Fountainhead, February 1, 1979






Circulation 10,000
East Carolina University
North
Voi. 55 Ho.JT
1 February 1979
REAL CRISIS CENTER provides information referral and short-time counseling 24 hours a day. Photo by
Chap Gurley
REAL Center offers service
By JULIE EVERETTE
Staff Writer
REAL Crisis Center,
located at 1117 E.
Evans St provides in-
formation referral and
short-time counseling 24
hours daily to Pitt
County citizens in crisis.
According to Mary
Smith, Program coor-
dinator, REAL offers
seven major programs
to help citizens in need:
Help-Line, a 24 hour
telephone service;
Calkin service; Off-site
service, a program re-
quiring the REAL team
to go to the individual
in crisis who is unable
to come to the REAL
center; Dial-A-Teen, a
youth employment ser-
vice. Outreach Edu-
cation, a service that
informs the communitv
through speaking en-
gagements and a
newsletter; Rape, a
service providing
counsel for the rape
victim; and Battered
Persons, a service
providing counsel for
the battered person.
REAL is a non-profit
organization and is
funded by the state
division of Mental
Health Services, United
Way funds grant, and
local membership
drives.
The organization also
receives money through
donations from com-
munity individuals and
periodical fund-raising
events.
According to Smith,
REAL helps citizens
with problems ranging
from loneliness to
suicide.
Smith added that
REAL encounters a high
percentage of problem
pregnancy, drugs and
alcohol, and familv
problems.
Currently REAL has
two paid employee
volunteers, a volunteer
director and Resident
Counselor, 11 volunteer
staff members, and 11
persons in training.
Smith said many of
the volunteers are ECU
students.
Because ECU
students usually leave
during the summer
months, Smith feels
REAL needs to gain
more volunteers from
the community.
Smith hopes REAL
will continue to develop
the programs more to
benefit more people.
According to Smith,
What's inside
� Local economic outlook predicted,
see p.3
� ECU beats William and MAry, see
P-
� Black Arts Festival set for Feb. 11,
see p.6
� Eugene Fodor packs the house, see
p.6
CLINT EASTWOOD'S
LATEST . . . See p. 6.
REAL needs to help
increase the knowledge
of the community about
some of the problems
through speaking en-
gagements and a
monthly newsletter.
Smith does feel that
REAL receives good
publicity in Pitt County
by distributing news-
letters and REAL
stickers, speaking to
community groups, and
Public Service
Announcements.
A Board of Directors
governs the organization
and meets the second
Tuesday of each month.
The Board consists of
20 members.
According to Smith,
REAL began in the late
1960's when a con-
cerned group of stu-
dents wanted to help
students with drugs and
other problems. A Hot-
-line was established
and REAL was chart-
ered in November,
1974.
Anyone purchasing a
membership card will
eceive a monthly
tewsletter, and may
i-ttend the monthly
board meetings.
The cost of a
membership card is $10
for individuals and $50
� or groups.
Smith said anyone
nterested in volun-
.eering for REAL should
contact her for infor-
mation at 758-HELP.
Volunteers are
trained and required to
work a minimum of 16
hours a month.
Brewer to present REBEL awards
By LUKE WH1SNANT
Staff Writer
Chancellor Thomas
Brewer will present
three awards from the
REBEL to ECU students
this Thursday night at 7
p.m. in the Mendenhall
Coffeehouse.
The winning students
are: Sue Aydelette;
Greg Schroder; and
Marylou Warwick.
Each year, the
REBEL sponsors a liter-
ature contest and an art
show open to all
students. Prize money is
donated by interested
businesses around the
Greenville area. The
winners of this year's
awards will each receive
a plaque and a check
for $100.
In the literature
division, Sue Aydelette's
poem "Screens" won
the Jeffrey's Beer &
Wine Award. The
Anheuser-Busch Award
went to Greg Schroder's
two stories, "Wasps"
and "Birdladies The
winning pieces will be
published in the REBEL
this spring.
Marylou Warwick's
"Self-Portrait" won the
Best-in-Show Attic
Award in the Fourth
Annual REBEL Art
Show held last October
in Mendenhall Student
Center. Other winners
in the show included
ECU students Jeff
Fleming, Janet Rose,
Robert T. Dick, Mike
Duggins, Brenda Wil-
liams, Art Shirer, Ro-
bert Danial, Eric Thiele,
Kathy Fahrenbruch,
Carol Ann Roberts, and
James Jorden.
Money for this
year's prizes was do-
nated by Tom Haines of
�he Attic and Mickey
Cochran of Jeffrey's
Beer and .Wine.
The Award presenta-
tion Thursday night will
be followed by a poetry
and prose reading,
sponsored by the
REBEL staff.
Good morning
FOUNTAINHEAD has become a morning news-
japer. The change came to serve you better � to
;et the latest campus news, sports, and changing
rends, along with thought provoking editorial
;ommentary and national reporting frm the wires of
he Associated Press to you faster. "The main
source" is constantly updating its service to its
eaders and advertisers, so that we can become the
est we can be! Now, you can pick up
'OUNTAINHEAD at any of the standard distribution
)oints at 11 a.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Keep
ibreast of what's going on on campus. Read
OUNTAINHEAD � your student newspaper.
EBONY HERALD is
Media Board topic
By MARC BARNES
News Editor
Discussion of the fate of EBONY HERALD
dominated yesterday's Media Board meeting.
According to Tommy Joe Payne, chairman of the
Media Board, he entered the EBONY HERALD
office on Mon Jan. 29 to find the office closed
down with copies of Media Board minutes dating
from January 17 strewn upon the floor.
There was no evidence of any work having been
done, according to Associate Dean of Student
Affairs Rudolph Alexander.
Payne added that he assumed no work was done
since September, because the minority-oriented
newspaper had not been published since then. "They
haven't done anything Payne commented. "When
we went over the EBONY HERALD's budget, we
told them that this fall would be a testing period
In the course of the meeting, there was a
question of salaries being paid to personnel at the
newspaper while the publication was not being
printed.
Payroll checks totalling $1,014 were dispursed to
staff members at EBONY HERALD between October
and December, accoring to figures released by the
Student Fund Accounting Office. A paycheck for the
month of January in the amount of $278 was
requisitioned by EBONY HERALD, but payment was
stopped on the check by Payne.
The last issue of EBONY HERALD was
published in September, 1978. The total budget for
the publication was approximately $6,000, according
to Payne. The newspaper was supposed to be
published once a month, during the academic year.
A copy of EBONY HERALD was passed around
during the meeting, and some members of the
Board criticized its layout and design. One member,
who asked not to be identified, stated that it looked
like a junior high school newspaper.
Executive Editor Jerry Simmons was brought into
the meeting, and was asked why he had been
paying salaries to personnel at the publication while
the newspaper was not being printed. "I have been
paying salaries because they have been doing the
work Simmons commented. "We couldn't use
National's layout room (a local printing company
which printed the first HERALD), and we couldn't
use FOUNTAINHEAD's
According to a directive issued Oct. 18, 1978,
the Media Board established certain guidelines for
EBONY HERALD to use during layout at the
facilities located at FOUNTAINHEAD. The directive
stated that FOUNTAINHEAD would open its office
for use on Tuesday, Thursday and Friday from 9 to
5 p.m. and from 5 until 9 on Tuesday nights before
the newspaper came out. Also, the directive stated
that EBONY HERALD had to give FOUNTAINHEAD
48 hours notice concerning use of the facilities.
According to FOUNTAINHEAD editor Doug
White, neither Simmons nor any member of his
staff have contacted FOUNTAINHEAD to use the
layout room since the guidelines were issued.
Dr. Thomas Eamon asked Simmons how many
hours a week the staff put into production at
EBONY HERALD. "This semester none, last
semester plenty. Last semester, I went every day
Simmons remarked.
He added, "I assign storiesit keeps on coming
down to no layout area
Alexander pointed out the agreement worked out
between FOUNTAINHEAD and EBONY HERALD
would have allowed Simmons to have a layout area,
"I don't understand why people can't work out their
schedules Simmons said that his schedule
prevented him from knowing what he would be
doing a week in advance, and he added "I cannot
do it with circumstances the way they are now
Simmons said that if the Board wanted to
combine the two newspapers, or if thev wanted to
find someone else to do the job at EBONY
HERALD, that it would be fine with him. He
accused FOUNTAINHEAD of not allowing him to
use the layout room, and he added that if he had a
key to the layout room he would be able to put out
a newspaper.
Several members of the Media Board asked
Simmons why they hadn't come to the Board to
complain, and he replied that he had � at the
meeting that was set to lay down the guidelines for
use of the lavout room.
"There was no work done this month Payne
said. "Why did you sign a requisition for salaries?"
After a long pause, Simmons said, "Checks were
written Payne said, "I had to stop the checks
"All I'm asking for is a typewriter, an office and
a layout room Simmons declared. "I got the
office, I got the typewriter, but I didn't get the
layout room He added, "I know what I have
sacrificed, I know what I have gone through last
semester
Were vou denied
access
���
avne
� ked.
Simmons stated that he had called Cathrine Mercer
(secretary to the Media Board) and she told him to
get in touch with FOUNTAINHEAD advertising
manager Robert Swaim. When asked, Swaim said
that he had never heard from Simmons on the
matter of using the lavout room at FOUN-
TAINHEAD.
"If you had a key to the FOUNTAINHEAD
office, then you could publish the EBONY
HERALD? Payne asked. Simmons said that he
could. Several members of the board expressed a
apreference for doing away with the HERALD
entirely, and appointing a minoritv editor to work
for FOUNTAINHEAD. This editor would have a
certain set amount of space, and would devote
himself herself entirely to covering campus events
which concern minority students at this university.
Alexander pleaded to the board that any decision
concerning the future of EBONY HERALD be free
of politics, and the board adopted a wait-and-see
stance on the issue, saying that if EBONY HERALD
is published, the staff would be paid. "If no papers
are printed, no one will be paid for it Payne said.
FROZEN FINGERS CUNG to a wall of Whichard as
a crystal reminder of winter's grip. Photo by
Marianne Baines).
�. �r m0 0 0- Mr irv-nrmr.xr id &r � - - . . , , .2&naarsR- 2?�is
v
�mmm n





Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 1 February 1979
Christian
The Fountain of Life
Christian Fellowship will
sponsor a revival on
Feb. I, 2 & 3. Services
will begin nightl) at 7
p.m. m Wright Auditor-
ium. Chaplain Kenneth
P. Edwards will be the
guesi speaker.
Psi-Chi
Psi Chi, the National
Honor Fraternity lor
Pihology, is now
aeeepting applications
� membership.
uirements are as
P
follows: the applicant
-houhi be a psychology
major, minor or grail-
uate student with at
least eight semester
hour- in psychology. A
3.0
average must
psyc
be
;hol-
maintained in
og) courses.
All applications
should be turned in no
later than Feb. 16. The
membership fee is $30.
rhis includes a lifetime
membership with no
additional or annual
Applications may
be obtained from the
psychology office in
Speighl Building.
Chi Beta
The honorary Scien-
tific Fraternity Chi Beta
Phi vsi hod its Initi-
ation Banquet for its
pledges on Thur Feb.
I at the Villa Roma
restaurant. The banquet
begins at 6 p.m. and
all pledges are expected
expected
attend. Additional
information may be ob-
tained from Ken Russell
at 758-6747.
Darlings
There will be an or-
ganizational meeting of
the Diamond Darlings
for the 1979 Baseball
season on Wed Feb.
7. 7 p.m. in classroom
1 12 Minges. All attract-
ive, interested females
who want to support
ECU Pirate Baseball are
urged to attend. If
unable to attend meet-
ing, please call 752-9989
weekdays after 5 p.m.
Wanted
Wanted - Young
Beautiful Girls! For
Miss Black and Gold
Pageant in March. All
oung ladies interested
please contact Michael
Harrison, Plat Simmons,
Anthonv Richmond.
Beta Kappa
Beta Kappa Alpha
will hold its monthly
meeting, Mon. Feb. 5,
at 3 p.m. in Rm. 103,
Rawl. Mr. Furney
James, ECU Placement
Dir. will speak on
career planning. All
members and interested
students are urged to
attend.
Speaker
Carol Simmermacher,
Director of the Land
Resources Information
Service of N.C. Dept. of
Natural Resources and
Community Development
will speak and show
slides explaining
workings of the Land
Information System.
Computers are used to
store data from line
maps and manipulate
and present results in
the form of line maps.
This is an advanced
system designed to
assist in making land
use decisions on state,
regional, and local
levels. Mon Feb. 5, 7
p.m. Brewster B102.
Law
There will be a Law
Society meeting Feb. 6
at 7:30 in Rm 221
Mendenhatl. The
speaker will be John
Matthis who is Special
Deputy Attorney
General with the
Consumer Protection
Agency. This meeting
should prove to be very-
interesting and all
students are invited to
attend.
LAE
The American
Criminal Justice As-
sociation, Lambda Alpha
Epsilon, is actively in-
volved in the constant
improvement and re-
search in the areas of
criminal justice. The
ECU chapter will be
having its installation
banquet Feb. 16, 7
p.m. at the Ramada
Inn's Restaurant. There
will be a guest speaker
and members Qf LAE
will be receiving their
certificates.Tickets are
$5.63 and money for
tickets must be in by
Feb. 7. Applications to
LAE are taken year
round but are only to
be sent in to the
national organization
once every semester.
The deadline for this
semester is Feb. 15.
All persons wishing to
join should get in touch
with Mr. Campbell
757-6961 or Toni Dye
752-8501
Classifieds
Smoker
Spring Smoker,
Wed Feb. 7, 9 p.m.
Aycock Dorm Basement.
For all young men who
are planning to pledge
either Spring or Fall
1979.
Gays
The East Carolina
Gay Community will
present Claude and
Carol Andrews from
Creative Living Associ-
ates who will discuss
relationship counselling
on Tues Feb. 6, 5
p.m. at 608 E. 9th St.
Anyone associated with
East Carolina is invited
to attend. Regular
meetings of the East
Carolina Gay Com-
munity are on Tuesdays
at 5 p.m. at 608 E. 9th
St.
SNEA
The Student National
Education Association will
be meeting Feb. 5,
Mon. at 4 p.m. in
Speight building, room
129. Mr. Oliver John-
son, consultant of the
Division of Human Re-
lations and Student Af-
fairs of the North Caro-
lina Department of Pu-
blic Instruction will be
speaking. The public is
invited. Refreshments
will be served.
cso
If you are studying
toward a career in a
health-related major, the
Center for Student
Opportunities wants you
to know about new
opportunities to learn
speedreading, effective
organization of lecture
notes, and Active
Reading-knowing more
about what you read, in
a shorter time. Your
course notes and text-
books will be used, so
time spent developing
these skills will also
serve as course study!
For information about
individual or smail-
-group sessions, contact
Beth Stephenson, 208
Ragsdale, or call 757
6122, 6081 or 6075.
Signing
There will be a
meeting for Sign Lan-
guage Club held at BD
101 at 7:30 p.mNOT
6:30 as said earlier,
Thurs Feb. 1. Mem-
bers are urged to at-
tend the meeting. The
meeting is open to
interested students and
faculties regardless of
how much they know
sign language (if at all.)
We meet in the same
classroom every Thurs.
at the same time.
tSsmtns
Gamma Beta Phi will
meet on Thurs Feb. 1,
7 p.m. in Biology 103.
All members are urged
to attend. Semester
dues are payable at this
meeting.
The Men's Residence
Council is sponsoring a
Valentine's Dance on
Mon Feb. 12 at the
Greenville Moose Lodge.
This event is open to
any of the men on the
hill and their dates.
Tickets can be pur-
chased for $5 from any
MRC member or dorm
official. Tickets may
also be purchased dur-
ing office hours in the
MRC office located in
the Scott Hall lobby.
The Embers will be
providing the
entertainment from 8
p.m. to 12 a.m. Couples
only.
Gamma Rho
Sigma Gamma Rho
service sorority is
having a spring rush
Tues. Feb. 6 at 7 p.m.
in Mendenhall Student
Center. This rush is
open to all interested
students.
Ski Club
All persons in-
terested in joining the
Ski Club are invited to
meet Thurs. Feb. 8 at 7
p.m. in Rm 104 of
Memorial Gym. Plans
for upcoming ski trips
will be discussed. If
unable to attend, please
call 758-5375 and ask
for Jeff or Rick.
Tennis
If you enjoy playing
table tennis, stop by
the Mendenhall Student
Center table tennis
rooms each Tuesday
evening at 7 p.m. when
the Table Tennis Club
meets. You will find
players of all levels of
ability participating.
Various activities such
as ladder tournaments
are often scheduled. All
ECU students, faculty
and staff are welcome.
Rebel
The REBEL, ECU's
LiteraryArt Magazine,
sponsors a program of
prose and poetry read-
ing monthly. Refresh-
ments are served, dress
is informal and the
atmosphere is relaxed in
Mendenhall's Coffee-
house.
Previously selected
writers read original
work, and occasionally
the program is varied
with contributions by
artists from disciplines
other than literature.
The writers and
other artists are usually
ECU students or facul-
ty. Readings are open
to the public.
The Feb. 1 program
will feature the follow-
ing writers: Dr. Peter
Makuck, Alison Thomp-
son, Robert Jones, and
Ray Harrell. Chancellor
Thomapr-Brewer will also
attgffdT fo present the
REBEL Literature and
Art awards.
The REBEL annually
presents two literature
awards, one for the
best poem accepted by
the magazine, and one
for the best story. An
award is also presented
for the "Best in Show"
piece from the REBEL
Art Show. Money for
these awards is prov-
ided by Jeffrey's Beer
and Wine Co. and The
Attic.
Would you like to
learn more about how
to live a fruitful life in
the body of our Lord?
Well, come to Leader-
ship Training Class in
Brewster-D, Rm 311 on
Thurs. night. There is
alot of good fellowship
and singing too! The
time is from 7-9 p.m.
and it is sponsored by
Campus Crusade for
Christ.
Crafts
The Crafts Center at
Mendenhall Student
Center is now offering
introductory level work-
shops in a variety of
crafts. Beginning Dark-
room, Pottery, Floor
Loom Weaving, Wood-
working, Quilting, Lea-
ther Craft, Enameled
Mirrors, Printmaking,
Kite Making, Beginning
Jewelry, and Contem-
porary Basketry will be
offered.
Chess
All persons interes-
ted in playing chess are
invited to stop by the
Mendenhall Coffeehouse
each Monday evening at
7 p.m. when the. Chess
Club holds its weekly
meeting. Competition is
at all levels and every-
one is welcome to
attend.
Delta Mu
Alpha Delta Mu will
meet Mon Feb. 5 in
Allied Health Building
at 5:10. Room to be
announced.
Gamma Rho
Sigma Gamma Rho
service sorority is hav-
ing a spring rush Sun
Feb. 4, at 7 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student
Center. This rush is
open to all interested
students.
Courses
Students may reg-
ister for a mini-course
in Beginning Bridge,
Billiards, or CPR train-
ing, sponsored by Men-
denhall Student Center.
The courses are open to
ECU full-time students,
faculty and staff MSC
members and their
spouses or guests.
Persons must regi-
ster and pay fees at the
MSC Central Ticket
office between the hours
of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m
Monday through Friday.
The first course begins
Jan. 29.
Biology
Anyone wishing to
go on the Biology Club
field trip to Burroughs-
Wellcome on feb. 2 are
asked to sign up by-
Thursday, Feb. 1 on the
sign up sheet in the
Biology Reading Room
(second floor in the
biology building.)
� AnyfimgHsttd -stu
dent is welcome.
Fellowship
The Fountain of Life
Christian Fellowship will
sponsor a revival on
Feb. 1, 2, and 3.
Services will begin
nightly at 7 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium.
Chaplin Kenneth P.
Edwards will be the
guest speaker.
Gammon
The newly formed
Backgammon Club gets
together on Monday ev-
enings at 7 p.m. in the
table games area, off
the ground floor at
Mendenhall.
Interested students
are asked to bring their
sets.
Race
The Coastal Carolina
Track Club will sponsor
the First Annual Green
�ille Road Race on
April 1 at 3 p.m. Thi-
race is being sponsored
bv H.L. Hodges and the
funds received from the
entry fees will go to
benefit the Easter Seal
Society.
The race will begin
on the Town Common-
and circle around
Greenville for a distance
being 10,000 meters.
Merchandise prizes will
be awarded for the top
finishers in the age
divisions, both male and
female. Everyone who
finishes the race, no
niattchow long it takes
will receive a certificate
from the CCTC.
The first 500 to
enter will receive a race
T-shirt. All entry fees
are tax-deductible, re-
freshments will be pro-
vided throughout the
race.
Applications and in-
formation are available
by calling the Easter
Seals at 758-3230 or
Robert R. Gotwals Jr.
at 752-3411.
Bail
Tickets are inns on
sale for the Alpha's
Black and Gold Bail
March 24, 1979. Contar!
an Alpha Member.
STUDENT UNION
Applications for these Committee
Chairmanships are NOW
being taken through Tue�, Feb. 6
?ART EXHIBITION
ARTISTS SERIES
COFFEEHOUSE
FILMS
LECTURE
MAJOR
ATTRACTIONS
�� univniKY
r
234
Mendenhall
SPECIAL
ATTRACTIONS
MINORITY ARTS
THEATRE ARTS
THE
ENTERTAINER
TRAVEL
foment�!
FEMALE ROOMMATE
needed immediately to
share 2 bedroom apt.
Call Marsha at
758-2081.
Large furnished bed-
room for rent, some
kitchen privileges.
Across from university.
758-2585.
ROOM FOR RENT:
Male, $50 per mo. plus
13 utilities, phone &
cable TV. Fully
furnished, color TV.
Only need bed &
dressser. on ECU bus
route. Call 752-7225,
113B N. Holly St.
Would like to sublease
2 bedroom duplex 3
blocks from campus.
Call 752-1792.
for sate
SKI SET - Hart
Freestyle 175 cm skis
with Salomon "S" type
binding with ski poles
included. All for just
190. Must sell. Call
7582272.
'71 Mustang, good
condition. P'B, PS,
AC, Automatic, V-8,
AMFM Stereo. Call
756-7965 after 5 p.m.
freisono�!
CHANELO's now has
openings for delivery
personnel. 758-7400.
BELLY DANCE
Lessons for fun tnd
exercise! Call Sunshine
758-0736 (mornings and
evenings).
YOGA: a night course
in Hatha Yoga is be-
ginning Feb. 27. All
interested persons
please call Sunshine at
758-0736. (Mornings &
nights).
Junior & Seniors:
Looking for a part time
job? Get a jump on a
summer job with good
income, flexible hours,
and real experience in
the business world. Call
Northwestern Mutual
Life for an appointment.
752-4080.
SENIORS � resume
preparation is the key
factor in job placement.
National Printing Com-
pany is offering resume
preparation to seniors.
You merely submit the
information and we
provide the resume.
Photographs can be in-
cluded. Low prices. For
more information contact
Richard Cole at Office
758-286 or Home
752-1662.
DISCO DANCE - A
course in disco is be-
ginning Feb. 2, early
Fri. evenings to warm
you up for the weekend
- specializing in spins
and partnering with an
emphasis on arms. A
more bask class will
begin Feb. 4 Sundays
" P;m. specializing ,n
fancy footwork. You can
,earn ver complex
movements golng
bs�ep. l�'s really v�y
e,as and such ; fui
class There' �i
for i �n,v ro�m
r f more tuples or 6
� call .U
OnTyllO 2T t0d
0736� �J� C�
evenings.
T
t
sr�





Local economic outlook
for '79 predicted good
1 February 1979 FOUNTAINHEAO Page 3
B MARTHA OAKLEY
Staff Writer
Greenville area
businessmen and wo-
men, in a recent
survey, predicted im.
provements m the
economy h�r 1979.
Several people were
hosen a a repre-
sentative sample of
economic life in
Greenville. Asked about
their general outlook on
economy, each of
them gave a favorable
liction tor the
i oming year.
D.J. Carter.
senior
assistant manager of
Roses, said sales in his
store were up, and the
future for business
looked bright.
"January sales are
up 12 percent said
Waverly Phelps of
Phelps Chevrolet. "I
expect a 10 percent
increase in car sales for
1979, and a very strong
ear
Lynne Olmstead,
manager of community
development and re-
x-arch in the Greenville
Chamber of Commerce,
said the economic future
looked very good
locally.
"Indications of that
are the extreme rapid
growth and prosperity
in the Greenville area
said Olmstead. "There
will be new business
and industry, and right
now there are
approximately 25 new
families moving into the
area per week
"On the national
level, however, 1 believe
the economy still has a
way to go in order to
improve itself Olm-
stead added.
"We are doing fine
so far, ' said Peggy
Lockhart of Eastern
Construction Co "and
I hope we will continue
to do well
"Business is about
the same as it was this
time last year Lock-
hart added.
Manager of the Book
Barn, Grace Smith, said
sales in her store had
increased since the
same time last year.
"In spite of what
everyone is saying
about a recession, I
expect the economy as
a whole to get better
Smith added.
Controversy stirs in Co-op dept.
B GLENN THOMAS
Staff Writer
re-
v ording to a
nl rumor, the co-op
artmenl has not
essfully doing
: Several people
have said that they feel
op Dept. should
investigated.
Bets) Harper,
r of the Co-op
Dept said in an in-
yesterdaj that
not heard the
dn that no
a : approached
complaints about the
Co-op Dept they
should come forward
and speak up about
them. Dr. Harper
addedI really would
like some student in-
put
Dr. Harper went on
to say that there were
many students who are
very pleased with the
program. She said there
are many students who
have gone to other
schools to express their
happiness and praise of
the program. Dr.
Harper said, "Many
students have been to
other institutions to
speak out for the
program
Libby Lefler, SGA
Speaker, said that she
still wants to investigate
the program.
Lefler said that
they (SGA) are still
trying to find people to
fill the investigative
committee. When asked
if she had contacted the
director of the Co-op,
Lefler replied,
"No
it h
anv
com-
Hr. Harper said
- that it there
students with
rten
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1





Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 1 February 1979
Abolish the HERALD
Fall semester was a testing period
or the EBONY HERALD, and it
failed the test. There is only one
course of action for the Media Board
to take, and that is to completely
abolish the EBONY HERALD
Contrary to HERALD Executive
Editor Jerry Simmons' excuses for
only publishing one issue last semes-
ter, access to FOUNTAINHEAD layout
facilities was not the cause. After a
misunderstanding between the editors
of the two publications in late
September which delayed publication
of a second issue, the Media Board
adopted a set of guidelines and
timetables for use of the FOUNTAIN-
HEAD offices by the HERALD staff.
rFfi Jhe adoption of those rules,
FOUNTAINHEAD has not been con-
tacted by the HERALD.
These guidelines were adopted to
insure that no FOUNTAINHEAD
equipment would be damaged by the
inexperienced HERALD staff. Com-
mLtme! weLe a,so made to train
HbHALD staffers and to provide a
FOUNTAINHEAD employee in the
office whenever the HERALD was
laying out. FOUNTAINHEAD reser-
ved Mondays and Wednesdays for
wSpeRA,and��e?cBCL its doors to the
HERALD staff 28 hours a week for a
total of 112 hours a month' a
FOUNTAINHEAD manages to put
out an eight to 10 page broadsheet
paper twice a week in less than 48
hours of office use, yet the HERALD
is unable to put out a four page
tabloid each month.
These problems have not arisen
during the past few months.
Conditions have gotten progressivelv
worse over the past three years. The
paper has consistently set a standard
of such poor quality that it pales in
comparison with any high shcool
paper. It is, quite simply, an
embarrassment to the students of
' FOUNTAINHEAD has given ECU
minorities a good deal of coverage
this year including articles about the
first black owned newspaper, George
Washington Carver, the Student Union
Black Arts Week, and a black
sorority Articles about the Student
Union Jewish Arts Festival and an
Iranian student are slated for future
issues. A minority paper or a
minority section in FOUNTAINHEAD
is unnecessary.
criMM-fiftt!?ir.sJ?!fers are welcome at
FOUNTAINHEAD. Our doors are
always open to anyone who can write
or who has the interest and potential
Josr out" scfiAtL
HXXJuSTfrjfwT AMD oo SHoulD
Be ftfrtDV To (bLL-
-To AoM A Ct�CtL Of ALL YouL
CiAcuiTtf -� &r 7tie douse hold '
ajo ujr vit�( me PRoee 4�&
Au.j I'm josr all Tito up.
tiEl�um the v.l
TMtE'S Son&TrtivG- 5ouSlY
LOG-C OACuiTS
Forum
Uppity Women
Potholes plague unpaved parking lot
Women after the Gvil War
By CHARLENE CARTER
Staff Writer
A discussion of the history of more than half the
human race, in the space of a few columns, will
entail a lot of skimming and scanning. This column
be confined, for the most part, to the years
jusl before, during and after the Civil War.
In earlier centuries most women in America
worked, and they worked throughout their adult
Exceptions were the small minority middle �
ami upper � income families, who lived in urban
raters.
The major change in the pattern of American
women's lives occured after the Civil War, when
accelerating industrialization and urbanization ush-
ered in a rapid increase in the urban middle
classes. This isolation of women from work was a
significant phenomenon in American life for only
about 80 years � from after the Civil War to the
end of World War II.
Throughout the United States, at the time just
before the Civil Was, the status of individual
women, with few exceptions, was determined not
only by the prevailing convention reflecting male
dominance, but also by the position and disposition
of individual fathers and husbands. Few women
could escape this placement. Neither wealth nor
poverty liberated them.
Even if they were financially independent and
entirely free from any man's supervision, which was
in itself difficult status to attain, there were still
strong, definite, thoroughly-supported codes which
were too entangling to give any woman, whatever
her station, any considerable degree of inde-
pendence.
In a society where the role of women was so
definitely drawn and masculine dominance so
secure, perhaps' it was natural for compensatory
sentiment to glorify the virtues of the woman and
to place her on a pedestal. It was rare to find
women protesting the idealization,the homage, and the
practices of social courtesies characteristically carried
on by men.
Along with this system went a definition of
status alter marriage often in sharp contrast with
the spirit of courtship days. The older woman
appears to have accepted, as a matter of course
her adult responsibilities (long-suffering was one of
the outstanding women's virtues back then).
The brutally sentimental 19th century provided
for the division of women into "good" and "bad"
and the setting off of "lust" from "pure love
Extramarital sex (for men, of course) was provided
by prostitution much more than by adultry.
Love was divided into "sacred" and "profane"
a situation which is usually thought of from the
male point of view as offering a chance for eating
one s cake and having it, too. Marriageable girls had
something to bargain with, their virginity, and this
provided a social balance for women who had little
or no economic base for bargaining.
These same pampered goddesses descended from
their pedestals in angelic throngs, when they were
needed to maintain the home fires while their men
were fighting the Civil War. . They maintained
homes, worked in the fields, in war industries and as
nurses.
The increase of interest in woman's suffrage was
one of the most important influences that the war
had on northern women. The demand there for
political equality had been gradually gathering
strength, but after the war it grew rapidlv and
became more assertive. rapidly and
The agitators led the way, but the strength of
this insistence upon the rights of women came from
changing economic social conditions and from
recognition of the handicap to women from society's
discrimination between the sexes. The placement of
the word 'male" in the 14th Amendment brought
forth bitter resentment from such leaders as
Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony.
It represented an attitude that was nothing less
than an insult. The agitation for women's rights
given momentum by women's war experiences and
granting the vote to Negro men, was soon to force
both men and women's attention on a great national
issue.
Rather than go forward at this point, however,
the next three columns will briefly cover women's
history from (1) early America to the Civil War, (2)
old England to early America, and (3) a brief
discussion of women in the ancient world. With a
more far-reaching history as a back-drop, discussion
ot the more recent history (some call it 'herstory')
of women will be resumed.
I would like to take a little space here to
respond to Ms. Holtzclaw's letter, from last
Ihursday s issue. Regarding the use of the words
bitches and "uppity Because this column is a
university-wide publication, I must of necessity
address this column to both male and female
readers. The word "bitches" was used in a part of
a sentence which was a clarification of a male
attitude.
I think if you will go back and examine the
context, that you will find this to be the case. The
word uppity" is used as a tribute to women's
history ,n the United States, and is certainly not
intended to be derogatory. It is my firm belief that
issues are better dealt with out in the open
particularly in an academic community, rather than
being hidden, as if they do not exist, or have never
existed in the past.
If this requires the use of certain descriptive
words for clarification, I feel that we are all old
enough now to see past the superficial, through to
what is really being said.
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
I've thought about
writing this letter for a
long time, usually every
morning when I drive to
school. Each day, as I
attempt to park my car,
there is a constant
reminder of the reason
I wish to write � the
parking lot behind Joy-
ner Library and Men-
denhall.
I personally would
not even go so far as
to call it a parking lot.
The only resemblance I
see is by the fact that
there are cars there.
Otherwise, the space of
land would better be
classed as the Pits.
When I went home
over Christmas vacation
I was sure someone
would have the fore-
sight to use the time to
fill in the water holes
which constitute a large
percentage of the lot. I
should have known bet-
ter.
And so I am writing.
It has taken awhile, but
my anger is slow to
rise to a state of action.
I see letters in FOUN-
TAINHEAD about stu-
dent apathy (of which I
am also a victim), but
now ask how can we
really ignore the park-
ing problem behind
Jovner and Mendenhall
any longer?
Anyone who parks
there in the morning
knows how difficult it
can be to find a space.
Sometimes spaces can
be found which others
pass by, and no wonder
when getting to them
requires driving through
a small pond.
The holes alone are
bad enough but when
they fill with water �
well, you try and keep
a car clean. I would
like to see how the ad-
ministration would like
parking there.
Every year I hear
rumors about the park-
ing lot being paved.
Well I would like to say
that right now I would
be very grateful if
someone just filled it in
to make it easier to
park. I'm sure others
must feel the same way
as they drive around
there in the mornings.
There must be
something that can be
done. I would also say
that I would love to
save myself a hassle
and some gas and take
the bus, but then they
aren't too reliable if you
are on the Brown
Route.
Diane McCovern
Sport of name-calling is alive at ECU
To FOUNTIANHEAD:
Attention Name Cal-
lers:
There is a sport in
this world that does not
get the body in shape
but is immensely help-
ful in the development
of the mind. To elim-
inate the inexcusable
sin of redundancy, the
mind had to search
painstakingly for new
nomenclature, and for
the effort a visible
change can be seen.
Truly, the sport is quite
fitting for the mature,
sensible college student.
Quite common is this
sport of name-calling in
my family. I can't re-
member not using it,
since its inception in
me started practically at
birth (please excuse my
reminiscing, but my
Fountainhcod
Serving the East Carolina community for over 50 yeers
EDITOR
Doug White
PRODUCTION MANAGER ADVERTISING MANAGER
Steve Bachner ws EDTQRS Robert M. Sw.im
RMd GUarmt
TRENDS EDITOR
Jeff Rollins
SPORTS EDITOR
Sem Rogers
of East
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newaDM
SK diiTryT. SI? b th "sdlaBoaro of ECU
and is distributed each Tuesday and Thuradav wekiv
during the summer). �rtursoay (�eeiy
27834 addrti: m th ��"�. Greenville, N C.
l'fiSJlil57-6300' W3S7, 757309
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni $6 annually.
frame of reference
doesn't include the fu-
ture, and the present
leaves me in a state of
confusion so utter that I
find it impossible to put
into words).
A big bully would
always pick on me
when I was but a wee
lad. In retaliation I
would call on all my
resources and voice out
a series of bad names
in his direction. He
would then proceed to
beat me severely in the
face.
Boy would he get
punished for that. Our
teacher would make him
beat out erasers for a
whole week in a row. I
really showed him. Right
then I realized there
was a lot to be had
from name-calling, and
I have been an advocate
of it ever since.
I was quite pleased
when it came to my
attention that we had
numerous name-callers
at ECU. Why, some of
them impress even me,
the now dethroned King
of the sport.
I've heard such
goodies as selfish, im-
mature, ignorant, demo-
gogue (wow!), vicious,
and liar. Bravo I say!
Just think of the great
things you're doing rat-
tling off these names,
the people you impress,
the good will you en-
courage, and the co-
operation that results.
Now, to get to the
point of this article.
What I want to do is
form a name-caller's
club. We could meet at
my house once a week,
or maybe twice (fpr a
small fee naturally, to
cover the utilities, pay
for my food, etc.). With
heads combined we
could assimilate some
great names, and then
begin our assault on
FOUNTAINHEAD, SGA,
and other campus or-
ganizations.
We could bring
great changes to the
campus, maybe even
convince the most con-
servative teachers to
call their students ugly
names. We'd revol-
utionize! Then we could
send people to other
colleges to preach our
gospel.
It could even spread
all across the country,
and we could have the
national convention right
here at our own school.
The great good we
could do! And it
wouldn't be so hard,
not with the foundation
of experience we have
here in our laps.
Now, for an end to
this letter. What, at last
you say? Why , thmk
all of you are stupid,
lowdown, scallywags
Probably didn't like
that, did you (or mavbe
you did). Now vou're
wondering if name-cal-
ling is really okay (or
maybe you're not) Let
me assure you that it
is, I think.
Steven M. Fisher
MSC staff praised for
letting movie finish
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
On Jan. 21, I went
to Mendenhall Student
Center for the sole pur-
pose of seeing the new
5-foot Panasonic televi-
sion recently purchased.
Since the movie, The
Longest Yard was on I
decided to watch the
two-hour show.
Because of network
difficulties, the movie
lasted about 10-15
minutes past the 11
P.m. dosing time for
the center.
instead of makina
myself and the 15 other
students viewing the
movie leave the prem-
5? ' tne �PPropriate
��� (ID, the staff at
M2- were very con-
siderate and jet us
cont.nue to watch the
mov,e Lunl�' �ts condu-
f�on, which was approx-
imately 11:15.
� this, I WouJd
Me to express mv
appreciation to the
Mendenhall Student
Center Staff, especially
pbby Cook, Dougoh
unidentified mpus
policeman, who allowed
us to sta and watch
the conchi-inn
If the rest of the
tCU Student Activities
were run in this man-
ner, I believe the stu-
dent body would have s
more favorable attitude
ECU1 UfC here �
Duane Grooms
I
m
"��T. �-� �
. d





�.
1 February 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Paga 5
Eastwood and
up in simian
Clyde team
"High
and, of
Harrv
East-
h WILLIAM JONES
tssistant Trends Editor
Clinl Eastwood. A
that universally
gs to mind an
ige. Tough, grim,
hless-supennacho. An
tg that has become
ingrained fr0m
- like "A Fist Full
Ol Dollars
is Drifter"
rse, "Dim
invariable
In "Ever) Which
W But Loose East-
Fs currently plaving
re, the character
ains basically the
e. Tough and
'� yel with a softer
Inside he's a ver
guy. In fact, he
head over heels in
i
Directed by James
go, "Every Which
But Loose" re-
ts the adventures of
Beddovt. his 165
orangutan Clyde,
his sidekick Orville.
Ph'jo is a truckdriver.
He s also one of the
best backstreet brawlers
W the San Fernando
Vall,e Eastwood
n t play this part, no
one can).
Philo won Clyde in a
f�ght from the owner of
one of these snakes 'n
gaters zoos you see on
the highways' of warmer
states.
Philo picks up extra
money by having Orville
set up fights and place
side bets. Philo rarely
loses. The money goes
toward fixing up Or-
ville's car, Philo's pick-
UP and keeping Or-
ville's Ma reasonably
quiet by feeding Clyde
and repairing the dam-
ages he incurs to Ma's
property and peace of
mind.
One day Philo falls
in love with an at-
tractive country-western
singer playing amateur-
night at his favorite
nightspot. Lynn Halsey-
Taylor, played by Son-
dra Locke, is deter-
mined to a recorded
star and own her own
nightclub one day.
When she moves off to
another performing en-
gagement out of state,
Philo takes out after
her.
But! In the mean-
time, due to his short
temper and fast lists,
Philo has incurred the
wrath of a pitifully
bumbling motorcycle
gang and two inept
cops. And they take out
after Philo.
The character of
Philo is perfectly com-
plemented by his re-
liable but not too pretty
or bright sidekicks Or-
ville and Clyde. Orville,
played by Geoffery
Lewis, is under constant
haranguing from Clyde.
Clyde is continually
looking for something to
get into. Like driving a
steamroller over bikes
of some motorcycle
gang members who've
insulted him. What he
usually get himself,
Philo and Orville into is
trouble. Clyde's "I
don't give a f
expression and attitude
is the most humorous
thing "Every Which
has to offer.
my knowledge,
Eastwood's first
in a com
Every Which
is. as a whole,
and loaves one
where the
Way
To
this is
involve
edy.
Way
erratic
w ondering
laughs went. In the en-
tanglements with motor-
cycle gang, for instance,
you know what's going
to
uoe-
happen
But
iefore it
sket-
are
they
manage
in this
ovei ter-
be re-
elf- sucn :
usually iuun
somehow don
to pull it ol
picture. The
eotyping may
sponsible.
"Every Which W ay
should have been a
hilarious movie. It has
all the ingredient The)
jusl don't come together
successful: v liich
CLINT EASTWOOD (RIGHT) and Clyde (left) mean
monkey business in "Every Which Way But Loose
ntal
zzi.
ers
isty
3pe
I it
vay
illy
to
in
'00
er
ee
ail
op
�ie

s
�n
ie
and the audience goes bananas.
leaves the blame in
James Fargo's (the dir-
ector) lap.
Country-music con-
noiseurs will be pleased
by the cameo appear-
ances and songs ol Mel
Tillis, Charlie Rich, and
Phil Everly. The mo-
vie's theme is the
current 1 country sin-
gle. "Every Which Way
But Loose" by Eddie
Rabbitt.
If vou want action
J
and some fair-to-mid-
dling fight scenes,
you'll enjo) "Ever)
Which Way But re-
member, as far a com-
edy goes, an orang-
utan is the filmV saving
grace.
Violinist Eugene Fodor packs Hendrix
B) JEFF ROLLINS
Trends Editor
La-t night violinist
gene Fodor astounded
rilled and delighted a
� i house at Hen-
1 Theatre. The hand-
some violin virtuoso had
aristocratic, athletic
anng and a dynamic
stage presence. His art-
-tr was nothing less
sublime.
lor divided the
: halt of the program
the pre-Clas-
1! composer, Guisep-
Tartini, and the
Ru-�ian reactionary.
Serge Prokofieff.
Tartini's Sonata in G
minor (Devil Trill) was
a cheerful, sensitive
piece, with melodies
imbued with a lyrical
quality which resembles
that of vocal arias.
Fodor's cadenza in the
allegro assai has a tour
de force of sparkling
virtuosity.
Fodor handled Prok-
ofieffs Sonata No. 2 in
D Major, a complex,
difficult to interpret
sonata, with supreme
modern musicianship.
The Presto of this work
gave the audience a
glimpse of the violinists
ability to play pizzicato,
whereas the Andante
was otherworldly and
almost eerie.
The second part of
the program was com-
promised of seven short
work- that would each
make excellent encore
pieces. Fodor began
with the lovely, gypsv-
like Tzigane by Maurice
Ravel. Then he played
Tchaikowsky's Serenade
Malancolique which po-
ssesses one of the com-
poser's characteristically
beautiful themes.
Kreisler
Fodor exhibited the
dexterity of his touch
on Fritz Kreisler
Tambourin Chinois. The
piece began with daz-
zelingly fast arpeggio-
and then slowed to a
waltze of exceeding
technical demands.
The highlight of the
evening was when Fo-
dor played three Ca
prices b the violin
irtuoso and composer
nonpareil, Nicolo I'ag-
anini. The aprices
,s. Ik 9 ami 24 are
surel) -erne f the" mos
difficult and most strik-
ingly effectiv composi-
tions written for the vi-
olin. Fodor played them
with insuperable ability
and with unquestionable
musical sense.
H W ieniawski's
Caprii se is a
ery 1 ri al wot k that
gave Fodor opportunit)
to displav the poetic
The theme is anguished
and lovely which Fodor
rendered with an im-
peccable sense of what
makes music music.
Pag
qualities
an in i
The final piece on
the program was La
hette The Bell by
Paganini. Three times
during the piece the
violin is made to sound
like a bell, "ringing"
three notes, immediately
after which the aceom-
pnisl rang a real bell
three times. Again, we
see Paganini, and Fo-
dor, stretching the ex-
pressive qualities of the
violin to unexceeded
limits.
The virtuoso re-
turned from the curtains
to the applause of an
audience that was on its
feet. The encore was
Melodie by Gluck, a
slow, lyical piece that
was a pleasant con-
tretemps to the impres-
sive Paganini that pro-
ceded it.
The Artists Series
Committee of the Stu-
dent Union deserves re-
cognition for scheduling
such musicians as Eu-
gene Fodor and guitar-
ist Christopher Park-
ening. Parkening will
appear here February
20th and can play the
guitar, like, well, Fodor
the violin.
Eugene Fodor
Student Union announces 1979 Black Arts Festival
The ECU Student Union has announced plans for
the 1979 Black Arts Festival. The festival, which
will begin on Feb. 11 and conclude on Feb. 17, will
feature a varied series of activities. Plans for the
tival are being coordinated by the Student Union
Minority Arts Committee with support and
assistance from other committees of the Student
I mon.
On Sun Feb. 11 a gospel group concert has
been planned for the Hendrix Theatre. Gospel music
is an integral part of the Black Experience. This
concert will feature selections ranging from tradition
Negro Spirituals to the contemporary sound of
gospel music today. The program begins at 5 p.m.
and there will be no admission charge.
Walter Atkins, founder of Poetry Pusher
Productions, will appear in the Ledonia S. Wright
Afro-American Cultural Center on Mon Feb. 12 at
8 p.m. to present a reading of his poetry. Aikens, a
Greensboro native, attended A&T State University.
He has appeared on several local television -hows
and has read his poetry at numerous � s. The
poetry reading is free; however, si will be
limited to 75.
Hendrix Theatre will be the site of a Black
Experience Film Festival. The film festival, which
will begin at 7 p.m. on Tues Feb. 13 will feature
two films, "Imitation of Life" starring Juanita
Moore, Susan Kohnoer, Lana Turner, and Sandra
Dee and "Blue Collar" starring Richar Pryor and
HArvey Koetal. Admission is by ID and Activity
Cards for ECU students and MSC Membership Card
for ECU faculty and staff members.
Ramona Austin will present a dramatic
presentation on Wed Feb. 14 at 8 p.m. For the
duration of her presentation Ramona is the Black
Experience. The works of Richard Wright, Imamu
Baraka, Nikki Giovanni, Sonia Sanchez and others
are infused into her presentation which she calls
"New Seed Admission for ECU students will be
by ID and Activity Cards while admission for ECU
faculty and staff members -will be by MSC
Membership Card. Public tickets are priced at
SI.50.
On Thurs Feb. 15, Ed Bradley will present a
lecture in the Hendrix Theatre. Bradley is the first
black to host a network news program, the CBS
Sunday Night News. With assignments ranging from
the Vietnam War to his present position as White
House correspondent, he is uniquely suited to
present perceptions and perspectives different from
the "run of the mill" correspondent. Admission to
the lecture will be by ID and Activitv Cards for
ECU students and MSC Membership Card for ECU
faculty and staff. Public Tickets are priced at $3.
A "Disco Jam" has been scheduled for Fn
Feb. 16. It will feature the Leroy Dawson Mobile
Disco. The disco gets underway at 8 p.m. and will
be held in the Student Center Multi-Purpose Room.
Admission will be $1.
The Black Arts Festival will conclude with the
showing of the film "Conrack Based on the Pat
Conroy's factual book The Water Is Wide, the film
stars Jon Voight and Paul Winfield. Showtime is 7
and 9 p.m. The film will also be shown Sat. night
at 7 and 9 p.m. Admission is by ID and Activitv
Cards or MSC Membership Card.
THE NORTH CARO-
LINA premiere of
"Emily a startling
new play for mature
audiences, is set for
Feb. 7 in the Studio
Theatre at the East
Carolina Playhouse.
Written by Thomas Pat-
terson, Professor Emeri-
tus of Playwriting al the
University of North Car-
olina at Chapel Hill, the
play delves into the life
of Emily Dickenson to
examine how secret per-
sonal agonies of unful-
fdled desire and love
stimulated her creative
spirit and contributed to
her development as a
poet.
1





Page 6 F0UNTAINHEAD1 February 1979
Sherrod directs Telerama
B SUSAN CLIFFORD
Staff Uriter
For the second con-
secutive ear, WXH-TV
12 ol inston-Salem
and Ilu' Forsyth County
Chapter ol tin1 March
(' Dimes requested
EG student, Charlie
Sherrod to direcl the
lloor and stage pro-
ductions for last week-
end's 1979 March of
Dimes Icleraina.
Charlie, a junior
political science major,
worked with the crew of
W1I-TY 12 and the
national talent coordin-
production events
ivere tele ised live
for 18 hours in the
Winston-Salem and
Greater Greensboro
viewing areas. WX11-TV
12 requested Charlie to
return for work this
year's Telerama because
of his success with last
year's program.
A telerama presents
a unique and difficult
situation for a floor dir-
ector. For 18 hours
straight he has to co-
ordinate with the talent
exactly what will be
lone and who will do
it. The show is non-stop
and the entertainment
or interviews are con-
tinuous. Also the floor
director must insure
Arts Forum
presents lectures
The Visual Arts
f irum, an art student
gi Fast Carolina
1 ni ersitv. will present
series ol lecturers
king on the effects
societj and
the individual beginning
F ebruary.
1 he -eric- of lec-
to be presented
the Leo V. Jenkins
rts Center aud-
: . will begin on
with Richard
n gallerv direc-
festival
itor in Fdin-
speak-
artist as an
- ond lecture
). when
stei Fuller ol
will
symposium.
- - n to t h e
e will be S3
r. All the
ARMY-NAVY STORE
1501 S Evans
B-15 bomber, field,
sck, flight, snorkel jackets
Back Packs
other lectures are free
of charge and all lec-
tures begin at 7:30.
On March 13, Jan
van der Wfarck, director
of the Dartmouth Col-
lege Museum and Cal-
ler) will talk about art
as an intellectual pur-
suit, especially dealing
with art in the seventies
and eighties. Van der
Marck is noted for his
writings about Christo.
A native North Car-
olinian. Kenneth Pol-
and, co-founder of the
X ashington Color
School is the fourth
speaker. He is known
tor his target paintings,
banded color patterns
and shaped canvasses.
The lectures arc
being tun.led by the
East Carolina Student
Government Association
and with special funding
from Chancellor Thomas
Brewer.
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AT ALL NEWSSTANDS NOW!
that the lighting and
audio are in good order
for television. For 18
grueling hours he is the
person that insures the
producer and the dir-
ector have a telerama to
present to the home
audience.
The talent for � the
tlerama include Wesley
Eure of NBC's Days of
Our Lues, Lee Kirk, a
Los Angeles based
singer and actress, and
Pete Saver an enter-
tainer from England.
These three headliners
plus a cast of regional
and local talent pro-
vided the entertainment
in an effort to raise
money for children with
birth defects.
When the Telerama
concluded Sunday at
6:30 p.m. the total
hoard showed $110,000
and calls were still
being received. That
ligure will grow even
higher once other
March of Dimes events
report their totals.
Charlie is a full-time
student at ECU but
does some TV and film
work along the way. He
is a past recepient of
the Thomas Jefferson
journalism award given
by the producers of
CBS television's 60
Minutes, and in 1978
won a Goldren Screen
award for a film he
produced and directed
entitled "Laurie the
story of a young world-
class female marathon
runner.
He also finds time
to get involved with
school activities. For
two years he has served
on the Student Union's
film committee and this
year joined the SGA as
an elected day legi-
slator.
STUDENT CHARLIE SHERROD �� Lives
Susan Hayes of NBC's "Days of Our
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�. � - �





w
�w
1 February 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
Sfflemovedback lo 7:30
Pirate women face eighth-ranked Wolf pack
SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
alreadf madele S�Uth Caroli- -d Detroit have
;� "Pi�earanceS in Minges Coliseum this
, . tI�tic Coast Conference member
hfduled �n late February.
"l" perhaps the h���i t,
I m jes show is vet to come.
' ranked North Carolina State -women's
ges this vear showcase of talent in
Pirate's 106-74 loss to State earlier
N( h(l has destroyed Longwood and
5 7l"in' ,n ,ts "� two games and is now
C State game is always very important to
Pirate coach Cathy Andruzzi a. a press
fuesdaj afternoon. "When we played
" � �he season, it was only our second
: ' honeath though, we played as
tha� time. We got into foul
. i
omething we can't 'afford to d
well as
trouble
o agaic-t
ECU wrestlers
set for quad
B SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
uch needed two week break behind
wrestling It-am swings back into
� nd when the Bucs trael to
for a quad meet against William
Dominion and Virginia Tech.
disappointing 0-4 dual record this
ach Bill Hill believes the quad is
his team for more than just one
� � -t victories would certainly bolster
lene which hasn't tome close to
tal match this season. And secondly,
lings tor the upcoming Eastern
be determined. The regionals serve
round tor the NCAA Champion-
h will be held m Ames, Iowa in earl
Ma
I rtant match for the entire team
Hil M lav before practice. "We could sure
wins, but the regional seeding- are
rv important to us. I'm sure the other team-
meeting with us. are also very well
important those seedings are.
