski Bibs- Coats, Jackets.Pants &
nSv tS o GOLF SETS Regulary $90 NOW jump Su,ts for men, women and children
UWLY 5oU 1 woods - 4 irons - putter & bag-tees
& balls 40off on all turtle necks ski sweaters
50OFF ON ALL KNIT HEAD COVERS AND ODD LARGE RACK LADIES FALL & WINTER, Sk.rts,
SETS OF HEAD COVERS pant Suits, Jackets and tops 75OFF
CARDIGAN ALL CAPS. Hats. Toboggans, Ski Masks, Gloves,
Mittens and Long Underwear for Men,
ALL IZOD MENS V-NECK &
SWEATERS NORMALLY ABOUT $22. NOW $14
ALL GOLF GLOVES BUY 2 get one free - You may Women an Children 25off
All Ski Boots & Apre Ski Boots bv Caber, Longe,
mix sizes
SPECIAL SALE ON ALL GOLF CLUBS - WE ALSO
ACCEPT USED GOLF CLUBS ON TRADE
ALL GOLF BAGS 25off
San Marco, and Blondo NOW 3COFF
LARGE Selection Ski Socks Reg. $4.50 now only $2
All Izod Short Sleeve Junior Shirts
SIZES 2-20 NOW $8
GORDON D. FULP
GOLF PROFESSIONAL
LOCATED AT GREENVLLE COUNTRY CLUB
COUNTRY CLUB DRIVE
OFF MEMORIAL DRIVE
GREENVLLE. NORTH CAROUNA 27834 .
t

� �� � �
. - . 0 1 �- s t 0
� W





1�"�11
"� ?
Pleasers maintain top ranking
By CANDY WEDEMEYER defeated Alpha Omicron
Intramural Writer
Top-ranked teams
continued to play well
as basketball enters
mid-season. Belk Pleas-
ers maintained their top
ranking with a defeat
over Scott's Bad 63-26.
Other dorm teams
that recorded wins were
the Jones Jaguars over
the Scott Rockets 60-46,
and the Jones Playboys
55-37, Scott Stooges
over Belk Whit Hope
54-43, Scott Anythings
over Scott Blues Bro-
thers and the Jones
Rolling Stones 38-36
and 64-24 respectively,
Slav stead Villians over
Scott 79-ers 57-27. Belk
Player- Assoc. over
Aycock's Worst st 67-37
and Belk Slimey Dogs
over Scott Supermen
and the Belk Bullets
77-15 and 50-41. In the
Bullets game Larry Rav-
nor -cored 33 pts. for
the losers.
Moving over to the
club independent -core
the Nads defeated the
Rookies 54-33, No
Jumping Fools defeated
the Body Mechanics 57-
28 and the Tasmanian
Devils defeated previous-
ly unbeaten Nuggets
64-35. The Langston
D.J. s who were upset
last week by Pac 8,
defeated the Heartbreak
Kids 48-47. and Pac 8
lost to Sociolog) Anth-
ropology "B" 41-36.
In Fraternity pla
top ranked Kappa Alpha
had no trouble defeating
Sigma u 44-19
ranked
Tau
and
Phi
easilv
Alpha Sigma Pi
second
Kapj a
a ned
60-31. Alpha Phi Alpha
is emerging as the
darkht rse as the) down-
ed a strong Kappa
Sigma team 37-35.
Other fraternity scores:
Beta Theta Pi defeated
Sigma Tau Gamma 39-
38, Kappa Alpha psi
defeated Pi Kappa Phi
40-38 and Omega Psi
Phi defeated Sigma Phi
Epsilon 46-35.
In women's play
most of the top teams
were idle last week. In
sorority plav, Tri Si
gma
Spartans
win with
'Magic'
By KEN RAPPOPORT
AP Sports Writer
If the Michigan State
basketball team has an
Achilles' heel, as some
suspect, the Kansas
Jayhawks surely didn't
find it.
As a matter of fact,
they had a problem
keeping their own foot-
ing Sunday.
Other teams have
used the collapsing zone
defense to beat the
Spartans this season,
but Kansas just collap-
sed, period, and lost an
85-61 decision in the
nationally televised
game at East Lansing.
"It's difficult for
clubs that haven't scout-
ed us to do things
other teams can do
said Jud Heathcote,
coach of the 15th-ranked
Spartans. "It was good
to do some of those
things we haven't been
able to do for some
time.
In theory, the collap-
sing zone is supposed
to stop the intricate
passes of Earvin
"Magic" Johnson to
Greg Kelser and Jay
Vincent underneath the
basket. But Johnson
found enough daylight
inside to see the Spar-
tans' two big men, and
hit them enough times
so that Kelser could
score 22 points and
Vincent 20.
"We didn't antici-
pate that Michigan
State would run as well
as they did noted
Kansas Coach Ted
Owens.
Pi 39-6, Chi Omega
defeated Delta Zeta 14-
10 and Alpha Phi
defeated Alpha Delta Pi
29-19. In the indepen-
dent division the Rip-
pers defeated Peace
Pirates 27-21 and the
Foxes defeated Undeci-
ded 37-26. In dorm
Tyler Tapers defeated
Clementines 25-11,
Fleming Bad "L" Fly-
ers defeated Student
Affairs 25-20 and Gar-
rett upset the Cotten
Jumpers 16-11.
Racquetball singles
tor men and women got
underway last week
with the doubles expec-
ted to start sometime
soon. Advancing in the
w omen's "B" bracket
were J. McVeigh, S.
Chepko, D. Starks, B.
Byrum, E. Thompson,
S. Briley, K. Dryer, L.
Riggs, and C. Bolton.
In the "A" bracket,
Laurie Arrants the No.
1 seed defeated Linda
Eaton and Deb Knight
to advance to the finals
of the winners' bracket
in the double elimina-
tion competition. Ar-
rants will meet the
winner between Di
Worthy and Dina Jack-
mofsky. The men's tour-
ney has barely gotten
underway but Bobb
Little is slated to take
the "A" bracket and
Milian and Homey are
expected to fight it out
for the "B" title.
Bowling also got
underway this week. In
the men competition
Joe Ward took high
game honors with a 225
to lead Kappa Alpha
over Pi Kappa Phi. In
other Frat. matches
Sigma Tau Gamma
scored a whopping 1909
pins to defeat Lambda
Chi Alpha, Sigma Nu
took a 3-1 decision over
Phi Kappa Tau and
Kappa Alpha Psi forfeit-
ed to Tau Kappa Epsi-
lon. In dorm play all
four Jones teams
Gutterballs, King Pins,
Spare Ribs, and Strikers
recorded forfeit wins
over the other dorm
competitors. In the club
independent division,
Degree of perfection
defeated YMHS and Phi
Epsilon Kappa defeated
ROTC "A
In women's play
Omicron
forfeit,
division
Favorites
Pi won by
In the dorm
the Fleming
tallied two
Alpha X
defeated
1481-1063
Delta 1
Alpha Phi
and Alpha
-wins with the leadership
of Robin Brunson who
took high game honors
last week with a 208. In
second place in the
division is Cotten
Strikes Again who re-
corded a win by forfeit
over White.
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re
quired to be readily available for sale
at or below the advertised price in
each A&P Store, except as specifi
cally noted in this ad.
ViMa, Jl&ma,
ITALIAN RESTAURANT
2713 10th St.
FAST FREE
DELIVERY
PIZZAS
SUBS SPAGHETTI
DINNERS SALADS
fact-
calling this a "brush"
4
is like calling this a "radio"
���������
L.
1 O
9 j
��� 9' 0
88
we call it a Dynamic Stabilizer
critics call it a major innovation
mmw

