Fountainhead, December 7, 1978






Circulation 10,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, North
Vol. 55 No.
r 7
December 1978
1
In open meetings law
Trustees meet to adopt bylaw ehang
Bv MARC BARNES
ens Editor
The Board of Trustees
met in general session
Wednesday afternoon. A-
mong the topics discus-
sed were proposed chan-
ges in the bylaws, com-
mittee reports, and se-
veral resolutions pertain-
ing to I niversity person-
nel.
Chairn Trov Pate
ol Goldsboro acknow-
ledged a resolution, sub-
uenth adopted h the
Boat i. u hich expressed
sympathy at the
; ol Dr. James
Si ' M Daniel, w ho was
the Chairman of the De-
Biologv.
M Daniel. 15, died No -
26 ol an apparent
irl attack.
airman Pate then
went on to praise the
hi rale group.
performed recent!)
t r d.
W illiam Powell, chair-
the Bylaws
mittee, detailed sev-
t hat the
acted up-
ges in t he-
iii officers
more than
in suet ession,
I the Ex-
sl U Id
� � the
request
eeting ol
executive
: e deci-
� te instead of
request by the
rm.in of the Board of
Dump
Trustees
Powell commented that
this last recommendation
was mandatory to bring
the university into com-
pliance with newly-writ-
ten state laws concerning
open meetings. Dr. John
D. Bridges stated that
�IB hours notice had to
be given to the news
media in order to close
a meeting to the press.
A. Louis Singleton
stated that the committee
system should be put to
more advantage bv re-
quiring committees to re-
port directly to the
hoard.
Bridges made the
point that policy is often
made in the meetings,
and he asked the Board
it any mechanism existed
to bring these changes
before th� Bylaws com-
mittee for consideration
as to whether or not
new policies should be
written into the bvlaws.
"Sometime a polio
made in here could
change the bylaws1
Bridges -aid. A motion
was then made, and
subsequent!) passed. to
change the bylaws to set
up new procedures for
the installation of officers
and to bring the Board
into line with the Open
Meeting Law
There was no discu-
ssion of old business.
K. Edward Greene o-
pened up the new busi-
segment of the
meeting by expressing
concern for th�- Media
Board's decision no; io
print the now-defunct
77-78 BUCCANEER. He
stated that he had read
the article in FOUN-
TAINHEAD about $21,000
bring appropriated to
help the ECU Playhouse
and other activities, but
he said he didn't know
what the Board planned
to do with the $21,000 left
from the original $42,000.
Greene noted that the
Board should appoint a
committee tc look into
the Media Hoard. Chari-
man Pate concurred,
saying "It concerns me
that a board could de-
cide not to do some-
thing Pate added that
a new committee, The
Committee for Student
Affairs would review the
activities of the Media
Board and report back to
the trustees.
Pate then called for
committee reports for the
next meeting.
Pate directed the
Board's attention to a
request that the Board
endorse the Eastern
North Carolina School for
the Deal, which is pre-
sentl) in the planning
stages in Wilson. K.
Edward Greene said,
"This is completely out
of our realm and he
added, "We ought to let
it run its course
Greene explained that if
the legislature passes the
bill for the appropriation
for the building ol the
school, and ECU is dir-
ected to help with it,
we should.
"To take a position
at this time would be
inadvisable because we
don't have enough infor-
mation to take that po-
sition Dr. Edwin Mon-
roe said.
Glenn Jernigan mo-
tioned for a continuance,
and Greene stated "I
would rather leave it as
it is Dr. John Bridgers
concurred, and the mo-
tion to continue the de-
bate until the next
meeting was defeated.
A series of staff re-
ports followed.
Dr. John Howell, Vice
Chancellor of Academic
Affairs reported that Phd
programs in Anatomy
and Biochemistry were in
the process of being ac-
credited.
Dr. Edwin Monroe,
Vice Chancellor of Health
Affairs reported that ac-
creditation of programs
in Social Work, Physical
Therapy, and Occupa-
tional Therapy were in
the process of being ac-
credited. He said that he
expected to receive a
report on the findings of
the accrediting agency
after the first of next
year. He added that ac-
creditation for the third
and fourth year instruc-
tional program for the
Medical School was going
well, and that con-
struction should begin
soon on the addition to
the Medical School Com-
plex.
As a lighter note, he
reported that one of the
residents in trie Medical
School, Dr. Edward
Kites had recently won a
chess tournament.
Dr. Robert L. Holt,
Vice Chancellor for Ad-
ministration and Planning
reported that his depart-
ment was delighted with
the installation of the
new computer, and he
remarked that by sum-
mer, the computer should
be in full operation.
Holt also reported
that November had been
the best fund raising
month in the history of
the university. He said
that over $35,000 had
been raised this month,
compared to almost
$5,000 during the same
time last year.
In terms of housing,
Holt said that the uni-
versity presently had a
97 occupancy rate, and
he projected that the
occupancy rate for the
spring would be about
93. He said that this
was normal for this time
of year.
Holt added that the
Student Union had spon-
sored about 100 pro-
grams this fall, with
51,000 patrons taking
part. He mentioned the
College Bowl, and the
fact that the English
Department had won the
quiz game.
Holt noted that ECU
was one out of 150
colleges that had been
picked to participate in a
federal study to see
how well federal monies
were being used.
Tommy Joe Payne
commented that over
THE IH MPSTER HERE is safe. If all the metal on
the right side of the dotted line were cut away, it
u ould fie apparent that the container would be
unstable. Photo by Steve Romero.)
Vandalism to blame
By GLENN THOMAS
Staff Writer
Within the past seven
years, 21 children have
died as a result of
being pinned or crushed
by dangerously unstable
rear-loading sanitary con-
tainers. The container, a
slant-sided type of rear-
loading dumpster, is
usually larger than one
cubic yard and may
weigh between 200 and
400 pounds.
The Consumer Product
Safety
Commission issued a ban
on all slant-sided, rear-
loading dumpsters last
June. Although no one
has been fined yet,
many illegal dumpsters
have been found.
Tamara Young, a
Public Information Spec-
ialist for the CPSC, said
that the ban had actually
gone into effect in June
of 1977, but that mer-
chants were given a year
to fall into compliance.
Ms. Young also said
that the fines for an
illegal dumpster could go
as high as $50,000. The
ban covers all "danger-
ous" dumpsters of one
cubic yard or more.
Ms. Young went on
to say that although no
one has been fined yet,
"The commission is cur-
rently enforcing it (and
that) the investigators
will be taking action
Phil Nowers, a repre-
sentative for the National
Solid Waste Management
Commission, said that
the CPSC ban covered
only "one's that were
too tippy
Nowers also said that
though most of the
dumpsters were for the
most part safe, some
"could be pulled over
with relative ease
Although the first
death from the dump-
sters occurred in 1971,
the ban on the dump-
sters was not initiated
until 1977. According to
Nowers, this is due to
insubstantial proof that
the dumpsters were
hazardous. Nowers said,
"When something is per-
ceived as a problem is
difficult to say Twenty-
one children were killed,
and many more injured
in the period between
1971 and enforcement of
the ban in 1978.
There is a great legal
question as to what the
ban covers. According to
Nowers, the ban covers
only those dumpsters
considered dangerous by
the CPSC. According to
the CPSC Hotline, (a
tollfree telephone number
where illegal dumpsters
may be reported), all
slant-sided rear-loading
dumpsters are covered by
the ban. Paul Galvydis,
a legal representitive for
the CPSC, said that the
ban covers only those
dumpsters that are
leased out.
In an investigation on
Nov. 20, an "illegal"
dumpster was found in
the city of Nashville,
N.C. The dumpster was
approximately eight cubic
yards in volume and
weighed between 400 and
500 pounds empty.
In speaking with the
mayor of Nashville on
that date, he said that
he was not aware of
any such ban, but said
at the time that he
would check into it.
The dumpsters can be
made legal and safe at
the same time by
investing in a stabilizing
bar, said Phil Nowers.
The bar, which costs
between $10 and $50, is
simple to install and is
very effective.
FOUNTAINHEAD run halted
THE BOARD OF Trustee
questions pertaining to the
$20,000 had been col-
lected in the Phone-A-
Thon so far.
C.G. Moore, Vice
Chancellor of Business
Affairs said that he ex-
pected that the Snack
Bar and new parking
lots would be constructed
soon.
Dr. Sallv Brett, of
the Department of En-
glish gave a faculty re-
port. Brett was involved
in being an advisor to a
group of students which
wrote a collection of bi-
ographies of eastern
North Carolina. According
to Brett, the student-
did extennive work, and
designed the book � as
well as wrote it. She
added that students have
lectured throughout east-
ern N.C. to civic groups
and others. Brett said
that the work was a re-
sult of the writing pro-
gram in the English de-
partment, and she ex-
pressed the hope that
v ponder
operation
th running of a unit �
Photo f, i�hn H ���g,in
research projects like thi-
one could continue.
Chancellor Thomas B.
Brewer then made sev-
eral closing statements.
Brewer t'ir-t praised
the effort- of Dr. Brett
and the English depart-
ment for this work, and
he added that the fed-
eral grant that was giv-
en to finance the pub-
lishing of the work was
given to a ten few in-
stitutions, and that we
were fortunate to receive
the grant.
He announced the
selection of Dr. Clinton
Prewett a the Assistant
io the Chancellor for
Special Assignments, and
he noted that Prewett
will be responsible for
the implementation of af-
firmative action programs
and public relations.
Brewer noted that Mr.
Blake � the present as-
sistant to the Chancellor
� would remain.
"c alsn announced
the selection ot Mrs
IWis Lamm to the post
t Financial Aid admini-
strator. "We ft ,hat
Mr Lamm will bring a
great deal of administra-
tive talent to this 0f.
Kce He added. "We
are delighted that she
accepted it
Brewer announced that
formation of a single
adv isory commit . for
athletics.
In the pa there
have been two commit-
-�-s, nt- which reported
tri ihe Chancellor, and
one which reported to
ihe Athletic Director.
Brewer said that at other
universities there v�as
irh one committee. He
aid that the chairman
i the committee would
he the university's of-
ficial representative to
the NCAA.
What
HENRY V1SKLER
STARS in this week's
Free Flick, "Heroes
Marathon '33 is reviewed, see p. 6.
John Prine will appear at the Row
Arts and Crafts Center tonight. For
a preview, s p �
Title IX will soon be enforced on the
nation's colleges and universities. st
i. 3.
Lady Pirates demolish Wake Forest
102-48, see p. 9.
Local reaction to the Independence
Bowl, see p. 9.
ECU chess club wins
By MIKE ROGERS
.4 ssistant ews Editor
According to FOUN-
TAINHEAD Editor Doug
White, FOUNTAINHEAD
did not come out
Tuesday because its
typesetter was broken.
"Sometime between
Friday and Monday,
some person or persons
quietly broke into the
office and sabatoged our
typesetter. At First, we
thought it was merely
broken, but the repair-
man we called in ex-
plained that there was
no way the machine
could have broken by
itself.
"The guilty person
burned through the plas-
tics and cut through the
wire and flipped some
switches to make it look
as if the machine had
shorted itself outsaid
White. "It was the
flipped switches which
prevented the machine
from workingnot the cut
wiring. So we know that
it was tampered with
he added.
White added that
someone also urinated on
the door, stole the
name plate off the door,
made prank phone calls,
and moved one of the
paper's distribution boxes
from in front of the
supply building. It was
later found behind a tree
with a poster for the
ECU Print Auction in-
side, according to White.
"We are not impli-
cating that the Print
Group vandalized the
boxes said White. He
added, "We are just
reporting what happen-
ed
White commented,
"Im sorry that we have
such immature students
on campus. They don't
realize that they're only
hurting themselves and
their fellow students
since the money for
repair comes from stu-
dents' fees. I hope we
have seen the last of
this childish behavior
FOUNTAINHEAD
Advertising Manager
Robert M. Swaim said
that the malfunction was
discovered in the news-
paper's typesetting mach-
ine on Monday morning
by the FOUNTAINHEAD
secretary.
According to Swaim,
when the secretary tried
to begin setting the type
for Tuesday's paper the
machine "went haywire
Swaim explained that
all stories that appear in
the newspaper must be
set in type on a Com-
pugraphic typesetter.
By GLENN THOMAS
Staff Writer
The ECU Chess club
met Burroughs Wellcome
Co. in a chess tourna-
ment early last Saturday
morning in Mendenhall.
The event, which
began .at 10 a.m
proved to be a very
interesting match. Al-
though ECU had never
met Burroughs Wellcome
before, the two teams
turned out to be very
evenly matched.
The lead match, Jeff
Seidenstien of ECU ag-
ainst Luigi Pinti of
B.W turned out to be
the most interesting of
all the matches. The two
players played for three
and one half hours
before the match finally
ended in a draw.
Although they were
somewhat disappointed in
the match ending in a
draw, Seidenstien and
Pinti both felt that it
was a good game. Only
one game was played,
due to time limitations.
The outcome of the
tournament was much
the same as that of
Seidenstien's game. The
final score for the teams
was ECU 7, Burroughs
Wellcome 7.
The matches were
determined bv the best
two out ot three games.
This system wa used to
determine all matches
except the lead.
Local effort begun
to boost sales
By MARTHA OAKLEY
Staff Writer
A local effort has
been started to have
students who cannot
attend the Independence
Bown Game to purchase
a ticket anyway, to be
sent to Shreveport, Loui-
siana. The ticket will
then be given to some
child or adult in
Shreveport who would
otherwise bo unable to
go-
Sue Francis, secretary
for the center supervisor
at the Department of
Recreation in Washington,
North Carolina, initiated
the movement.
"The tickets will be
sent to the Sports Infor-
mation Director in
Shreveport. and he will
distribute them there
Francis said.
Francis stated that
although she and her
husband would not he
able to go to the game,
they did not want their
tickets to be wasted
"I hope that the
students at ECU who
can't go will buy a
ticket to send to Shreve-
port continued Francis
"It's not going very well
over here. We were
hoping to sell 100 tickets
by Friday, but so far
we've only sold six
Hp- "
"�Viiwj W - - -
's ffr'bi 4
yir-V5�





Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 7 December 1978
Choir
Tests
Applications Playhouse Finances Sierra Club Band
t
The Caswell Choir
from Caswell Center in
Kinston will present a
Christmas Concert on
Mon Dec. 11 in Room
244 Mendenhall Student
Center at 7 p.m. The
Concert is sponsored by
the Student Council for
Exceptional Children and
refreshments will be
served. All members of
SCEC, jpecial education,
and interested persons
are urged to attend.
Come and support this
worthwhile event
ILO
You are cordially
invited to the Inter-
national Christmas Party
sponsored by the In-
ternational Imanage
Organization Fri. . Dec.
8. 8 p.m. untilto be
held at the ECU In-
ternational House, 9th St.
behind McDonald's. This
trul interntational
celebration features
In-
and
limited
asking
of $1
Sangria, Pinatas,
ternational foods,
door prizes.
Due to our
budget, we are
for a contribution
from ILO members in
d -landing, and $1.50
irom non-members. Any
person who brings any
tvpe of refreshments
and or food-preferably
"ethnic food will be
welcome gratis. If you
have a Christmas record
or 8-lrack cartridges,
bring them.
Tickets may be
purchased at the
Dawrtmenul ottjSS-
VoWifcn Languages �n�
Literatures, 4lh floor,
Brewster Bldg from any
ILO member, or at the
entrance. If you do not
like Sangria, you may
BYOB
The Allied Health
Professions Admission
Test will be offered at
ECU on Sat Jan. 20,
1979. Application blanks
are to be completed and
mailed to Educational
Testing Service, Box
966-R, Princeton, NJ
08540 to arrive by Dec.
23, 1978. Applications
are also available at the
Testing Center, Speight
Building, Rm.105, ECU.
Home Ee.
The student section of
the American Home
Economics Association
will meet Mon. Dec. 11
in the VanLandingham
Room of the Home
Economics Building. The
meeting is scheduled for
7 p.m. and will feature
Mrs. Grossnickle from
The Kitchen Cupboard as
guest speaker. She will
talk about kitchen
equipment and suggest
some excellent Christmas
gift ideas. Attendance of
all members is required.
Any other interested
persons are invited to
attend.
Applications for
Student Union President
are being accepted from
Dec. 4 until Jan. 16. AH
applicants must file at
the Information Desk or
the Student Union Office,
Rm 234 in Mendenhall
Student Center by Jan.
16, 1979.
Phi Eta
Phi Eta Sigma will
hold its meeting Dec. 11
in Room 109, Austin at
7 p.m. An exciting
possibility for our spring
social will be proposed,
along with fund raising
projects. Our fantastic
bowling team's record
will be announced, and
wishes for a good
Christmas might be
heard also.
Gamma Beta
The East Carolina
Playhouse has announced
auditions for its third
major production of the
season. The play,
"Emily" by Thomas
Patterson of the UNC
Chapel Hill Faculty, is
based upon the private
life of Emily Dickinson,
and will run Feb. 7 thru
17 at the Playhouse on
the ECU campus in
Greenville. Director Edgar
R. Loessin indicated that
there are parts for three
men and six women.
"We encourage everyone
who is interested to
come to auditions, which
are open to residents of
Greenville and Eastern
North Carolina as well
as ECU students, faculty
and staff
The auditions will be
held in room 206 of the
Drama building on the
ECU campus this Thurs.
Dec. 7, from 3-6 and
8-10 p.m as well as
Sat. Dec. 9 from 2-5.
There will be a
meeting at 4 p.m.
Thurs Dec. 7 for all
financial aid recipients.
Information will be dis-
seminated and 1979-80
applications will be
distributed. Meeting will
be conducted in the
Wright Auditorium.
Boxing
Lecture
SCJ
The Society for Colle-
giate Journalists will hold
their fall induction and
Christmas Party Tues
Dec. 12, at 7 p.m. in
Mendenhall Coffeehouse.
All members and pledges
are required to attend.
REBEL
There will be a
REBEL reading on
Thurs. Dec. 7 at 7 p.m.
in the Mendenhall
Student Center Coffee-
house. Prose andor
poetry will be read by
the following writers:
Terry Davis, Luke
Whisnant, Sue Aydelette,
and Tim Wright. Artist
Jeff Fleming will also
speak.
Socio-Aitth
The Sociology-An-
thropology Club announ-
ces their annual Christ-
mas Party to be held on
Fri Dec. 8 at 7:70
p.m. It will be held in
BB-302. Please let us
know what you can
bring!
Dr. William C. Haag
will present a lecture
on "Archaeoastronomy"
to the ECU Chapter of
Sigma Xi at 7:30 Thurs.
evening, Dec. 7, in Rm.
244, Mendenhall Stud- nt
Center. Dr. Haag's talk
outlines the development
of astronomical know-
ledge, calendncal obser-
v�tio�H� and observatories
by prehistoric cultures as
they became dependent
upon agriculture and
needed to predict sea-
sonal change. Such sites
as Stonehenge in En-
gland, Cahokia in Illinois,
and Maya structures in
Mexico are included in
the slides accompanying
his lecture. Dr. Haag is
Emeritus Alumni Profes-
sor of Anthropology at
Louisiana State Univer-
sity, Baton Rouge, where
he has taught since
1952. He has also served
as chairman of the de-
partment, curator of the
Museum of Anthropology,
and Acting Director of
the School of Geoscience.
The University com-
munity and the general
public are cordially in-
vited to the talk. This
will be the second meet-
ing of the year for the
ECU Sigma Xi chapter.
Therapy
If you are a freshmen
or sophomore in the
pre-physical therapy
curriculum, or if you just
happen to have a
personal interest in
physical therapy, then
Mr. Angelo Suggs would
like to extend to you an
open invitation to take
part in a new and
exciting phase of re-
search dealing with the
effects of cryotherapy
and thermotherapy on
isometric strength. This
project will begin in
January and ail in-
terested participants are
urged to make request
now. For further infor-
mation dial 752-9310, and
get yourself involved.
Gamma Beta Phi will
meet Thus Dec. 7 in
Biology 103 at 7 p.m.
This is a regular
meeting as well as In-
duction of new members.
All members are asked
to bring at least one
canned good to be given
to a needy family and
also a toy or $2 for the
Pediatric Ward at the
hospital.
Bible study
"For as many as are
led by the Spirit of
God, they are the sons
of God"Rom.8:14. This is
the key scripture for this
Thur's. Bible study.
Everyone is invited to
come this Thurs. night
and hear a Bible study
on Knowing God's Will.
John Crowe will be
teaching this at the Full
Gospel Student Fellowship
meeting in Mendenhall
212, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Come
expecting a muscle?
Tau Kappa Epsilon
Fraternity will be holding
their 4th Annual Boxing
Tournament Feb. 20, 21,
and 22. The tournament,
which is AAU sanctioned,
will be held in Wright
Auditorium, Due to the
overwhelming success,
there will be 6 Ring
Girls chosen this year in
a contest to be held at
the Elbo Room in Feb.
All those interested in
participating in the tour-
nament, boxers and pro-
spective ring girls alike,
are urged to contact the
TKE House promptly.
Proceeds will be given
to Saint Jude's Children
Hospital.
Buy a mountain? An
island? The North Caro-
lina Conservancy does.
The work of the Con-
servancy will be discus-
sed at the Sierra Club
on Mon Dec. 11, at 8
p.m in the First Pres-
byterian Church, Green-
ville.
Featured speaker will
be Rich Preyer, assistant
director of the North
Carolina Nature Conser-
vancy and son of Con-
gressman Richardson
Preyer.
ATTENTION
MARCHING PIRATES:
Turn your uniforms in at
the FLETCHER Music
Building Mon Tues. or
Wed. between 11 a.m.
and 3 p.m.
The Student National
Education Asociation will
be meeting Dec. 7 �
Mendenhall Rm 244 at 4
p.m. Dr. Brewer, rXL
chancellor will be
speaking. Everyone is
urged to attend.
Our membership dr.w
is neanng its end, so
come join in now.
Gays
Anyone interested in
joining a gay organization
that wouid:counsel gay
people, discuss all the
aspects of being gay,
and educate anyone who
wants to know more
about the gay lifestyle,
is asked to come to an
organizational meeting
Thurs Dec. 7 at 7:30
p.m. This meeting will
be held at 608 E. 9th
St. If you want to learn
more about yourself and
work to help other gays
please come to this
meeting.
The Graduate Record
Examination will be
offered at ECU on Sat.
Jan 13, 1979. Application
blanks are to be
completed and mailed to
Educational Testing
Service, Box 966-R,
Princeton, NJ 08540 to
arrive by Dec. 12, 1978.
Applications may be
obtained from the
Testing Center, Rm. 105
Speight Bldg ECU.
Party
Do you enjoy having fun'
Come to the Christma-
Party for games,
singing and a talk on
how Christ's birth affect-
us. Party will be held at
the home of Mr. &
Mrs. Sam Johnson. Meet
at Brewster B-102 at
6:30 p.m. Thurs. for
directions and rides.
Sponsored by Campu-
Crusade for Christ.
Racquetball Bow.0f
There will be a
racquetball Club meeting
Wed Dec 13. 6:30 p.m.
at 105 Memorial Gym.
Party with DZ big
brothers. Mon. Dec.
11th. Pre-exam.
BLOW-OUT
Admission
The Graduate Manage-
ment Admission Test will
be offered at ECU on
Sat. Jan. 27, 1979.
Application blanks are to
be completed and mailed
to Education Testing
Service, Box 966-R,
Princeton, NJ 08540 to
arrive by Jan. 5, 1979.
Applications are also
available at the testing
center, Speight Building,
Room 105, ECU.
Bns trip
Bus trip to Shreveport
for the Independence
Bowl. Includes bus fare,
quad occupancy at
Holiday Inn, trans-
portation to and from
stadium, and ticket. No
meals, no frills. Room
for 37 people. $83
students and $86.50
non-students; payable in
advance. Call 752-9887 or
758-9505 for more info.
Classifieds
MOVING: Must Sell!
Matching couch and
chair, both for !4t
Double bed, box spring,
mattress and frame: $35.
Call Winston nt 756-1468.
FOR SALE: Sony Inte-
grated Amplifier, 60
watts per ch. Asking
$150 in very good
condition. Call 752-9423,
ask for Mclntyre.
FOR SALE:
Pair of 3-way Lyric
speakers, were $300, now
$100, call 758-1186.
Itorwnr S)
RENT: 3 bedroom
duplex near ECU, Jan.
1, fenced in back yard
and pets allowed. $225.
Call 756-5346.
a
aaaaaap
WANTED: 2 roommates
to share 3 bedroom apt.
spring semester. $70. per
month plus 13 utilities.
Call 752-3459.
ROOMMATE NEEDED:
To share 3 bedroom
house near campus. CaU
758-6293.
ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Male to share 3 bed-
room trailer. $50 plus
utilities monthly. Call
Jimmy at 758-6712.
ROOMMATE NEEDED!
Situation available for a
male roommate. Apt. is
located at 514 First St. 2
B.R 1 Bath, Kit
Living room. Rent is
$185, $92.50 a piece and
half the utilities. Apt.
will be open for second
semester. If interested,
call Mike at 758-4158.
LOST: Ladies glasses and
glass case. Reward. Call
du8 ln �y fof p1
!lJ57-�73i or Bifhf
d� of 1978 scfcooV
"� lapis �,��� CCC
�nitiak on inside. Please
c�� 752-1096, .o
quetsions Mked
TYPING SERVICE:
Contact Pmb m
School of Iftsie, Ma
Office or call 7574S�52.
Fast, reliable WL: .75
to $1.00.


