Fountainhead, November 30, 1978






Circulation 10,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
Vol. 55 No. IT
&
November 1978
Ho well announces plans for bowl game
Exams
not to be
changed
By MARC BARNES
News Editor
The biggest question cir-
culating around campus dur-
ing the past week or so was
answered last night � a
memorandum issued from
the office of Dr. John How-
ell, Vice Chancellor of Aca-
demic Affairs stated that the
exam schedule would not be
changed to accomodate stu-
dents wishing to attend the
Independence Bowl in
Shreveport, Louisiana.
Rather, students who
purchase a ticket to the game
(available from the Pirate
Club) should present that
ECU campus police
present rape program
By RICHY SMITH
Assistant Sews Editor
Crime and Rape
Prevention on Campus
program was presented by
Lnn Singleton, a campus
police officer in the lobby of
Fleming hall recently. The
program is being presented
across campus for students.
The program consisted of
a slide show prepared by
Singleton and a discussion of
some ot the practices
necessary to help prevent
rape and crime on campus.
This is being presented
with the hope that the
students will benefit from it.
according to Singleton. The
slides depict places on
campus that are potential
assault and rape scenes.
Most rape occur outside
of the dorms, noted Single-
tori. They usually occur
in academic buildings, open
and badl) lit areas, but no
one can definitely say where
rapes will occur, she added.
One just has to be aware of
their surroundings at all
times
The majority of campus
rape- are committed by
nontudents. Singleton
commented. It's important
that you pay attention to
what is going on around
you
and don't do such things as
walk at night alone or take a
shortcut through wooded
areas, she continued.
One could say that
everywhere on campus is a
potential area for rape or
assault. Violations of dorm
rules also contribute to
assault.
Visitation violations are a
concern and are most
dangerous, commented Sin-
gleton. What starts out being
very harmless like letting
someone in the back doors
aftr-r hours may turn into an
assault case. No one seems
to get concerned until
someone gets raped. If ever
you become a victim of rape
or assault, report it, she
added.
Many times students fail to
report such an incident for
fear of being embarrassed or
for fear of their private lives
being probed into.
That is no longer the
case. The victim is no longer
placed on trial.
The 1977 General As-
sembly passed the law that a
defense attorney cannot
bring up the past of a rape
victim unless it is pesfinent
to the case in question
Officer Singleton also
talked about the crime that
occurs on campus.
Procedures for getting in
touch with the campus police
at all hours were explained.
Careless mistakes often
result in a crime .being
committed such as forgetting
�I
to lock your doors to your
room or to your car.
Leaving money around is
a common mistake that often
leads to losing it and other
articles of value.
Campus police can obtain
arrest warrants on persons
taking personal property, but
they have no say so in what
happens.
It's important that these
crimes be prevented. Stud-
ents' lives are sometimes
endangered by careless
mistakes. Singleton com-
mented.
The program presenta-
tion has proved to be very-
successful.
"Fleming Dorm has had
the program for the past
three years and we have
always had good atten-
dance. It helps answer a lot
of questions that the resi-
dents have and lets them
know the importance of the
rules provided in the dorms
stated Linda Lawson, a
representative of the dorm.
"Other dorms have also
had this presentation and
have had the same results
she added.
If an organization or
group is interested in the
presentation, they should
contact Francis Eddings,
chief of campus police, for
further details.
CATHY DREYER, featured
majorette is obviously get-
ting into the spirit of the
occassion as she and the rest
of the squad gets ready for
the upcoming Independence
Bowl Game in Shreveport,
Louisiana. The majorettes
and the football team are
getting ready to "take the
field and if you want to be
a part of the action, get your
friends together and get in
touch with the Pirate Club
for ticket information. The
entire weekend promises to
be a treat, now that arrange-
ments have been made so
that students can take make
up exams later on. Photo
by John H. Groga
ticket to the appropriate As-
sociate Dean of Student
Affairs. At that time, and
Official University Excuse
will be written which should
be presented to instructors.
These excuses will only
apply to those exams which
fall between 1 p.m Thurs
Dec. 14, and 11 a.m. Mon
December 18. According to
the memo, when the ticket is
presented to the Associate
Dean, it will be stamped
indicating that an excuse has
been issued for that ticket.
Intructors will then award
a grade of incomplete or a
makeup exam prior to the
time that the final exam is
currently scheduled.