V15 Type IVLthe stabilized cartridge
HUR
V 15 Type IV $99.95
M91 �D $25.36
DISCOUNT
PRICES ON ALL
SHURE
PHONO
CARTRIDGES
PAIR
V
M95 ED $33.79
STEREO and SOUND
beside Tarheel Toyota, on 107 Trade St.
phone 756-2291
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT. FEB. 10 AT AP IN GREENVILLE
WOWILOOK WHAT I GOT AT A&P!
ACTION
� PRICES
WEEKLY
SPECIALS
ECONOMY
CORNER
SUPERCASH
BINGO
PLUS I WON $1000
4 400 ANN PAGE SPAGHETTI SAUCE 32 OZ
8 800 ANN PAGE MAYONNAISE 32 OZ
1 650 ANN PAGE PEANUT BUTTER 18 OZ
1 650 ANN PAGE BLACK PEPPER 4 OZ
30 800 ANN PAGE KETCHUP 14 OZ
1 650 AAP TOOTHPASTE 1 OZ
1 650 AAP SHAVE CREAM 11 OZ
1 65C AAP BABY SHAMPOO 16 OZ
4 400 ANN PAGE SM STUFFED OLIVES 5 ; OZ
9 350 OUR OWN TEA BAGS 100 CT
$252,000
IN CASH PRIZES!
57,785 CASH PRIZE
WINNERS
66,000 FOOD PRIZES
Number of
Winners
Winning
Amount
! ��
0KJ� I
Vis.I
V.tiU
Ooai 26
V.SIIl
I-i
' "I I- �� T i I
�' ' ' I � . . .
' � I - . 4
. t. I. . . -
AAP QUALITY CORN-FED
PORK CHOPS
QUARTER LOIN
SLICED
LB.
A&P QUALITY HEAVY
WESTERN GRAIN-FED BEEF
RIB STEAKS
bone,n $38
ANN PAGE
A&P COUPON
MAYONNAISE
V
r-sl
.AP
J-y LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON
SAVE AND ADDITIONAL $7 50 ORDER
.i, LIMIT ONE COUPON
N � r GOOD THRU SAT. FEB 10 AT A4P IN
QUART
JAR
GREENVILLE
692
A&P QUALITY
A&P COUPON
CREAM CHEESE
T" L, LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON
SAVE AND ADDITIONAL S7 50 ORDER
� ��"�' � 20C LIMIT ONE COUPON
niTnr,N. CCMllTT " o�j
if -QCLPN VjLLE
ITEMS OFFERED FC NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DeS l
8 02
PKG
�c
A&P COUPON
ANN PAGE CHOCOLATE COVERED
THIN MINTS
LIMIT ONE COUPON
GOOD THRU SAT. FEB. 10 AT AAP IN
8 02.
PKG.
695
GOLDEN YELLOW
CHIQUITA Z
LBS
ONLY
GOLDEN FRIED
CHICKEN
8 PC.
BUCKET '
HYGRADE-SLICED TO ORDER
COOKED HAM 4
LB.
GALLO
or rhEenk chablis
HEARTY BURGUNDY
CHABUS BLANC
BTULTRS5.59 i� - -
ofjferoodolyinQREeNvili







Title
Fountainhead, February 6, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 06, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.541
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy