Fountainhead, January 9, 1979






Circulation 10,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
Vol. 55, No.
9 January 1979
Supreme Court reviews ruling
WASHINGTON AP - The Supreme Court, in a ease
that could affect educational opportunities for handicapped
persons nationwide, agreed today to decide whether a
North Carolina college illegally refused to admit a partiallv
deaf woman.
The justices said the will review a lower court's ruling
that Southeastern Community College in Whitevill.
violated federal law when it turned down Frances Davis
tor its nursing program.
The court's action leaves the wav open for a crucial,
edent-setting interpretation
of the scope of the Rehabilitation Act of
I al law prohibits programs or activities receiving
f)i aid to discriminate against any "otherwise qualified
licapped indiv idual
One measure of the case's potential importance is that
26 states, arguing as friends of the court, backed the
- appeal. The states said the ruling could turn the
law into a tool of oppression
M Davis' n"u ib a" a licensed practical nurse for
12 years, sought in 1974 to join Southeastern
nursing program leading to licensing as a
I nurse
I here was never any question that Ms. Davis, who had
been an undergraduate student at Southeastern during the
I .3-19,4 school year, was academically qualified for
admission to the nursing program.
But because of a serious hearing impairment, she can
communicate with others only when she wears a hearing
aid and looks directly at the talker to read lips.
Southeastern officials submitted an audiologist's report
to the executive director of the North Carolina Board of
Nursing. The board official said Ms. Davis should be
advised "to alter her career goal
The school was told that her handicap would make her
incapable of performing various duties assigned to a
registered nurse such as aiding in operations when
surgical masks are worn.
After her application was rejected because of her
hearing impairment, Ms. Davis sued the college on the
ground it had violated the 1973 law.
I S. District Judge Robert Hemphill dismissed the
charges but the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals last
March ruled that Southeastern had violated the 1
aw.
The appeals court sent the case back to Hemphill with
instructions to give "close attention" to Ms. Davis'
request for some form of "affirmative relief by modifying
the nursing program to accommodate her hearing
disability.
In seeking Supreme Court review, lawyers for the
college argue that although the 1973 law serves a
legitimate interest, "the nature of some physical handicaps
may make it unwise and unsafe to permit a handicapped
person equal access to certain programs, activities or
professions
They likened Ms. Dav.V case to that of a one-armed
student studying to become a surgeon or a blind person
seeking to become a bus driver. P
Lawyers for the National Association of the Deaf
representing Ms. Dav.s, accused the school of distorting
the impact of the appeals court ruling.
They quoted one hospital official as saving that "there
are a number of settings in which Ms. Dav'is 'could perform
sat.sfactonly as a registered nurse, such as industrv oH
physician's office industry or a
New course offered
SPECIAL TO
FOl TAINHE D
DOl CIAS J.
hUll.A
English
rs for the
ster 1979
VSMR 4000:
Medieval Ren-
Studies have
the eminar
The) invite all
� tits interested in anv
ol Medieval Ren-
mi&nance studies to consider
for the seminar.
iar will fo us on
lual and his or
during the 11th
syllabus
from anv
Dr.
Mi Foreign
Douglas
lish; Mr
- �� � n, History.
� will meet
p m. in
Br : on Tues-
' m January 16
�" Ma) 1. "l979.
Undergraduate students
may earn 3 s.h. credits:
graduate students mav
audit.
Highlights from the
syllabus include the
announcement oi' the main
seminar textbook as the
current bestseller
Distant Mirror: The
ntury by Barbara W.
Tuchman.
Lectures leading to
seminar discussion include
l. Roman de la Rose. Had
the Impaler. and The Jew:
His Life and His Culture
by Professor Bassman;
Dante. Arthurian Romance,
and Biographies and Auto
biographies by Professor
McMillan; Historical Over
rieu of the 12th and 13th
enturies. Historical Over
'� the 14th and 15th
' ' � s and Medicine
and Scienct m the 14th
and 15th Centuries In
Professor Herndon.
In addition other faculty
have volunteered to talk on
such topics as Plague
(Professor Sundwall), Lan-
guage Evolution (Professor
Wright,) Marsilius of
What's inside
Padua's Political Philoso-
phy (Professor Ryan.)
Razor at the Throat of
Dogma (Professor Ross,)
Religion in the 14th and
15th Centuries (Professor
Nischan), Women in the
14th and 15th Centuries
(Professor Immele,) etc.
In addition to discus-
sion, the seminar work
includes student projects
related to each student's
interests in some area of
Medieval Renaissance Stu-
dies, a Mid-Term Exami-
nation, and a Final Exam-
ination.
Prospective students are " FrOTTl the itlOUIltainS tO the 8ea
encouraged to confer with
one of the instructors: Dr.
Bassman. Foreign Lang-
uages; Dr. McMillan,
English, Mr. Herndon,
M istorv.
Independence Bowl cover-
ageSee p.9.
Student Union holds spring break trips
to New Orleans and the Bahamassee
page 5.
Student Bill Robinson performs magic
see page 6.
Pirates stomp Bulldogs at Independence
Bowlsee page 9.
Reginald Marsh paints humanitysee
page 6.
AT LAST, THE trophy of the Independence Bowl comes
home to Ed. The Pirates won a very physical game
down in Louisiana. Sports Editor Sam Rogers made the
trip with the team, and files several stories, beginning on
page nine. FOUNTAIN HEAD photographer John Grogan
also has contributed a full page of photos, which are on
page 11. Photo by John H. Grogan)
Award given
Proposed Trail Corridor
This is truly an in-
terdepartmental seminar:
students with any major or
minor who are interested
in the Middle Ages and
the Renaissance should
consider this
offering.
unique
Motel rates compared
DENISE KINLAW
Staff Writer
recent comparative
motel room
le re-
Olde
ndon Inn � loseh
bv Smith's
M
are the most
ical in range.
- comparative
surve) vsa- completed by
committee three 0 Dr.
Sparrow's Business
Industry class.
mittee members were
Harris, chairperson;
Kinlaw, chairper-
of research subcom-
mittee; Diane Nelms, as-
soi iate chairperson;
Brenda Little, chairperson
"f writing subcommittee;
and Brett Melvin.
The report lists the
-even motels in Gren-
ville which include: Olde
London Inn. Smith's
Motel, Camelot Inn,
Econo-Travel Motor Hotel,
Greenville Best Value
Motor Lodge, Ramada
Inn, and Holiday Inn.
It determines the
least expensive overnight
rate for a single room
to be occupied by one
person. The quality of
the rooms, convenience
of location or added
luxuries sUch as swim-
ming pools and television
were not an included
factor.
The location of these
motels is just off the
2f4 bypass east of
Greenville.
All of the motels
accept the major bank
cards as well as other
credit cards.
The main objective of
the report is to assist
the University community
and future visitors to
Greenville concerning
motel rates in Greenville.
ECU NEWS BUREAU
A proposed Mountain-to-
Sea Trail Corridor, a series
of trails stretching from
the Great Smoky Moun-
tains National Park to
Jockey's Ridge on the
Outer Banks, may be
closer to reality after
meetings at East Carolina
University on Jan. 13 and
14. A North Carolina Trails
Committee meeting chaired
by Dr. Raymond L. Busbee
will be held Jan. 13 to
review potential water
trails in coastal North
Carolina.
This committee, com-
posed of seven members
from the different areas of
N.C. representing all types
of trail users, will meet in
the ECU Regional Devel-
opment Institute, Willis
Building, at 10 a.m.
Then on Jan. 14, a
North Carolina Trails
Coastal Area public meet-
ing will be held at the
ECU Regional Development
Institute from 1:30-5 p.m.
The meeting is the second
in a three part series of
regional workshops spon-
sored by the N.C. Trails
Association, N.C. Trails
Committee, N.C. Dept. of
Natural Resources and
Community Development
and the Parks, Recreation
and Conservation Curricu-
lum at ECU.
Howard Lee, secretary
of the Dept. of Natural
Resources, announced
plans for the Mountain-to-
Sea Trail last Fall. Jim
Stevens director of State
Parks and Recreation, set
up the meetings and
appointed task forces to
involve the trail users and
landowners who would be
participating in the devel-
opment of the trails.
The Greenville meeting
will set the course of
action to establish the new
trails in eastern North
Carolina. The coastal area
will be divided into work
groups and lask forces
appointed to establish a
regional trail complex for
the Wayne Lenoir Counties
area. " the Jones Carteret
Counties area, the Outer
Banks, the Merchants Mill
PondDismal Swamp area
and the Bladen Lakes area.
The Greenville work-
shop will coordinate with
the other two groups in
Greensboro and Asheville
to link the series of trails
continuously from the
mountains to the Outer
Banks. The workshop is
designed to promote
interest in hiking, bike,
canoe, horse and off-the-
road vehicle trails. The
meeting will be open to
the pvhlic.
Tl t successful estab-
lishment' of the state-wide
would make North Carolina
the only state with a
project of this kind.
Busbee is on the
faculty of the ECU Depar-
ment of Parks, Recreation
and Conservation.
By ARAH YEN ABLE
Staff Writer
The campus ministrv
staff has decided to
make a periodic award
to the person publishing
an article in FOUNTAIN-
HEAD which b-st por-
trays cei I un qualities.
Global . -vareness. the
needs of third .rid
countries, the participa-
tion of the U.S. in
international affairs. ar,d
the responsibilities of
higher education in seek-
ing solutions to global
problems are the desired
qualities.
The article can be
done as a feature. a
letter to the editor, or
an editorial. A student.
lacult) member, or a
member of the ECU
staff nia submit the
article.
This award will be
presented in the form of
.1 ca.sh prize which mav
� announced as frequent-
ly as once a month,
assuming that articles of
suitable quality appear.
I he criteria for judg-
ing the articles will be:
whether it raises the
iuarenrs, uf other coun-
tries, il it expresses the
value system of the
ludec-Chi jstian tradition,
ami does it articulate the
' "r rt.t,u itwll
h in sue, a manner
stimulate lurther
inquiry? Does the article
article.
er. feature generate
� ritual response from the
� umpus community ?
Rev. Dan Earnhardt.
methodis) student mini-
- ' ' - -aid the campus
� � fell the
I br the award
they wanted to
�ni mirage people to
-ulmil items of world
itieiihip and to stimu-
late thinking. He aid
FOl NTAINHEAD.s news
I should reflect
beyond the boundaries ol
.llliplls.
FOLNTA1NHEAD, he
-aid. usually i ers
campus events. �t, ��
��s polities, and
Her- tii the editor of
local "iiceriis.
Earnhardt added that
1 ivay tor someone to
ipate who docs not
� '�� write is through
Campus mini-
sters u otihi welcome
additional contributions to
tl � award fund from an
member of the commun-
ity interested 111 support-
ing this effort.
I he campus ministrv
' .iiii-t� of vlergv-
m�n o the Methodist.
hell Presbyterian,
1 i -� i�paL Lutheran. Bap-
IVne. osi.il. )
s; religions.
Christian schools balk
REFLECTIONS IN THE window, of what we were and school spirit was spotted recently,
what we are about to become. This artistic reflection of
CHARLOTTE, AP -
Never have so many gone
to court so much over a
few regulations - at least
that's how it seems to
state officials fighting a
costly legal war against 63
of the state's Christian
schools.
"Never have we had a
problem where so many
nonpublic schools have
refused to comply with
state statutes and board of
education regulations
said Andrew Vanore Jr
the N.C. deputy attorney
general coordinating most
of the state's cases.
The 63 schools maintain
they are religious opera-
tions and should be pro-
tected from government
regulations by the consti-
tutional separation of
church and state. But the
state is arguing the schools
are subject to the same
regulations as other public
and private schools.
The fundamentalist
schools have objected to
state regulation in four
areas. The schools have
refused to file annual state
reports on teacher quali-
fications, curriculum, text
books and physical facili-
ties.
A Wake County Super-
ior Court judge ordered the
schools to file the reports
Sept. 1, 1978, but 53
schools refused and ap-
pealed to the N.C. Court
of Appeals.
That court won't hear
the case for at least eight
months, so the state will
ask the N.C. Supreme
Court next month to
bypass the appeals court
and hear the case before
its session ends in May.
In another case, the
Wake Superior Court three
weeks ago ordered 11
church run day care
centers to obtain state
licenses or shut down. On
appeal, the N.C. Court of
Appeals on Dec. 28
ordered the state to allow
the schools to remain open
until the court rules on the
case.
The state has asked the
N.C. Supreme Court to
overturn the appeals court
ruling. 'We're saying the
schools should not be
allowed to continue operat-
ing unless they have satis-
fied the authorities they
are operating safe facilities
for minor children
Vanore said.
The third area of liti-
gation involves the church
schools' refusal to pay
unemployment insurance
taxes for their employees.
The state has asked that
the suit be moved to
federal court.
In the fourth area, the
state and the fundamen-
talist schools are at odds
over the schools' refusal to
administer the state
compentencY test.

�� �"� f �� K'
'0 4 m m s
4F m
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i �
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 9 January 1979
Would you spend $11
� it
to lock this guy up?
a year
Instead of finding him a
job. Or teaching him a skill.
Or building a resourceful
community which would
provide him a decent quality
of life.
No. Yet the government
plans to spend more than
what a year at Harvard costs
to put him in prison, where
he'll be warehoused and
then returned to the com-
munity without the skills or
contacts essential to life out-
side of prison. That's why
60 of all people presently
in our jails and prisons will
end up back there.
Over 920 new prisons and jails are currently
planned or under construction. Why? Because the
people who are building them have succeeded in
convincing the public of the following myths.
MYTH 1: Prisons protect us from
dangerous criminals.
TKey don't. Most people in prison are not dangerous
or violent. "90 of the people in prison don't belong
there' says Carl G. Hocker. Hocker, warden of the
Nevada State Prison, is known as "a stern
disciplinarian and tight custody man Another
warden puts the figure at "less than 5-8 Many
other prison administrators give similar figures.
These figures imply a need for many fewer prisons,
not hundreds more.
MYTH 2: Prisons help criminals
reform their behavior.
Though the evidence supports the opposite, this
myth is still widely believed. Just about no one
seriously advances the idea any more. Chief Justice
Warren Burger sums up expert opinion: "Clearly
prisons do not rehabilitate
MYTH 3: Prisons punish criminals.
They do�but almost exclusively poor and non-white
people. Yet these people don't commit more crimes
than anyone else. Most crimes are committed by
people who don't get caught�professionals,
corporate criminals, those in organized crime.
Compare forty billion dollars a year lost through
white collar crime with 2.5 billion dollars lost through
street crime.
Corporate crime is seldom discovered. And
when it is, the offender rarely goes to prison. For
example, only 18 of all convicted embezzlers go to
prison (for an average of 15 months). For the rest,
there are numerous alternatives. 89 of all
convicted robbers go to jail (for an average of 10Vz
years). For robbers there are virtually no alternatives.
Who benefits from prison
and jail construction?
First, the companies who
build them. New prisons
and jails today cost between
$30,000 and $100,000 per
bed, more than luxury
hotels. Second, the growing
correctional bureaucracy
whose jobs depend on an
expansive program of prison
construction. The Federal
Bureau of Prisons plans to
build more prisons in the
next 10 years than they've
built since the Bureau was
established. State and local
government plans similar
expansion�dose to 920 new jails and prisons.
Finally, politicians who want concrete responses to
the rising public fear of crime. Prisons are fust that.
Prisons and jails are the most visible responses to
crime, but the least effective. The solution to crime
lies in changing the conditions which produce
crime�serious unemployment, poor education,
inadequate housing. These are long-term solutions,
but there are dozens of alternatives available now.
They all work better than prison. And they cost very
little or nothing.
For a fraction of what government wants us to
spend on building new prisons, we could go a long
way toward eliminating the need for prisons. We
could, that is, if some very powerful people weren't
intent on keeping things just the way they are�
inefficient, brutal and profitable.
If anything is to change, the public must know
the truth about prison construction and take an
active stand against it. Our initial goal is to stop all
prison and jail construction in the United States. This
will force governments to consider, try out and
finally adopt alternatives to imprisonment. You can
help as a volunteer or financial contributor in curbing
expansion and eventually putting to rest one of the
cruelest and most useless institutions in our society
For more information, write the
NATIONAL MORATORIUM
ON PRISON CONSTRUCTION
3106 Mt. Pleasant Street NW,
Washington, D.C 20010
or the WESTERN MORATORIUM
ON PRISON CONSTRUCTION
1251 Second Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94122
(Projects of the Unitarian Unwersalist Service Committee)
'References for all statistics will be provided on request
Prepared by Public Media Center, San Francisco.
��
' " ' ' -VwH






& & t
9 January 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 3
� � �Open Wei & TW, Jan. 10, 11 tiU 9KX) � �
8 GOOD REASONS FOR
BUYING YOUR TEXTS
DOWNTOWN
The University Book Exchange
I.LowPrices
has got thousands of USED TEXTS that
you 25 over the price of new texts.
2. Great textbook selection�The U.B.E. has mad
an all out effort to have every book used at ECU.
Quick S
This Spring we will have 8 cash
get you through our store quickly
4. Friendly Personnel� 80 of our book rush employ
ECU students. They can easily relate to your textbook
id problems.
5. Mastercharge and Bank Americard�Again this Spr;
U.B.E We now accept America's top 2 charge cards fc
& supplies.
6. Convenient Location�We're across Cotanche Stree
the girl's dorms, down the hill from Greenville's bars.
ided
The University Book Exchange will be
open from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. on Jan. 10, Jan. 11 th
8. Increased Selection of school supplies, art supplies, and sports
wear. Let us be your only stop for all your texts & supplies.
NEW TEXTS
USEDTEXTS
PHOTO SUPPLE
ARTSUFPLES
LX)WNTOWN-GREENVILLE
STUDYAEJS yT pirates j�7
ECUNOVELTES
SPORTSWEAR
TEACHING AE6
SCHOOLSUPPLES
FILM PROCESSING
- ; (J
' J tf
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'
m' �� � ���

-� 9
'





� �i
ECU '78 in review
The past year was a landmark for
campus media, with the creation of a
relatively non-political Media Board to
oversee their operations. This progressive
step was perhaps the single greatest benefit
to campus media, and the board has
handled its duties reasonably well. Of
course mistakes were made, but the final
record is a favorable one.
The 1978 BUCCANEER failed to
materialize due to a number of blunders
and an irresponsible editor.
WECU-FM almost became a reality, and
hopefully will get off the ground in the
coming year. Despite some ominous rumors
of an administration takeover, the outlook is
promising. Station Manager John Jeter is to
be commended for making more progress
thatn his predecessors toward this goal.
The creation of the position of
vice-chancellor for student life, one of
Chancellor Brewer's first steps in his
administrative reorganization, can only be
viewed as a step forward. Under Brewer's
plan, any branch of the university directly
affecting students would come under this
person's authority, alleviating many of the
problems students faced in the past when
they often found themselves with no place
to turn.
For the first time in over three decades,
ECU had to break in a new chancellor, and
managed to twitter away $2,000 on an
imperial mace, one which will no doubt be
carried proudly into battle. Aside from such
frivolities, the chancellor seems to have
blended well with the university community.
McGinnis Auditorium finally got its long
needed appropriation from the legislature to
renovate the decaying structure, ECU got
its first bowl bid in years and, as seems to
be our habit in bowl games, won.
Unfortunately, ECU lost a dedicated warrior
when Edwin Monroe, vice-chancellor for
health affairs, saw his position eliminated in
an administrative reorganization. Monroe
was a key force in the fight for the ECl
med school, and it is shameful that he
could not assimilated into the university
somewhere. The loss is ours, not his.
owcroR
GWETICS
LAB"0
TRVING To PlM DouN o
AC�uevrrfi�WT & pisnucny
Said CL0NE
Cpo
Forum
Viewpoint
Newspaper accused of antagonism
Anti-nuke stand rebutted
CARL G. ADLER, BYRON L. COILTER ASD
J. U iLUAM BYRD
ECl Department of Physics
Th�
article bv Harvey Wasserman entitled "Atomic
ns Man which appreared in the Nov. 30
: FOl NTAINHEAD is regrettably typical of much of
�nation" presented by the more zealous
A nuclear energy.
ptions oi these critics seems to be that since
mi nuclear energy is the ultimate evil, anything
'Ppose it is justified. The article's inaccuracies
nstortions concerning the risks of nuclear power are
r a point by point refutation. Instead we
"ur comments to the one place Mr. Wasserman
�all) gave a source for his "information The
iislortions that occur here are typical (though not always
a those that occur elsewhere in the article.
Mr Wasserman states: "A major 1974 study by none
ther than the Ford Foundation showed we could, with
simple conservation measure, cut our energy consumption
in halt with minimal effects on our precious lifestyle, thus
eliminating the need for nuclear expansion altogether
Arm Energy Future (Ballinger Publishing Co.
nbridge, Mass 1974.) What the report actually says
(summarized in a graph on 91) is that by enacting'certain
conservation measures we could cut our energy
consumption in the year 2000 by 46 percent of what it
would be in that year if we did not take any action.
However, the actual energy use in the year 2000, even
with thos(. conservation measures enacted, would still be
33 percent higher than the 1974 level of energy use
rather than 50 percent lower as Mr. Wasserman implies
is a matter of debate as to whether or not the
iservation methods would have a "minimal" effect on
It's.
The Ford Foundation report states that no new nuclear
power plants will be needed before the year 2000 if the
conservation measures are enacted and the use of
domestic fossil fuels is expanded. A very small
tnbulion from other energy sources such as solar and
thermal is projected. However, the report does not
alternative energy sources to replace dwindling
lossil tuel supplies after the year 2000.
Mr Wasserman sweeps this serious objection aside by
simply declaring (without supporting evidence, as usual)
that solar energy and its "cousins wind, tidal, and
geothermal energy are well researched and ready to go
as a partial source within the next five years and our total
supplier by the second or third decade of the next
century Since we in the Physics Department at ECU do
arch in solar energy we would be happy if such a
prediction came true, but we believe it to be seriouslv
overstated.
Information pertinent to this subject can be found in an
article by Dr. Norman R. Sheridan who is a director of the
International Solar Energy Society and is a recognized
expert in the field of solar energy. In the August 1978
issue of Sunworld he writes: "Today solar energy is a
topical subject with a great many advocates, many of
whom do not comprehend the complexity of the
situation.They consider only that part of the problem
within their experience
"To the antinuclear lobby, solar energy is the
antithesis of the dreaded nuclear reactor with its waste
disposal problems To them it matters little that nuclear
energy is available now whereas solar energy is a promise
for the future.
"As a whole, modern society is becoming aware that
damage can result from human interaction with the
environment. Concerned members of society believe that
the impact of energy use on the environment can be
reduced by solar energy and that the quality of life will be
enhanced. This simplistic approach does not consider
whether solar energy can meet the legitimate demand for
energy, n0r does it consider the resulting downturn in the
economy if the demand is not met.
"World energy demand has been increasing exponen-
tially lor several decades and could be expected to
continue to increase as population expands and the
underprivileged nations strive for increasing affluence.
Even in developed coutries, it is hard to predict a
levehng-off of energy consumption, since the economy is
eared to the rise in production that has been achieved bv
"Oar energy future is too impor-
tant to have the facts so greatly
distorted; . . . abandon rhetoric
and replace it with informed
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
With regard to the
Dec. 7 article on the
vandalism of the FOUN-
TAINHEAD office and
property, if editor Doug
White did not mean to
implicate that the Print
Group had vandalized the
boxes then he should
have simply reported what
happened rather than
making the statement that
he did. His disclaimer says
more to imply he felt the
Print Group was involved
than any fair and accurate
reporting of the incident.
If anyone of the
FOUNTAINHEAD staff had
ever been in the Art
School the week before
exams they would know
that the last thing any art
student has time to think
about is whether FOUN-
TAINHEAD is printed,
distributed, or much less
ways to vandalize it. I
doubt if you could find
more than a handful of
students who even had
time to realize that the
paper did not come out on
Tuesday.
With such incidents as
not printing commitments,
printing of a letter not
intended for publication,
and advertisements for
employment with the
student newspaper reading
not for art majors,
FOUNTAINHEAD seems to
be deliberately trying to
antagonize the students of
the Art School. We can only
wonder whv.
Patricia P. Knight
Editor's note: FOUN-
TAINHEAD regrets that
the Print Group feels
accused of vandalism due
to the Editor's comments.
Ao accusation was in-
tended.
The advertisement in
question was for the
position of Production
Manager, a job dealing
uith graphic arts, infor-
tunately, that term means
hoth visual arts i.e
design and the technical
arts oj printing and
photographic reproduction.
We were. naturally,
interested in the latter
definition.
In the past, whenever
we hate advertised for
persons skilled in those
areas, art students have
applied expecting to do
design. etc on the
creative side of the graphic
arts com. U e were only
trying to prevent such
applicants from wasting
their time and ours.
FOl NTAINHEAD has
no wish to antagonize the
school of Art or any other
segment of this unuersttv.
Be apologize for the
unfortunate misunderstand-
ings which have arisen.
Inmate responds to gay's plight
reason
99
� � �
the increasing application of energy. Certainly, energy
conservation could provide a temporary respite; but the
seemingly insatiable demand for affluence would ensure a
return to energy growth after a time.
"On the basis of predictions made from current trends
and with existing societal attitudes, it is doubtful whether
solar, energy will be able to make up the shortfall in
several critical energy areas before the economy suffers
One means of satisfying our energy needs 'in the near
future is through increased use of nuclear power. There
are risks associated with nuclear reactor, but we believe
there are more serious risks associated with the other
energy sources that will be available in the near future.
Certainly the nuclear risks were greatly distorted bv
Mr. Wasserman. We could encourage everyone to read the
following two articles available in the Joyner Library (1)
'Impact of the Nuclear Energy Industry on 'Human
Health and Safety American Scientist, vol. 64, p. 550
and (2) "Nuclear Power-Compared to What? American
Scientist, vol. 64, p. 290. Both articles are well
documented and give a positive view of nuclear energy.
Our energy future is too important to have the facts so
greatly distorted as they were by Mr. Wasserman. We
urge all to abandon rhetoric and replace it with informed
reason.
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
' read the letter to your
'Forum from the person
who wrote of loneliness,
the plight of the homo-
sexual and an apparent
willingness to take his own
life.
To the Anonymous, I
apologize for responding so
late. Upon your cry for
help you probably received
none or very little. But if
by chance you had
committed suicide, every-
one would have said, "I
read about him. If I'd done
this or that; if I'd known
he would commit suicide; I
wish I'd talked to him, had
written, or had called or
anything: Now I feel
bad
We feel bad after a
tragedy and say we could
have helped in time if we
had known the end result.
(1.) We must know what
feelings are in order to
feel and understand the
feelings of others. (2.) We
must know what hurts u in
order to know and under-
stand the hurt of others.
Boston flop
no fault of
intramurals
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Rxjntainheod
Sarving the East Carolina community for over 50 yaars
EDITOR
Doug White
PRODUCTION MANAGER ADVERTISING MANAGER
Steve Bachner EmjQns Robert M. Sw.im
R. M Gliarmis
Marc Barnes
TRENDS EDITOR
Jeff Rollins
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student
SPORTS EDITOR
Sam Rogers
of East
newspaper
� Media Boarc
ZT&� addrtt: 0W th ��"� Qr��mllle, N C.
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6667, 757-6309
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni 66 annually.
I would like to take this
opportunity to set the
record straight concerning
the Boston concert. It
appears like all the blame
is being placed on the
intramural department for
the cancellation of the
concert.
Actually the Intramural
Department played a minor
role. The main reason for
the cancellation was the
Physical Education classes.
The gym area would be
occupied from 24-48 hours
by people connected with
the concert.
This would disrupt
classes. In fall and spring,
classes can be held
outside, during the winter
they can not.
The second reason for
the cancellation was the
fact that the varsity
basketball teams would be
practicing at this time of
year. They occupy the
basketball court from 4-8.
Intramurals was the
third and last reason and
is willing to take pan of
the blame, but not all of
it. Voicing disapproval is
fine, but let's complain to
the right people.
William A. Greene
(3.) We must know what
oppression is ourselves in
order to understand oppre-
ssion of others. (4.)
e must know what being
shunned and ridiculed is in
order to understand others
who are being shunned
and ridiculed. (5.) J(e
must know what tokenism,
oppression, racism, love,
hate, humanism, selfish-
ness, jealousy, etc are in
order to understand our-
selves and other human
beings.
Whoever or whatever
ou are, there are people
who care about you. I for
one will respond to
anybody regardless of what
�hey are, who they have
been with, what thev have
��one, where thev are
Rmng, where they are
roaunf from, no matter
what.
Now let me explain mv
circumstances. I have been
an inmate in ,ne N C
Department of Correction
��r 10 years, come Sept. 8
Fm a black man of age 31
and have been through
many changes and much
r-luule, and according to
m sentence, I have
�� more of imprison.
ment.
Still hfe is too gOQd for
mp to hurt myself in anv
2 ,m;n,a � pHysi:
CaU Le �� good. But my
concern is for ,he man
;vrote ,o FOUNTAINHEAD
����� of taking his life.
Lje has too many thmgs to
offer for a n
himse fherself n .
person. " ln�,h"
1 h�ve suffered hard
5h'P trough rici8mhtrd-
Bul I continue i� .� t '
�� ����. I V.?
Wh�8 �-ker, tnem M'
t
Ml
I
1
.
" you had committed
suicide. 1 would e felt
bad. I would e asked
myself a few questions
concerning �ur death
Could le .aid. -Hex.
man. 1 reaped .u and
Would this have made the
difference between lit- and
'bath' It enuld haxe meant
the difference between the
��� Man. I �ve you and
'are what happens lo you.
One hug fmw someone
� ven a kiss lo w m
'b' these things, would .t
make me less than a man?
()r �ouW .1 ,�.lkr ��.
�� J an � mt Mand
1 hbl mx pound
Ihruunh ,rar () uhj(
�hiok someone else would
� r think about me. and
i�t let you take (,ur l,te?
Jut remember. there
�"��� mam people uho eare
�iUI ha. happen ,�
tpon reading Pr�.
�r Bxrd IIt.r m hf.
P� FOINTMNHFAD �
md,i' �� ver much aware
ol hi. belief
Sopreme Being
rWessoc Bvrd. I ,xanl
bank ou for standing
"H ����, -I care for
oy, whoever vOU are" It
w rlcar that vou have �
'�"�med heart for others
Jl are not go.ng lo ai�
"r " to be too e. You
bac d.gnity as a man.
Anonymous, I wouj
bke to say ont more ,hng
� pite of be.ng in jail, I
know m,nv people here at
school ,nd outside school
�n the general public. I can
s. honestly, of the
friends I know, I don't
know one of them who
would put you down for
being yourself.
rrtr j Jessie Hik
LCU student and inmate of
the N.C. Department of
Correction, Maury
I
m
the
�Mi 0hi





9 January 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Papa 5
Student Union offers trips
Ry MARC ADLER
Staff Writer
A Bahamas Cruise-Ft
Lauderdale Tour iT hV
offered by X c ig
Union T Lei rntUdem
dur,n� c Committee
aurmg Spring Break
March 3-�l. ak'
"Registered for ,he
ItuL. � mostIy ��Uege
�"�: a�d Bill Martin,
chairperson of the Studen
1 "� Jravel Committee.
Students will travel on
"� ocean liner, �meraW
Sew, said Martin.
The students wju
�P�id tour nights and
hr1' 'Ihns on the luxur
liner and i, j a,so
serve as a motel when in
P��, aid Martin.
According to Martin,
in ship will be at Nas-
sau, an island in the
Bahamas, for three days.
For entertainment, Na-
! offers El Casino, a
gambling center located in
�he cit) of Freeport said
Martin.
El Casino is one of
the 'argest gambling cen-
" r- m the world he
said
Also students may
rent a motor scooter
for halt" a dav to travel
around the island said
Martin.
J he cost of the
cruise b $389 said
Martin
The registration
deadline is January 16
However, if '90 stu.
dents do not register by
I tic .leadline, the tour will
cancelled by the com-
�" -Martin stressed.
The Travel Committee
sponsored a tour to New
ork City during Thanks-
ng Break.
According to Martin,
18 students traveled to
Nen ork City in four
.sses.
The committee only
expected 92 students
Martin -aid.
"1 hope the students
take advantage of
Bahamas Tour 8aid
Martin.
i "New Orleans would
foer rr.f,imaie Party y
lor ECU students said
�� Martin, chairperson
c the Student Union
'ravel Committee.
The committee is
sponsoring a tour for
students to New Orleans-
Atlanta on March 3-11.
"Many college stu-
dents across the United
States travel to New
Orleans during Spring
Break said Martin.
The first four days of
the tour will be spent in
New Orleans and last
three days in Atlanta.
The remaining two days
are left for travel.
"This tour is nine
days of just fun said
Martin.
"The students will be
staying in the Ramada
Inn on Bourbon Street
which is located in the
heart of downtown New
Orleans
"According to Martin,
Bourbon Street is in a
section of New Orleans
which has a great amount
of French influence.
Students will arrive in
New Orleans at the end
of the Annual Mardi Gras
festival which is in Feb-
ruary said Martin.
After four days in New
Orleans, the students will
travel to Atlanta where
they will stay in the
Atlanta Townhouse.
"Many nightclubs are
found in the area known
as the Lnder ground,
which has an interesting
history said Martin.
During the Civil War,
I nion Troops led by Gen-
eral Sherman, burned At-
lanta to the ground. The
city planners rebuilt At-
lanta on top of the ruins.
As a result, some of
the bars are located un-
Take a friend to
lunch at Hardees. And,
tr our new Big Roast
Beef Sandwich. It
couldn t be better, so
we made it bigger.
With 50 more
tender roast beef,
slow cooked till its
tender and juicy, sliced
thin and piled high, with
your choice of three
sauces, on a toasted
sesame seed bun.
Use this coupon
for a big deal on
two Big
Roast Beef
Sandwiches.
�m:
�.

rt
v
derneath the city and are
actually a part of pre-civil
war buildings Martin sta-
ted.
The Committee charges
$185 for bus fare and
motel rooms.
A student should have
at least $150 for pending
monev added Martin.
The registration
line is February 1.
dead-
JANUARY
at
THE TREE HOUSE
"Sharing The New Year With Friends'
1 WONCLOSED (HAPPY NEW YEAR)
2 EOAVID LEWIS
3 WEDBLUEGRASS WITH MIKE. JOHN & LANE
4 �UTHE BUBBA WILLIS JAM
5 FRI MIKE "LIGHTNING" WELLS
6 SATTOMMY G AND COMPANY
9 "TUEMITCH BOWEN
10 WE0RON ANDERSON
11 THURON ANDERSON
12 �ME4E
13SATMEaE
15 MONDAVID LEWIS
16 VJECHRIS FARREN
17 WEDBLUEGRASS WITH FLAT ROCK
t8 THUTHE BUBBA WILLIS JAM
19 pR THE PIERCE FAMILY (BLUEGRASS)
20 SAT BLUEGRASS WITH MIKE, JOHN & LANE
21 SUNPATS DANNY
22 WONED COLLEVECCHK)
23 TUECHRIS FARREN
24 WEDMIKE "LIGHTNING" WELLS
25 THUTHE PIERCE FAMILY (BLUEGRASS)
26 FRITOMMY G. & COMPANY
27 SATTHE BUBBA WILLIS JAM
28 SUNMITCH BOWEN
29 WONMITCH BOWEN
"SOTUEDAVID LEWIS
31 WEDBLUEGRASS
EVERY TUESDAY NITE IS "LADIES NITE" WITH
REDUCED PRICES ON YOUR FAVORITE
BEVERAGE (FROM 8:00 - 10:00 P.M.)
THE TREE HOUSE RESTAURANT
123 Eaat Fifth Streat
Graanvilla, N. C. 27834
Prior. 762-7483
fh
s
V
HfcflpA.
TWDNEWiiM,&&Sj'iJ3Jjf
SAHDWKHBF0R
0NJUTJUJKX.
Grfiliiw
l&tt-m SAMDWKHES
FOR '1.89
Good at all participating Hardees. Please present this coupon before ordennq
One coupon per customer, please. Customer must pay any sales tax due
on the purchase price. This coupon not good in combination with any other offers.
No. 1 910 Cotanche
No. 2 Qroonvlllo Blvd
No. 3 2907 E. 10th
Oupon expires
JAN. 31
oEKO SEKC
KO SEIKO SED
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FLOYD G. ROBINSON
JEWELERS
YOUR SEIKO
HEADQUARTERS
DOWNTOWN- 758-2452
SUKHHBHAMINs
Multi-Vitamins with Minerals
'LOOK FOR THESE SPECIALS HOUR STORE
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when you buy 72
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YOU SAVE 2.95
72 TABLETS fPff
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Ta�e on table) each day 10 gel me vitamins and minerals your
body need lo tuncl.on property Each tablet contains 11 essential
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'�'?'� mt�.
- .





Reginald Marsh paints with 1
'humanity' and 'power'
By JEFF ROLLINS
Trends Editor
Reginald Marsh paints
life in the city with all of
its sensuality, vulgarity and
joie de vivre. From the
1920's to the 1950's he has
depicted such urban scenes
as subway station, crowded
streets and buildings, all of
them flowing over with
humanity.
The burlesque house
especially interested him
with its frank sexuality. He
made hundreds of sketches
and paintings of burlesque
actresses in varying stages
0. nudity along with the
gaping, cigar-in-the-mouth
men who formed their
audiences.
The book,Marsh, repre-
sents the artist's entire
oeutre, from the 1920's to
the 1950's which includes
tempera, oil and watercolor
paintings, as well as
murals, etchings, engrav-
ings, chinese-ink drawings,
sketchbook pages and ana-
tomical studies.
Lloyd Goodrich, con-
sultant to and former
Director of the Whitney
Museum of American Art,
who was a long ' time
personal friend of the
artist, explores Marsh's
role as one of the out-
standing painters of the
American urban scene.
At the beginning of our
centurv the attitude of
most American artists
toward the native scene
was either avoidance or
idealization. The raw actu-
alities of the United States,
the life of most of the
population, and that vital
phenomenon the American
city, were shunned by the
academic artists who
controlled the art world.
Turning away from such
vulgarities, they devoted
themselves to the world of
the upper and upper-mid-
dle classes, to the pleasant
aspects of life in America,
and to the idyllic in
nature.
Women
Womankind played a
large role in their art, but
womankind idealized: the
wife and mother in her
sheltered home, the virgin
untouched by life, the
allegorical figure symbo-
lizing all the virtures. The
female nude was a favorite
motif, but shown under
definitely restricted condi-
tions: the model in the
studio, the nymph by the
pool.
In the early 1900's this
academic idealism was
shattered by the young
rebels led by Robert Henri,
who painted New York
City and its people with a
blend of robust realism
and genial romanticism,
relishing the city's wealth
of human interest and
character, but ignoring
its seamier -itit
In their attitude toward
sex they continued the
traditional American reti-
cence; they pictured
vaudeville but not bur-
lesque. Nevertheless the
Henri group effected a
revolution in the American
artist's concern with
American life.
By the middle 1920's,
when Reginal Marsh began
his career, the contem-
porary American scene had
become major subject
matter for artists of many
different viewpoints. A
rising generation of New
York painters, of whom
Marsh was one, was
beginning to picture the
city and its lie with a
realism more drastic than
that of the Henri group but
at the same time with a
deeply affirmative love of
the city in its manifold
aspects.
Marsh first studied at
the academic stronghold,
the Yale Art School. "I
was taught drawing from
the antique and painting in
still life by the pedants of
the Yale Art School he
wrote later, "in a way that
would make their 'old
master' heroes turn in
their graves
"First orthodox lessons,
1919, still lofe class he
recorded in 1937. "Your
palette is your violin, your
brushes the bow oxfor-
dized Dean Sergeant
Kendall. "Use dirty palette
and unwashed brushes all
season. Denied access to
life class. It was all I could
do to pass the courses
he recalled.
His first experience in
illustrating came from his
drawing for The Yale
Record. On graduating in
1920 he came to New
York, and embarked on the
precarious career of a
freelance illustrator for
newspapers and slick-paper
magazines such as Vanity
Fair and Harper's Bazaar.
His special subjects be-
came theatres, vaudeville,
night life, and humorous
illustrations.
Burlesque
Then in 1922 the Daily
News took him on as a
staff artist to do a daily
column of vaudeville
drawings. "I must have
covered and drawn at least
four thousand vaudeville
acts he said a few years
later.
"It took the place of an
art school he said, "and
was very good training
because you had to get the
people in action, and
sketch them quickly
Reginald Marsh's vision
centers on humanity;
wherever the crowds are
thickest, he finds his
themes. He loves the
multitudinous life of New
York City, and in his art
captures its entire social
range, from dance-dives to
the most exclusive night-
clubs and the opera.
REGINALD MARSH'S VISION centers on humanity;
wherever the crowds are thickest, he finds his themes. He
loves the multitudinous life of New York City and in his
Marsh's
art captures its entire social range. Few artists have had
such an eye for the urban environment.
realism was
uncompromising; he drew
and painted American
urban life without romanti-
cizing it or adding false
glamour. In his vital,
bravura style he recorded
the popular pursuit of
pleasure, especially sex as
publicly presented and the
magnetic power of the
female bod v.
In burlesque houses
and dancehalls, on the
beach at Coney Island, in
the image of the girl
walking on Fourteenth
Street, he finds the human
figure in all its beauty or
ugliness, but always in its
common humanity and
essential ii;ilit.
No one portrayed with
more authenticity or less
sentimentality the seamv
side of life, the degrada-
tion and misery that can
be seen along the Bowery-
bums, drunks in flop-
houses, the derelicts of our
civilization.
Such pictures are
poignant documents of
human tragedy. Humor is
often present, but it is a
mordant humor, and there
is often a relish for the
grotesque.
This collected works
will certainly be one of the
most important out in the
new year and may cause
museums to feature exhi-
bitions of Marsh's work. If
so, one of the major artists
of this century will be
finally getting the recog-
nition he deserves.
student, Bill Robinson, 'astounds
baffles audiences' with his magic.
MAGICIAN BILL ROBINSON
Madrigal Dinners, the Lion's
Alcoholic Rehabilitation Center,
School, and for numerous other
has performed at the
Club. Walter B. Jones
WahlCoatges Elementary
groups.
By DENISE DUPREE
Staff Writer
You can fool some of the people some of the time, but
you can't fool all the people all the time.
A wise man penned those words. However; this man -
great wisdom and all - never saw an audience at Bill
Robinson's magic show.
Robinson, a Junior at ECU, totally astounds and baffles
audiences with his unique brand of magic.
"All magic tricks are technically the same. So I try to
make them my own by adding my little personal touches
he said.
One of Robinson's personal touches has to be his quick
wit and flair for comedy.
Robinson readily admits to enjoying the comedy aspect
of magic. He feels this gives his act another dimension.
"I'm not stupendous yet, but I'm improving he
related with a grin.
Robinson's specialty and favorite form of magic is card
; and coin tricks. One could discove; this by simply looking
t at his business cards. They read: "Doc" Robinson -
CARDiologist.
Robinson delivers his card and coin tricks with a fluid
hand-to-eye motion that is almost uncanny.
Robinson passes the motion off as misdirection, but his
audiences know better.
One person who can testify to Robinson's magic skills
is Carolina Today host "Slim" Short. While guesting on a
recent show, Robinson had "Slim" Short almost
flabbergasted with his deliverance ol packet routines.
Robinson explained that packets are cards with
specially designed faces.
"I like doing packet routines. You can really get the
audience involved with these cards he said.
Robinson said packets give him the perfect opportunitv
to work comedy into his act, because some of the car'd
faces are particularly interesting and humorous.
Believe it or not, the great "Doc" Robinson has had a
tnck backfire. Admittedly, the mistake did happen in
practice, not in performance.
Theatre
"i
was practicing a trick where you throw a flame out
of your hand, and I shot the flame past my ear and nearly
set my hair on fire he said with a laugh.
Robinson wouldn't divulge his favorite trick for fear of
revealing secret mannerisms. However, he did discuss his
most difficult trick.
"The hardest trick 1 do is one involving Chinese
linking rings. The difficulty doesn't come from the
technique required, even though the directions are nine
pages long, but from the smoothness and misdirection it
requires said Robinson.
Robinson has worked out the "kinks" in the Chinese
linking rings, and it is now one of his crowd pleasers.
One thing Robinson would like to incorporate into hi
is
Samuel R. Delany's Nova 'seizes your attention9
Bv WILLIAM JONES
Staff Writer �
"We have to go to the
rim of chaos and bring
back a handful of fire
"Into the blasting sun
plunge?How, Captain?"
Like any well written
adventure story, Samuel R.
Delany's Nova seizes your
attention and welds it to
each sentence.
Set 1200 years in the
future, when interstellar
travel is commonplace, the
human race has colonized
dozens of star systems.
The two most powerful are
the original Sol-centered
Draco system and thePlei-
ade- Federation.
From its headquarters
on Earth, Red Shift Limi-
ted, manufacturer of all
interstellar propulsion
units, dominates the econ-
omy. In competition, the
Pleiades based Von Ray
family holds extensive
influence over mining oper-
ations in the Outer Colon-
ies. What the two have in
common is Illyrion.
Illyrion. Several grams
and you can turn a lifeless
moon's frozen core to
molten rock and create a
paradise of it. With an
atomic weight exceeding
three hundred, Illyrion has
thousands of times the
energy of uranium. And is
the power source for every-
thing from hyperlight tra-
vel to flashlight batteries.
Mined at tremendous
expense in the Outer
Colonies, Illyrion is as rare
as a snowball in Florida.
Therefore political and
economic sway is directly
proportional to the amount
of Illyrion one possesses.
Against this backdrop is
an even more intense
personal rivalry between
the sinister Prince Red, his
Sister, Ruby Red, heirs to
the Red Shift dynasty, and
Lorq Von Ray. This hatred
de-lops into a ruthless
race across the galaxy to
tap a virgin source of
immense amounts of Il-
lyrion � a star gone nova.
Only Von Ray, a hot
young pilot, knows exactly
how to dive into the
inferno of a nova and come
back with a "handful of
fire Enough "fire" to
cause the Reds' downfall
and give the Von Rays'
economic control of the
galaxy. But success is not
without its price.
Von Ray's starship is
crewed by a rainbow of
characters from all corners
of the galaxy. Moon-born
Katin, an intelligent but
somewhat egotistsic 6'9"
scholar engaged in the
outdated art of writing a
novel. Sebastion, whose
quiet strength is symbol-
ized by his black eaglelike
pet. Tyy, Sebastion's Tarot
reading mate. Idas and
Lynceos, one black, one
albino, twin brothers from
the Outer Colonies. And
finally the Mouse, a young
gypsy from Earth who
creates fantastic visions
with a . sensory projection
device.
This colorful character-
ization helps make Nova
the intriguing novel it is.
Samuel Delany, a four
time Nebula Award winner,
is author of the widely
read Dhalgrena long,
"schizophrenic" novel a-
bout the end of civilization
on Earth). In Nova, Del-
any's writing prowess is
shown through the most
effective use of foresha-
dowing I've ever encoun-
tered. By use of the Tarot
and comparison of the
pursued nova with the
Holy Grail, a subtle yet
perceptible inference to the
story's conclusion is made.
Exciting and masterfully
written. Nova is another
example of science-fiction
as a legitimate form of
literature and good read-
ing.
act is music. Since he's a music major with an interest in
composing, this seems quite natural.
"I'm into the mannerisms and style of the medievel
wizard. So I'd like to work up a rout.ne around the
medievel wizard and have music for effect he related
Robinson, a member of Ph. Mu Alpha Music
Fraternity, is also working up a show based on the brother
hood of Phi Mu Alpha.
Probably the most interesting thing Robinson -
currently working on is a show for a national and major
entertainment agencv.
"I'm not at liberty ,t name the agencv at this ,
because the contracts haven't been signed, but I hop,
have them very soon he added.
Considering Robinson's professionalism and matuntv it
is hard to believe he's only been a mag.c.an three vears
Robinson says his friend Eddie Thigpen introduced him
to mag.c at a music camp about three vears ago
"Uhen I got home. I worked with two professional
magmans, and they really helped me get started sa.d
nobinson .
Robinson's firs, job as a professional mag.cun came in
19.6 when he performed at the Madngal Dinn
Rob.nson a working the dinners again this vear
Although Robinson has been a mag.oan a short while
he has quite a set of equipment. He own. abut Si 000 in
equipment, with about S250 invested ,� card and cZ
Robinson is also pleased to he
w,v �, Ametlc.� Mp,g,c,�sAM,H ;i:al r" "
for ,hr local newsletter occasstonallv. " �Umn
"This is a really nice organization, it uas founded
�be late 1800's and Hond.n, �as a pas, prcs.den, "
said.
Robinson a Hampton, Va. nat.ve. ,s currentlv
salesman and demonstrator for "The Magic pace-
magic store in Newport News, Virginia
One of Robinson's mus.c professors Dr C
Kn.ght. has taken ,o calling Rob.nson "the worid ' 7"
mug.cian, a mixture of majrician and i"B'
the m.xture is what accoumlf uu mu5"�� ' Mavb,
success. f�r Robson's tremendous
The many places he has wnr
jestintonv ,o his �bv,�us skill �'lm T �" Z
So-ne places R�bi�s�� b.s worked i code ,he mT
Dinners, the Lion's Club Waller � I M��ingal
Rehabilitation Center W.hl r I, lm" AI�"ohc
Mendenh.il S.�d�, CeLr Ibe � School.
- numerous nantTi, o'd Efe C��"�
�W'YS'E-ZFZjr �
if yon need someone to wU, " ,s��?���. So.
your phone and dial 7S2-947. a�d .s 7o'r � "
The only thing you'll set is -
how to operate. ' �ct " � doctor who really knows
in
he
a
a
t
f
.��� k.
�' " '





9 January 1979 KOUHTAIHHEAD Paot 7
Barbra Streisand's Songbird is Wit' and 'sensual
By JEFF ROLLINS
Trends Editor
Barbra Streisand's latest alh�m � l j
� k .till the voung quel of ygMt Pr0VM that
-pr.no voice is as ever Svelt ea,8yll8tenin� " Her
but Songb�d se;ms f �-d consumately romantic,
�han many of her earlier albums " '
-nge from the t0p tn souj ?�
�he highly sensual "Hn7 r "S L�VC Bre�"own" to
Barbra SeTsan-T ' ' �" Y�Ur Clothes"
Stretsand . previous albums were often full of
RTfiP CAMERA
526 8. Cotanche St.
Downtown
golden oldies that, even though her renditions gave them
new hfe, stifled her talents as a singer of the seventies.
Songbird, though, is comprised only of new songs and
very good ones, too.
If you've seen Pippin you will be familiar with the
pleasant song "Tomorrow Streisand's version of this
lovely song is liliting and softly cheerful. It really does
"clear away the cobwebs and the sorrow
'A Man I Loved" gives Barbra a chance to belt out a
strong song, utilizing her powerful, controlled voice. One
test of the truly superb singer is when she can sing
fortissimo and not be simply yelling.
'I Don't Break Easily" is a song about love lost and
which possesses a fine melody. In "I Don't Break Easily"
Barbra sings with the spirit of a woman who has been in
love and who is determined to cope bravely with the end
of the affair. Her interpretation of this song is flawless.
"Love Breakdown" sounds as if it were constructed to
become a hit. It has the characteristic back-up vocals, the
catchy "hook" and the compulsive beat that would make
it a perfect flip-side.
On the albumSongbird Barbra appears more as herself
than she does on many of her previous albums. The cover
shows her posing with Sadie, her favorite dog, and the
back cover has pictures of several of her other dogs.
This album is a very personal album, and when the
person is Barbra Streisand, that's very good.
Songbird Barbra Streisand
BACK TO SCHOOL SALE
JAN 9- JAN 20
NATURAL OCCURANCES'
1801 S. Charles Street
Suite No. 10
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Bruce Gray
Brenda Gray
Terri Clark
Norma Gray
? '
Mi
IW � i -( 3t.cf
VICE CHANCELLOR FOR
INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT
East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina, invites applica-
tions for the newly-created position of Vice Chancellor for Institutional
Advancement beginning 3uly 1, 1979.
The University has an on-campus enrollment of 12,000, offers degree
programs in usual academic areas, including the doctoral degrees in selected
disciplines. On-campus housing accommodates 5,600 students; a new student
center is on campus, and a strong student government association exists
There are approximately 40,000 living alumni of East Carolina.
This appointee will report directly to the Chancellor and will admini-
ster and coordinate activities and units such as News Bureau, E.C.U. Founda-
tion, Institutional Research, Alumni Affairs, Deferred Giving, Planning
Office, and corporate and foundation relations. This appointee will have
opportunity to recruit most of the staff for this expanded area at the
University.
Requirements include B.A. degree (advanced degrees preferred), a record
of prior accomplishments in institutional advancement activities, knowledge
In fund raising and alumni affairs, administrative skills, ability to
articulate University goals to the various constituencies, parties and
interests of East Carolina University, and capability to travel as required.
The salary for this position is negotiable. Applications for this
position will be received until February 19, 1979. All materials should be
sent to: Dr. Thomas B. Brewer, Chancellor, East Carolina University,
Greenville, North Carolina 27834.
East Carolina University is a constituent
institution of the University of North Carolina.
An Equal OpportunityAffirmative Action Employer.
WELCOME BACK
ECU STUDENTS
JAMBOREE Grape Jelly
3lb. jar 99
DIXIE DEW Pancake Syrup
24oz. bottle69'
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package of 6 selected flavors
WHITE HOUSE Apple Sauce
16 Voz. cans3Sl.OO
Ground Beef Patties$l.39lb.
KRAFT Creamy French Dressing
8 oz. bottleszvsi.oo
STUFFY'S
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FREE
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with purchase of any one of
STUFFY'S FAMOUS SUBS
(offer good thru Jan. 15,1979)
anz
W
752-6130
Georgetown Shoppes

i
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�� -� � m m m �





Page 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 9 January 197
Pirates capture Independence Bowl title
button slips past Louisiana Tech defenders in Independence Boir actittn
Pirate defense keys Indy Bowl victory

x
� '
' �
Bill I
B
K.
ies.
Mi-Southland Con
�'� � - i iii - back-up
r tr.n ure, regular center
� '� Larrv -tn;
team a- we'v
ndcr (,r
� �an i I ei h i oa h Maxie
give them a lot
mendoti. and thev totallv
I us to throw
r i r t a c k j
: � � I 2 � 1I : -
� ��'� � ' - 1 i :
I : Eddie Hicks
� 18 yards ai : -
Bill) Ray � .
' � i Hi kei plays the first wh
hdown.
' hey rr a big team defensivelv. but w
until the holes started
t � Matl Mulholland who sprui ke
ECU faces South Carolin
a
B) S M ROGERS
Sports Editor
rhe game will be broadi asi . b I 1 N I
W i-hington, N.C. beginning it 7 SO p m
�. . i, i i j , Xr � ,u 71 loss to Atlantn Coast Conferenc.
head coach Larry Gillman a month of the Marvla.
n a
. the Pirates topped Manhattan 74-71 : rea h
finals ol the L'Conn Classn plaved over tl lavs m
probably admit he could do without NewHav, Conn FGI l�. th t'n
"�lwn- uonn. r.i.i lost trie following e igainsl
1 nnei ticul 80 68.
' played well against Manhattan in thi first hall
!� ur blew .i big lead there al the end ol ih game
' Gillman. "I was certainly happy we could gel to
finals, but we shot very poorly against Connecticut and
it hurl us.
ECI trailed by a- many a- 15 points in the first hall
against lona, but battled back to tie the score before
ird Georgi Maynor hit a long jumper with two seconds
' lo give the Pirates the victory Oliver Mack was the
game's high scorer with 22 points, 18 which came in the
i hall while transfer David L'nderwI had If and
1 ornelius added 10
nytime you're on the mad and gel behind by that
many points it awfully difficult to comi back, but we
like to eliminate and the talkative New York
native won
il rider
the Pirates dropped -even ol their first
and this year brought relatively few changes.
' H � � ; record, ECI was anything but
' - �' ' v' Leo's and Lynchburg.
lh� Mew Year has once again
I - ' ear th Pirates ended a
�' kid with a i iad v ii lory over highly touted
M � in January.
v : � ' la week, the Bucs si ored their I
"ti with a surprising 76 7) win over lona, a
Sports lllustrated's pre season i twenty
" had in beat somebody sooner or later said
("lln ona had ,i- by 15 points in the game, but we
in 'hen and played an excellent second half
Muck scores inside
Photo by John H Grogan.)
Defensivelv r,� r, I i i , "r u" �t1 B�' some bre�s down the stretch
� r, i1;I: r � t: �- ;�� ��� ts re�
.� , hd ' vv Kames and 's going to be a great player
' iP ettort in every game i i ,�, . ��. "
icton nve, l� Pr,H . Underwood was the Pirates top scorer against
Ion- was ECI s second ,n three Connecticut with IX points and is averaging .5 points per
ve as a big confidence booster with game and four rt ,�� i i
-uth Carolina ding Minges Coliseun, MeanwhX M k Ti
Wednesday nigh, The Gamks Lched hv Frank sTump and is not 7 ,�T "
N(� bring an impressive 6-3 record into the contest Jn ooTnts COnie,iUS
-h,ch will be USC-s only appearance in North Carolina Sunder wi,hd. ! tLr1 U'am
this season '
game
and from downtown
,Ph b) j()hn H
r gan i
v





Indy Bowl
notes
9 January 1979 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 9
Po
�r attendance
B SAM ROGERS
SPorts Editor
One of the
SHREVEPORT u
ndanc t . a rhe fl
though bowl
l'rlj '�� than W,000
;o1, for e game onl,
Whlch m�de the spacious
m aPPar all bu. emptj
' � the primary
�' ECU fan .1
,l 'au failed t��
K
h the
?rsi�) -till paid
guarantee
'rher turned
in nation
financial burden
� it
nee
I def,
Valentine were both
ffensive and
Sutton
- game ol the
I IT times tr a
He also scored
game on a i
sidelines
! . -
twice and
solo stops in the
� forced a
Pirates quickh
ichdown tor a 14-0
�ead late hi the first quarter.
Credil tackle Mitchell Smith and split
end Bill) Ra Washington with the two
best blocks in the game. Smith leveled
�' Louisiana Tech defensive back in the
open field which sprung Washington on
a 26 sard run on the flea flicker play.
Hi Pirates eventually scored on the
drive. Washington blasted a Bulldog
-�'leu i .prmg Sutton on his big 45
ard touchdown run.
Becords? The l'irate broke or tied
at least 15 Independence Bowl records in
their 35-13 victory. ECU scored more
P��nts than any other team (35) and
allowed the fewest (13). ECU recovered
ir fumbles ami intercepted three
passes which established new records
and allowed the fewest ards rushing.
Louisiana Tech could manage only 12
yards on the ground.
Anthony Collins1 two touchdowns was
rush'ng record and tied a seonng
ri1 Bill Lamm's live conversions
vvaji the most number of PATs made
I attempted m any previous Indepen-
dence Bowl game.
Ruffin McNeill also set a
'ford tor the long pass interception
turn with a 59 varder which also set
�! � thi i Pirate touchdown.
il?
Hick boicl over Bulldog
John H. Grogan.)
ALL YOU
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Tuesday only
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Fri.&Sit,
Friday's Seafood
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-rflUlJ
Send someone
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Ellen's
Hallmark Shop
I Pitt Plaza
Open 10 9
Mod Sat
� ���V,�
SUB SHOPS n GREENVILLE and NAGS HEAD. NORTH CAROLINA
Weds is
Dollar Day at
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wit h purchase
of a soft drink.
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Join us each week for:
GENTLEMENS NITE EVERY WED.
(SAME AS LADIES NITE)
COLLEGE NITE ON THURS.
(WEEKLY SPECIALS)
END OF WEEK PARTY FRI.
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LADIES NITE - EVERY SUN.
Beginning the end of January the ELBO ROOM
presents it's �S��$D ANNUAL
SATURDAY NITE mVER DANCE CONTEST
FOlftfeTAILS
WELCOME BACK
4 a � �
� � � �





Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 9 January jgl
krusen shoots over Lynchburg defender
Thompson leads
scoring race
w 1
(l"i" b) John H. Grogan.)
Three home meets in January
Pirate swimmers face Maine
By DAVID MAREADY
Staff Writer
Despite an overall 1-2
dual meet record thus far
in the season, the Pirate
swimming team has
acheived some remarkable
accomplishments.
Earlier in the season
the Pirates traveled to
Chapel Hill where they
swam against long time
rival UNC. The match went
right down to the wire
with the Tarheels edging
out the Pirates in the end
l a heartbreaking score of
57-56.
According to Pirate
coach Ray Scharf, the
Pirates swam one of their
best meets ever. "We had
an excellent overall team
performance commented
Scharf. "Several of our
guys broke school varsity
records which really
pleased me; we also had
about three swimmers to
break best time of the year
records
Pirate diver Tom Bell
swept both the diving
events while qualifying
nationally in the one meter
diving competition with a
socre of 171.45.
arsity records were
broken al the meet by
Kevin Meisel in the 1000
yard freestyle, by Jack
Clowar in the 200 yard
individual medley, and by
Clowar in the 200 yard
backstroke.
"Carolina always brings
out the best in us
continued Scharf, "This
year we even shaved our
legs for the meet and they
shaved theirs too. So, both
teams turned in some
really excellent times be-
cause of this. Our squad
took nine of the thirteen
�vents, but we still lost the
match by one point. The
reason for this is that UNC
has the better depth of the
two teams and were able
to score more points
-imply because they were
able to place more men in
each event
The South Carolina In-
flation was the next stop
lor the Pirates on Decem-
ber 8th and 9th. Several
Pirates posted nationally
qualifying times including:
John Tudor in the 200
freestyle, and the 400 and
800 freestyle teams of
Tudor, Bill Fehling, Jack
Clowar and Ted Nieman.
Several other nationally
recognized teams were on
hand for the meet includ-
ing such powerhouses as
Florida St University of
Miami, USC, University of
Tennessee, and UNC.
"The whole squad
swam very well noted
Scharf, "everyone recorded
his personal best times
The Pirates recorded
their first win of the young
season on Dec. 16 versus
Old Dominion. The ECU
squad easily defeated the
Monarchs by a comfortable
margin of 75-39. John
Tudor was at his best as
he posted a varsity record
time of 1:57.37 in the 200
vard backstroke.
During the holidays the
ECU squad was in Winter
Park, Fla. for their annual
training session at Rollins
College. Scharf explained
the purpose of the expedi-
tion.
"The purpose of the
trip is to boost the stamina
and endurance of our
swimmers physically as
well as mentally. The trip
is financed entirely out of
fhe money raised by the
team members. This year's
trip was very successful
Three home dual meets
are scheduled for the
Pirates in January. The
first of the matches will be
swam against a strong
University of Maine Team
which has already seen teh
Pirates in action during the
Perm State Relay in which
they narrowly defeated the
Pirates in final lean, -tan
dings.
Starting time for
meet will be 1:00
Saturday, January 13th
Miflges Natatonutn
NOW OPEN
THE HEAD HUNTER
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located at Rivergatc Shopping Ct on
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752-8855
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CALL 758 7400
Fast Free Delivery
nnnmmm
�nmn
1979
2nd Annual
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WELCOMES ECU STUDENTS
BACK TO SCHOOL
E. 14th St. 7S-936
" Visit us for your laundry needs
� 36 washers change � plnball
� 30 dryers machine color T.V.
� dry-cleaning pick-up station
� attendant 8:00 a.m4:oo p.m. daily
Bring this coupon for free wash.
" 6 Sat. BOP ����
7 Sun. Cirkus

8 Mon. Jesse Bolt

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' 10 Wed. Heroes

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Full line of Redken products
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Open Monday thru Friday by appointment only
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Phone 758-7570
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WELCOME BACK ECU!
SALE
38.00 Jeans & H.I.S. slacks
$12.00 Wrangler cords
Rappers Drill Cloth
$14.00 Straight leg Jeans
MALE Pre-washed Jeans
Jewelry 25off
All ladies Holiday wear
drastically reduced
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Plus all the new goods not on sale are f0 ft
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Independence Bowl 678:
,s- s '�
s
EDDIE HICKS 28
9 January 1979FOUNTAINHEADPage 11

w!K&r �
Bfc -
�mw
Hr - t'B

TOMMY SUMMER 64
VANCE TINGLER 73 ZACK VALENTINE 89
MITCHELL JOHNSTON 65
CHELL SMI1
ECU SUPPPORTERS
LEANDER GREEN 10
EDDIE HICKS 28
Pirates Win
35-13
Over
Louisiana Tech
�?-&M
�ff
A
�HA3mUi jtfas?
(K.r



BILLY RAY WASHINGTON 85
PHOTOGRAPHS BY
JOHN H. GROG AN
MOST VALUABLE PLAYER THEODORE SUTTON 36
)





� ' � 1
' v t 1 1 , 1
' � . , . t
Page 12 FOUNTAINHEAD 9 J�nm.ry jqtq
WESTERN SIZZLIN
BACK TO SCHOOL
STUDENT SPECIAL
SIRLOIN
with or without green peppers and onions
ONLY$
with coupon
and ECU
2903 E. 10th St.
Greenville. N.C.
Open
FH.& Sat.
m
m
COUPON
WESTERN SIZZLIN
STUDENT SPECIAL
wl, ��fOIN TIPS
' OMIT � I.M
POOP T�,u FDAT JA�.
1.

� � .
;�





Title
Fountainhead, January 9, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 09, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.532
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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