- '�(Piiiwgiirtiaa)lajaj
tfoHirttrtCaaa
JUttHmI " mmnfimmmMmmum
t





Women athletes to receive
the same amount of funds
B MICHAEL PUTZEL
Associated Press Writer
fhe
� SHIN(;T0N (Ap)
governmem
announ-
; V l0da " Plans l0
"�!��� colleges and uni.
"erSlt,es � spend �he
same Per capita amount
"omen's sports as
' d� on men's -
exceptions fof
and so-called
linaton fac-
Department 0f
"e" Education �nd
� said that
years of �)��-
whether
, i ri ll i
�Ul it'll boys
wear their
facials are
sex dis-
regulations
sonal ap-
lio
for-
Secretary
X Jr.
mmediate
between the sexes for
athletic scholarships, re-
eruiting and other readily
financially measurable
�� and opportuni-
tit's.
The government would
Kr�n up to three addi-
Iio�1 years for schools
10 implement affirmative
action programs to en-
courage women in ath-
letic competition.
Since publication of
'�if first regulations to
implement the 1972 law
outlawing sex discrimin-
on college cam-
puses, the nation's fed-
erallj assisted institutions
of higher learning al-
ready have had more
tnan three years to com-
ply.
Noting that there are
thr-�' times as manv
women involved in com-
petitive athletics. HEW
said its polic) "bases
complicance on participa-
'�on rates, not enroll-
ment, hut require- that
procedures be established
to increase
for women
opportunities
There have been dra-
matic increases in female
participation in sports
since the passage of the
so-called Title IX sex
discrimination law six
years ago.
But HEW said the
latest figures indicate
that about 300,000 of the
100.000 students partici-
pating in intercollegiate
athletics are men, and
on the average, colleges
and universities provide
approximately 10 sports
for men and only six for
wnm en
A key to federal en-
forcement of the new
policy is what the gov-
ernment considers to be
non-discuninatory factors
that would permit un-
equal spending on differ-
ent sports.
Such factors mav in-
clude "the nature or
level of a particular
sport HEW said, sug-
gesting that the extraor-
dinary and unique costs
of fielding a college
football team would not
require a comparable ex-
penditure for less
pensive women's
such as tennis.
ex-
teams
"This will not nece-
ssarily result in identical
men's and women's in-
tercollegiate athletic pro-
grams the government
said. The interpretations
"take account of the size
and cost of football by
measuring present com-
pliance in terms of ac-
tual, rather than poten-
tial, participation rates;
by recognizing the fact
thai the costs of some
sports are greater than
ethers, and where appro-
priate, by taking account
of the scope of com-
petition
News
writers
needed
call
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. 5 Ff� WMNi. intpact UMMB and Drum
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Our footlong Frankfooter is a full 12
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to size. It's topped just right with extra-meaty
chili, freshly chopped onions, and mustard.
Plus you'll enjoy an order of our own
special french fries and a soft drink, too
this at your Wiener King� restaurant for 99�
take advantage of this Wiener King offer and
exempt yourself from the high cost of eating
GRADE A OFFER
One footlong Frankfooter, AA�
french fries, and a drink for ww
Wiener King provides you with taste thot never foils. So clip
this coupon and enjoy one frankly delicious footlong
Frankfooter, a small order of our own
special french fries, and a small
soft drink for 99.
(local address pubset)
Please present this coupon before
ordering Limit one coupon per
customer Void where prohibited by
low Coupon good through (date
pubset).
EXPIRATION DATE IS 12-17-78
70��mt�T 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Pay 3
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� �
1
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 7 December 1978
Childish pranks cost
newspaper, students
We sometimes forget how fragile the
links in a communications chain can be,
how little it takes to cut-off an
information medium, as was the case
with the senseless vandalism which has
plagued FOUNTAINHEAD recently.
An outlet for disagreement
It only takes one malcontent to
sabotage our equipment, move our
boxes, or pull any of the other childish
pranks we have been subjected to. It
is one thing to disagree with the paper.
There is an outlet for expressing such
disagreement on this page, the "Forum"
column. On rare occasions, we have
not printed letters, almost always be-
cause they did not contain the proper
information about the author (address,
phone number, signature, etc.) or be-
cause they were held from one issue to
another due to space limitations and
became outdated in the carry-over.
If a reader cannot air his gripes
fully through "Forum then the Media
Board is his next step. Naturally, they
can't make us print anything, but they
can investigate complaints and help to
remedy some problems. These com-
plaints will also be kept in mind should
an editor re-apply for another term.
Maturity
Apparently, some students are not
mature enough to disagree in a civilized
manner. Instead, they run like maraud-
ers through the night, moving boxes,
damaging equipment, wasting student
fees. The culprits of these pranks is
not an enemy of FOUNTAINHEAD so
much as he is an enemy of the
students.
SNTA, ALL I
YsJANT Toft
CHRISTMAS 15
TO ititCP
PAT DYE
Forum
Commentary
Bible's view on gays is presented
Matriarchy vs. patriarchy
By HESTER PETTY
Lppity Woman of Greenville
I skirt the edges of my writing table with the
anne restless ca.ul.Jon. viitti which I circle the edge of
my experience and knowledge.
I am aware of the responsibility I will assume
when 1 sit down to write this article. I am leery of
the preMimptuousness of this act of writing.
Just as a person would choose particular flowers
from their garden in order to fashion the bouquet
that they have in mind, I select certain facts and
feelings in order to construct the conclusion that I
have in mind.
I feel sometimes almost like an unwilling partner
to these articles. I drag my feet. We struggle, the
article and I. 1 submit. I've never missed a deadline.
And so it is with this week's edition. "But you
waste pace here the conscientious side of me
exclaims, "with all this flailing about on paper you've
vritten nothing about matriarchy. This is matriarchy
week, isn't it?"
Quite right. But how am I to extricate myself
from this ragged beginning and move smoothly into a
discussion of matriarchy?
At this point I feel a light tap on my shoulder.
Who could this be? Why it's my Muse!
Tell me. Muse, what am 1 to do here? Um
hmmm. You've got to be kidding! Naw, 1 can't say
that. What? I should at least try it? well
Once upon a time (can you believe this?) the
gods, the rulers, and the priests were women. Most
of the world was matriarchal and this state of affairs
lasted for about 15,000 years during an era we' know
as prehistory (that is, before recorded history).
The supreme Goddess was known by as many
different names as there were languages. She was
called Tiamat, Isis, Astarte, Brigit, Mawu, Luna,
Diana (to name only a very few).
But all of Her names meant basically the same
thing in each language. She was the Queen of the
Heavens, the Mother of All Things, the Creator. The
moon was the main source of symbolism associated
with the Goddess.
Somewhere along the line, the art of prehistory
began to depict the Goddess as accompanied by a
SonConsort. In the beginning he was presented in a
much smaller scale than his mother. As time went
oni he was depicted in equal proportion to Her.
Eventually patriarchal forces conquered the Goddess
cultures and the SonConsort replaced his mother as
Supreme Being. The Greek and Roman myths
represent this overthrow. Although many Goddesses
still existed, they were all subordinate to Zeus. The
Christians then completed the transition.
During the years prior to the patriarchal take-over,
queens were the heads of state. The concept of a
king did not exist. The husbandslovers of the
reigning queens had no power.
The throne was passed down through the queen's
daughter or to the queen's sister if the queen's
children were male. Among the populace this rule
was applied with property which was passed down
through the female line of the family.
The patriarchs took over the Goddess religions,
often by force. Through careful planning and
sometimes through the murder of their wives, the
queens, the patriarchs assumed control of the
government.
This take-over was almost complete by the time of
the late Greco-Roman civilization. Although women
still occupied a few high positions, the control of the
?government was in male hands. The Christians
completed the process by relieving women of all of
their former positions and rights.
The establishment of matriarchy was logical con-
sidering the impression that the birth process must
have made on the minds of the newly conscious
humans. Women created life. What was more
important to the survival of these people than this?
Until the male's role in the process of life-creation
became known, woman was the all-important com-
ponent. It makes sense that her shape would be
worshipped in the form of the Goddess and that
PW?- YSW Jtfmm �� ��l�r to daughter. g�
What doesn't make sense is the brutal manner in
which patriarchy was installed. Thousands of Goddess
worshippers were slaughtered by the Hebrews and
their patriarchal predecessors.
After patriarchy became established, women were
pushed into a much deeper abyss than the men
under matriarchy had ever known. Under matriarchy,
men had most of the basic human rights. Under
patriarchy, women had none.
All that I have said has been of extremely broad
nature. It is difficult for me to make the information
that I have about this subject clear. There are
several reasons for this.
For one thing I have only read three books on
the subject of matriarchy. Secondly, I have not
studied the subject, in other words, the exact dates
and chronology are not planted in my memory for
me to pass on to you. Thirdly, this is not a term
paper and there fore I don't have to footnote.
I have tried to tell you a story, h is a story that
you are probably not familiar with. It is a story that
I hope will either make you disbelieving and angry
(so that you will do some reading on the subject) or
sort of believing and curious (so that you will do
some reading on the subject).
I believe, as many others do, that our present
society in unbalanced. The rational "male" thought
which originates in the left hemisphere of the brain
is revered and the intuitive "female" thought which
originates in the right hemisphere of the brain is
discredited.
The rational "macho" male of today is suffering
from ulcers and heart attacks and the intuitive "total
woman" of today is suffering from depression and
alcoholism. There is some truth in this over-simplified
generalization.
Perhaps men's consciousness-raising groups will
help men tune in to their feelings and recognize
their feelings and recognize their intuitive knowledge.
Perhaps feminism will help women move into careers
involving rational thought exercises.
I believe we can learn from each other. And I
believe we'd be better off if we did.
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Many letters have
recently appeared in your
paper concerning the
plight of homosexuals in
their search for their
"rights 1 had intended
to stay out of this
discussion but a recent
letter from a professor
in the Community Health
Department is in need of
a � reply. ?f k
1 can do little in the
way of reply to the
letters and opinions of
those who look at this
problem from a social
point of view. But our
professor's letter seems
to attempt to say that
God approves of homo-
sexuality and this I can
take issue with.
God's point of view-
in the Old Testament is
clear: "Thou shall not
lie with mankind as with
womankind, it is abomi-
nation (Lev. 18:22). "If
a man lie with mankind,
as with woman, both
have committed an ab-
omination, they shall
surely be put to death;
their blood shall be upon
them(Lev. 20:13.)
The city of Sodom
was totally 'destroyed by
God because of it's
homosexuality. God dealt
harshly with this sin
under the old law.
God also spoke on
this subject in the New
Testament. Paul said,
"Women did change the
natural use into that
which is against nature
(Romans 1:26) That is
lesbianism. Further, Paul
said, "likewise also men,
leaving the natural use
of the woman, burned in
their lust one toward
another; men with men
working that which is
unseemly (Romans 1:2)
That is homosexuality.
In I Corinthians 6:9,
Paul says the "effemi-
nate" and "abusers of
themselves with man-
kind" in that condition
were "unrighteous" and
"shall not inherit the
kingdom of God I
Timothy 1:10 says that
men who defile them-
selves with men are
God has spoken in
His word. Homosexualitv
(or lesbianism) is not
normal, nor is it just a
sickness. It is a sin
"against nature (Rom.
1:26,27).
The professor was
right when he said that
God is more loving and
merciful and understand-
ing than His people. But
He is also more just
than His people and
"will bring every act to
judgement whether it be
good or evil(Ecc. 12:
11) � The professor also
noted that Jesus said.
� 'fiL, him vdjo witioujfc
Jesus was telhng these
men that they had no
right to judge the hearts
of others. Nor do I have
that right.
But I do have the
right and the respon-
lfge. ��,
sibility to share G
word. Jesus told thi
woman, at who no
could cast a stone, to
"go and sin no m
It he did go on -inning
she had "a certain ter
rifying expectation of the
judgement and the fur
of a tire which will
consume the adversar
ies (Hebrews 10:26-31).
If vou see homosex-
ualjlv purely from a
social point ol view, I'm
�ure a thi mean- little
to ou. But if vou want
to bring God into the
debate, you need to
what Hi- word as.
Frank Holloweil
Major Attractions explains position
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
As chairperson for the
Student Union Major At-
tractions Committe I find
it necessary to clarify
the committee's position
with regard to the pro-
posed Boston concert.
We agree with the
position taken bv FOUN-
TAINHEAD that' the pri-
orities on Minges Col-
iseum need to be re-
examined; however, we
do not believe that any
personalities (i.e. Dr.
Edgar Hooks) are in-
volved in the unavailabil-
ity of the facility. In-
stead, we believe that
priorities are at fault.
The committee does
agree that academic mat-
ters and intercollegiate
athletics should have a
higher priority than con-
certs. However, consider-
ing our substantial in-
vestment (in a floor co-
vering to protect Minges)
and the fact that we
only wish access
Minges two times
semester, we
that Major
should have
priority than
into
per
do believe
Attractions
a higher
intramural
basketball.
This is not to impiv
that intramuraU aren't
important, they are. We
simply believe that after
everything has been con
sidered, concerts should
have a higher priority
than intramurals.
In the future, the
committee will work
change the present pri-
orities on Minges Col
iseum. We do not be
lieve priorities should be
come a question of per
sonalities.
Charles Sune
Bowl ticket drive encouraged
Fcjnfainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over 50 years
EDITOR
Doug White
PRODUCTION MANAGER ADVERTISING MANAGER
Leigh Coakley tfcWg EDITORS Robf X M'Swaim
Ricfci Gliarmia
Marc Barnes
TRENDS EDITOR
Steve Bachner
SPORTS EDITOR
Sam Rogers
FOUNTAINHEAD la the student newspaper of East
Carolina University sponsored by the Media Board of ECU
and Is distributed each Tuesday and Thursday (weekly
during the summer).
Mailing address: Old Sooth Building, Greenville, N.C.
27634
Editorial offices: 757-6356, 757-6367, 757-6306.
Subscriptions: 610 annually, alumni 66 annually.
Editor's note: This let-
ter appeared in the
"ft ashington Daily
Wars" and was forward-
ed u, FOLST.USHEAD).
ECU has grown in
leaps and bounds over
the last decade. Part of
this growth can be attri-
buted to the outstanding
football program which
baa been developed.
The ECU football pro-
gram has reached a high
level of respect through-
out the south. This
respect has been gained
by successful regular sea-
son campaigns over the
last five years, with the
aid of several regionally
televised games. Pirate
football is now on the
verge of national promi-
nence.
A good showing at
the Independence Bowl
on Dec. 16 will help
ECU gain even more
recognition. However,
more is needed than just
a victory in the bowl
game. The athletic de-
partment of ECU pur-
i-hascd 10,000 ticket to
be sold to Pirate friend
Ian, and alumni.
There are many fUn
in ur area that will not
be able to attend and
we have thought of a
aj to help the Pirate
With ticket .ale and
also bM�t actual attend-
ance.
We are asking each
� "ate fan to purchase
�� regular amount of
tickets as if ik�.
�� ii tne game
were ,n Greenville. We
will then send the lark.
rt� lo Shreveport through
i.hfr newspaper to be
'�nhuted ,o local bovs
ClU,s' orphanages, bov
�M girl scout troops
nior citizens, and any-
one that might not oth-
erwise be able to attend.
and1" � ,? �
� lhe m��y will be
colleded .� 231 Eaat 7
� ' W8�ngon, (7th St
Kecreation Center! fo
B10 a in. 12 p.in . i
p.m.
h" that ,iT
w Ul" �� a rattttto'ta
t' .il-oiii Ifcj a- ur jr
and will want i h� l
our �,r pjrat
Mm ha. I ��,�,j.l
Sll-ail Fr.un I-
McDaniel
will be
missed
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
ECU lost a grest
k�der when Dr. McDan
�' of t�e Biology De-
partmeat pataed awsy.
�� "M�, be was a frest
teacher, � fuse leader.
nd unioae friead
Lawrence W. FcMbss
� Mi mm mn in m iMnamii m m�
mtmmm





Greek Forum
B R1CKI CLIARMIS
"ews Editor
- ' . Christmas �
now m �. s
�n Progress. This
tPKeOV,tDthe P" h
� �PPonun,tv to tour
1 �r0r,tV hou8e� Wed-
�V. Thursday, .J
� Alpha Kappa
AIPa will be KnU
their open h� ng
Panh.i? �USe at le
'anhellenic office
A ee thro contes,
, �" a"d women w,
hd D- T and 8
1. Mea��f�i Gym and
Wun Coliseum. On
Thursday. Dec. 7
tor the free throw
"ll! bt' 3 p.m. untI 5
P� at Memorial and 8
P-�. until 10:45 p.m. at
M�ng� On Dec. 8, the
m� will be 2 p.m.
Unt1' D P� at Memorial
onl) No pre-reg.stration
is necessary for the
P�"ion. Just drop bv
Memorial and sign up.
'lather information
IM-Rec Office, 204
Memorial, 757-6387.
At Co-Greek's last
meeting, Winter Greek
J" planned. This year's
Wter Greek will be
be,d �n Jan. 19 at the
American Legion.
thJ1 T a,S� enounced
that there will be a
hrtstmas party for all
Greeks on the last day
of classes, Dec. 11 at
the log cabin at Con-
tentnea Campground. The
campground is located off
of 264 between Green-
ville and Farmville. The
party will start around
8:30 or 9 p.m.
This will be the last
Greek Forum for the
semester and will begin
again after we return
from Christmas break.
The day for Greek
Forum will be changed
from Thursday to Tues-
day- So, instead of
turning in your articles
on Tuesday, turn them
in on Monday. The
articles must be in bv
12 noon on Monday.
They will still be placed
in the Sigma Sigma
Sigma box in Dean
Fulghum's office in the
Whichard Building. Please
pay close attention to
this announcement
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
The lambda Chi Al-
phas have set the date
for Crescent Girl, their
formal dance. The dance
will be held on Feb. 10,
1979.
The brothers and as-
sociate members had a
Christmas party on Wed-
nesday night with their
Little Sisters.
Jay Downie, social
chairman at the house,
has been named to
Who's Who Among
American College Stud-
ents. Congratulations Jay.
The associate members
decorated a Christmas
tree at the house.
The Chi Omegas will
have their house open
for Three Days of Chris-
mas. They are also busy
with a telethon Tuesday
night, basketball intra-
murals Wednesday night
and their annual Christ-
mas party on Thursday
night.
The Sigma Sigma
Sigmas are having a
Christmas party for
school children at Elm-
hurst School. The party
for these underpriveleged
children is a philanthro-
pic project for the
sorority and will be held
on Dec. 12 at the
house.
At the Tri-Sig formal
which was held Saturday
night, Molly Casey was
named Best Pledge in
the fall pledge class and
Kathy Adcock was named
Best Sister by the
pledge class.
Economists make report
F.(.l News Bureau
r
The possibility of sex
Timination in wages paid
the nation's physical thera-
pists is explored in a report
I J two East Carolina
University economists in a
-ue of the journal
Industrial and Labor Rela-
tions Revteu
Drs Louis Zincone and
Frank Close say they found
that accounting for produc-
tivity-related factors and job
titles "significantly'
reduced male-female annual
vNdge differentials in the
physical therapy profession,
but that a considerable gap
between $3,240 and $3,730 -
remains, which may be
attributable to one tvpe of
r mination or other.
The Zincone-Close arti-
5exDiscrimination in a
Paramedical Profession is
based on a statistical study of
a representative sample of
ng phvsical thera-
js the U.S.
'Productivity characteri-
sl cs" which cause differ-
- in pay levels include
of physical therapy
Applications
taken
for S.U.
president
b MIKE ROGERS ,
Assistant News Editor
According to Mike
Morse, Student Union
President, applications
will soon be accepted for
his office.
"You should apply
December 4th through
January 16th. In your
application, you should
address a letter to the
Student Union Board of
Directors stating why you
believe you should be
accepted said Morse.
N previous experience
is necessary According
to Morse, the Student
Union Board of Directors
will make their decision
on January 24th. "April
6th is the date of the
installation banquet
U hen asked about the
hours the president has
to serve, Morse replied,
"That's up to the pre-
sident. Usually a mini-
mum of 10 hours a
week
Morse also listed the
committees that the pre-
sident must serve on.
"The president is on the
Afro-American Cultural
Center Advisory Board,
chairman of the Student
Union Program Board,
serves on the Media
Board, is responsible for
the budget of $250,000 a
year, serves on the Soli-
citations Committee, and
is � member of the
Student Union Board of
Directors
The Student Union
President is paid $175 a
month. The number of
terms cne can serve are
unlimited.
degrees held, years ot
experience, weekly work
schedule, type of job (super-
visory, staff, private prac-
tice, etc.), job location, and
family situation and net
income, which can strongly
at feet an individual's per-
sonal salary goals.
"Marital status may
influence productivity in a
number of ways Dr. Zin-
cone said.
"For males, families
imply the legal obligation of
support and may generate a
conscientiousness that mav
nut be present in unmarried
males.
"Married females, on
the other hand, are often the
secondary earners in the
ATTIC
family, by choice or chance
subordinating tlieir own
interests to those of their
husbands
For the purposes of their
study, Zincone and Close
make distinctions between
four types of sex discrimi-
nation, not all of which can
be treated in a statistical
survey: "Value discrimina-
tion in which females are
guided into roles tradition-
ally believed suitable for
women; "rational discrimi-
nation which is based on
the tendency for many
married females to interrupt
their careers lor family obli-
gations; "educational dis-
crimination by which
qualified women are denied
Thurs. Sun.
BLAZE
Epic Recording
Artist
lilh A Evan Streets
BCTiiltZ. "� f
Mnter, Strofi's nmem $7.88
Miller Ute n'oTL $7.96
Piels sM $1.49
Butipweiaar, Schlitz,
MaSr,StrohsKegs $34.00
SO Lbs. Ice $2.75
OPEN24HRS
access to training programs;
and "employment discrimi-
nation the failure to hire
women or to hire them at
lower wages.
According to the re-
searchers' analysis of all
data relating to physical
therapists' employment
backgrounds and circum-
stances, the large gap
between male and female
average annual earnings,
which comes to $7,240, can
be reduced by half when
adjustments are made for
productivity variables.
However, all other fac-
tors being equal, they dis-
covered, a considerable
wage gap remains, which
is caused by discrimina-
tion.
pjpjp
WE ARE PAYING
CASH
FOR GLASS RINQS
(REGARDLESS OF CONDITION)
OTHER GOLD RINGS
(REGARDLESS OF CONDITION)
ANY GOLD OR SILVER OF
ANY KIND AND
TOP CASH PRICE PAID FOR
SILVER AND GOLD COINS
COIN COLLECTIONS
BRING TO "COIN MAN"
HARMONY HOUSE
SOUTH
ON THE MALL
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
758-2211
k
706 Evens st.
SPiCMt
THE
WORLD'S BEST
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AT THE
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WITH THIS cotmi & mCHA&fr sonowK
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Moil, thru Thar.
xFr&Sat. 11:00-12:00
San. 12:00-11:00
DINNER SPECIALS
tl.S9
11-2
Mon. thru Fri. &
7 Docombor 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD P
SSL
�tU
WE GLADLY ACCEPT
PERSONAL CHECKS
IRISH COMEBACK
NIPS TROJANS
25-24
By TOM HAINES
Joe Montana spear-headed one of college football's
all-time comebacks Saturday to give the So 8 Irish
of Notre Dame a 25-24 victory over the .0 4 �
ranked Trojans of the University of Southern California
Montana passed two yards to Pete Holahan for a
touchdown with 46 seconds left in the game to cap a
brilliant 1 po,n. fouth quarter. With 44 seconds
rematmng USC got the ball for the last time. A
outfit Tn fr(mPaUJ McDonald to Vk Rakhshan,
put the L all on the Trojan 40. The next plav was
then ruled an incomplete pass bv referee ' U C
,Tah, T ame uthen protes,ed ,he cail ��
ti right o hnve the play reviewed on video-tape
�nstant replay by the officials. Referee Myopia needed
only one viewing of the tape before changing h,s ��
from a� incomplete pass to a fumble. This was the
32 t.me a referees decision has been contested, with
ufe oTThT ' ,S'nCe NCAA iniated the ed
season " " by � A team
Completely dominated in the first three quarters bv
auaterrn V t t" M'�ed the'r dr� EJ
quarter comeback through the strong arm of Joe
Montana who threw for over 350 Lds, and the
rht v;Ha,nes wh� � - -
However in the first quarter the Trojans
See COMEBACK, Page 58.
Paid for by A.F.T.E.R.
4
V
I


V
Y

V
w
ST

") TA�.yFw SI Pv" ��� y,
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If you're a little bored
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It's called the Pabst-Marshall Tucker
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Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 7 December 1978
Marathon'33: 'realistic atmosphere of 30 s9
By
SUE ELLEN McCLEOD
Staff Writer
Marathon '33, Caro-
lina Playhouse's second
major production of the
season, finds it's greatest
asset on the genuine at-
mosphere of the 1930's
which permeates the
show.
Aspects of set and
costume design, musical
coinpostion and delivery,
and the stance, move-
ment, and attitudes gen-
erated by the cast as a
whole combine to create
a believeable and pic-
turesque atmosphere.
The show begins with
background music of the
1930's. As the music
plays, pictures of the
depression flash on
separate screens,
pictures range from
pression victims to
four
The
de-
Hol-
II II7.VC "HORSES" IN a scene
'Marathon '33 Tuvla Jereme.
Rutch White. Denny Wright. Marshall
Suing and Debbie Phipps.
Photo by Pete Podeszwa
lywood stars to Political
Policies.
The slides provide a
cross-section of the
beautiful and the ugly,
offering an impression of
what is to follow. The
nature of the slides and
the idea behind their
use is well conceived;
however, problems with
mechanical adjustment
resulted in unclear pic-
tures and uneven pre-
sentation.
The set
designed by
Havnes to encompass not
only the dancer's floor
but all the facilities used
during the marathon as
well, including a hospital
station, rest quarters,
and spectator stands. The
set adds to the overall
atmosphere in color and
decor as well as its
versitality. The set works
is beautifully
Edward
LYNN HICKS. HOLLY Jereme and Sally Clodfelter.
Photo by Pete Podeszwa
Roxy Theatre plays host
to songwriter John Prine
well for the play provi-
ding maximum space for
large screens as well as
small ones.
Maria Jurglanis' cos-
tumes also contribute to
the general atmosphere.
Not only do they repre-
sent the period style,
but also they reflect the
character's various stages
of wealth and poverty.
ssion era attitudes and
interests. Edgar R. Loe-
ssin's direction in this
respect is excellent as
are Sara Jo Berman's
period dances.
The play concerns the
3000 odd hours of a
dance marathon and the
people involved , but in
doing so becomes almost
entirelv a series of char-
By CHRIS FARREN
Staff Reporter
-lum recording art-
ist John Prine will be
performing his own
brand of home-spun mel-
odic- this coming Thurs-
day night at Greenville's
Row Theatre.
Over six years since
he was touted as the
'next Bob Dylan Prine
has been making per-
sonal apppearances all
over the country promot-
ing his latest release
Bruised Orange, and
firmly establishing himself
as one of the very best
American songwriters.
Bruised Orange marks
a new phase in the
career of this unique
performer. It has been
over three years since
Prine's last album, The
Best of John Prine, was
released.
During the interim
Prine took some time off
from recording to reassess
his career as a musician
and according to Prine:
"It took me a year to
get out of my contract
with Atlantic, a year to
decide whether I wanted
to make records any
more, then a year to
make the album
Brui.sed Orange is a
10-song collection which
reaffirms Prine's position
as one of today's finest
folk-oriented songwriters.
Unlike Springsteen,
whose Born to Run
success three years ago
propelled him onto the
covers of both Time and
Newsweek, Prine is
something of a trade
secret.
His tunes have been
recorded by such res-
pected pop figures as
Bette Midler, Joan Baez,
John Denver and Bonny
Raitt. Still the combined
sales of his first four
Atlantic albums probably
was less than last
week's tally for Saturday
Night Fever.
Drama
The atmosphere is
completed by the huge
cast and their smooth
semblance of the '30's
in evcrv detail. Their
collective attitude and
movement, even down to
the manner of their gait
provided a final, believ-
able element to their
portrayal of the depre-
acter studies rather than
a presentation of the
growth and maturation of
any one character. The
script lacks the ability to
draw any conclusions
from its own actions,
failing to show how its
characters grow or
change from their exper-
iences.
Sally Clodfelter, ��
the role of June, is the
one character who could
be expected to learn
from her experience, as
it is her first marathon.
Clodfelter gives the im-
pression of hope and re-
newal as the play closes
but fails to present the
gradual transition which
must occur within the
plav in order for her to
reach this final state. Al-
though she is very ener-
getic and moves well in
her portrayal, Clodfelter
is troubled by an uneven
delivery.
Several characters de-
liver fine supporting per-
formances. Among these
are B. Lynn Hicks (Flo
Marciano) and Holly Jer
erne (Rae Wilson) as
marathon "horses and
Tom B. Kastenbaum
(Mr. Dankle) as the
marathon's organizer and
promoter. Debra Zum-
bach's portrayal of Eve
Adamsnski, Dankle as-
,�, refined
providing a
-i-tanl.
clean.
blitzing factor in
-how
Marathon '33 pres
a multitude ol chart
studies in realisti
mosphere o( the I
The show Ha- problei
however, communi .
more than a picture
what a dance maratl
l- like.
The hermne. J.
leaves the marathon
hope and faith
future. but the pla-
in provide adequate
ization or transit
enable her lo reach
attitude. The r alisl
mosphere reated b
-ign. special
the cast presents an
foundation for the d
opment of the show
the characters; yet,
-how itself, unfortunati
fails to provide this
elopment.
Blues: Hove, life and livin
real simple but to the point'
By DOUG WHITE
Editor
"1 think the blue- are uniquely American. The
songs are about lim life, and love. Real simple
lyrics, but real to the point. They make ya feel
good -aid Mike Well 26, local white bluesman
and frequent downtown performer.
"Like, some people think that blues make ya feel"
bad and some people get depressed hearin' blues, J
but I think its to make ya feel good
Wells began performing in coffeehouses about 1973
when he was living in Chapel Hill and going to
school at UNC, but his interest in the blues goes
back much further.
"I first got interest'd in the blues when I was
young. I was in junior high or high school, I was
listenin' to old Bob Dylan stuff, and I listened to
Woody Guthrie, who was his influence, and Woody
Cuthrie was hangin' around with people like Sonny
Terr and Leadbelly, and 1 think the first real blues
I heard was Leadbelly. He got me into other kinds
of blues
"When 1 first moved here, not that many people
had heard any blues, but I think it's starting to be
popular. Like, I been playin' a lot, and people are
exposed to it there, and James Cotton has been at
the Roxy, and they're plannin' on getting Muddy-
Water- in January. I think there enough
here that like- it
Despite the apparent n-e in popularity. w
admits that blues album- aren't a- easy to find a-
they once were. He remember- in the late txi - you
could go to the Record Bar ami see a
different blues things, and now it not there, now
vou see just a little bit.
"Most of the stuff they're puttin" out now i- just,
Jike, on small labeU. It's J.ust BAJieJUng like it was,
�tut f think it's a popular 'cause I know it'll a!w.i-
e there. People like Muddy Water- fare -lartm' to
come back now, and put out some good -tutt. with
help from people who are into blue like Johnny
Winter, especially young musician U hue people m
than black people Wells added.
The blues first arose in the Mississippi
region and gained widespread popularity ami ng
rural blacks in the south. According lo Well
one knows what the blues sounded like before
1920's because it was never recorded.
The first recordings of country blue- start :
1926.
"The first blues star was Blind Lemon Jeffi -
and he recorded a lot. Then there were some n
stars in the '20's. They mostly lived in the country
and would go to the city to record Wells -aid
Wells divides the blues into two chronological
categories, the pre-World II country blues, based in
See BLl rS, .
Bruised Orange may
finally bring him a wider
audience. Produced by
Steve Goodman, the LP
has a brighter instrum-
ental texture than Prine's
previous efforts and it
features - on balance-
the most accessible batch
of tunes since his
heralded 1971 debut
album.
The new collection
bristles with an energy
and spirit that is due in
large part to a rekin-
dling of Prine's musical
interests.
Prine will be per-
forming two shows on
Thursday night at 7
p.m. and 10 p.m.
RECORDING ARTIST JOHN Prime will perform live
concert, tonigkt at GreenviUeS Roxy Tkeetre.
t
i





Another 'poor script
?
7 Dtcwibw 1978 OUNTAtNHEAD Page 7
By BARRY CUYTON
�instant Trend Fj
ers reeling
Th
'ends Editor
er seems to be an
in,nate number an
r based on thj
V-tnan, War coming out
� HolK.ood these "days
M- recent among them
�unn also ma�s.
.l, a karate
wno-aun-it.
J h tar of the
lm - � Norri
tm' ��peutor on
k�- competition
C,rcU,t a��i the impres.
�on s, glven b that
movie Koing to
1 UP e martial arts
- Norm' past
But even though
here are several rough
au turnhU � l �
lumou punchmg-
�ut scattered through-
Good Guys (T
Set h? arC defi�"elv
8ven back-seat treatment
M�re of intere8t tQ
Noms. it seems
�.as, is to
��ke debut as . 8er
2 K 'T' so�nething
�h' the average mo
super-secret group of
specially trained assasins
attached to the infamous
Phoenix Project (a rela-
tively long-term American
operation which effected
the kidnapping or liqui-
Cinema
ear
vie-goer will probably
view with some scepti-
cism after having sat
through Good Guys.
The development of
John T. Booker (played
by Norris) throughout the
film is decidedly incom-
plete. We first see him
in Vietnam as the leader
of the Black Tigers, a
FOREST VILLAGE APARTMENTS
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MeJvinRBoyd
MelvinRBoydJr.
Franklin C Tripp
dation of some
thousand North
mese officials over
conflict's duration).
The scene is the
pending close to the
American involvement
the battle. The American
Under Secretary of State
Conrad Morgan (played
by Jamrs Franciscus) is
twenty
Vietna-
the
im-
in
engaged in difficult ne
gotiations with the reflff��
sentative from North "ft"
etnam who exacts froli
Morgan a promise to set
up the Black Tigers for
a Vietcong ambush.
Morgan, aspiring for
power and favor Ml
home, agrees and sends'
Booker and his Tigers
on a mission behind the �
'lines' to rescue a cache
of CIA agents being held
in a POW camp. When
Booker arrives, he And
his men are fired upon
and receive heavy f
sualties. As if that aV
not bad enough the he1
icopter scheduled to refl.
devous with them to
make pick-up doeso!t
show, and the team
makes a dangerous ex-
cursion back to friendlier
climes on foot.
The scene shifts and
ie sre suddenly in pre-
sent-day America. Booker,
ex-commando major, now
teaches Political Science
at a local university
while racing cars as a
past-time.
it
'Escaped the
ambuah
He is contacted by
an old friend working in
�" the CIA (Lloyd Haynes)
who informs him that
seVeral of the five Black
Tigers who escaped the
ambush have died mys-
teriously and asks him
to contact the remaining
Tigers to warn them.
5P Simultaneously, Booker
meets a beautiful young
federal investigator (por-
trayed by Anne Archer)
whose current assignment
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is prying into the closets
of Conrad Morgan who
is scheduled to be
moved up to the recently
vacated slot of Secretary
of State.
Together they make
their way across Califor-
nia in search of the
surviving Tigers while
being pursued by Viet-
namese killers and CIA
agents who are deter-
mined to do in Booker
and his lady-frjend.
Booker manages to
kill several of them and
leaves the rest spread-
eagled in multiple-contu-
sion induced dreams to
find himself finally con-
fronting the man who
masterrnined the liquida-
tion plot, the soon-to-be
Secretary of State Mor-
gan.
Aside from being trite
in conception, the main
problem with this film is
an unbelievable lack of
good acting. Norris him-
self tries, but he is,
after all, not an actor
� he is a karate in-
structor, and his attempts
to transmit righteous in-
dignance are hampered
by "his voice which he
delivers in a high-pitched
gravelly rasp that simply
can't be taken seriously.
There is however, no
excuse for the poor per-
formance given by vet-
eran actor James Fran-
ciscus. That is just bad
acting.
Olriei actors are prob-
ably competent with re-
sponsible scripts, but this
movie simply doesn't
give them the chance
thev deserve.
Midi
tbursii
presents
Henry
Wlnkler
in
Heroes
This Frl.
and Sat.
night at 7
and 9 p.m.
in the
Hcndrli
Theatre
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JACK'S
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Higher Education for Less
II Steak eating 101. Course includes choice of any regular steak
or seafood dinner (sandwich platters excluded).
II Steak eating 102. Same, but with a friend. I get 50 off twice.
Offer good throughout 197879 school year.
Not valid on Tuesdays and cannot be used in addition to other specially -priced offers.
500 West Greenville Blvd. Greenville , N.C.
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Page 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 7 Deombr 1978
Lucifer's Hammer Hs a fast
moving adventure yarn9
By BARRY CLAYTON
Assistant Trends Editor
EDITORS NOTE:ln the
previous installment, we
nere introduced to Ham
er-Brown (Lucifer's Ham
mer) the comet destined
to strike the Earth.
Through Randall we are
introduced to Mark Czeseu,
.i biker, philosopher, aging
tough, and friend of Randall
who elects to hire him as a
production assistant (car-
rying the heavj stuff, setting
up tape recorders, cameras,
etc.)
In researching the Ham-
ner-Brown comet (there were
dis ocrers Brown,
however, is a pubescent
photographer that we never
ft in the hook), the trio
goes to California Institute of
Technology's Jet Propulsion
Laboratories.
It is there that they meet
Dr. Charles Sharps, Lab-
oratories Project Director,
and the brilliant Dr. Dan
Forrester, a technical staff
member. VI hen asked, aca-
demicaiiy, about the amount
damage Hamner-Brown
would inflict if it happened to
-trike tiic Karth, the two
astronomer-scientists launch
themselves in the direction
i nearby blackboard and
attempt to establish a model
to unrk their calculations
around. They settle on a cubic
mile of hot fudge sundae
ause the density of its
ingredient- would approach
"t the components of
Hamner-Brown.
Through a series of
ising calculations, they
arrive a! an estimate of the
rgy-release a collision
Mi would produce:
enough to vaporize a cube of
water two-hundred and
seventy miles to a side!
Or as Sharpes puts it:
. sixty million cubic kilo-
meters of water go into the
atmosphere. Harvey, it's
going to rain
To say nothing of earth-
quakes, tidal waves, or the
new ice age that putting so
much water into the air
would insure.
comet has struck, we see
some of them die in the
ensuing cataclvsm.
Lucifer's Hammer is,
however, basically a story
about survivors, and the
greater part of the rest
of the book deals with
their individual struggles
to make their way to
the relative security of
the Jellison ranch-sanctu-
ary in the southern Cali-
Books
As the comet approaches
and the liklihood of collision
increases, a handful of far-
sighted individuals make
careful preparations for sur-
vival. In Los Angeleg, es-
pecially, citizens anxiously
await the arrival of "Hot
Fudge Sundae which falls on
Tuesday this week A sur-
prising number of them have
left the city of the Angels by
Tuesday, the day earmarked
for Hammer-fall, the arrival
of the comet.
No one, of course, quite
believes that Hamner-Brown
will actually strike the
Earth. But that, after all, is
the thrust of the book, and
after some two-hundred
pages of introductions and
supporting story-line, the
Hammer (as it has been
popularly renamed) does, in
fact, fall.
As previously mentioned,
a very large number of
characters are followed
throughout the story (far too
many to mention even briefly
a- individuals), and once the
BLUES
. 6
and the post-war blues, based in
"Lighmin" Nhk Wells, a nickname he has borne
since childhood, s equally adept at the guitar, banjo.
Jar. harmonica. and the resophonic slide
He recently graduated from ECU with a
therapy. For the moment, he
- �n ' music, admitting that although "it's
� - kmda poor
"ell - ntrigued bj the possibilities of using his
and once set up a program along
. local rehabilitation center.
real into that. The program was
pie involved in music in different
-tarted out list'nin and then gettin'
involved, and maybe get 'em started playin' an
rument ell- -aid.
Hi- patients were people who had been in auto
idents or had suffered Mrokes or similar
irtunes and were fated with having to learn to
usl ii after their misfortunes. They came from
ail ages and background- and according to Wells,
responded well to the therapy.
'Everybody alwav- responds to music. I got
interested in that from playing in nursing homes and
stuff, and that one thing you can reach retarded
plf with i- music
fornia highlands.
Food is decidedly in short
supply. The primary agricul-
tural areas of California are,
ironically, the most useless
to the scraggly few who have
managed to survive the
initial holocaust. The Sand
Joaquin Valley has become,
through the offices of floods
and tidal waves, the San
Joaquin Sea, and the
torential rains have managed
to all but destroy the crops in
the relatively undamaged
regions.
Most of the canned goods
which might be immediately
useful now lie under several
hundred feet of water. The
rest of it is either quickly
consumed or falls victim to
the continuous rain which
rusts its way through the
cans.
As if this wasn't enough,
groups of roving bandits
begin to organize with the
aim in mind of raiding the
tew small communities that
begin to look as if they might
be able to make a go of
survival. They have, through
proudly
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The inevitable battle be
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about survival after the
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Independence
Bowl
B SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
the last six years, Pirate faithfuls have
bitched, griped, complained. and cursed after the
conclusion ol ever) football season because they have
!ai1' receive that elusive bowl imitation.
Reasons? Most of them have been directed at the
Pira schedule. Teams like Marshall, Western
Carolina, Toledo, and Southern Illinois don't draw too
man -tare- from howl scouts. And ECl is constantly
playing in the shadow of Atlantic Coast Conference
tear-
But finally, alter a length) 13 year wait. ECU has
received an imitation to pla in the
Independence Bowl, Dec. 16. in Shreveport, La. Call
Independence what you want, it -till is a BOWL
the Indpendence Bowl is not a household
the Rose, Orange and Cotton bowls, it still
the 15 post season bowl games
b the NCAA. It played in a 51.(XX) scat
fair Stadium diui Southland Conference champion
ma Tech i- certainl) a worth) opponent. And
W ITV I in Washington, VC has announced they
will broadcast the game live from Shreveport.
Hi a successful howl contesl is measured bv
� thing- than just who win and loses. It's
importanj jut how man) tans each team
brii because at gate revenue.
II both schools bring a huge following along with
- quentlv each team will go home with a
heck. And chance- are a larger and more
bowl ma) invite them elsewhere next year.
Earh reports? from universit) officials and students
this vear - Independence Bowl have varied.
Pirate club members and administrative officials
the) will attend while the majority of
. :� tits on campus have given a number of
� thev won't or cannot attend.
II KCl doesn't draw a large crowd on the road
- Independence Bowl, one thing remains
I: ma be another 13 years before the
mother howl imitation.
H NTAINHEAD recentl) questioned administrative
and students about their opinion on the
nee Bowl game.
I
BILL CAIN, thletic Director- "Everything we do here
� to benefit the -indent- which is just what
I in the country does. A howl game
r. positive step for KCl athletic Unfortuna-
� set the time, date and place tor these
: ize it going to be an inconvience tor
but 1 hope our fans and students all
important this game is for the growth of
Personally, I'm er enthusiastic about
ind I think we'll take a real representative
there with US
MIKE CARROLI
istant Pirate Club Director- "The
ire l- -omething no one can overlook.
o far is no excuse. Look at
re going to El Paso. Tex. and there are
who will still have to travel even
It important ECL takes a big
ise in order to be invited back or to go
bowl game we'll have to have a big
I
VTHER PRINGLE, Trenton, N.JT think it's
. . ir the administration to give excuses for a
.irne Besides, only a minority of the
campus are interested in it anyway. I
go even if I had the opportunity -imply
I'm not interested
m -i
DAVIS Wh.teville, juniorMy reasons are
n.ncial If I had some extra money stashed
sure 1 would go. And then again, it's so
Besides I want to finish my exams before
I guess the game has really come at a
time this year too.
IANE iRWl Asheboro, sophomoreMy exam sche-
,11, keep- me from going, and its also kind
vp,�ve But if I could go with some group and
to an I wou d be more than
help rai-e the money to go i WUUIU
happv to go I'm a member of the pom pom squad
and I'm really disappointed that the band and our
squad can't go.
OSA D1NARD0, Jamesville, freshman don't want to
have to wait until after I come back to take exam.
II r mc I would probably go to the
If it wasn t for exams I wouiu v
game
DARRELL HARRISON, Greenville Pirate ajk-b-
Tm not going largely because of UJw
W1TN-TV announced they were gomg to' ��e the
same I'm sure a lot of people have changeI their
minds about going down there. Its a long way to
drive I
Lady Pirates blast WFU;
Thompson sets pace with 31
By JIMMY DuPREE
Staff Writer
"The) didn't come
out expecting to beat
Wake Forest We knew
what we had to do
said Lady Pirate coach
Cathy Andruzzi at the
conclusion of a 102-48
shellacking of the D
Deacons by ECL Tuesday
evening at Minges Coli-
seum.
The Ladv Pirates were
once again led by star
forward Rosie Thompson
who poured in 31 points
and garnered 20
re bounds.
Thompson devastated the
less-talented visitors bv
connecting on 13 out of
2 field goals, including
a lay-up which sent the
Ladv Bucs total into
three digits for the first
time this season.
The Pirates had a
total of five players in
double figures for the
night. Point guard Lydia
Rountree came through
with her first big scoring
effort of the season with
20, while forward April
Ross added 12. Gale
Kerbaugh, the team's se
cond leading scorer con-
tributed 1 1. while serve
center Marcia Girven
contributed 10 points.
"we had five plyers
in double figures. We
saw a lot of plusses in
tonight's game noted
Andruzzi. "We had good
ball-playing from Lydia.
Lydia is feeding to her
teammate Another point
guard might have drove
and drove, but Lydia
waited to set up the
offense instead. We had
April Ross shooting five
for seven and she could
have shot more, but she
chose not to
ECU jumped out front
from the outset, not
allowing the Deacons to
score until four minutes
had elapsed in the game
witnessed by a small
gathering of 100 follow-
ers.
The Pirates dominated
the boards throughout
the contest, as they out-
rebounded Wake 58-32.
The Deacons are,
however, improved over
last year's squad, which
was held scoreless
through the first 15
minutes of play against
N.C. State the nation's
second ranked team.
The lone player to hit
two figures for Wake
was Jane Hendrick with
1 1, followed by Lori
Bailey and Janet Gleason
with eight and seven,
respectively.
"75 percent (freethrow
percentage) is just about
where we want to be.
When we were sloppy, it
wasn't for a long period
of time. We shouldn't
have 20 turnovers
analyzed Andruzzi.
With the victory over
Wake and a previous
victory over another
Atlantic Coast Conference
foe, Duke, the Ladv
Pirates now stand at 2-2
overall and 2-1 against
Division I schools.
"They have to work
and they know it said
Andruzzi. "The girls still
don't realize how strong
they are physically. I
think when we get into
some tighter games with
a faster pace, they will
see that they are in
better condition than
most of the teams thev
play against
Gail Kerbaugh
Vols destroy
Pirates 89- 71
George Maynor
Mack scores 24
Freshman guard Garv
Carter ignited a scoring
blitz late in the second
period as the Volunteers
defeated ECU 89-71
Tuesday night.
Carter spurred the
Vols on with aggressive
defense, accurate shoot-
ing, and fancy passing.
He teamed with senior
Tommy Darden to form
a zone man-to-man
defense thai nave the
Pirates fits late in the
game.
Chuck Threeths laun-
ched a seven point indi-
vidual scoring streak that
helped ignite the home
crowd in Knoxville.
Threeths, who finished
with 11 points, gave the
ols a 54-51 lead on a
tip-in with just under 12
minutes remaining and
scored three more times
on a pair of shots
underneath and a free
throw to widen themargin
65-55 with 7:21 left.
The victory propelled
Tennessee's record to 2-1
on the season. ECU
dropped to 2-2.
The Pirates erased a
-ix point lead by Ten-
nessee early in the game
and went ahead twice
before the half when the
score was tied 32-32.
Guard George Maynor,
hitting on long 25 foot
jumper- gave ECU a
tour-point lead early in
the second before the
ols opened their rallv,
that was chiefly due to
a pressing man-to-man
defense.
Maynor lead all scor-
ers with 24 points. Cen-
ter Greg Cornelius added
14 for tKo i'lratri, hu
points coming mostly on
moves towards the bas-
ket. Oliver Mack, the
Pirates' All-America can-
didate suffered a horren-
dous shooting night and
finished with only 12
points.
Highly-touted junior
Reggie Johnson led all
Tennessee scorers with
22 points. His power
drives towards the basket
caused the center of the
ECU difficulties through-
out the contest. Terry
Crosby added 20 points
for and Tommy Darden
18 for the victorious
Volunteers.
The Pirates' next ac-
tion is upcoming this
Fridav and Saturday
nights.
Indians scalp Pirates
State wrestlers
roll past ECU
B) SAM ROGERS

RALEIGH With thre. -tarter-
Pirate lineup and fre-hmi i
classes, it w a- quiti
N.C St Hi
Vnd the tig V
champions had little tr
a- N ,C. St a t e i
ECU. The
ECl in the la-
impn ied thi -
"w hal ti
H I "W.Ni t
i I unl
hcaltm � �
Bui � . � St
mil
St ate quii � - . .
-ions in
runnpr-Ui Ion 1 n, itumpi I 1 � : '
al til md - Mil
16-0 -
State's K e i r � :
Pirate's Dutcl v � il
Sieve k right :
Pa k its third w in
- icr Titni Robins
nd r rank Castrignano pu
�' r eli pinning Fran! S
Th � - , a. : � .
match was I -
and get a �. � - jn the upper v
Bui Stat reall) look
It - reall) tough wrestle with
there. Bui we've gol -tart
ag j - � to win
? tte Mike kooh defeat) I Si
�ml lime this season with ,J -
158 wt ighl i la and 1 ig Carei
win in er Briai Merrian al i
ECl Jam Klh-on Mil - - �
167 and Ja) Devi
Rloru at � '� Pirates
o riling State- Pau F
hea vwcighl liti .
'James Flli-on ami Jav Dt ki
some prettv tough opponents - Hil
reall) missed V i nrthrup, Bute! H � -
Jouer. Thev are all our k
weight ami thev will make
matches.
B
CHARLES CHANDLER
4ssistant Sports Editor
WILLIAMSBURG' Va.
� ECL head coach Lar-
rv Cillman could only
shake his head after
watching his Pirates drop
a 60-54 decision here
Saturdav night to William
and Mary.
Two factors led to
the Pirates loss. First
and foremost, the Bucs
were outplayed and out-
hustled in the first half
by a pesky, yet under-
manned Indian Ball
club.
Secondly, the Pirates
shot only one free throw
the entire contest, while
William and Mary had
27 attempts. "I can't
believe we shot only one
free throw tonight said
Gillman after the contest.
"That just doesn't hap-
pen to a team playing
major college basketball
Surely the Pirate ab-
sence at the line dented
their chances for victory.
From the floor ECU out-
scored the Indians 54-42.
But, of course, it was at
the line that William
and Mary claimed the
victory. The Indians ac-
cumulated 18 points
there while the Pirates
failed to score.
But this i- not to sav
that the Indians didn't
pla a good game from
the floor. Throughout the
contest, coach Bruce
Parkhill's young club
went all out with super-
aggressive play.
The Indians were led
by senior sparkplug Billv
Harrington. The gutsy
little guard scored 15
points and played like a
coach on the floor all
night.
Harrington opened the
night's scoring with a 17
foot jumper to give the
Indians a 2-0 lead. Wil-
liam and Mary built that
lead to as many as 14
points in the first half
and never trailed all
night. The Indians led at
halftime 34-24.
Led by All-America
candidate Oliver Mack,
the Pirates battled back
in the second half. On
numerous occasions,
ECU had the Indian
margin down to two
points, but were never
able to pull even.
Following Mack's field
goal that cut the Indian
lead to 52-50 with 7:17
left in the game, Wil-
liam and Mary went into
their customary stall
game.
Harrington kept the
ball outside the perimeter
for most of the next few
minutes. The only points
scored during a five
minute span that follow-
ed Mack's shot were ea-
sy layups by the In-
dian's Ken Bown and
Scott Whitley.
The Pirates were then
down 56-50 with just
over two minutes left in
the game. Though they
had had their chances,
the Pirates were not a-
ble to score key baskets
when they needed then
late in the contest.
One bright spot for
ECU in the loss was the
play of Mack. The senior
from Queens, N.Y. led
all scorers with 24 points
and displayed his great
all-around play.
Barry Park'hill, William
and Mary assistant coach
and an ex Ail-American
at Virginia, was quite
impressed with the play
of Mack. "He can play
with anyone in the
country said Parkhill.
"There's nothing he
can't do. I was very
impressed. I guarantee
that he will be drafted
very high by the NBA
when he graduates
Though he played a
superb game, even Mack
couldn't get the basket
that would have tied the
game midway through
the second half.
"We certainly passed
up some opportunities to
catch them said Gill-
man. "We had our
chances. And I'll have to
give William and Mary
credit. They're a tough
team to play against
we battled
well in the
I was proud
. I just would
to have got-
more calls out
win at this
have to shoot
"I felt
back real
second half
of our kids
have liked
ten a few
way. To
game, you
free throws
After Mack's 24 point
total, the Pirate scoring
was balanced. Greg Cor-
nelius and George May-
nor both finished with 8
points on the night.
Herb Krusen tallied six
points in the losing ef-
fort.
Oliver Mack
T
� i
� m
r w - f
f






P�g� 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 7 December 1978
Oliver Mack
THE ECl
SENIOR guard will be up against
State A11 American Larry Bird this weekend in
Hatter Classic in a classic dual. Bird and Mack
'i s top two returning scorers.
Lady Pirates
fall to State
B JIMMY DITREE
Lad)
drop-
Staff Wr
RALEICH-The
ite round-ballers
1 their second game
the young season to
- n poised, but
surprised, N.C.
i t. 106-74.
! ad) Bucs made
contest tor the
set i nd ranked
' - i until the
lute mark in the
vhei a fiurrj
break- pushed
int an insur-
iead.
g that really
'� �� game for u
about five bark-to-
bai k fast breaks
analyzed State coach Kay
kept
rhe) (ECU)
shots with
r 1
on
me
their
them,
unbe-
ible shots
As usual,
was led
the
bv
Rous
Wolf-
their
renter,
with 26
Ginger
with 20
Ronnie
Rosie
against
line of
ng junior
Cenia BeaIe.
Guard
� w ed
vards
Laughtin and Trudi Lacev
I 19 and 14, res-
tivel).
For the Pirates, the
gun wa senior Gale
Kriough with 19. A
-ant surprise to ECU
partisians wa- the effec-
ess of Lynne Emer-
son (18) and
1 hompson 12)
lanky front
the Wolfpack.
"1 wa not as intimi-
dated against them as I
was lat year states
Emerson. "If we had
played better, defense on
the fast break, the game
vuM have been a lot
-er
The Pirates were
again plagued by a rash
early first half fouls.
Center Mania Girven
was !rred out of a
large portion of the half
with four penalties and
Thompson and April Ross
also suffered from three
fouls each.
State exhibited their
bench strength in the
second half as the reser-
ves displayed their ability
to maintain up to a
thirty point advantage.
States' starters were,
however, reinserted when,
with three minutes left
to play, the opportunity
arose for the Pack to
push the score over 100
points.
The Wolfpack domi-
nated the boards, outre-
bounding the visitors 57-
25 before a Reynolds
Colisium audience of
2200. Beasley led the
way with 14 grabs, fol
lowed by Laughlin with
12 and Lacey with 11.
About their strategy
against taller NCSU,
Pirate coach Cathy An-
druzzi stated, "We want-
ed to keep her (Beasley)
down. They knew what
to do, they just weren't
doing it. We weren't
getting back
defense
The loss put
Lad) Pirates at 0-2
all. and 0-1 against
sion 1 opponent
on
the
o er-
Divi-
ECl -NC STATE BOX
ECU(74)
Thompson 5 2-3 12.
Emerson 6 6-7 18, Cir
en 3 0-0 6, Kerbaugh
6 7-8 19, Rountree 3 2-2
8, Ross 1 2-6 1, Barnes
0 0-0 0, Howell 1 1-1
1, Seale) 2 0-0 .
NCSU (106)
Laughlin 7 5-6 19,
Lacey 6 2-3 14, Beasle)
10 6-7 26, Rouse 10 0-0
20, Earnhardt 3 l-l 7,
Rogers 1 0o
Roger- 1 0-0 2. Dob) 2
0-0 4, Owen 3 2-3' 8,
Parker 1 0-0 2. COffe)
1 0-0 2. Fielden 1 0-0
2. Totals 15 16-20 106.
Halftime-NCSU 51.
ECl 37. Fouled out-
ECl . Girven, Thompson.
Total fouls ECU 20.
NCSU 19. Technical �
None. Attendence-2200.
Ford
replaces
Pell
CLEMSON, S.CDannj
Ford top assistant to
Charlie Pell, wa- named
Tuesday to succeed Pell
as head football coach at
Clemson University.
Pell announced Mon-
day he was leaving
Clemson to become head
coach at Florida, suc-
ceeding Doug Dickey,
who was tired.
Pell had recommended
Ford for the Tiger
coaching job and Clem-
son Athletic Director Rill
McLellan announced the
appointment at an after-
noon news conference.
Both Pell and Ford
were assistant coaches at
Virginia Tech before join-
ing then-head coach Red
Parker's staff at Clemson
thrpe vears ago. One
season later, Pell repla-
ced Parker as head
coach and Ford remained
on the staff as assistant
head coach and offensive
line coach.
Ford, 30, is a native
of Gadsden, Ala. He
was a three-year letter-
man, as an offensive
tackle and tight end, at
teh University of Ala-
bama and later served
as a graduate assistant
and full-time assistant
under Crimson Tide
coach Paul "Bear"
Bryant.
Ford left Alabama to
join the staff at Virginia
Tech in 1974.
Pirates finish sixth in Penn
Stole Relays, win 500 meter
ca.RWAY FRIENDS
By DAVID MAREADY
Staff Writer
Although the ECU
swimming team could
only manage a sixth
place finish in the Penn
State Relays, for coach
Ray Scharf and the
Pirates, it was hard-
fought and well-deserved.
"U e swam reasonably
well noted Scharf,
"considering we didn't
bring out diving team to
the meet. We only had
one diver who was readv
for the meet and the
relays require at least
two, so we lost some
points in that aspect of
our game
first
year
did defend their
place finish of s
ago in the 500 meter
crescendo with a winning
time of 4:02. Members
of the team were Jack
Clowar, Ted Nieman,
John Tudor, Bill Fehling,
and Joe Kushy.
The Pirates gave very
solid performances in the
freestyle events with
finishes of third in the
400 meter, fourth in the
2000 meter, and sixth in
ne 200 meter freest vies.
However, the P
rates
"Overall said
Scharf, "we did about
as well as expected;
however, I hoped we
might place higher in
the final standings. I
was satisfied with
effort because
our
our mam
objective in swimming at
the Penn State Relays is
to prepare ourselves for
the Carolina meet. Last
year was the first time
an East Carolina team
has ever beaten UNC in
men's swimming so we
would like to continue
the streak this year
Several ECU men
swam well in the relays,
hut it was senior John
Tudor who was "an out-
standing individual on
the Pirate squad said
Scharf.
"John, swam very well
for us said Scharf,
"he turned in an excel-
lent time in the 500
crescendo and he kept
us in most of the
freest) It- events
hile the men's swim
team was in Pennsyl-
vania, the women's team,
also coached by Scharf,
was in Wilmington for
the NCAIAW state
championships. Although
no .(X schools were
present, trie meet was
officially swam for the
state championship in
women's swimming.
The Lady Pirates were
victorious in the match
defeating strong LNC-W
and UNC-G teams. The
women's swim team will
join the men Dec. 6 in
. dual swim meet.
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
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'� '

SHOP EARLY Album
AT THE r�TEw fa!
STUDENT progress
SUPPLY STORE
FOR YOUR CHRISTMAS
NEEDS
VISA
H0O0 123 5b 1B�I
BAXK CARDS
ARE WELCOME
master charge
THE INTENMANK CAMO
WE OFFER
FREE GIFT
WRAPPING
ON ITEMS
OF $3.00
OR MORE
BROUSE IX OUR
TRADEBOOK AREA
CALCULATORS
WAR5T-UP SUITS
ECU BLANKETS
ECU JACKETS
ECU JEWELRY
IMPRINTED SHIRTS
GLASSWARE
STUFFED ANIMALS
BOOKS FORR GIFTS
MEDICAL BOOKS
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
WRIGHT BUILDING
BONANZA
FOR PIRATES ONLY
Bonanza is proud to present
the return of our fabulous
PIRATE SPECIAL!
Which includes a 5oz. Sirloin Steak,
Baked Potato , Texas Toast, Salad
from our FREE, all you can eat Salad Bar
and your choice of Beverage
( except milk� and Dessert.
All for $2.89
� �� HinHiO;

'JT&
� .
�ks�
Offer good all day, every day
with presentation of ECU I.D. card.
Remember Great Things Happen
at Bonanza and ECU
Thursday Family Night
ALL YOU
CAN EAT
trout $1.95
shrimp $3.95
OYSTERS $4.25
FLOUNDER ���������� $3.95
Dinner meal includes Golden Crisp
French Fires, Cole Slaw, Tartar Sauce and
the world's best hushpupples.
FRIDAYS
1H0(I Sun. thru Thurs. 4:30-9:00
CfflfAAfl Fri& Sat' 4:3o-io:oo
Friday's Seafood
(The management reservVfcTftf rieht to 23X � jB�Va��� W�
refuse excessive reordering)
Take it from Ole Blue Claus
We're up to Our Chimney
in Christmas Bargains!
Save
30 to 60
This
Christmas!
1
Famous Name
Men's Jeans
only
$984

� : - '
- A
wm
rS
Jeans & Sportswear for the whole family
all at outlet prices!
Blue Bell
Factory Outlet
703 Greenville Blvd . Greenville. N C 919 7�.mi7
Mon. - Fr, 10:00 AM - 9 00PM 756'0337
Sat. 10:00 AM-6:00PM
Also in GoWsboro. Kmston. New Bern, and Rocky Mount
� ��

1





Mar
Giai
7 Dfmbw 1976 FOUNTAINHEAD hn. 11
CHARLES CHANDLER
Assistant ?�� r,
s��� �� tn . ���
N-TheYorC0f "78
or "ants U an
"�terming one. The dub
started the - ub
h.�k season in
h gh gear, winni �
their first
Giants
this
by the
re losing
lr. as they are
�y the team
"as been los
all the
fans, suffer through sad
The Eaffles npnv.�j �n .r.i ii i l , S
eight
This 5-3 reCord
tied for
second
'fC East
games.
was
place in ,h
Division.
Bui suddenly the tide
turned on the r
la . ine �ants.
Uck of 0ffense and
7 l"HHrtantlv lack of
k �u(iht up with the
V Vorker The Giants
have now iost six
�raight. Angry Giant
fans have called for a
re�Ufamem of the club
Approximately loo dis
pfjed season ticket
holders donated their
�� st Sunday in a
formal sacrificial burning.
"� ashes from these
tickets were then turned
�ver to Giant owner
Wellington Mara.
Th' New York
lan" called for the
J�i ol Giant coach
John McVay, the acqui-
s,t,on ol a new quar.
terback, and suggested a
change in the team's
ownership, a real slap in
the face o( Mara.
And these fans have
reason to be angry. For
the past decade the
Giant franchise has gone
nowhere. Also, these
Nev� York followers
games,
not
are
mg- Nearly
ies in the
recent losing streak have
COme in dose
M�re often th
Giant offensive errors
have been fatal.
Just last week the
giants were playing fairly
well against the play-off
hound Us Angeles
Rams. New York lost
�M7; respectable, right?
Wot for Giant fans. They
look back to the inter-
ception by Ram come
back Pat Thomas that
was returned for a
touchdown. Take away
that interception and the
Giants may have won.
But the one play that
Ciant fans, players,
coaches, and
cannot forget
jew weeks ago against
Philadelphia. With less
than 30 seconds left in
the game, the Giants led
17-12. They had posse-
ssion of the football at
about their own 20 yard
line. All they had to do
was fall on the ball,
right? Well, someone
thought not.
A running play was
called. Quarterback Joe
Pisarcik was to hand off
to fullback Larry Csonka
on a dive play. But
Csonka never got the
ball, as it was fumbled.
opponents
came a
JENNIFER
LESUEBOVEE WELLES GLORIA LEONARD
26 PLAYHOUSE
HWY264
GREEWIIXE N.C.
V.SJK.
24 Hours a day
Large homemade hiscunto with
Ham-Sausage-Steak
Qiicken-Qieese-Bulter
Also Combinations
-Dinners-
FriedGiicken Tubs and Buckets
also Drive thru window
For take out call 500N.GreeneSt
758-7607
Piedmont
has discount fares
worth
i n: u
Or just about anywhere else you d like to go For
instance, our Round Thrrtt�3 Fare saves you 30
roundtrip when you return no earlier than the third
day following your original date of departure Pied-
mont s Weekend Excursion Fere means a 25
roundtrip discount if you leave Saturday and return
Saturday Sunday or Monday through the first avail-
able flight after noon.
Piedmont has five other discount fares to
choose from too For complete information call your
travel agent or Piedmont Airlines Major credit cards
accepted All discount fares subject to change
without notice
The Eagles recovered
and went in for the
winning score. Shockingly,
Philadelphia won the
game 19-17.
The New York fans
then began their attack
on the team. One must
realize that these fans
are loyal and stubborn.
They like to win. They
also like to dream. New
Yorkers are calling for
the hiring of Penn State
coach Joe Paterno. Who
knows, Paterno might
consider the offer.
Anyhow, the Giant
front office should at-
tempt to acquire Pater-
no's services. It's the
least they can do to try
to repay their fans for
all the misery of the
1978 season.
Here's a look at the
games around the NFL
this week.
PITTSBURGH 24
BALTIMORE 10
The Steelers appear
headed for a showdown
with New England for
bragging rights in the
AFC. Coach Chuck Noll
has Pittsburgh playing
nearly as well as they
did when winning two
consecutive Super Bowls.
This spells trouble for
the ailing Colts.
MINNESOTA 17
DETROIT 14
The chase is n in
this one. The vaunted �
Lion pass rush, possibly
the best in the League,
goes after mad scrambler
Fran Tarkenton this
week. The results could
prove most interesting.
Anyhow, the battle will
be won in th trenches
in this one. The Vikes
get a small edge.
NEW ENGLAND 28
BUFFALO 7
The Patriots are com-
ing off a tough loss to
Dallas last week. Chuck
Fairbanks and his team
look back to the first
half of that game and
to all the scoring
opportunities they missed
out on. They will not
miss the opportunity to
win their eleventh game
this week.
DALLAS 24
PHILADELPHIA 14
The Cowboys are on
top of their game. The
Eagles need this one to
' continue their hopes of a
wild heard playoff spot .
But after this one, Philly
coach Dick Vermeil will
have to get ready for a
winter; at home.
GREEN BAY 24
CHICAGO 13
The Bears were hum-
iliated 40-7 by San
Diego last Monday night.
Their pride was deeply
hurt. They probably
won't be able to put the
pieces together soon
enough to win over the
playoff contending Pack-
ers
HOUSTON 21
NEW ORLEANS 14
This game is rated
close because of the
injury sustained by Earl
Campbell last Sunday.
The Oilers' prize rookie
may play, and play well,
but he shouldn't play as
much as usual. Besides,
the Saints are no longer
pushovers.
DENVER 20
KANSAS CITY JO
A victory here would
clinch a second consecu-
tive AFC West Division
championship for the
Broncos. You carj bet
that Denver coach Red
Miller will have his team
up for this one as they
need only one win of
their last two games to
cop the title. Also, they
must play Pittsburgh
next week. That makes
this one a must for the
Broncs.
NEW YORK JETS 24
CLEVELAND 21
The Jets are in con-
tention for a wildcard
playoff berth. The
Browns lost their
chance last week in a
loss to Seattle. In that
game, Jim Zorn bombs
to Steve Largent killed
the Browns. The Jet
pass-catch duo of Matt
Robinson to Wesley
Walker should also prove
fatal to Cleveland.
WASHINGTON 20
ATLANTA 17
One of these two
teams will be all but
out of the playoff race
after this one. The
Redskins get the edge
as they are long overdue
for a good game.
MIAMI 27
OAKLAND 17
The Raiders simply
stunk against Denver last
Sunday Numerous mis-
cues destroyed Oakland's
dreams of a victory.
They can afford to make
none against Bob Griese
and the Dolphins.
ST. LOUIS 20
NEW YORK GIANTS 13
The Cards are
coached by a smart
man, Bud Wilkinson, and
are directed by a smart
quarterback, Jim Hart.
The Giants can make
neither claim.
SAN DIEGO 28
SEATTLE 27
Bombs awav! The
Chargers' Dan Fouts and
the Svahawk's Jim zorn
love to throw that pig-
skin. The Chargers get
the edge in this aerial
battle on the basis of
their defensive superiority
over Seattle. Also, coach
Don Coryell still hasn't
informed his Chargers
that they're out of the
playoffs. Maybe they're
not.
TAMPA BAY 17
SAN FRANCISCO 9
LOS ANGELES 23
CINCINNATI 17
Wiener King
1011 CHARLES ST.
HELP WANTED
Part-time help needed
from 11a.m. til 2p.m.
Asst. Manager needed
from 11a.m. til 7p.m.
ftpringtitti) IRtpubltcan feb. 12.1978
French mineral water
new gourmet drink
By MARIAN BURROS
The Washington I'ost
WASHINGTON � One
fashion magazine recom-
mends pouring a large
bottle of it into the bath
water. Another recom-
mends misting the face
with it.
Most people, however,
drink it, and this year
sales for Perrier in the
United States will be
about $10 million at the
wholesale level. Not long
ago, the naturally spark-
ling water was quaffed
in this country only by
the rich, international
traveler.
According to the pre-
sident of the firm that
imports Perrier from
France, the 10-fold in-
crease in sales is the
result of a $2-million
advertising campaign in
selected areas in this
country. They are going
all out to sell bottled
water now because the
product fits right in with
the "natural" craze.
"It's not so much what
the product has in it as
what the product doesn't
have in it Bruce Nev-
ins explains.
By that he means no
sugar, no artificial colors
or flavors and virtually
no sodium. Even plain
club soda has a consider-
able amount of salt.
But it isn't just the
alternatives to tap water
with which Perrier ex-
pects to compete. The
safety, not to mention
taste, of water that
comes out of the faucet
has been a subject of
concern recently, and
Nevins wants to capital-
ize on that, too.
Americans traveling a-
broad, especially, to
countries where drinking
the tap water has not
been recommended, be-
came familiar with Per-
rier. On arriving back in
the United States, they
encountered difficulty in
finding it and then,
when they did, had
some difficulty swallowing
the price. Even with the
current mass marketing,
a 23-ounce bottle still
costs 63 or 69 cents in
Washington. But that is
considerably less than
the 89 and 99 cents that
had been the standard
price before and is still
charged in some specialty
markets.
Perrier wants to
"maintain its image
but insists it isn't snob
appeal.
It's also branching out
into health and physical
fitness. According to the
company's literature, Per-
rier is non-diuretic be-
cause of the natural car-
bonation. That means it
is absorbed more quickly
into the tissues, which
makes it perfect for ath-
letes, or at least the
company hopes so.
"3
perri
perries
1
"
�ow Available In Tour
Favorite Restaurants.
Food Stores. Clubs, Etc
Distributed By
BOWLES
DISTRIBUTING
COMPANY, INC.
Goldsboro, W-C.
734-2443
NaturalyspaiUing from the certerof the earth.
Today. Man artificially carbonates his drinks and mixers.
But not Perrier.
The miracle of Perrier is natural carbonation:
Lighter, more refreshing and more delicate
than any made by Man.
That "mirade" takes place deep below the
surface of the earth in Southern France near Vergeze.
There, delicate gasses - trapped over M0 million
years ago m the volcanic eruptions of the Cretaceous Era
-are released and rise through porous limestone and
cracked marts to add natural hie and sparkle to the icy
waters of a single spring: Source Perner.
The result is Perrier.
Bottled directly from Nature. With no chernkafe,
preservatives, flavorings or additives of any type.
And no calories.
100 natural Perrier.
Pure refreshment served chilled with a shce of
fresh lemon or a wedge of Hrne. So versatile it adds
"the sparkle of champagne" to fine wines. And, with
�nported spirits, is the mixer par excellence.
Imported Perrier.
It is the product of Nature and the love of France.
Enjoy it in good health.

A
r - 1

' ' ' "
11'





Page 12 FOUNTAINHEAD 7 December 1978
STUFFY'S
�l2ZZ.2.
Good Stuff
DRbFT
12oz.
Student Appreciation Night
break at Stuffy's before Exams
Saturday Dec. 9th 6:00pm-ll:00pm
521 Cotanche
7526130
� i - in i iinrmaBii
Georgetown Shoppes
� � ��� � I � . � .
You too
SiK
M
.tlHiJlll
1-K
��-

If .
il could become
7 a collector's item
Make pur YEARBOOK PORTRAIT
�pointment NOW at:
APPOINTMENTS
BEING TAKEN NOW
COME BY
OR
CALL THE BUC OFFICE
AT 757 6501
PICTURES WILL BE MADE
FROM
MONDAY, NOV. 6
UNTIL
Friday Dee. 8
FROM 9 a.m. TIL 5 p.m.
The Photographer
Will NOT Be Back
Next Semester!
1
j� r � w, iWf a m. -





Title
Fountainhead, December 7, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 07, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.530
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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