Th.
wly record this season has
trgeh to the rash of injuries which
-quad. The Bucs have been forced to
man) a- seven freshmen in dual
H - Hill said he expect- most of his
: ai k by Saturday. Vic Northrup,
- been sidelined since November with a knee
injurv. will be ready while 158 pounder, Steve
- also expected to be back in the lineup.
missed the Pirate last two dual-
Northrup, a member ol last season's NCAA
wrestled since the Monarch tournament
irl November.
We're -til! not at lull strength, but we're still
better off than we have been during the lat
matches Hill said. " ic has been
- hard in practice, although I don't know
he will be aide to wrestle in all three
Saturday. Steve Goode still has some
swelling in his leg. but I think he'll be ready
William and Mary, Virginia Tech and Old
finished one-two-three in the Virginia
;iate Championships last weekend. Old
1-3 overall, will face ECU at 1:30 and
Will and Mary, 5-1 this season, will meet the
Virginia Tech, 11-2, will square off
� Bucs at 1:30.
'All three of these teams did well in the
Ias1 vear. and Virginia Tech has had a
ssful season so tar Hill noted. "Most of
individual performers in the regional- come
� team too. There will be a lot of
sting matchup
homore Buddy Lee, a 134-pounder is Old
Dominion's top wrestler with a 29-0-1 record. Lee
firsl in the Virginia Intercollegiate's last
weekend and i- currentl) ranked sixth in the nation
Amateur W restling News. Junior Tim Davidson
at 150 has a 20-8 record while Sophomore Eric
Webb at 1 2 boasts a 20-12 mark.
Indian- are led by 167-pounder Colin Steele
who ha- a 12-1 slate while Jim Tagano at 118 is
and Tom Braun at 134 has logged an
impressive 21-3 mark.
Virginia Tech's Mark Miller, a 190-pounder, has
a 12-0 dual record and is 15-1 overall while Chuck
Broderick at 158, has a 11-0 dual mark and is 16-2
overall this season. North Carolina transfer Chris
Conkwright is 14-2-1 this season, but will probably
mi the quad meet because of a broken toe.
ECU's top individual performers are Frank
Schaede at 150, Goode at 158, Northrup at 167 and
Butch Revils at 177.
Jay Dever is still suffering from a back injury
and will miss the quad meet while 142-pounder Tom
Robinson will also miss the match because of a leg
injurv.
Following the quad meet, the Pirates will face
Old Dominion again in a dual match in Norfolk, Va.
Feb 7 and will conclude their season Feb. 17
against North Carolina in Chapel Hill.
The Eastern Regionals will be held Feb. 23-24.
Lydia Rountree Cathy Andruzzi
However, we've really matured lately and we've
played very well during our last two games. We're
playing aggressive!) on defense ' and more
importantl) we're playing team ball. And a team
efforl is what it will take to beat State
Alter the Pirates dr�pped a tough 92-90 decision
to East Tennessee State in double overtime, the
Bucs have roared back to destroy Longwood College
82-12 and UNC-Greensboro 109-43.
Gail Kerbaugh gunned in 25 points, Rosie
rhompson had 23 and Lydia Rountree added 18 in
the Hue- victory over UNC-Greensboro Mondav
night. Thompson continues to lead the Pirates as
well as the NCAIAW Conference in scoring with an
impressive 24.5 average.
Kerbaugh is scoring at a 14.3 clip while Rountree
is averaging 13.2 points a game followed by center
Marsha Girven who has a 11.4 average. Thompson
is also the Pirate's top rebounder with 12.7 a game.
However, the Pirates will face an NC State team
loaded with talent and one that has also improved
drastically since the beginning of the season.
All America center Genia Beasley heads the
Wolfpack's balanced scoring with a 19.7 average per
game followed by Ginger Rouse (14.7), Trudi Lacey
(13.6), Ronnie Laughlin (13.2) and June Doby (10.0).
"Everyone talks about Genia Beasley and she's
certainly an outstanding player, but State has
unbelievable depth said Andruzzi. "Once anyone
gets tired, they can go right to their bench and find
a very capable replacement. They've got excellent
inside and outside shooting which presents us with
a lot of problems
State, now 15-4 overall and 6-0 in the NCAIAW
conference has won its last four games with its la-t
loss coming against Atlantic Coast Conference rival
Clemson 86-73.
VXr " have l0 be very, verj fundamental
against them arid avoid turnovers noted Andruzzi
Xi ur�' "ut defend all five ol their plavers
in the game. Thev will run on us.
We'll try to put a lot ol pressure on Christv
Earnhardt and force
some turnover- which vs hope
will take them out of their offensive pattern. Hut
will certainly be a tough matchup the whole way
round.
NOTESThe ECU-STATE contest was origin
scheduled lor 7 p.m. but ha- been moved ha
�:30State has gone over the eentun mark in
seven games this season and has come'within 100
points in tour other contestsEC1 has scored
100 point- m three games tin- year. .Lydia R
'J KU 1' assist maker with 53 while
Kerbaugh has 36. .Marsha Girven is the team top
-hot blocker with 22 to her credil while R
Lhompsonis the team leader in -teal- with 27
Thompson only need- -even points against C
State to become the second player in ECI history
to ore more than 1500 points in a career
Beasley has a total of 11 bio ked shots this
along with 19 stealsChrist) Earnhardt is
Pack - leader in assists with 73
Thompson seeks record
Record setting Rosie Thompson
Photo by Chap Curler
By JIMMY DuPREE
Staff Writer
With five games still remaining on the 1979
schedule, ECU junior Rosie Thompson needs only
seven points to become only the second Lady Pirate
to score 1,500 points in her career.
Thompson managed only 23 points in ECU's
109-43 stomping of UNC-Greensboro Mon but she
only played 75 percent of the game.
Thompson began the season with 1,051 points,
but her solid 24.5 average has enabled her score
442 through 18 games.
Thompson has been in double figures in each of
the Lady Pirates 18 contests, with her high being
35 against UNC-Wilmington.
She presently holds a career average of 21.3,
which is also tops by any Lady Pirate eager.
Thompson currently holds nine team records;
most points (single game and season), most free
throws and free throws attempted (single game,
season and career), and most field goals (season.)
She is presently second on the career scoring
table behind Debbie Freeman with 1,570.
In the current AIAW Region II standings, she
ranks second in scoring and forth in rebounding.
She lead the NCAIAW in both of those categories,
as well as free throw accuracy with 75.8 percent.
"When people think of ECU women's basketball,
they think of Rosie Thompson praises coach Cathv
Andruzzi. "Rosie has put East Carolina on the
women's basketball map
Although Thompson is only -even shy ol the
1.500 plateau, -he will have to work hard, a- the
opposition Friday will be provided by N.C State,
currently ranked sixth in the national poll.
NCSU defeated the Pirate- in Raleigh 106-74,
but Thompson has confidence m her teammat -
There are four other girl- out there capable
scoring she emphasized.
Thompson joined the -quad
participation in volleyball, but she refuses I
that as an excuse for her meager 12 point I
against State.
I wasn't taking outside shots then she
explains. "With a lot of help from the coaches, I've
-tarted to shoot outside more. Mv mam (
when I go up to the basket is squaring off
Andruzzi observes that. "She ha- a whole lot of
pressure on her. She withstands a lot of thai
pressure through her outside interests
"Dirk Jones (WiTN-TV) had Rosie and I
March ol Dime- Telethon last weekend and Rosi
presented the poster child with a Lad Pirate
Basketball tee-shirt.
Some ol the kids asked her tor her aut
and she jusi blushed adds Andruzzi.
Andruzzi considers Thompson a "team-oriented"
player. "She a very unselfish bail player;
sometimes we have to tell her to shoot
"The only time she get- me mad is when -he
fouls she added jokingly .
W ith another vear o eligibility remaining. Rosie
Thompson has the potential to establish a point
total which will stand untouched long after si �
leave- Ladv Pirate basketball.
ECU wins 61-59 in 2 OT
Mack's bucket lifts Bucs past W&M
By SAM ROCERS
Sports Editor
For the second straight game, ECU was forced
to put in more than its share of overtime, yet the
Hue- needed ever) second to subdue a determined
William and Mary team 61-59 Tuesday night in
Minges Coliseum.
Pirate guard Oliver Mack drove down the middle
tor the winning basket with just four seconds
remaining in the second overtime period which gave
the improving Bucs their third consecutive victory.
William and Mary had a chance to send the
game into a third overtime, but Billy Harrington's
25 footer bounced off the rim at the final buzzer.
I'm sure glad we only have to play them twice
a year said a relieved Larry Gillman after the
game. It just seems like every game we play
against them is just murder. We played well in the
first half, but really let it get away in the second
half.
"We sure didn't play very well tonight, but
anytime you don't play well and still win you have
to be happy. One thing's for sure, we've got a lot
of work to do before Saturday when we play Old
Dominion
After building a seemingly insurmountable 35-24
halftime advantage, the Pirates quickly watched
William and Mary tie the score at 38-38 on Kenny
Bowen's bucket with 14:43 remaining in the second
half.
But ECU quickly regained the lead 40-38 on
Mack's jumper and extended the margin to as many
as five points in the final ten minutes of play.
However, William and Mary continued to gradually
chip away at the Bucs lead with Bowen and forward
Scott Whitley working inside for easy buckets.
With just over six minutes remaining and ECU
ahead 53-52 Gillman sent the Pirates into their
delay game. And it failed miserably.
Herb Krusen hit one free throw with 3:47 which
was the only point the Pirates managed during their
stalling tactics. Meanwhile, Bowen worked his way
inside again for a bucket with 24 seconds remaining
to tie the score at 54-54.
And with five seconds left, Mack missed a 15
footer which sent the game into the first overtime.
Al Tyson scored the Bucs first basket in overtime
on a follow shot and after the officials missed an
obvious goal tending call under the William and
Mary basket, ECU had the lead and control with
2:41 remaining. But then George Maynor turned the
ball over and Whitley canned a 15 footer to tie the
score with 1:31 left.
The Bucs gave the ball back again when Tyson
fumbled the ball out of bounds, but Harrington's 25
footer at the horn was no good.
Bowen put the Indians ahead early in the second
overtime 57-56 on a free thrown, but a free thrown
by Greg Cornelius and a 15 footer by Krusen gave
the Bucs a 59-57 advantage.
Bowen canned two more free throws with 1:58
remaining to tie the score, which set the stage for
Mack's winning bucket. "Herb, George or me had
the opportunity to make the move said Mack who
scored 13 points. "I just happened to get the
opening at the basket and the shot went in. I really
thought the official was going to call charging, but
he didn't
The loss was just another one of many
frustrating setbacks this season for William and
Mary's young Bruce Parkhill. "It was very tough
for our kids to lose one like this, but they showed
a lot of character out there. It's games like this
that can really get you down, but our kids just keep
hanging in there.
"Our plan in the second half was to get the ball
into Kenny Bowen and it really worked well. He's
come a long way this season and he certainly
doesn't look like a freshman anymore
Bowen, a freshman from Richmond, Va was the
Indians' top scorer with 19 points while Whitley
added 16. Krusen led the Bucs with 19 while
Cornelius was the game's top rebounder with 12.
"Everything just came too easy in the first half
for us admitted Gillman. "In the second half I
think everybody was standing around waiting for
someone to take control and no one did.
"We're happy to win, but we certainly weren't
the same team out on the floor as we were during
the last few games.
Herb Krusen manuevers for shot
Photo by Chap Gurley
I






n


1 � I
Pag. 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 1 F�bru.rv 187
Wolfpack swimmers top ECU
By DAVID MAREADY
Staff Writer
The Pirate swimming
teams traveled to Ral-
eigh Tuesday night and
were soundly defeated
by superior N.C. State
teams in a dual swim
meet action. The men
lost 66-47 while the
women were beaten
78-29.
"I had hoped for a
closer meet commen-
ted Pirate coach Ray
Scharf, "but we lacked
the intensity needed to
beat a team as good as
State. They also have a
very strong womens
team. In fact, they gave
our women a lot of
points toward the end
of the meet.
John Tudor was the
ECU hooters
place eighth
only bright spot for the
Pirates during the
men's competition. Tu-
dor placed first in the
100 and 200 yd. free-
style events and was on
� the winning 400 yd.
freestyle relay team.
Bill Fehling was the
only other Pirate indi-
vidual event winner.
Fehling took the top
spot in the 50 yd. free-
style.
The best the Pirates
could do in the diving
competition was a se-
cond place finish by
Tom Bell in the three
meter diving event. Bell
also placed third in the
one meter event.
For the Lady Pir-
ates, Julie Malcora
broke the women's var-
sity record in the 100
yd. breastroke with a
time of 1.12.98. Sharon
Burns captured first
place in the 200 yd
freestyle; and, Cindy
Sailer won the 50 yd
butterfly.
Tuesday's loss broke
the men's three meet
win streak as they fell
to 3-3 on the season.
The women's record
also dropped to 3-2.
The Pirates wrap up
their dual meet season
next Saturday, Feb. 3,
in Greenville, when they
face long time rival, the
Duke Blue Devils.
Starting time for the
meet is 1 p.m. in
Minges Natatorium.
ECU-State 8wimming action
B) SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
North Carolina State
Iged North Carolina
1-3 to capture the North
Carolina Wesleyan In-
door soccer tournament
held last weekend in
Rock Mount, N.C.
ECl finished the
two-da) event with a
2-3 record and placed
eighth. The Pirates
dropped their first game
10 to Atlantic Christian
College and lost again
m the second round 2-1
to High Point College.
However, the Bucs
bounced back in their
last two games, edging
State 1-0 in overtime
and defeating Guilford
College 3-1. ECU also
lost a consolation game
t Wesleyan 1-0.
"Indoor soccer was
something new for us
and we had never even
played the game until
we stepped out on the
�urt against Atlantic
Christian aid Pirate
"r coach Brad
Smith. "The skills in-
volved in indoor soccer
arc much more refined
that the outside game,
but our plavers picked
up the game prettv
quickly
Freshman Shawn
Berry scored the Bucs
only goal in ECU's
narrow victory over
tournament champion,
N.C. State. Berry along
with Brad Winchell and
sophomore Devid Rad-
ford all scored goals in
the Pirate's 3-1 victory
over Guilford.
Kris Soit, Stan Griff,
and Eric Tucker were
all credited with assists
in the game. Berry was
also named to the
All-Tournament team.
The victory over
N.C. S tate was cer-
tainly the highlight of
the tournament for us
said Smith. "We got
outstanding performan-
ces from a lot of our
younger players. Kenny
Lovette, our goalie,
made a lot of crucial
saves and had a fine
tournament. Howard
Bern us and San Griff
also played well.
Although Smith said
the team will not per-
ticipate in any more
indoor tournaments this
season, the Pirates have
a scrimmage against the
Goldsboro Club team
this Saturday.
. KORE-O-MAT
WELCOMES ECU STUDENTS
e. MthACK TO SCHOOL
Visit us for yonr laundry needs.
� 36 washer change plaball
� SO dryer machine color T.V.
� ryctoaning pick-op station
� attendant 8:oo a.m4:00 p.m. dally
?r.?niLli,00,i tor �� wath. j
The Marines Are
Platoon
Leaders
Class
Breakfast, Lunch
and Dinner
Specials
MONDAY
through
FRIDAY
Officers
Candidate
Class
I
I
I
I
$.20 OFF ON ANY MEAL
Coupon offer effective Jan. 30
Feb. 2,1979
MrirrtJIS?8 CLASS PR0GRAM (PLC) 0FFERS A COMMISSION AS A 2ND
rt�2?2uDX,J!Er!LS; WRm C0RPS AFTER GRADUATION FROM COLLEGE.
HRFp? I R?rGRJcUS INCLUDING LAW STUDENTS ARE ELIGIBLE TO JOIN.
HERE ARE A FEW OF THE PROGRAM FEATURES AVAILABLE TO MEN WHO CAN QUALIFY:
1. No on campus requirements (Summer Training - Good Salary).
� Aviation, Ground and Law options available
3. $100.00 a month during school year.
4. Challenging career with competitive salary and benefits after
collcr;��.
5. Option to drop from program up to nraduation from college.
CAPTAIN COOK FLORENCE WILL BE AT THE COCK STORE THE 5 f anc 7TM OF
EeqS975 T� INTERVIEW �0SE INTEREST" c� � � no resuhe
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CALL CAPTAIN FLORENCE'S OFFICE COLLECT AT
The Few.The Proud.The Marines.
The Few.The Proud.The Marines.
The Few.The Pmuri thp Mna.
WESTERN
SIZZLE
V.
ANNUAL
STOH'S HALLOW
DIST. CO
CASE
STACKING
CONTEST
V v.
r

. s
Western Sizzlin Steak House
SPECIAL
No. 1 8�fc. SIRLOIN
ONLY �2.79 with coupon
Reservations available
for Private Parties
coupon
WESTERN SIZZhm
STEAK HOUSE
8�. SIRLOIN OHXY �2.79
Offer good Feb. 5-8
HA
Wright
Auditorium
Feb. 5
6-9pm
ALL ECU
STUDENTS
ARE INVITED
To ATTEND
f
t
� �� �� v j
� �






Title
Fountainhead, February 1, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 01, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.540
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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