The instructors will sche-
dule makeup exams accor-
ding to the following guide-
lines:
�Makeup exams must be
administered before April
13, 1979, which is the last day
to remove incomplete given
during Fall Semester
� Makeups may be given as
early as Reading Day (Dec.
12) to those students wishing
to go to the game.
�In any other situations that
would require an incomplete,
existing rules published in
the current catalog will ap-
ply.
Pirate Club
As mentioned earlier, the
Pirate Club is offering two
package deals to any stu-
dents who wish to attend the
game.
The club is offering two
"Packages One of the
packages will include spend-
ing Friday night in Shreve-
port, and the other package
will consist of a Saturday
"shuttle" service.
The shuttle package in-
cludes air transportation to
and from the game, all
ground transportation, and
game tickets. The flight will
leave Kinston Airport on the
day of the game. Dec. 16 at 8
a.m and will return im-
mediately following the
game. The cost for the
shuttle is $190 per person.
The overnight package
includes air transportation,
all ground transportation, a
one night accomodation at
the Booier City Hilton, a
steak dinner and cocktail
party Friday night, pregame
brunch and game tickets.
The flight will leave Kinston
ast 10:30 on Dec. 15 and will
return immediatelv after the
J
game. The cost for this
service is S265.
Anyone interested in at-
tending either of these
games should contact the
Pirates Club at 757-6178
immediately, as the deadline
for reservations and regi-
stering is nearing.
What's inside.
rrs rue
WOULD
JM�ATTST
MMt
i AND H SIM AWT
FOOTBALL i
)e Rollin's reflect- ou the genius oi Rodinsee p. 6.
Top tf) sex-rock -hocks D.Jee p. 6.
iven Pournelle's Lufifer's Hammer receives a glowing
reviewfor the lir-t installment, see p. 7.
ECU Lad Basketball team loses to Campbell Collegesee p.
8.
Pirate freshman Al Tyson and Clarence Miles drawn early
season praisesee p. 8.
WMXGREENEECl QUATERB.4CK �.� fc, j�hn II
Gragan
"Who's Who"
announced here
Greek forumsee p. 3.
Vandalism results
in poor fire safety
By MIKE ROGERS'
Assistant !vus Editor
According to A.L. Col-
clough. Director of Occupa-
tional Health and Safety,
abuse of fire extinguishers
has reached alarming pro-
portions.
He explained, "In a one
month period from the last
week in September until
October 23, we have had
twenty cases in which one or
more of the above listed
damages occured (stealing
and discharging fire exting-
uishers).
He added, "This is a very
expensive maintenance cost
that is paid by housing and
eventually by students
He went on to say, "The
cost to replace a broken glass
is approximately $4; to re-
charge an extinguisher is
approximately $6; toreplacea
dry chemical extinguisher is
$15; and to replace a water
extinguisher is $20.50, plus
labor on the installation of
approximately $3 per exting-
uisher
He commented that the
most recent damage, mostly
from Jones and Aycock, had
totaled approximately $500.
James Mallory, dean of
men, commented that many
of theincidents could involve
visiting students.
He said, "During the
past few weeks, we have had
several instances of non-
students being involved in
residence hall incidents. This
leads us to believe that a
good percentage of vandal-
ized fire extinguishers could
possibly be the result of
action by non-students
He added that the dorm
students would have to help
stop this theft.
By MARC BARNES
Sens Editor
The following students
have been selected for
inclusion in Who's Who In
American Colleges and
Universities: Ann McRoy
Arnold, Wayne Patrick
Banks, Rebekah Ann Bitt-
ner, Thomas Waggaman
Brawner, Eddie Wayne
Caudle, Roy Robert Chris-
tiansen, Jr Susan Linda
Corda, Sheila Gay Craddock,
Margaret Lynn Daniel,
Susan Tuck Danin, Ramon
Leonidas Davis, Jr Millard
Dalton Denson, Jr James
Kevin Dill. Edith Renee
Dixon, John Carlton Downie,
Dana Selene Dragstedt,
Merrily Standley Fletcher,
Baylus Milton Francis,
Charles manning Friddle,
Steven Eugene Greer,
Gerald hall, Eddie James
Hicks, James Edward Hoop-
er, Jack Warren Jenkins,
Gale Denise Kerbaugh,
Jennifer Gail King, Bernard
Francis Lambe, Jr James
Robert Lammert, Barbara
Ann Lewis, Michael Thomas
orse, Jr Christina Lois
Padilla, Tommy Joe Payne,
II Robert Dale Pitt, Janice
Media Board meets Wed
By GLENN THOMAS
Staff Writer
The Media Board met
yesterday afternoon to dis-
cuss topics currently before
them.
Among the most con-
troversial items was the
current licensing of the
campus radio station,
WECU. The FCC has
delayed processing of the
application for 30 days, due
to a possible shift in fre-
quency and wattage.
The delay, which results
from a mandatory increase of
all class "D" radio stations
up to a 100 watt broadcasting
level, was debated for some
time before it was finally
decided to move the wattage
of the station from 10 watts
up to 100 watts.
John Jeter, General
Manager for the station, said
that he feels there ,is no
problem with this, though
something should be done
now to avoid any further
delay in opening the station.
The possibility of a full-
time, professional manager
for the station was also
discussed. This is to be
decided upon at a later date
by Dr. Thomas Brewer.
This move in wattage
would constitute an in-
creased broadcasting radius
of up to 25 miles.
The next order of
business was the allocation
of $21,000. Robert Swaim of
FOUNTAINHEAD spoke out
first saying that the news-
paper would need $15,000 by
February to cover printing
costs. Swaim said that this
was merely a matter of
business and that any
remaining monies would be
In other old business, the
board reviewed an invoice
for last year's Buccaneer in
the amount of $414.57. The
board approved that the
The other $6,000 of the
$21,000 to be allocated will
be held until a review of
other "needy" areas of the
media can be made.
invoice be paid at this time.
Among the topics dis-
cussed under new business
was the allocation of approx-
imately $1,000 for the 1979
Rebel. This request was
tabled until more bids can be
received on the printing cost
of this year's edition.
In other new business the
plans for student attendance
of the Independence Bowl
were discussed. The main
area of importance was the
need for photographers to be
there for the game. It is to be
decided upon later this week
as to how many the board
will send.
After the board meeting.
Tommy Joe Payne spoke
with Bill Cain, Athletic
Director here at ECU. Mr.
Cain said that he had
checked into chartering a few
busses for the students to
use to travel back and forth
from the Independence
Bowl, on December 16.
Mr. Cain said that he
wasn't sure if there was
enough interest from the
student body to warrant
is
chartering a bus.
He said that it
dependent on the response
he gets from students in the
next few days.
Phone-A -
Thon held
ECU News Bureau
Each weekday evening,
between 7 and 10 o'clock,
volunteers from ECU's
student body use the tele-
phone to call ECU alumni to
get acquainted and seek
financial supporforthe alma
mater.
In the first week of the 1st
annual ECU National Phono-
thon, a total of $7,777 was
pledged to the ECU Alumni
Loyalty Fund, according to
Don Y. Leggett, executive
director of the ECU Alumni
Association. A goal of more
than $40,000 has been set for
the campaign which will
continue through Dec. 7.
Patricia Riley. Kieran Joseph
Shanahan. Hal Courtnev
Sharpe, David Bruce Sher-
man, Mary Charles Steven
Ernest Franklin Stine, Jr
Kathy Colene Sugg
Thomas Larry Summer. N
Ann Thompson. Rosalynn
Thompson, Cyndi Lynn
Towner. Edward Ju.
Tver. II, Stephen Reed
warren. Gerry Gray Wal-
lace, and Cynthia Lynne
REBEL
wins
award
By SUSAN CHESTON
Staff Rvpnrter
The REBEL has won
another All-American award
rating from the Associated
Collegiate Press, an noun
Editor Luke hi-nan; thi-
week.
The award, issued ur la-t
year's issue of the EG I
literary art magazine, i- the
highest honor the ACP gives.
This is the third year in a row
the REBEL has won All-
Amencan.
The REBEL must be a
great source of pride tor the
editor, staff, and contribu-
tors, said ACP judge
Jeanne Buckeye. "If- a-
good a magazine in content
and appearance- a- we've
-een
Out of a possible 1900
points, ihe REBEL scored
1855, making it one of the
top college magazines in the
nation.
Last month, the Society
for Collegiate Journalists
rated the REBEL as the
second best college maga-
zine in the United State
Harbinger, a publication of
Bethany College in West
Virginia, was ranked as
first.
The REBEL scored a
perfect 100 points on
editorial standards, typo-
graphy, and publication
factors. Editorial content was
graded as "excellent and
illustration was awarded 10
bonus points for a "su-
perior" rating.
t
����� m
- -






Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 30 November 1978
Chess
The ECU Chess Team
will be competing with
Burroughs-Wellcome" in its
first tournament of the year.
The tournament will be held
Saturda) in Mendenhall
Student Center, Room 221,
at 10:00 a.m. All spectators'
are invited to attend.
Biology
Ml persons going on the
trip to ilmington Fri
I are to meet in front ol
�rial Gym at 12 noon.
Ml persons leaving Sat
2, are to meet in front ol
' rvm at l a.m.
For further information
lit the Biolog Bulletin
Board in the Biolog) Reading
Room (C-201) or contact
W arren (756 8898).
Grindstone
Grindstone Island, in Big
Rideau, Canada, 55 km north
of Kingston, Ont. (125 mi.
north of Syracuse, N.Y.), is
ihe ettmg for the two 1979
sessions ol the Grindstone
School for Peaee Research,
Education and Action. The
June School runs from June
16-29, and the August
School, from Aug. 7-20.
The June School will deal
with the Middle East, Alter-
nate Lifestyles, Native
People Struggles, and In-
ternational Economics and
Imperialism. The August
School will consider Nuclear
Power, Southern Africa, Sex
R"les. and Disarmament.
Cost is $250 per participant
lor tuition, room and hoard.
writ C.T. Stieren.
Grindstone School for Peace,
p.o. Box 571 Stn. P. Tor-
onto. Ont. Canada M5S
21 1 lor applications and
information.
Gay Union
Any gay people inter-
ested in the formulation of a
university Gay Union are
asked to attend an organ-
izational meeting on Thurs
Dec. 7 at 608 East Ninth
Street.
The purpose of this or-
ganization is to serve as a
supportive, educational and
working organization for ga
people who need support and
guidance. This in not a social
club. It you are willing to
work to help other gay
students we need your sup-
port.
Blow-out
Kappa Sigma Little Sis-
ters will be holding a pre-
exam Blow-Out on Dec. 6 at
Blimpies. The Blow-Out will
begin at 8 p.m. and last until
whenever. The Blow-Out will
feature your favorite golden
beverages, a bubble gum
contest, and drawings for
prizes. Admission is 50 cents
at the door.
Ceramics
The Ceramics Guild is
sponsoring a Christmas Sale
in Wright Auditorium on
Nov. 30 from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
and on Dec. 1 from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. Give pots for Christ-
mas this year.

Minges
REBEL
There will be a REBEL
reading in the Coffeehouse,
room 15, Mendenhall, on
Thurs Dec. 7 at 7 p.m.
Program includes readings
by selected writers of prose
and poetry on campus and a
talk by a student artist.
Auction
The Baptist Student Un-
ion is having a Summer
Missions Auction to raise
money for Summer Mis-
sions. It will be held Sat
Dec. 2 at 9 a.m. until The
Baptist Student Union is
located on the corner of 10th
and Lawrence. All merchan-
dice was donated by local
Greenville merchants.
SNEA
The Student National
Education Association will
be meeting Dec. 7, in Men-
denhall, room 244 at 4 p.m.
Dr. Brewer, ECU Chancellor
will be speaking. Everyone is
urged to attend.
Pi Omega
Pi Omega Pi, the Busi-
ness Education Honor Soci-
ety, will meet Tues Dec. 5,
at 5 p.m. in RawJ 304.
Another action-packed
Fun Nite has been scheduled
for all special students at
ECU on Thurs Nov. 30, at 8
p m. in Minges Gymnasium.
Floor Hockey and basket-
ball will be played, with
space available for free play.
All handicapped students
and friends are welcome.
Auditions
Auditions for the ECU
Symphonic and Concert
Bands will be held this
coming Mon. beginning at 3
P m. at the Fletcher Music
Building.
Auditions are open to all
students of the university
and Non-Music Majors are
most welcome.
Gamma Beta
Gamma Beta Phi� Aca-
demic and Service Fraternity
of ECU, is sponsoring a
paper drive the week of Nov.
28-Dec. 1. Any paper that is
donated would be appre-
ciated. The following times
and places have been allo-
cated for pick-ups: Wed
Nov. 29 after 2 p.m. and
Thurs Nov. 30 after 1 p.m.
for businesses already par-
ticipating; Fri Dec 1, from
12-5:30 p.m. and Sat Dec.
2, from, 10 a.m4 p.m. for
pick up spots at the Main
Greenville Post Office, Brook
Valley Entrance, and the
Elm Street Gym.
All day Friday and Sat-
urday a truck will be sta-
tioned at Pitt Plaza. This is
an important activity as all
proceeds go towards schol-
arships from deserving ECU
students chosen by our fra-
ternity.
There is one opening in
the SGA Legislature for Day
Representative Screenings
will be held on Mon Dec
4th, at 4 p.m. in room 239 of
Mendenhall Student Center.
You may apply for this
position m 228 Mendenhall.
Hillel
Hillel is sponsoring a
Bagel and Lox Brunch for the
Jewish students and facultv
at 11:30 a.m. in the Den
located on James street and
9th street. The Brunch is
for Sun Dec. 3.
Bring your activity fee
and other fees at this time.
The many people of Hillel
hope to see you there.
I
I
I
i
The Student Union
Coffeehouse Committee
presents . . .
Basset
Mt.
String
Band
along with
Hobbit
Thurs. & Fri.
8:30 & 930 p.m.
Room 15, Mendenhall
Admission SO cents
proudly presents
Burt Reynolds, Kris Kristofferson, Jill Clayburgh and Robert Preston
in
Semi-Tough
jj

This week's Free Flick Friday and Saturday night at 7 and 9 p.m. in Mendenhall Hendrix Theatn
Help us reach
2UJreS?2thdefeCtS
SP'ofrSis
This SPACEC NTR
7
BONANZA
��??��?���
��a�3��fc5�S
8
$
ft
cree 2W OfCRris-mas
Two
Sirloin Dinners
Only
Dinner includes
choice of potato, Texas
Toast and salad from our
all-you-can-eat Salad Bar.
3fere
use
6e ic
m
CtdL
St.
' on ik mi
ChHstmw Okholiy at7:sm.JAtasfyfa3.
520 North Greenville Blvd.
264-by-pass Greenville
NEW HOURS
SunThurs. lla.m9p.m.
Fri. & Sat. 11 a.m 10p.m.

I
kv.
Classifieds
torrent �
FEMALE ROOMMATE:
Must be full-time working or
graduate student. Call
758-6887 after 6pm.
FOR RENT: Private room.
Quiet. Close to college.
Male. Available for use in
January or 2nd session. Call
752-4006 after 1 p.m.
FEMALE ROOMATE: To
share half expenses at
Greenway Apts. during
spring semester. Call 756-
7888.
FEMALE ROOMATE: To
share nice, 2-bed room, fur-
nished appartment. Rent $60
monthly plus H utilities. For
rent immediately or Jan. 1.
Call 758-0267.
ROOM AVAILABLE: Men
interested in applying for
residency in Wesley House
should contact Dan Earn-
hardt at the Methodist Stu-
dent Center prior to the end
of Fall Semester. Phone
758-2030.
WANTED: College girl
needed for part-time help in
a small school. Call 752-2430
WANTED: '&&) Chev-
rolet Corvairs. Call 756-6601
after 6 p.m.
THE PORTRAIT GALiERY
Would you like to have your
portrait taken, Senior
resume pictures, weddings
or art portfolio? We do
color or black and white
prints. Think ahead for
Christmas presents! Call us
- 758-0962. If answering
service is on, please leave
your name and phone no.
YOGA: Hatha yoga is now
being taught by Sunshine.
New classes forming. Relax-
ation, realization, weight
los. For more infor. call
756-0736.
MID EASTERN DANCE:
(Authentic Belly Dancing)
taught by Sunshine . ex-
perienced teacher and per-
t
� m





Greek Forum
ByRlCKlCLlARMJS
Newa Editor
Exams are right around
rner, and because of
WM dreadful tak
-�s, and people. ul0;�a:
�� � � for their
ldsI nunut' camming.
("U'r,amir'� 'heir ,hJr
rf'rrom c
"�� Friday and will "
uriti Sun.) .v Q ,
3und�y-Saturdaj rugh,
thi Ti�us Wil have .
Par,V at the house for him.
T Phi Tan. and
Dta IT. an- finish-
'ng up the selling ol the
emei King coupons, a- a
d raising project. A per-
' 'he earnings will
� fund.
Three days of Christmas
'�"lire student
� faculty. Anyone
visit these houses
come to do so. Hours
' open houses will be
; until 5 p.m.
�ther Panhellenic acti-
aroling on the mall
�� � ac tonight on the
mall at 7 10 Vfter the
g on the mall, the
rit ies will visit Dr.
me.
Panhellenic has recently
waited a Greenville rest
home. They decorated the
rest home with corn stalks
and pumpkins.
Announcements:
The Chi Omegas have
just concluded a successful
winter rush. The Chi ()'s
have received seven new
pledges.
rhe Sigma Sigma Sigmas
elected new officers last
week. The) are: Julia
Rowland, president; Sarah
Floyd, vice-president; Claire
Baeten, secretary; Jo
Stroud, treasurer; Kim
Coley, rush chairman; and
Tamim Sinclair, education
chairman.
1 he Sigmas are holding
their Fall Pledge Formal
Saturday night at the
Brentwood Country Club in
Washington, VC. Five
Degrees South vmII be
playing for the dance.
rhe Delta Zetas are bus)
preparing for the three days
of Christmas. They will be
decorating for Christmas and
will put up their tree on
Sunda). Dei . 3.
Faye Hall, Delta Zeta
president, ua� named the Pi
Kap sweetheart at their
fhanksgiving Dinner, the
OYD'S BARBER
id HAIRSTYLINC
1008 S. Evans St
Phone 758-4056
By Appointment Only
MelvinRBoyd
MdvinHBoyd-jr.
Franklin C Tripp
y
!
�.
sisters and pledges had a
hake sale Monday. The
reported the bake sale to be a
hig success.
The Lambda Chi Alphas
have worked hard this year
fixing up their house. The
entire house has been
painted and new shutters
will be put up soon.
New storm windows have
also been installed. Every-
one is invited to visit the
house.
An annual event which is
sponsored by Panhellenic
every Christmas is Panhel-
lenic's nine days of Christ-
mas. This year this event has
been changed to the three
days of Christmas. The first
Hay will be Dec. 5. On this
da. the Alpha Omicron Pi
house. Alpha Delta Pi house,
and the Chi Omega house
will be open. On Dec. 6, the
Sigma Sigma Sigma and
Delta Zeta houses will hold
open houses and Alpha
kappa Alpha will hold their
open house at the Panhel-
lenic office at Fleming Dorm.
On Dec. 7, the Alpha Phi,
Alpha Xi Delta, and Kappa
Delta houses will be open.
30 November 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 3
Thursday Family Night
ALL YOU
CAN EAT
TROUT
SHRIMP ����
OYSTERS
FLOUNDER
$1.95
$3.95
$4.25
$3.95
Dinner meal includes Golden Crisp
French Fires, Cole Slaw, Tartar Sauce and
the world's best hushpuppies.
FRIDAYS
tSQfl Sunthru Ttur 430-9:00
�ffjffAf Fri. U Sat. 4:30-10:00
noun i) st. iso,
approaching fast as Christ
nuts res nrc orated and
� I 1 ��pin d.
fuW i
n
Friday's Seafood
(The management reserves the right to X3XX 9 iLVIiflS St
refuse exc ssive reordering)
ALWAYS FRESH
1uM�C� &tev�u
CANDIES
CU&otUcl C&cc��cuU
4 1 lb. $3.50
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;
(
Fl
1
-c
Ft
Favored football fans
Why do football fans receive preferred
treatment at this university? Why are they
allowed to postpone their finabexams because
they bought a ticket to the Independence
Bowl? This university, obviously, can be had
cheaply.
A particularly irritating point is that the
administration unhesitatingly approved the
extension policy for the bowl?game, although
they are remarkably intransigent when it
comes to other excuses.
For example, one student last Christmas
was not allowed to take her exams early
because of the university's policy of not
moving exams. This student, putting herself
through school, could only getxne flight out of
the area to her home state, & it was before
the official time for the exam. ?
Since she hadn't seen her family for six
months, she had hoped to leave a few days
early in order to spend more time with them.
Instead, she was forced to leave Greenville
later and return earlier and had to travel by
train both ways.
This is but one example we know of.
Certainly, there are others. We can understand
the policy against postponing the exams, since
many students would take advantage of being
allowed to postpone their exams.
We cannot, however, comprehend this
prohibition against taking exams early, with a
legitimate excuse. As long as it is agreeable to
both the professor and the student, why should
the university step in and say no?
Which brings us back to our original
question. Surely the university realizes that
scores of students will buy tickets just to
postpone their exams. We question the
justification for this move; does the university
receive a cut of the gate and is trying to sell
more tickets? Would they allow a similar rule
change if, say, a College Bowl team were to
compete for a national title during exams? We
doubt it.
The administration should take a serious
look at why this university is here and get their
priorities in order. This is an educational
institution, not a football camp.
I'D HfSITATE TO CALL
THIS AN ACCIDCMT, HA$MAW
7
�3 O
P. .
CD
Viewpoint
Forum
Atomic energy threatens man
ECU Print Group demands apology
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
As an officer of the ECU
Print Group and as the
person who contacted
FOTNTAINHEAD about this
vear-? print auction, I am
registering this formal com-
plaint. For the second year in
a row, the school newspaper
has failed to run any notice of
our annual print auction.
We had no difficulty in
getting a notice of our 1977
auction in FOUNTAIN-
HEAD, and we wonder what
has happened since then.
Last spring we attempted
to get the information to
FOUNTAINHEAD well in
advance, in time to be run
twice before the auction. The
-tudent who made the first
contact reported that the
school paper turned down
our ad.
Our current President
then carried the poster over a
second time; and he was told
that if there was room the
notice would be run. Never-
theless, our ad did not
appear.
This year I delivered a
copy of our poster on Mon
Nov. 13, three days in
advance of tfie Tfcars-Nbv.
16, issue. We had been told
you need a minimum of two
days notice.
I was told by the Assis-
tant Advertising Manager
that every effort would be
made to at least get a line
about the auction under
"Flashes I made it plain
that we preferred a reduced
version of the poster, but
would accept a word under
"Flashes I emphasized
that it had to be in the
Thursday issue because the
auctionjus to be Mon Nov.
20. 1
I wBold that space was
tight, bin I was no told that I
was too late. I assured the
young man that we are a
recognized organization and
told him that the money
raised by the auction is used
by our group to improve
conditions in the print-
making studios. I was not
told that we would have to
purchase an ad; for if that
have paid for and ad in order
to make sure that the ECU
students got word of our
Third Annual Print Auction.
Print Group members
work hard to conduct this
auction and the money raised
is very important to every
printmaking student. Money
from our first auction pur-
chased numerous small stu-
dio supplies which made it
possible to function normally
after a move from two rooms
to six rooms.
One item we added to the
department is an air brush,
which has been used exten-
sively by print students but
which is too expensive for
most students to purchase
individually. This fall the
remaining auction money
from last spring purchased
emergency supplies, things
we all use, when the school's
Community Health professor
offers advice to homosexual
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Tonight I read the letter
to ur Forum from the
person who wrote of lonli-
ness, the plight of the homo-
sexual, and an apparent
willingness to take his own
life. In the classroom I'just
left, we discussed suicide
and the insensitivity of
family, friends and acquain-
tances to the cries for help.
My hope is that the writer
might be heard, that he
might realize that many
individuals and groups are
oppressed, shunned and
ridiculed. I hope he will
realize that God is the true
judge and that God is more
loving, more merciful and
more understanding than
His people.
Too, I would urge the
writer to visit the counseling
service on campus. Not all
people are insensitive and
crude.
There is (or was) a
student group on campus
who would be appreciative of
his situation. Too, the
Paddock Club has the repu-
tation of bei. g h gathering
place. The unfortunate fact,
however, is that the writer's
fear of the stigma remains
and is not totally unfounded.
Any communication or
association with a known
homosexual, or even a
Forum policy
Forum letters must contain the name, address, phone
number, and signature of the author(s) and should be typed or
neatly printed.
Letters are subject 4o editing for brevity, obscenity, and
libel.
Nomore than three letters on any subject will be printed in
one issue.
Letters should be limited to three typewritten,
double-spaced pages.
Letters must be received by noon on Mondays and
Wednesdays either at the FOUNTAINHEAD office, second
floor, Publications Center, or at the information desk in
Mendenhall.
Authors' names will be withheld only when inclusion of the
name will embarrass or subject to ridicule the author (such as
letters discussing homosexuality, drug abuse, etc.).
sympathetic bystander,
might result in ridicule.
Again, though, ridicule is not
the unique plight of the
homosexual and he, like
many others, can only try to
adjust to the realities of his
particular burden.
To wait for or expect
society to become "civi-
lized" would be unrealistic,
in light of history.
My impression is that
much progress has been
made on our campus in
recent years, on behalf of
blacks, women, and handi-
capped persons. At the same
time, the progess is in reality
little more than tokenism, or
small offerings to the still
living gods of sexism,
racism, etc.
The irony is that any one
of the oppressed may be
amongst the oppressors: not
being guilty of sexism
doesn't make me immune to
racism; not being guilty of
racism doesn't guarantee
that I'll not ridicule the
homosexual, or the divorcee,
or the female colleague.
