Fountainhead, January 30, 1979






Circulation 10,000
East Carolina University
North
Vol. 55
luary 1079
Tenants homeless after fire
GREG WRIGHT, 15, discovered the fire at an
apartment at Tar River and reported it to the
Greenville Fire Department. Photo by Doug White)
By DOUG WHITE
Editor
One apartment was gutted, an-
other received water damage and six
couples were forced out of their
homes Monday night due to a fire in
one building of Tar River Apartments
on 104 Ash St. Other apartments in
the building received smoke damage.
The fire began in the kitchen of
Apt. 6 around 5 p.m. and swept
upstairs and into an open attic space
running the length of the building.
The fire apparently began when
record albums left on the stove
caught fire, according to Beth Gillum,
23, the wife of an ECU political
science graduate student and a
neighbor in Apt. 5.
The tenants of Apt. 6 had just
moved in and were gone when the
electricity was turned on. The stove
was set on high and ignited the
records, she said.
The fire had burned through a
window when it was spotted by Greg
Wright, 15, who tried to in vain to
fight the flames with a fire
extinguisher. He reported the fire at
5:28 p.m.
Four trucks and 20 men re-
sponded to the call and stayed on
the scene until 8:15 p.m. One
fireman suffered a burned ear and
was treated and released from Pitt
County Memorial Hospital, according
to hospital and fire department
spokesmen.
No estimate of the damage has
been made yet, and residents of the
building were reluctant to assess
their own losses until they could
contact their insurance agents. The
grounds around the building were
muddy and the carpets in the
damaged apartment were more water
than fabric. Residents were busy
loading their belongings into cars or
friends' apartments.
Tenants of the building were
moved to the Ramada Inn at the
apartment complex's expense, ac-
cording to Jerry Cox, manager of Tar
River Apartments. He said he hoped
to have better arrangements by
Tuesday morning.
FIREMEN FIGHT A blaze which River Apartment Complex Monday-
gutted several apartments at Tar night. Photo by Doug White)
Williams nominated for election chairpe
By CHRIS CAGLE
Staff Writer
SGA President Tom-
ni Joe Payne nom-
inated Jeff Williams,
SGA Secretary for Ex-
ternal affairs, for Spring
elections chairman, at
the Monday meeting of
the SGA legislature.
U illiams' name was
sent to the Screenings
and Appointments com-
mittee for consideration.
Payne said that he
has confidence Wil-
liams honest and his
ability to do the job.
"Jeff i qualified for
the job. He has already
been through one
Spring election so he
knows what is expected
and what is required
said Payne.
The Appropriation to
Team Handball was
sent back to the com-
mittee. The team re-
quested $1370. This in-
cludes money for un-
iforms, hotel accomoda-
tions to the West Point
tournament and hotel
accomodations for the
National Tournament in
New York.
Some of the mem-
bers felt the request
was too much and SGA
should not support the
bill. They also felt the
survival of the team
handball does not de-
pend on this figure.
The members added
that, if the rugby team
had to get out and
organize events to raise
money for their uni-
forms, the handball
team should do the
same.
Phil Marion, a
member of the Handball
Team, spoke to SGA
members. "We have a
better team this year
and we are gaining na-
tional recognition for
ECU. This year the
tournament will be held
in Madison Square Gar-
den New York He
added that, "Last year
at the tournament we
won one out of five
games, but we still re-
ceived national recogni-
tion
According to Marion,
the reason the handball
team does not want to
buy their uniforms is
because some team
members will be grad-
uating and taking their
uniforms with them,
this would cause new
team members to be
without uniforms and
new uniforms will be
hard to order, because
the design of the uni-
form may change.
Tommy Joe Payne,
SGA president submit-
ted the name of Jeff
Williams for the election
chairperson to the
members. "One who
has been through this
type qf election before,
I think he would be fair
and honest in the poli-
tical election com-
mented Payne.
The Student Welfare
Committee reported that
it has divided into sub-
committees, so the
members can concen-
trate into the three
areas: parking and
towing, consumer book-
let for students, and
lighting unsafe areas on
campus.
The committee re-
ported that the con-
sumer booklet will con-
sist of listings of re-
staurants, apartments,
convenience stores, en-
tertainment areas,
banks, fast foods and
grocery stores in the
Pitt County area.
What's inside
J.J. Cale appears at RoxySee p.6.
ECU SChool of Art faculty exhibition
See p.6.
Pirate basketball team upsets Georgia
Tech, 66-64See p.7.
Lady Pirates destroy Long wood, 82-42
See p.7.
Greek Forum
See p.5.
needs participation
Towing affects several ECU students
See p.3.
DON SCHLITZ
See p. 6.)
Jarvis residents moved
ECU School of MBHiing
By ANITA LANCASTER
Staff Writer
Jarvis Dorm residents were informed during a
Jan. 25 meeting with Carolyn Fulghum, dean of
women, that they would be moved out of Jarvis
within the next two weeks. The evacuation of Jarvis
was the result of a Jan. 9 incident in which a
ceiling in the west wing of Jarvis Dorm caved in.
New facilities initiated
By STEPHEN WILSON
Staff Writer
The ECU School of Medicine is continuing to
make the rapid progress that it has since its
inception. Although the Pitt County Memorial
Hospital complex has already begun to take its
place as a fully functioning regional medical center,
there are many programs and facilities soon to be
initiated by the School of Medicine.
These new programs and facilities are being
anxiously awaited on by all of the faculty, staff, and
students directly concerned with the School, and
they will greatly affect the quality of medical care
available to the regional community.
Since many of the facts concerning the school's
formation and operation have been confused, or
vaguely understood, by many ECU students, and
since a better liason is sought between the Medical
School and all of the other departments within the
university, a brief history is in order.
The plans for the formulation of the School of
Medicine were being considered prior to 1965, when
the General Assembly of the State of North Carolina
provided planning funds for East Carolina College
lor its establishment. Additional funding and
encouragement was given to the university by the
Assembly, and in 1969 the recruitment process for
the necessary core faculty and administrative
personnel was begun.
In 1971, the recommendation of Governor Robert
Scott and the State Board of Higher Education,
lunds were appropriated by the Assembly to allow
the enrollment of the first class in 1972. From 1972
to 1975 the School operated on a First Year
r-rogram in Medical Education in cooperation with
the School of Medicine of the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill. All students who
successfully completed this First Year Program at
fcLU were automatically transferred into the
sophomore class at UNC-CH.
r 5? � vC Aisembly a�owed for the expansion
of the First Year Program and the establishment of
a second-year curriculum at ECU. But in November,
ECU MED SCHOOL is initiating several new
programs and facilities which will be in conjunction
t
with the new Pitt Memorial.

Photo by Chap Gurtey
1974, ECU was authorized to begin work on a
complete degree-granting School of Medicine.
Appropriations by the Assembly at this point
were in excess of $43 million. Accreditation was
awarded in April, 1977, and 28 students were
enrolled in the School's first class. Since then, the
School has enrolled its second class of 36 students,
and Residency Programs have been initiated in
Family Practice, Psychiatry, Internal Medicine,
Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Surgery.
At present, the School ts housed in several
interim facilities, until the future Health Campus is
completed adjacent to Pitt County Memorial
Hospital.
Several of the Basic Science courses are being
taught in the ECU Science Complex. Ragsdale Hall,
which was formerly a dormitory, has been
completely renovated and houses such departments
as Physiology, Pharmacology, and Pathology. The
Department of Psychiatry occupies its own interim
facility adjacent to the hospital.
Some other departments have moved to their
permanent sites on the Hospital Complex. In the
main building of the Complex are located the
Departments of Pediatics, Obstetrics and Gyn-
ecology, Surgery, and Radiology.
The soon to be completed Health Campus will
include several major additions to the Medical
Complex. The nine-story Science Education Building
and adjacent Administration Building will be the
future center of operations for the Mescal School
Construction on these buildings has begun with an
anticipated completion date of summer, 1980.
Since the major goal of the Medical School is to
provide physicians who intend to enter the Family
Practice, or other related Primary Care specialties,
growth in these departments has occured at a
greatly accelerated rate.
The striking, new, Family Practice Center
exemplifies well the effect that the Medical School
will have on the regional community. The Family
Practice Center is now fully staffed with four
full-time faculty members and 14 resident
physicians.
It offers some of the most sophisticated
programs found in the field for its patients, and can
boast of the most advanced facilities and equipment
offered as well.
"What I have to tell you is very hard to say, so
I am going to be as honest as possible. The
university has been advised by the State
Department of Insurance that, as a precautionarv
measure, we must relocate you as soon as
possible Fulghum's opening statement was met
with mixed reactions from the residents. There were
shouts of happiness, tears and anger at the news of
the mandatory move from Jari.
Fulghum stated that the dorm would only be
closed temporarily, and stated further that, the
building has not, and I repeat, has not been
condemned She said that the building had been
inspected and the university was assured that it was
safe. However, the State Department of Insurance,
upon receiving the investigative report on the
accident, advised that the dorm residents be
evacuated from the dorm in order to make the
needed repairs.
Fulghum told residents that this would be a
permanent move for the remainder of the year.
"We know that this is a difficult time for you,
but the university has no choice, we must relocate
you and make the needed repairs said Fulghum
to the residents. "The university is willing to help
you as much as we can to make the move as easy
as possible
Fulghum went on to explain exactly what the
university would do. Residents were given a list of
one-occupant dorm rooms (148) and a list of
off-campus housing (37), which were supplied bv the
ECU Housing Office. The univeristy would also
supply movers to help relocate the women's
belongings to other dorms on campus.
The residents were advised to start looking for a
new place to live as soon as possible as, "it will be
a first-come, first-serve basis. We will give you time
to look for another place to stay, but if you don't
find a place soon, housing will have to assign you
to a room Fulghum said. She also said she would
send a memo to one-occupant dorm rooms asking
for their full cooperation in this matter.
The university will also tk the cooperation of
professors. "We understand that you may fall
behind in your studies during the time of your
move, so we will ask professors to work with vou "
stated Fulghum.
Fulghum also said that the SGA agreed to give
full-refunds on rented- refrigerators, if the residents
found they no longer needed them anymore.
Julian Vainright, business manager of
ECU, is also checking with the post office and
Carolina Telephone to see if something could be
worked out in the resident's favor.
Also, according to Fulghum, for those who move
off-campus, a prorated refund on dorm rent will be
given back to the resident.
Fulghum closed the meeting saying, "On behalf
of the university we are very sorry about the
inconvenience, but there is nothing we can do -�
we must relocate you.
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Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 30 January 1979
t
Gammon
The newly formed
Backgammon Club gets
together on Monday ev-
enings at 7 p.m. in the
table games area, off
the ground floor at
Mendenhall.
Interested students
are asked to bring their
sets.
cso
Students who have
or who intend to
declare a major in a
health-related curricu-
lum may qualify for the
following cost-free ser-
vices from the Center
for Student Opportuni-
ties: career-planning
assistance; academic,
personal and financial
counseling; tutorial as-
sistance; alleviation of
lest anxiety; improved
reading speed and com-
prehension; better note-
taking and test-taking
techniques; and others.
CSO also has im-
mediate openings for
student tutors, particu-
larly in the sciences and
mathematics. For infor-
mation stop by the
Center. Ragsdale 208,
or call 757-6075, 6081
or 6122.
Biology
Anyone wishing to
go on the Biology Club
field trip to Burroughs-
ellcome on feb. 2 are
aked to sign up by
Thursday. Feb. 1 on the
sign up sheet in the
Biology Reading Room
(second floor in the
biology building.)
Any interested stu-
dent is welcome.
Signing
There will be a
meeting of the Sign
Language Club at BD -
101 at 6:30 p.m.
Thurs Feb. 1.
The meeting is open
to interested students
and faculties regardless
of how well they know
sign language, if at all.
The club meets in the
same classroom every
Thursday at the same
time. The purpose of
the club is to socialize
and develop sign lang-
uage skills among deaf
people.
Christ
Students for Christ
sponsors an informal
discussion of the word
of God as a practical
guide for life each
Tuesday at 8:30 p.m. in
Brewster D-308.
NASW
The National Assoc-
iation of Social Workers
will have a meeting of
officers and advisors on
Wed Jan. 31 at 5
p.m. in the Allied
Health Belk Building.
Check the main bulletin
board in the lobby for
room number.
Crafts
The Crafts Center at
Mendenhall Student
Center is now offering
introductory level work-
shops in a variety of
crafts. Beginning Dark-
room, Pottery, Floor
Loom Weaving, Wood-
working, Quilting, Lea-
ther Craft, Enameled
Mirrors, Printmaking,
Kite Making, Beginning
Jewelry, and Contem-
porary Basketry will be
offered.
ROTC
The ROTC will
sponsor the Red Cross
Blood Drive at ECU on
Jan. 30 and 31 at
Wright Auditorium.
Many volunteers are
needed to make this a
successful effort, so
come between 10 a.m.
and 4 p.m.
Chess
All persons interes-
ted in playing chess are
invited to stop by the
Mendenhall Coffeehouse
each Monday evening at
7 p.m. when the Chess
Club holds its weekly
meeting. Competition is
at all levels and every-
one is welcome to
attend.
Comics
The ECU Comic
Book Club will meet
Tues Jan. 30 at 7
p.m. at the Nostalgia
Newstand, 919 Dickin-
son Ave.
For more information
call: 758-6909.
Tennis
If you enjoy playing
table tennis, stop by
the Mendenhall Student
Center table tennis
rooms each Tuesday
evening at 7 p.m. when
the Table Tennis Club
meets. You will find
players of all levels of
ability participating.
Various activities such
as ladder tournaments
are often scheduled. All
ECU students, faculty
and staff are welcome.
Classifieds
torrent�!
ROOM FOR RENT:
Male, $50 per mo. rent
plus 13 utilities, phone
& cable TV. Fully
furnished, color TV.
Only need bed &
dresser. On ECU bus
route. Call 752-7225.
113B N. Holly St.
p
MALE desires roommate
(male or female) to
share 2 bedroom apt.
King's Row Apts.
Located 1 mi. from
campus on bus route.
Call Burlon at 752-1929.
WOULD LIKE to sub-
lease two bedroom
duplex 3 blocks from
campus. Call 752-1791.
WANTED: Female
roommate to share 2
bedroom apt. close to
campus. $82.50 per mo.
plus 12 utilities &
phone. CaJi 752-6758.
Gamma Rho
Sigma Gamma Rho
service sorority is hav-
ing a spring rush Sun
Feb. 4, at 7 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student
Center. This rush is
open to all interested
students.
Fellowship
The Fountain of Life
Christian Fellowship will
sponsor a revival on
Feb. 1, 2, and 3.
Services will begin
nightly at 7 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium.
Chaplin Kenneth P.
Edwards will be the
guest speaker.
Rebel
The REBEL, ECU's
LiteraryArt Magazine,
sponsors a program of
prose and poetry read-
ing monthly. Refresh-
ments are served, dress
is informal and the
atmosphere is relaxed in
Mendenhall's Coffee-
house.
Previously selected
writers read original
work, and occasionally
the program is varied
with contributions by
artists from disciplines
other than literature.
The writers and
other artists are usually
ECU students or facul-
ty. Readings are open
to the public.
The Feb. 1 program
will feature the follow-
ing writers: Dr. Peter
Makuck, Alison Thomp-
son, Robert Jones, and
Ray Harrell. Chancellor
Thomas Brewer will also
attend to present the
REBEL Literature and
Art awards.
The REBEL annually
presents two literature
awards, one for the
best poem accepted by
the magazine, and one
for the best story. An
award is also presented
for the "Best in Show"
piece from the REBEL
Art Show. Money for
these awards is prov-
ided by Jeffrey's Beer
and Wine Co. and The
Attic.
Courses
Students may reg-
ister for a mini-course
in Beginning Bridge,
Billiards, or CPR train-
ing, sponsored by Men-
denhall Student Center.
The courses are open to
ECU full-time students,
faculty and staff MSC
members and their
spouses or guests.
Persons must regi-
ster and pay fees at the
MSC Central Ticket
office between the hours
of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m
Monday through Friday.
The first course begins
Jan. 29.
TKE
Tau Kappa Epsilon
will hold little sister
rush Mon. and Tues
Jan. 29 and 30, from
8:30 p.m. until, at the
TKE house.
Race
The Coastal Carolina
Track Club will sponsor
the First Annual Green-
ville Road Race on
April 1 at 3 p.m. This
race is being sponsored
by H.L. Hodges and the
funds received from the
entry fees will go to
.benefit the Easter Seals
Society.
The race will begin
on the Town Commons
and circle around
Greenville for a distance
being 10,000 meters.
Merchandise prizes will
be awarded for the top
finishers in the age
divisions, both male and
female. Everyone who
finishes the race, no
mattes, how long it takes
will receive a certificate
from the CCTC.
The first 500 to
enter will receive a race
T-shirt. All entry fees
are tax-deductible, re-
freshments will be pro-
vided throughout the
race.
Applications and in-
formation are available
by calling the Easter
Seals at 758-3230 or
Robert R. Gotwals Jr.
at 752-3411. ��- �-
Bake Sale
The Ceramic Guild is
having a homemade
pizzabake sale from
11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on
Wed Jan. 31 in the
upstairs lobby of Jen-
kins Fine Arts Center.
You can't find better
prices anywhere.
Pizza will be 50
cents a slice or $3.50
for a whole pizza.
Taxes
Free assistance in
preparing Federal in-
come and tax returns is
now available to ECU
students and faculty
taxpayers who cannot
pay for such a serice.
Vita-Volunteer In-
come tax assistance
program, sponsored by
the ECU Accounting
Society, will help tax-
payers in filling out the
1040 and 1040A forms.
Vita assistance will
be offered at Menden-
hall Student Center
from 4 - 7 p.m. on the
following dates:
First session: Jan.
29 and 31; Feb. 5 and
7; and Feb. 12 and 14.
Second session:
March 26 and 28; April
2 and 4; April 9 and
11.
Volunteer aids are
ECU students and
members of the Ac-
counting Society. They
are trained in basic
income tax preparation.
Sigma Xi
The next meeting of
the ECU chapter of
Sigma Xi, the Scientific
Research Society, will
be held on campus in
room 103, Biology buil-
ding at 7:30 p.m
Wed Jan. 31.
Dr. Stanley Riggs,
professor of Geology at
ECU, will speak on
"North Carolina Phos-
phate Deposits: Their
Geology and Future
Role as a Critical World
Resource
The general public,
students and faculty are
invited to attend this
lecture as well as all
Sigma Xi public lec-
tures.
Service
An Episcopal service,
of Holy Communion will
be held Tuesday ev-
ening Jan. 30 in the
chapel of the Methodist
Student Center Fifth
Street across from
Garrett Dorm.
The service will be
at 5 p.m. with the
Episcopal Chaplain, the
Rev. Bill Hadden offi-
ciating.
A supper will be
served at 6 p.m. at the
home of Eleanor Cole-
man, 1003 E. Fifth
Street (across from the
main gate.) Bible study
will follow. These pro-
grams are open to all
students.
Peter Brook's King Lear
and
Franco Zeffirelli's
Romeo and Juliet
Wednesday night in the Hendrix Theatre
Psi-Chi
Psi-Chi, the National
Honor Fraternity for
Psychology, is now ac-
cepting applications for
membership.
The requirements are
as follows: the appli-
cant should be a psy-
chology major, minor or
graduate student with at
least eight semester
hours in psychology. A
3.0 average must be
maintained in psycholo-
gy courses.
All applications
should be turned in no
later than Feb. 16.
The membership fee
is $30. This includes a
lifetime membership
with no additional or
annual fees. Applica-
tions may be obtained
from the psychology of-
fice in Speight Building.
Concert
Violinist Eugene
Fodor can be seen in
concert on Tues Jan.
30 at Hendrix Theatre
in Mendenhall Student
Center.
Fodor has been
calledone of the
world's foremost living
violinists Advance
tickets are : ECU stu-
dents - $2; Public $5.
All tickets at the door
are $5.
The concert is spon-
sored by the Student
Union Artist Series Co-
mittee.
Sigma Pi
Phi Sigma Pi will
hold its monthly busi-
ness meeting Wed
Jan. 31 at 6 p.m. in
Austin 132.
Center
All full-time students
students,
student spouses, and
staff and faculty Men
denhall Student Center
members are eligible to
join the Crafts Center
A semester membership
costs $10 and includes
workshops, tool check-
out, use of librar
materials, and aid ol
experienced supervisors
Personal supplies and
supplies furnished by
the Crafts Center must
be purchased by the
participant.
Crafts Center mem
berships are available
during regular operating
hours, 3 p.m. until 10
p.m Monday through
Friday, and 10 a.m.
until 3 p.m Saturday.
The last day to register
for Spring Semester
workshops is Sat Feb.
3.
Persons must reg-
ister at the Craft?
Center and class space
is limited. No refund?
will be made after the
workshop registration
deadline.
Phi Beta
There will be a Phi
Beta Lambda meeting
Wed Jan. 31 at 4
p.m. in Rawl room 130.
FOUNTAINHEAD regrets that an
error appeared in the ad for the
Tree House on Jan. 23. A date was
not given for the Pizza Special, which
was on Wednesday, Jan. 25.
FOUNTAINHEAD apologizes for the
inconvenience that may have resulted
from this error for Tree House
and the students.
STUDENT UNION
Applications for these Committee
Chairmanships are NOW
being taken through Tue Feb. 6
? ART EXHIBITION
? ARTISTS SERIES
? COFFEEHOUSE
FILMS
LECTURE
MAJOR
ATTRACTIONS
� untvuiitv s
PI
Mendenhall
SPECIAL
ATTRACTIONS
? MINORITY ARTS
?THEATRE ARTS
?THE
ENTERTAINER
?TRAVEL
lost �
LOST IN Joyner Library
Sun. night: Calendar in
checkbook style. Floral
design on front, plastic
covering. If found,
please call 758-9483, it
has important receipts
inside.

LOST: small Black
Alaskan Husky Puppy
about 3 mos. old. Lost
near Crow's Nest on
10th st. Answers to
Roscoe. If found, call
752-4227.
DISCO DANCE - A
course in disco is
beginning Feb. 2, early
Friday evenings to
warm you up for the
weekend - specializing
in spins and partnering
with an emphasis on
arms. A more basic
class will begin Feb. 4
Sundays at 7 p.m.
specializing in fancy
footwork. You can learn
very complex move-
ments going step-by
step. It's really very
easy and such a fun
class! There's only room
for 3 more couples or 6
singles so call and
reserve a space today.
Only S10 per mo. Call
758-Q736 mornings and
evenings.
YOGA: A night course
in Hatha Yoga is be-
ginning Feb. 27. All
interested persons
please call Sunshine at
758-0736. (mornings &
nights).
BELLY DANCE Lessons
for fun and exercise!
Call Sunshine 758-0736
(mornings and even-
ings).
SELLING you mobile
home in May? If you
have a 12x50 or 55
two bedroom mobile
home, I am an in-
terested buyer. Terms
negotiable. 752-8241.
Ask for Cheryle.
sale�
. : !0.
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CAMPER Top for sm.n
Pick-up truck (f,t8
Courier, eta) New
condition, includes
Wi!C,K�f �"��� to
�. �200. 756-0895

�WA GEAR: Double
ADri?' �77e8SUre
AP" 77; regulator; 28
dV�,k WCight8 w,ts'
�ePth gauge; spear gun
-1175534 ,15�'
,w wSALE: l RH-
Architects 3
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30 January 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 3
ED WILUAMS
Staff Writer �
rhe following poi.
�? � both the Green-
V K' amJ can�Pus police
departments are al
tht
th(
"aine, as
almost
well as
requirements gov-
erning a vehicle's eligi-
b�l�ty to be towed
Officer J.A. Karpo-
Vlc? of the campus
P�"ce department, said
wherever possible, cam-
Pus polar try not to
ltHv a student's car.
Infractions that
would involve the tow-
ing of a student's car
include blocking the
clearance for another
car to get out of a
space or lot, or parking
where rented reserve
parking lots or spaces
exist, such as the lot
north of the drama
building. Karpovich
said.
"Where 'Towing
Enforced' signs are, a
car can be towed for
the infraction itself
he said.
Students are not
notified if their car is
wed. They must check
with the Campus Police
Department to find out
it their car has been
towed, Karpovich add-
ed.
Captain A.G. Whit-
aker ol the Greenville
Police Department, aid
city towing poli-
appl) to citizens
I students alike as
as residential park-
erned.
do not have a
� ol standards
he said.
Greenville police try
to put only a ticket on
an illegally parked '
vehicle, instead of tow-
ing it, if at all possible,
according to Whitaker.
He also saia that
Greenville police do not
work in the campus
area.
The campus police
have a rotating list of
four service stations to
call when a car is to be
towed, Karpovich said.
The four stations are:
University Exxon, Fifth
Street, Dunn's Body
Shop, also on Fifth
Street, 10th and Evans
Union 76 on 10th
Street, and Curt Smith's
Amoco on 10th Street,
-he added.
� The stations must
meet certain require-
ments to get onto the
list. Such requirements
include having enough
insurance available to
cover a car if anv
damage occurs to it
during the towing
process, plus a place to
store the car. Also, a
station must be located
near the campus and be
available for towing 24
hours a day, Karpovich
said.
For vehicles involved
in accidents, the owner
of the car picks the
towing service, he said.
The police then call that
service.
Otherwise,the Green-
ville police rotate the
towing services to tow
cars that have violated
parking regulations.
Curt Smith, owner of
the Amoco Station on
10th Street, said he has
insurance policies total-
ing $300,000. He pays
close to $1,000 a year
on garage liability, cov-
ering fire and theft.
He said he double-
checks cars to deter-
mine what damage has
already occurred to it,
then he writes down
what's wrong. In this
way, he hopes to cut
down on arguments
concerning any damage
that may occur while
towing a car.
lowing costs are $20
a day, $25 a night by
the Greenville Police
standards, Smith said.
Officer Karpovich
added that the Campus
Police charge is $15 a
day, $20 at night for
towing costs. It is a
did
he
for
standard fee, with all
the money going to the
service station that
the actual towing,
concluded.
The best way
students to avoid gett-
ing towed is to go to
the campus police sta-
tion and get an ECU
Traffic regulations
booklet. This booklet
tells where students can
park and at what times.
Pi Lambda is reborn
By RICKI GLIARMIS
News Editor
Pi Lambda Phi Fra-
ternity disbanned during
the fall semester of this
school year, but because
of the continued interest
in the fraternity a re-
organization drive has
been started to save the
organization.
According to Bill
Shreve, a past member
of the fraternity, there
are several alumni
members of the frater-
nity that are interested
in keeping the Pi
Lambda Phi's organized
at ECU. Shreve said
that there are also sev-
eral members of the
fraternity who are still
in school and who are
interested in reorgani-
zing the chapter.
Shreve said that the
fraternity was strong
several years ago and
that the members are
tO�OMy
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interested enough to try
to revive it.
Shreve is especially
concerned in the frater-
nity because he is the
oldest founding brother
of the fraternity at
ECU.
"They came to me
to get it started again
said Shreve. "The Pi
Lam's that are still at
ECU are still very in-
terested and don't want
to see the fraternity
disappear entirely
Among the students
who are attempting to
reorganize the fraternity
are Bibb Baugh, Ken
Turner, Steve Broad-
head, and Ronnie Ea-
son.
According to Shreve,
financial problems was
one of the reasons for
the closing of the fra-
ternity. Shreve said that
there were about ten
separate problems which
plagued the fraternity
and they all came to-
gether at once. A large
graduating class from
the fraternity also added
to the problems. This
left the fraternity with a
very low membership.
Shreve explained
that the reorganization
of Pi Lambda Phi Fra-
ternity will begin next
week. He said that re-
organizational efforts
shall be conducted by
alumni and friends of
ECU.
There will be a
meeting of all alumni
and interested parties
on Feb. 5 at 7 p.m.
This meeting will be
held in Mendenhall
Student Center. The
gathering will be for all
interested ECU students
who desire to become a
part of a fraternal and
social organization ac-
cording to Shreve.
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Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 30 January 1979
(
P
ft
P
i
The ERA must pass
Three million two hundred twenty
thousand people can't be completely
wrong, right?
The North Carolina legislature
apparently thinks so, since, according
to North Carolinians United for ERA,
that is the number of North Carolina
citizens who support the Equal Rights
Amendment, and the legislature has
defeated this human rights proposal
three times since 1973. It is difficult
to understand their reluctance to
merely confirm what was put forth in
the Declaration of Independence.
The amendment is needed because
the constitution does not fully protect
both sexes. For instance, it wasn't
until 1971 that a woman bringing suit
under the equal protection clause of
the 14th amendment won a case
before the Supreme Court. That
decision, however, did not overrule
earlier decisions upholding sex discri-
mination.
The ERA will outlaw wage and
Social Security discrepancies which
exist between the sexes. Unequal
credit and estate laws (often discrimi-
nating against men; for example, a
widower's Social Security benefits are
not equal to those of a widow) would
be eliminated.
ERA would not conscript women
into the military. Congress has
always had the power to draft women
as well as men. Laws which apply to
one sex because of reproductive
differences, such as maternity benefits
would not be affected. The right to
privacy under the constitution would
permit a separation of sexes under
some circumstances, such as rest-
-rooms and sleeping quarters in public
institutions.
Every president since Eisenhower
has endorsed the amendment, along
with major religious groups such as
the Methodists, Catholics, Presbyteri-
ans, Episcopals, A.M.E. Zion, Unitari-
an Universal ists, American Baptist
Churches, and even a right-winger
like South Carolina's Strom Thurmond.
If you want to see women get a
fair chance in life and to insure that
neither sex will be more privileged
than the other, write your representa-
tives in Raleigh. Let them know that
the time has come to treat men and
women equally and fairly.
Greenpeace
Whale mail is necessary
By JERRY ADDERTON
Greenpeace Support of Greenville
Below you will find information and recom-
mendations concerning use of the Pelley Amendment
against the outlaw whaling nations of Peru, Chile,
ami Korea.
The Pelley Amendment is our only real hope of
stopping or curtailing whaling in these countries. If
Carter invokes the Pelley Amendment, it will mean
the United States will ban seafood imports from
these countries. Since their international trade in
fisheries products is far more valuable than their
whaling industries, invocation of the Pelley
Amendment would be a decisive blow against
outlaw whaling.
Each year outlaw whaling accounts for around 20
percent of the whales slaughtered thoughout the
world. Outlaw whalers respect no agreements
established to save the last remaining great whales.
Ihey kill nursing mothers and calves, and protected
species such as the blue and humpback whales. We
now have the opportunity to apply pressure to end
this outlaw industry through the Pelley Amendment.
Facts offered
A
(�
The Commerce Department has certified that
Peru, Chile and Korea violate international
conservation regulations because of their outlaw
activities.
It is now up to President Carter to invoke the
Pelley Amendment against those nations.
The deadline for action is Feb. 13 (the final
date for the ruling).
Recommendations made
1. That President Carter invoke the Pelley
Amendment to protect the whales from unregulated
whaling.
That the United States offer technical and
financial assistance to these countries to help
implement alternatives to whaling such as
aquaculture (i.e kelp cultivation and fish farming)
and jojoba farming. This would generate more
products, profits, and jobs than whaling could ever
now provide.
Please write Pres. Carter and urge his quick
action on invoking the Pelley Amendment. We can
usher in the end of this outlaw whaling if you send
your letters. Every 19 minutes a whale dies �
some by outlaw whalers. Time is running out.
A word about jojoba; jojoba (ho-HO-ba) is a
bean-producing plant that grows well in arrid areas.
The bean of the jojoba contains oil that is
comparable to whale oil in every way and superior
to whale oil in that it has no fishy odor and will
not turn rancid.
It is being grown commercially now in New
Mexico and Arizona. This plant could well mean
salvation for the great whales.
Last week, several groups, including Greenpeace,
Friends of the Earth, Sierra Club, Fund for Animal
Welfare, Whale Center, and Project Jonah, formed
a coalition called the Whale Alliance, to press for
adoption of a 10 year moratorium on deep-sea
whaling at the next International Whaling
Commission meeting in July. If the United States
were to introduce this resolution, it would be certain
to pass. Essentially this would mean victory in our
fight to save the whales.
David McTaggart and three of his associates in
Greenpeace Europe, who have conducted nine
brilliantly successful campaigns in the last eight
months, believes this moratorium is a strong
possibility � If the United States introduces it.
Therefore it is essential to pressure Pres. Carter to
do so.
Please be aware of this vital mailout campaign
coming up, and to immediately initiate the Pelley
Amendment mailout. This must occur by early'
February if we are to stop outlaw whaling.
This is only a first step in a multi-phased plan
aimed at ending whaling before it is too late. Speed
and quantity are equally important.
Greenpeace has waged a lonely struggle for five
years on the high seas to save a few whales here
and there. By utilizing the immense power of the
government to do the job for us, we can save
thousands of whales, perhaps even entire species
this year.
Please, put your energy and support behind both
projects.
Mail your letters to: President Carter
The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Ave.
Washington, DC 20500
For more information on any aspect of
Greenpeace, contact Jerry Adderton at 758-6259
after 5 p.m. on weekdays. Your support will be
greatly appreciated.
Forum
Miller's review of jazz is razzed
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Each time I pick up
a FOUNTAJHEAD, I
eagerly turn' "to the
"Trends" section to
read the latest farces
that sometimes pass for
record reviews. Fre-
quently, they show a
lack of knowledge and
understanding of music;
they are nevertheless a
consistent source of
entertainment.
For five years, I
have read your record
reviews, and with the
exception of Chris
Farren's pieces, they are
usually journalistic mis-
nomers.
However last
week's review of Bob
James' Touchdown by
Mr. Miller was a dis-
gusting dose of saccha-
rin-coated hero worship.
The quality of the album
is inconsequential, the
review was the absolute
pits.
First of all, Mr.
Miller, you are a record
reviewer. A reviewer is
a careful blend of fan
and critic and his goal
should be an objective
appraisal of a recorded
endeavor. It should be a
pairing of knowledge of
subject matter and a
tasteful exposition of
written talent. Your
accounts of Mr. James
failed on many accounts.
The most intelligent
phrase you used was
your initial emphasis on
Mr. James' influential
role in popular music.
Jazz music is as far
removed from the
musical mainstream as
is reggae or punk.
The popularity of an
album is not necessarily
a measure of judgement
of its musical quality,
and isn't that what we
seek in our music and
not slick production,
packaging, and publici-
ty? Columbia jazz artists
personify this smoothly
saleable item which we
Jazz enthusiasts are
supposed to accept as
the supreme being's gift
to the record market.
Jazz music, like
classical, has relied on
its musical integrity to
distinguish itself without
relying on popular or
commercial appeal. Jazz
is not a trend, it is a
culture which has and
will withstand the i
appeal of the mighty
dollar.
Mr. Miller, the
greatest composer-arr-
angers in the world
today (if your own
assertion holds true) are
starving students at
Ju'lliard or Berkley or
burgeoning neophytes
playing small clubs.
At this point I.
should rest my argu-
ment, but your ludi-
crous assaults upon jazz
music have incensed
me. Your contention
that Mr. James put
many jazz notables in
the limelight shows your
insufferable knowledge
of jazz. Each of these
stars had distinguished
himself by his talent
long before Columbia
hit upon the commercial
aspects of jazz and
allowed Mr. James his
melodramatic clutches
upon the sound mixer.
These stars put Bob
James on the map bv
showcasing his talent
which is production and
certainly not his musical
ability. You see, simple
music is simple music
regardless of the special
effects Mr. James can
incorporate into his
mundane music.
Higher quality jazz
music can and is being
recorded live with four
musicians, instead of
the plethora of musical
sessionmen and multi-
tracking wizardry
Mr. Miller, it was
the "heroin influenced
'artists' that laid the
groundworks for your
"money-influenced hori-
zontal men" like Bob
James. As far as better
music being produced
nowadays, there perhaps
might be such, but they
record on ECM and not
Columbia.
Columbia jazz artists
don't hold a candle to
gents like Charlie
Parker, Duke Ellington,
or Fats Waller whose
names have proved the
test of time. In my
opinion. Bob James
doesn't rate as a
popular jazz innovator,
he doesn't even rate.
Mr. Miller, your
review is as poorly
written, mostly unknow-
ledgeable and contradic-
tory as I have seen
grace the pages of
FOUNTAINHEAD. Your
biased favoritism is
unexcusable for a
supposedly literate re-
viewer.
Patrick Minges
Student Welfare Committee
m
member offers parking solution
Founfainhead
Swing the East Carolina community for oyst 50 years
EDITOR
Doug White
PRODUCTION MANAGER ADVERTISING MANAGER
Steve Bachner NEWS EDITORS Robert M. Swaim
�ls
TRENDS EDITOR
Jeff Rollins
SPORTS EDITOR
Sem Rogers
FOUNTAINHEAD la the student newspaper of East
Carolina University sponsored by the Media Board of ECU
and Is distributed each Tuesday and Thursday (weekly
during the summer).
Mailing addrees: Old Sooth Building, Greenville,
27834
Editorial office: 787-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309
Subscription. $10 annually, alumni $6 annually.
N C
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
In last Tuesday's
paper some misleading
information was re-
vealed concerning my
discussion of parking
with the director of
Traffic and Security,
Joseph Calder. This
letter will clarify out
talk on the subject of
future parking changes
on campus.
Chief Calder advised
me that the state ve-
hicles parked in front of
Memorial Gym will be
moved across from his
traffic office just as
soon as a new 75 space
lot is completed. This
new lot is projected to
accomodate top priority
vehicles (when it comes
to campus parking),
those belonging to the
university (state).
When the state ve-
hicles are moved from
in front of Memorial
Gym this will create 17
to 20 additional parking
spaces for staff parking
in a prime parking
Vea. Tle SGA Student
Welfare Committee re-
quested that those new
space's be allocated to
students.
The rejection seems
to be based on evidence
of past student parking
in that same area.
Students waiting to fill
spots once others left
created an intolerable
traffic problem for that
critical area. My com-
mittee did receive an
assurance that students
could possibly be com-
pensated elsewhere.
Also, the new 75
space lot across from
Traffice and Security
may free some spaces
around the campus for
staff or student vehi-
cles. Remember, that's
just a possibility.
The university plans
to pave and mark the
dirt parking lots across
from the Joyner Library
and Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. This will
become a reality once
the school receives a
low bid on the contract.
Once this vital project
is completed students
will enjoy at least a 20
percent increase in
parking spaces availa-
ble.
Chief Calder and the
committee are aware
that parking can be
troublesome. I can say
that Mr. Calder's co.
operation has been
commendable.
I feel the outlook for
increased student park-
ing looks a little bright-
er with the above men
tioned changes that are
in the works.
Charlie Sherrod
Student Welfare twam.
Parking and Towing
Subcommittee
�! �
� � �
� �
4 , Trmmm
mmm





1
Greek Forum
30 January 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
BJ WCKI GLIARMIS ,
hews Editor
Th
pre are 20 to 25
at s a lot more
hj" th"e are at many
schools. In fa�-t . '
1,1 ,act we re
�"that we are able to
ru,u�' so many frat.
ernitiea and sororities
order to par.
"cipate foil, i� the
system, each
,8e h to show
crea� in the organiia-
tjon, the system, and in
ampus. Every or-
ganization on campus
Greek or non-Greek is
�'d vMth this dil-
emma. Although
studying ukes up a large
amount f time in a
student's life, they
manage to budget their
time well in order to
participate in every
phase of college life.
Now, you are prob-
ably raying to yourself,
V hat is she talking
about or "What is
this leading up to?"
Thi is what the
article is leading up to.
An organization can
work well together as
long as everyone con-
tributes his or her fair
-hare. But when
apathy creeps into an
rganization, the entire
' rmula of success is
destroyed.
In other words,
apathy has almost
destroyed the Greek
forum. In order for this
column to be inforrna.
,Jve and helpful to the
students and to the
campus, the participants
must do their part. Out
of 20 to 25 Greek
organizations at ECU I
received three articles
this week.
The Greek Forum
could be a very in-
teresting column for
every fraternity and
sorority but in order to
do this, every fraternity
and sorority must par-
ticipate. Share vour
news with the other
students on campus. Be
proud of your organiza-
tion. Publicity is
number one when rush
time rolls around again.
Announcements:
Throughout the
month of February, the
Alpha Phi's will be
selling heart lolly pops
to raise money for their
national philanthrophy,
the Heart Fund.
The Sigma, Sigma
Sigmas are planning
their Spring Formal for
March 24 at the Green-
ville Country Club.
Virginia Minges,
chapter advisor for the
Tri-Sigs, is entertaining
the sorority at her home
on Feb. 5. Mrs. Minges
will be having a wine
and cheese tasting party
in honor of the sorori-
tv's 19th birthday at
ECU.
The Phi Kappa Taus
initiated 14 brothers
Sunday. The Phi Taus
also held their installa-
tion of officers. The
new president is Steve
Curry; Vice President,
Monty Rish; Treasurer,
Mike Newsome, and
Secretary, Steve
O'Geary. The new
Sergeant at Arms is
David Jones.
The Phi Taus are in
the process of selling
tickets to see the
Dynamic Upsetters on
Feb. 17. The fraternity
will be presenting this
group at the Greenville
Moose Lodge. It should
be a fun evening.
Tickets can be bought
from any Phi Kappa
Tau member.
This weekend the
Phi Taus will have their
parent's weekend and
formal which will be
held at the Greenville
Country Club.
Phonothon deemed success
itchell's Hair Styling
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v-lCrcenville North Carolina
756-2950
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By RICKI GLIARMIS
News Editor
The Second Annual
Pitt County Phonothon
was held Jan. 15, 16,
and 17. The Phonothon
is sponsored by the
ECU Alumni Associa-
tion.
During the phonothon
students and alumni
take part in calling ECU
alumni in order to get
monetary pledges from
them. This year, ap-
proximately 65 local al-
umni volunteered to
work at the phonothon.
According to an ECU
news release, the vol-
unteers were divided
into three teams. Each
team was responsible
for handling the re-
sponsibilities of the
phonothon for their par-
ticular night.
Responsibilities in-
cluded making personal
telephone calls to for-
mer ECU students
which are now residing
in Pitt County.
The volunteers met
at the Alumni Building
at 5:45 p.m. for a
buffet and orientation.
The phone calls began
at 7 p.m. and ended at
10 p.m.
The news release
stated that the purpose
of the telephone calls
were to solicit pledges
to the Alumni Loyalty
Fund which is designed
to supplement state
budgetary allocations for
the academic programs
at the university.
During the three
night phonothon, many
alumni were contacted
and a gracious amount
of money was collected
for the Loyalty Fund.
492 alumni pledged
money during the phon-
othon. The total amount
of pledges collected was
$10,436.
Of the 492 alumni
who pledged money,
354 were new contri-
butors. This came out
assic Saving.
On Sale Now Through February 1
Thv
H,�mantK io,n
B8nsjjis$
Includes:
Liebesfreud
Liebesleid
Caprice viennois
Tambourin chinois
The Old Refrain
RED SEAL
HC1 RED SEAL
International Tchaikovsky ViolinComfpetition
Top Prize Winner
Eiene Fodor
plays
Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto
and
Saint Saens: Introduction & Rondo Capriceioso
ev Philhaimonw Ore hesi r,
rich I emscloi f C ondut tew
H.99
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You'll find a wide selection of
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to be approximately 72
percent of the alumni
who were called.
During the phono-
thon this year, prizes
were given during the
three-day event. Incen-
tive prizes were awar-
ded during each hour of
the calling. An overall
prize was given at the
end of each session.
This prize was awarded
to the person who ob-
tained the largest a-
mount of money in
pledges during the ses-
sion.
Don Leggett, director
of Alumni Affairs, sta-
ted that the effort was
a tremendous success.
He also expressed his
appreciation to the vol-
unteers who were in-
volved in the project.
Leggett thanked
those who responded
favorably to the soli-
citation of the callers
during the alumni pho-
nolhon.
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Sh





atzaat
Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAO 30 January 1979
Don
By BARRY CLAYTON
Assistant Trends Editor
JJ.
Something old and something new.
This particular pair might seem out of place at a
wedding. But a lot of people are going to want to
see them when they appear at the Roxy.
They are songwriter-performers J.J. Cale and
Don Schlitz, and they will be performing at the
Roxy on the ninth and 10th of February. Shows will
be at 7 and 10:30 each night. Tickets will be J4.50
for members, $5.00 advance, and $6.00 at the door,
The best way to go about lining up one of these
$4.50 tickets along with membership in the Roxy (a
non profit organization dedicated to bringing all the
better things to its members) is to contact Shep at
752-7746. F
For some time the Roxy had been trying to book
J.J. Cale to appear in Greenville. And though the
story is sort of vague, it seems that Cale's
eventually accepting the invitation revolves around
the advice of his drummer Jimmy Carstein who
happened to be in town when John Prine played
the Roxy last December. Carstein was apparently
enough impressed with the atmosphere to talk to
Cale about it, and in the end Cale agreed to
appear.
An awful lot of people are going to ask, "J.J.
" ho.
Part of the reason for this is the plastic-glossed
pop-disco mania that has so successfully bleached
out the '60s and early '70s music awareness like a
Clorox enema.
And, partly, the reason is that Cale has always
preferred to avoid the spotlight, promoting his
music and not himself.
Those of you who get off on watching Kiss claw
and kick about on stage are going to be
dissappointed.
This man is serious. He's putting you on to
some good soundnot just putting you on.
But if the spotlight should catch him
momentarily (and Cale has been known to fairly fold
himself to avoid this), what you might see is a tall
wiry man in his late thirties clad in t-shirts, jeans,
dark glasses, and a $50 Harmony acoustic guitar
that ha, had its back removed to permit easier
access to tfe melange of pick-ups and other
assorted electronic paraphenalia with which Cale has
modified his instrument and is constantly tinkering.
Cale's penchant for anonymity has become
somewhat of a legend in itself. In past years he has
allowed no photographs of himself to appear on the
album covers of his three lp's (Naturally, Really
Okie) all released since '73. He likes to play on the
far edge of the stage, out of the limelight, and
sometimes not even facing his audience.
Of his reticence, Cale says, "I'm not really into
show business. I'm just there to play and sing my
tunes when people are coming up to you, you
know, it's kind of a drag. So I try to stay pretty
low. It slows down the career, but I've wanted it
that way I'm always afraid it's gonna by a hype.
Music is a free deal, you know? When I first
started getting any money for music, I couldn't
believe you got paid for doing it. Music is not a
commodity
It's a philosophy that Cale has lived since his
start in the entertainment field. Cale has been
around. His career began in the late '50s playing in
the bars of Tulsa and Oklahoma City for whatever it
would bring.
He became involved in some of the innumerable
band that sprouted up as Elvis first began to
popularize rock and roll music. Among these were
Cale's own group, The Valentines (remember, it was
another age entirely), and Gene Crose and the
Rockets for whom J.J. played guitar.
While playing in his native Oklahoma, Cale first
met Leon Russell, and in '64 the two of them
packed it up and headed for Los Angeles where
they helped put together Delaney and Bonnie's
band. Leon started to put together a recording
studio, and Cale spent a year playing at the
Whisky-A-Gogo where he appeared opposite Johnny
Rivers.
It was about this time that Cale wrote the song
that was to open a lot of doors for him in the
industry. Bui liU. immediately. In 1970 Eric Clapton
recorded it on his first solo album.
The song?
"After Midnight
And the way was cleared for Cale's own first lp
which was released on the Shelter label. The album
was Naturally, and the studio was Leon's.
Not surprising. Since '64, Cale had spent his
spare time at Shelter cutting demos and working
with the equipment trying to become proficient to
the point that he could capture that element of
"backporch" naturalism that he sought to preserve
in his music.
Says Cale's Nashville Producer Audie Ashworth,
"Sometimes he'll (Cale) walk into a studio, turn on
the tape machine and do the song in one take. The
spontaneity's there, and you just can't duplicate
that. Or sometimes we spend maybe $2,000 on four
or five overdubs of horns and voices, and then,
when we sit down to mix it, he'll say it sounds
better without them, and we'll take off all those
damn overdubs and we're right back where we
started, with the live track
And that, too, had become a trademark of the
J.J. Cale sound-everything a song needs and not
one note more.
Onstage with Cale will be a young face, but
SONGWRITER-PERFORMER J.J. Cale and Don
Schhtz will be performing at the Roxy on the 9th
one that is rapidly becoming well-known to the
citizens of Nashville. It belongs to 25-year-old Don
Schhtz, a songwriter-singer who is making a name
tor himself not just in the home of Opry but in the
rest of the nation as well.
Heard a song by the name of "The Gambler"
recently?
You should have. It has been recorded by no
tess than nine recording artists, among them Johnny
Lash and Kenny Rogers. Schlitz himself
recorded his own version of the tune which did
very well on the Billboard chartsmuch better than
those by Cash and Rogers, in fact.
Schlitz signed up with Capitol as a singer-per-
former, but it doesn't appear to be cutting too
deeply into his career as a songwriter. Schlitz's
songs are generally in demand, quite aside from the
phenomenal success of "The Gambler This year
18 separate artists are cutting their own versions of
Schhtz s songs.
In the meanwhile, he is causing a certain
amount of ripples on the usually mirror-slick
recording industry.
Maggie Cavender, the executive director of the
ind 10th of February. JJ. Cole's photo show
begins at 7 and 9:30 p.m.
Nashville Songwriters' Association has said that
Schhtz is going to be some kind of supercat "
And singer Bobby Bare has predicted that "within
two years Don Schlitz will be the foremost
songwriter in Nashville
Although he has sold other sorrgs, the success
that he enjoys today seems to be a direct
by-product of "The Gambler It is the top country
song ,n Nashville today. It netted for Schlitz the
Lountrv Music Magazine's "Song of the Year"
award. Says Audie Ashworth (who produces both
Schhtz and I Cap "Tk� u i i
arm.nrl ,t . � ' WH�le tHlng StemS
around that song.
Overnight success?
No not really. Schlitz spent five long years in
Nashville working at various jobs (the longest-last,�
was a job as a computer operator which he has
onlv just recently left behind), sleeping ,n his car
and living on a diet of jelly sandwiches.
A perfect pluck and luck storv
The new kid and the old hand. Thev should be
quite an entertaining pair, and they'll" be at the
Roxy Friday and Saturday nights
I
t
By JEFF ROLLINS
Trends Editor
A young scluptor plans a party for his fiancee's
father and for an important art collector. In order to
impress them he switches his furniture with that of
his wealthy neighbor who has left for the weekend.
But the party turns out quite differently than the
sculptor plans when the lights go out, one of his
ex-girlfriends crashes the party and the neighbor
from whom he "borrowed" the furniture returns
unexpectedly.
That's not all, though, the fun is just beginning
in Peter Schaffer's Black Comedy, a Mendenhall
Student Center Dinner Theatre performance. The
play is entitled Black Comedy because the action
takes place during an electrical black-out. Thus,
although the audience is able to see, the characters
must stumble around in the dark. And stumble they
certainly do, to their own chargrin and our
amusement.
This year, for the first time since the inception
of the Mendenhall Dinner Theatre, there will be a
special dessert Performance for students, faculty and
staff. For a mere $2.50, the price of a movie, the
play-goer is treated to cheesecake or apple pie a la
mode with coffee or tea, in addition to being able
to watch this delightful play.
In addition to the special Dessert Performance,
the show will also run for three evening
performances with only 100 seats available each
night. The dates are February 8-10; dinner is served
beginning at 6:30 p.m and curtain is at 8 p.m.
Tickets are available at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center. Prices are $6 for
students and $8.50 for the public. Mail orders are
accepted, and all tickets must be purchased at least
36 hours in advance.
Acting in the play are Marvin Hunt as Brindsley
Miller, and up and coming sculptor for whom
everything goes wrong, Phyllis Kivett as Carroll
Melkett, the sculptors debutante fiancee, Lee Baker
Comedy
as the fiancee's authoritative father, Sue Ellen
McLeod as Clea, the ex-girlfriend of the sculptor,
Gregory S. Smith as Mr. Bamburger, the wealthy
and stone-deaf art collector and Bill Roberson as
Harold Goringe, the sculptor's gay neighbor and
proprietor of an antique store.
Attending one of their rehersals this writer saw
that they are a hard-working and charismatic cast.
Says Dr. Farr, "We had tryouts before Christmas
and had rehersal the first day back
For Bill Roberson, the most difficult thing about
being in the play is "playing someone that's gay. I
tend to be a little too stereotype with it he says.
'They (others in the cast) tell me I don't but I feel
like I do
Sue Ellen
the
Sculpture, prints and woodwork highlight show
School of Art
McLeod, who plays Clea,
sculptor's ex-girlfriend, says of working on the
production, "I've enjoyed every minute of it It's
work but work I enjoyed. It's fun meeting new
.Pne0tPhecear"th0Ugh ' d " ' of PP'
One -remarkable feature of the play is that the
darkness brought about by the electncal balck out il
suggested by the characters actions while the stage
remains completely lit. g
McLeod observes that this technique "is
working very well. This play is difficult became eve
con act never happens. The characters are in lie
dark so its working together without seeming to '
Lindsay Pauly stage mistress, says of her job
e oa1rseSlvgeseatTheCa"Se �S � build �
ffcl , i �- There s a technical crew that builds
-�.Xihv. zz r- -
The comedy of errors situation combined with
the effective sight gags wntten i�to thTpla" thu d
make this plav the �, j V P- sno"la
P J ine )ifre-de-resistance o( a fine meal.
Trends Editor
An estimated 300 persons attended the opening
of the East Carolina School of Art Faculty
exhibition at Wellington B. Gray Gallery last Friday
night. Each year an exhibition of the faculty's
current work is held and this most recent show
illustrates that it is comprised of artists of
extraordinary quality.
Aaron Karp, director of the gallery, mentioned
that he was quite pleased with the caliber of the
works included in the exhibit. Mr. Karp deserves to
be commended for developing Gray Gallery into the
vital, intellectually active gallery that it is.
Ray E. Elmore's Rose and E.E. HenryAn Apple
a Day present us with arresting portraits of
individuals who intrigue us. These pencil portraits
are then set against a second idea. In Rose the
artist surrounds the pencil of a rather stoic Black
woman with a checkerboard of oranges, browns and
yellows, in E.E. Henry the portrait of a distinguished
father figure is seen though a calendar, onto which
are drawn apples, with one of the apples having the
only color on the drawing. The intriguing subject
matter and very finished quality of Elmore's work
makes it one of the most distinguished in the
Betsy Ross's series, Sidings, is a study of
exquisite textures. There is a tactile quality to this
series which is fascination in a irritatingly vague
way Ms. Ross also exhibits her Imaculat Conception
which is based in a delightful style of drawing we
are often treated to by this artist.
That is a very delicate, very feminie pure
rendunng of rabbits, white, white rabbits, or some
other immacualte field of animal, say, painted
against snow. These drawings which deal with the
variances of whitenesses often include ovals among
the imagery which implies a sense of prenatal
innocence or sanctity.
Betsy Ross is quoted in the brochure
accompanying last year's exhibit as saying, "I deal
with incongruities, taking pleasure in inventing
transitions between color and black and white,
between positive and negative, between the large
mass and the infinitesimal mark, between the sedate
and the outrageous
One of the best offerings this year was made
by George Danhires. His paintings of abruptly
foreshortened interiors are peopled with stark,
prosaically drawn but nevertheless disturbing,
nudes. His subject matter is Vat alter and he
tempers and humanises its cool emotional climate
Paul Hartley is surely one of the most talented
artists included in the show. His small Eve and
Serpent is a well executed cloissonistic composition.
Pedestal depicts a draped object with a strawberry
on top of it. It haunts back to the Dada wrapped
is
also drawn
flourescent-type light. The word "bit
,n a blue,
and painted'in Senegal'like 7"is inT ' rCVer�ed
Hartlol Ve Cat
images
lim
Hartl�v'c m� V7 u ,s ln Carnival.
y g-charged and evoeativ,
Art
object tradition. Three larger compositions show
Hartley's full tange of talents.
His Michael's Hero and Rainbow is comprised of
the �JwtH�Hy drswn images of Maurice Chevalier
and Mickey Mouse set against a design of blue,
circles. He adds to this compostion the upside down
reflection of Chevalier and Mickey Mouse. The
colors and subject matter of Michael's Hero make
the piece sasy to relate to.
Hartley's Carnival 28: Gold Dust at my Feet
incorporates the image of the stawberry again, as
wail as the image of Chevalier and a motif of
combined with his innovative hiT cvoc�" ag
one of the faculty fiU;ck�r�U-d� m
primal African JST � �
work. Her PrototypT J
feeling, mspite of its modern lines " Al,CC
the high-points of the tL hL'TI ere �ne of
photographs catch swirls of'li.ht f "
t�l��;oi lam� the strange light
f��mg in � bathtub
�f color �nd of the
tp
myself to stop "and ake ' 1� i l �Jkw
occasion I recognise what I aL ??' Md� ttP��
new m the oft-seen is Henrv S. mething
Donald Sexauerexhhs . S nn Ufeat-
�mages dealing with six J�" � si ���&
Charlotte before the 193? �ST' . .vison. of
Sexaue's dexterity with hi LT lnt,i�� evince
qualities may more �� ed�"� but his lyrical
T o seen in km
I" FACULTY p.?.
?LtfVe,eVision' the 8h�d�ws
and other .nterior scenes full
fanciful effects of light,
Stindt has said,
iiniarnniiim
I
�iMiaaiiw
,m�i,i �
mm&r mm:�

��� m
' �ttH��. �u. 4V�� ' ��b
" ���-� 1





30 January 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Psqs 7
continued from p.6.
drawin
Makebelieve a naint'
e .mages of mask, ' P�,gnantly incorporates
female figure present' in �d that �Huitous
�n Sexauer's works. His To
Construct -iri "
possesses the mi.f 1S . charanstic in that it
tema.efigUre;XnuC:0drb:tme d�m,nate
Marilyn Cordlev'sCrl l Scwsn'
both combine abstran T i a"rf 2
Curative Jages T rch,tectural �ents with
between the k! poppers. Thus the contrast
retail syatm (XM t"� and ,he inhuma"
achieved b, the use Z HTf �f � MaU?) "
one painting. d'fferent graPh,c styles in
MarUvn Gordlev's states in the brochufe
nuoth " ear,S 8h�W' "Tht' establishment
, eM'S" 'nventions, and visions have been an
32 motivation in my work. 1 wish
crystall�e vision through art applicabh
human Mate and to the reality of out time
this point of view has been pertinent to the
aching ol drawing and painting on an advanced
level. Students are encourages to think in a flexible
and creative manner and to develop a personal
aesthetic in ther work
Joe Buske's Fantasy with Pink Moon is a mixed
composition utilizing delicate variations in
earthly colors contrasted with a pink half-moon. It is
to
to the
Recital
planned
Charley Ann Peele
Hopkins, masters candi-
date in music at East
Carolina University, will
present her graduate
organ recital on Feb. 4
at the First Presbyterian
Church in Greenville.
Hopkins, stu-
dent of E.Robert Ervvin,
will present a program
which will include
"Prelude and Fugue in
sharp minor" by
Buxtehude. "Suite du
2nd Ton" by Guilain.
Sonata 11 for organ"
by Hindemith, "Sonata
111 for organ" by
Mendelssohn and three
chorale preludes from
"Clavierubung, Part
111" by Bach.
Hopkins re-
ceived her Bachelor of
Music from Meredith
College and has served
as a graduate teaching
assistant at ECU. She is
also choir director of
the First United Metho-
dist Church in William-
son.
The recital
to the public.
an understated piece, quietly lovely.
Buske says of the art of weaving that "The
woven image in both its loom-controlled and
hand-manipulated aspects has been my field of
studio interest for many years. The mechanics of
the process and the endless possibilities of pattern
and texture are alway challenging
Bill Holly presents us with a watercolor entitled
Fall Landscape' which is a non-objective composed
of dabs of Fall color. It is a pleasant composition-
Holly observes that "To the act of painting I bring
my subconscious experiences and reactions and
some conscious, preconceived notions about color,
composition, and technique. These notions serve as
guidelines to get started
"The fluid nature of watercolor challenges these
preconceived notions and forces changes in search
and discovery process. Hunches are followed,
chances taken, evaluation made, and corrections
implemented
"The in-process decisions may serve to clarify
ideas or may lead far from the original intentions.
Whether or not the results are successful the
satisfactions come fromexplorations and discoveries.
"Those possibilities not used in that particular
painting serve as stimuli for later paintings in
series
Phil Phillips' Mark is an endearing painting
I
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depicting the portrait of a little boy behind which
are the images of the boys dreams: a train, a
teepee, a car. The little boy wears a cowboy hat.
All this is saved from being too cutsy and cliche by
the excellently rendered portrait of the boy.
Ed Rood's Phenomenological Color Series is a
group of cool studies on the interaction of colors in
a controlled change of a series of related colors. His
designs are bold, masculine. "I paint says Reep.
"Once I made pictures, then works. I try to make
images today but can't. My vision is improving,
however. A great number of people enjoy my work
� especially my wife These etudes are brilliant
and subtle.
Cabbages, carrots and fruit are the subjects of
Tran Gordley's vision. His Cabbage V Section is a
convolus of green swirls. His Carrott Bands is a
neatly arranged pattern of oranges against white.
His Mixed Fruit is a composition of fluid color.
Lack of space prohibits discussion of Robert
Edminston's Head Study, a Nefertii, like sculpture
Art Haney's fanciful sculpture, Harlev Davidson
Panhead Hog Powered Trike, Bob Rashch's gum
prints of Americana, Tom Evan's lovely brown
non-objective Still Life, Wesley Crawley's Maillol-
esque Untitled Bronze, Chuck Chamberlain's
fantastical ceramic piece, Rita's Tickler, Terry
Smith's astonishingly lovely woodwork and John
Satterlield's necklaces.
Each of these artists deserves further description
and analysis than space permits, but suffice it to
say that their work represents them well.
A MESSAGE FROM
THE TRAFFIC FICLHF
Because II S If WIH 11 I I believes in and totally
supports the ECU Athletic Program, we are pleased to announce our
sponsorship of the University Women's Basketball team in conjunction
with WNCT-Radio. To help celebrate this initial broadcast of
women's sports, we are having a SPORTS SALE featuring sweatshirts,
ski jackets, flannel shirts, and jeans. Come on in and take advantage of
all the SUPER VALUES and support your women's basketball team.
The games will be aired Feb. 6 at 7:30 against UNC and
Feb. 12 at 7:00 against number one ranked Old Dominion
TIHE II 41114 lit H
Pitt Plaza
10:00-9:00 MonSat.
Phone 756-8320
t
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INC
SUPERMARKET
Prices effective thru Sat Feb. 3
Carnation instant88'
breakfast p��a� of 6
chocolate, chocolate malt
Oven Gold bread3S1.17
24oz. loaf reg. a79'
White House3$l .00
apple sauce ioxa oz. can
Kraft Macaroni3$ 1.00
and Cheese dinners
714 oz. box reg. a79
Overton's Finest
Ground Beef$l.39lb.
Bama non-carbonated
drinks4S1.00
looz. bottles all flavors reg. bo
Wishbone Salad58'
Dressing �� bottle
French and Thousand Island
t
i�� mil m my.
�aj�i�,iiiiiiiWajMlWI
m -
M





I
�an-
Page 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 30 January 1979
e Indians tonight
Pirates shock Ga. Tech 66-64 in OT
M avnor
hi Pirates I heii
i ten losses. M
the gun marked I
talented transfer
ight tin- Bij.
rienl Earliei this vear
horn which i
P
" W i
Kerb Krusen was opei
I We've
nt 13-0 in the earl)
I in the fir
mm) Drumm
trine bad
1
fers face
�i
e
ECl
mm?
Davenderwood muscles one in
i,
son. Kvrhaufih star
Pirates triumph
over UNC-W 92-79
UAH!
Bis win
Warrior. hrusen star
I
Herl
M
assis
e ening,
impressioi upoi S
Me
Ma)
"H
thai
er.
f
Waynor helps Mack
M
awa me
responsibilities tl .
star Oliver Mack lasl -� as
doesn't ha
ady Pirates humiliate Longwood
ded tl ml)
in it
i She was,
' ' � ontest
i itili give the Pirate
sperieni e While their
the first half
was light ami well
ard Brenda Fettrow hit the tirt ol
until
1 17 left, the
M' Wi
md
1


l
Sot
lasl wei k
rihute 18 to
ifl sev. i
Lillian Bai ne re ed Roun
N'i and . hes
W( R�ve thai starting
experiem i i ommented I ath) ndruzzi
" ' �'�' " pleased v ith the gamt . no doubt W e
! �' ' II defensive effort w e didn't know
what the) were doing on nfft n e foi a while "
rhe Pirate mentor also hi the strong plav
under 'he boards ol forward Lynn Emerson and
;v Patt Howell, as well a- Thompson and
Gin
' tt'ad th state in rebounding
x id a game like this (61 rebounds)
tainh helps
r game is an important game. We want
one game at a time
Hu 7. Pullen 1 ii I 2, Landon 2
0 0 In. Fettrow 3 1 10,
Hughes i) 0 i 0, V ilson I
" " i Min I (i (i 2, Ra) 0 1-3 1. Murrav �
0-0 0, Brown I 0 0 2. Gates 0 0 0 0 IDTALS
6 14
ECl i
hompson 9 5-7 23 E
mersori Z
Cirven 8 0-1 16, Kerhaugh 2 2-2 6, Barnes 0
" " 0, Young (i ii 0 0, Rountree 7 5 18,
Howell 2 ii 0 , Ross X 0-0 H. Inslej 1 0-0 2.
Versprille 0 0 0 0 TOTALS 35 12-17 82
Halftime ECl 52, Longwood 20 Fouled oul
NnM fotal fouls ECl 19, Longwood 18
� ethnical fouls: NONE. A-350v
s�i�-k? id, .ir(1(, defe
t





t
Long
wait is finally over for Northrup
30 January 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 9
By SAW ROGERS
Sports Editor
"� ht' would rathjr k" , be the first
�linnc his frustratedI �Ut �n the WrestHng "at
i long slump teammatea erge from thei,
Northrup, the Pirate's talented Ifi7
1 earlier this ' 6' pounder, was
W just before h V" ,Wh a torn ke
wo month lhKCrlTInvitati�nal- A"d
Welin� and watcthe'p t0sit �
�ual matches this year aU f�Ur �f
Pr"b4 be bafk n � "�& f
when the R, . , , � hneuD next
" ,f" Bucs travel to Williamsburgh
have l0 accept, ' explained Northrup who
season with an 18-9 record. "But right
;t� " gel hack out there and help my,
'K even more frustrating tor Northrup has
rash ot injuries which have sidelined
!t enttre Pirate's lineup at one time fr
� eyar. On paper, ECU certainly boasted
� finest dual teams in the state before the
�� And then, slowly, but surely, the
un to crop up
Revils, ECU's 177 pounder missed a
th bruised ribs while Jay Dever has been
all season long with back problems.
Heavyweight D.T. Joyner fractured a bone in his
hand near the end of football season and decided to
postpone his senior campaign until next year.
And just recently Steve Goode, a 158-pounder,
suffered a severely bruised leg and has missed the
Pirate's last two dual matches.
"No one realizes this, but ive had the potential
on this team to go undefeated at the beginning of
the year said Northrup. "We've had more injuries
and operations than any team here in the last five
years put together. We've just been a team struck
with bad luck and it really gets you down.
"The upperclassmen can take it, but it's really
tough on the freshmen who have to go out there
and wrestle against some really tough opponents.
Our Ireshmen have made tremendous improvement
all season long, :hough, and they're improving more
and more everyday In the wrestling room
The Waverly, N.Y. native had been pushing
himself extremely hard for the last two weeks
preparing for the season's final dual matches before
the Eastern Regionals and then, hopefully, the
NCAA Championships in Ames, Iowa.
"The last two weeks, I've worked real hard
said Northrup. "I've been running a lot even
though it hurts. But I've just got to do it to get
bark in shape. The trainers have also helped me a
lot with my knee
Although Northrup failed to win a tournament
title during the regualr season last year, everything
"fell right into place" in the all-important Eastern
Regionals which is the qualifying stop-off for the
NCAA Championships.
"I just seemed to peak there are the end of the
season and that's exactly what any wrestler wants
to be doing when he gets to the NCAA finals
explained Northrup. "But my knee started acting up
again after the regionals and it just hurt to walk by
the time I got to the NCAA tournament
Despite losing in the first round of the NCAA
WU'TenN N�rthn t WaS named t0 the Amateaur
Wrestling News All-Freshmen team and was listed
among the top wrestlers in National Mat News'
honorable mention selections.
And Northrup is confident the Pirate's will have
several performers, as well as himself, capable of
qualifying for the nationals this year "Steve
Coode was wrestling real well before he got hurt
Bf, .fV .P0tential All-America said Northrup.
Butch Revils and Frank Scaede are also real
talented wrestlers who could make it to the finals
As for Northrup? "I sat out of wrestling for
three years after high school before I started again
and it took me about five months to get that
competitive edge back he admitted. "I know I
on t be back in top shape in our dual matches
next week but maybe towards the end of the season
HI get a few breaks. After a season like this I
could sure use a few
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I �
Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 30 January 1079
�?�
iUUUttMUftUittM
� f"
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lift



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Located beside
the Ramada Inn,
264 By-pass.
t
ECU swimmer strokes forward
Photo by Pete Podeszwa
EC U swimmers drown Seahawks
By DAVID MAREADY
Sa Writer
The Pirate men and
women's swimming
teams posted convincing
victories over the UNC-
Wilmington Seahawks,
Saturday, in a dual
swim meet in Minges
Natatorium.
The dual meet, first
ever between the Pir-
ate- and the Seahawks,
was a runaway from the
start as the men
roasted to an easy 79-34
win, capturing ten of
the thirteen events
while the women's team
outdistanced their op-
ponents 65-44.
Pirate winners in the
men's events included:
Jack Clowar in the 100
and 200 yd. freestyle;
Tom Bell in the one
and three meter diving
events; Ted Nieman in
the 100 vd. freest vie;
John Tudor in the 50
yd. freestyle; Joe Kushy
in the 200 yd. indivi-
dual medley; David
Moodv in the 200 vd.
backstroke; and, Doug
Brindley in the 500 yd.
freestyle.
Coach Ray Scharf
was satisfied with his
squad's performances.
"Our guys were pretty
tired today, so we tired
to take it easy. We
expected the women's
events to be close and
they were. I was very
happy with the job they
did today
Cindy Sailer took
first place in three
Intramural basketball
moves into full swing
By
CANDY WEDEMEYER
Intramural Writer
The first full week
of basketball came to a
close with the tranked
teams for the most
pasrt of faring well.
Belk Dormitory contin-
ue- to dominate their
division as ten Belk
teams recorded wins.
Top-ranked Pleasers
downed their fellow
fdorm members Belk
slow motion 42-33.
The Belk Players
Association slaughtered
the Scott Challengers
102-30. Other Belk
teams recording victor-
ies were the Belk Buck-
les, Belk Aviators, Belk
White Hope, Belk Rush,
Belk Stylons, Belk Roa-
ches, Belk Stud Farm
and Belk Slimy Dogs.
Other ranked teams that
won were Scott Stooges
over the Jones Jailers
58-44, Jones Jaguars
over Scott Cadillacs 70-
26 and the Slaystead
Basketball Villians
downed previously
ranked Belk Bullets 44-
23.
In ClubIndependent
play the Nads easilv
overcame the Outsiders
52-29, No Jumping
Fools downed Phi Sigma
Pi 42-29, the Heartbreak
Kids downed the Dirty
Dogs 70-37, the Tas
manian Devils beat the
Ozone Airmen 59-47,
and the Pac upset the
Langston D.Js 60-40.
In a couple of close
games involving non-
ranked teams the Nug-
gets defeated On Your
Back 41-36 and Phi Ep-
silon Kappa defeated
ROTC I 47-46.
For the fraternities,
top-ranked Kappa Alpha
downed Kappa Sigma
52-44 and Phi Kappa
Tau had a rough rime
with the TKE Bomb
Squad but eventually
downed them 32-31.
Other fraternity results
were as follows: Alpha
Phi Alpha upset pre-
viously ranked Omega
Psi Phi 44-40, Sigma
Nu defeated Delta Sig-
ma Phi 40-24, Pi Kappa
Phi defeated Beta Theta
Pi 43-15 and Alpha
Sigma Phi defeated Sig-
ma Tau Gamma 23-18.
TOP TEN - Patterson
1. Belk Pleasers
2. Kappa Alpha
3. Nads
4. Jones Jaguars
5. Slaystead Villians
6. Heartbreak Kids
7. Belk Players Ass.
8. Scott Stooges
9. Tasmanian Devils
10. Phi Kappa Tau A
Arm wrestling began
last Thursday as several
spectators gathered to
watch first round action.
Thursday's most gru-
eling match was be-
tween Wes Carrell and
Michael Coopers in the
middle wieght class. Te
two struggled for over
three minutes until Car-
rell finally pinned Co-
oper. Strong semi-
finalists include Carrell
and Charlie Carter in
the middle weight,
Bobby Little and wrest-
ler Paul Osman in the
light class, and Elaine
Davis and Anna Ed-
wards in the women's
division. The heavy-
weight finals will be
held at halftime of the
ECU William and Mary
Basketball game. The
favorite to win this
match is Nate Wigfall.
The men's and
women's bowling pro-
grams get under this
week
Breakfast, Lunch
and Dinner
Specials
MONDAY
through
FRIDAY
$.20 OFF ON ANY MEAL
Coupon offer effective Jan. 30
Feb. 2,1979
i
i
i
i
-J
events including the 500
and 100 yd. butterflies,
and the 50 yd. free-
style. She was also on
the winning freestyle
relay team. Lucy Weck-
erling broke the
women's varsity record
in the 50 yd. backstroke
with a time of 32:17.
Other winners included
Karen Davidson in the
500 yd. freestyle; Shar-
on Burns in the 100 yd.
freestyle; and, Julie
Malcom in the 50 yd.
breastroke.
With Saturdav's win,
the men's swim team,
now riding a three meet
winning streak, in-
creased their record to
3-2 while the Seahawks
dropped to 4-2. Both
the Lady Pirates and
Seahawks now sport 3-2
records.
The Pirates will face
interstate rival N.C.
State today in a dual
swim meet at Raleigh.
Schedule starting time
for the meet is 7 p.m.
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Title
Fountainhead, January 30, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 30, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.539
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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