So, we might do well to
repeat frequently, "Let him
that is without sin cast the
first stone That might
reduce the need for Ameri-
can graffiti.
Bill Byrd, Professor
Department of Community
Health
supply order for the depart-
ment was two months late.
We also are using this money
to provide a series of semi-
nary on the "B.un
Art" which are free and o
to all interested students.
The large numbers of
ECU students who have
attended each of our three
auctions proves that non-art
students are interested in
original prints and would
look for a FOUNTAINHEAD
ad, if there were one.We
believe we could expect an
even larger student turnout
if we had FOUNTAIN-
HEAD's cooperation in get-
ting the word out. '
For all the above reasons,
I beiieve that we deserve an
explanation in writing, an
apology, and an assurance
that this will never happen
again.
Laura Jackson
Sec.T res.
ECU rint Group
Editor's Note: No one
from the ECU Print Group
contacted either the editor or
the advertising manager to
discuss a flash or an ad. A
large poster was found by
the advertising manager on
his desk with a note at-
tached. There was no indi-
cation as to the size or who
would pay for the ad, there-
fore it was not published.
Had the ECU Print Group
followed proper FOUN-
TAINHEAD advertising and
Flash procedures then per-
haps there would not have
been this problem.
FOUNTAINHEAD is not
a publicity tool for any
person or organization and is
under no obligation to print
any poster or announce-
ments that are presented.
The following article is presented by Greenpeace for the
benefit of all. It is an article written by Harvey Wasserman,
who is currently working with the Clamshell Alliance,
fighting nuclear power plants in New England.
For decades now it has been a fond dream of a large and
powerful group of scientists, politicans, and businessmen that
nuclear power plants would provide an infinite supplv of
cheap, centralized energy. That dream is now dead.
But the industry remains, a trillion-dollar capital drain
waiting to supplant Vietnam as the basis of a war economy'
1 his time, the war is on our bodies and our environment.
Atomic reactors regenerate electricity by harnessing the
power of the nuclear bomb inside enormously complex
sensitive cores. What they cannot do, however, is to turn the
trick safely, cleanly, or even economically.
All nuclear plants give off
a certain amount of radia-
tion, and this radiation is a
known cause of cancer,
leukemia, and birth defects.
All nuclear plants are
potential bombs. Should the
core of even a medium sized
reactor get out of control
(either by accident or sabo-
tage), it could release
thousands of times more
radiation than was spewed
out at Hiroshima and Naga-
saki. By the industry's own
admission, such a catas-
trophe could kill thousands
and cost billions.
All nuclear plants pro-
duce radioactive wastes
which cannot be handled,
which can be turned into
bombs, and which ultimately
pose an incomprehensible
threat to the health and
safety of this and all
generations to come.
There is no solution now
or on the horizon for the
waste problem, and any future remedy will cost billions
For many of us, any one of the above points is sufficient to
demand a stop to these machines.
Montague, Mass. would use a quarter of the Connecticut
River.
In all cases, the water is returned to the natural
environment 4 to 40 degrees hotter, with devastating effect
for the marine environment. Sometimes, cooling towers are
also used, releasing enormous quantities of steam, with
uncertain effects on weather patterns.
Despite the almosi incalcufcble investment of human and
natural resources, the fact is tfcat nuclear power plants do not
work. The track record of these stations has been so poor that it
has caused serious doubt that the industry can ever pa for
itself, r �
There have been accidents, shut-downs, and incred.blv
costly repairs. Their construction costs have soared vear after
ear' and de,avs have " some cases doubled or tripled the b.ll
Water for cooling
But there is more. Nuclear reactors require huge amounts
of water for cooling. The plant intended for Seabrook N H
would take 1.2 billion gallons of water a day; the one for
Fountainhead
Serving the East Caroline community for over SO years
EDITOR
Doug White
PMJMAMQER ADVERTING MANAGER
LlghCoekley a�WSE0ITOR8 Robert M. Svraim
Ricki Qliarmis
M arc Barnes ���,�� .
SPORTS EDITOR
$m Rogers
�N
Meanwhile, nuclear fuel, is both
There's a shortage of raw ur.niumd .e"en m 0Cd
s ortage of the enrichment MTtSZSTST
stuff is useless. �nicn the raw
Hopes for reprocessing the sDent f.��l
material are onthe brink of burial, as America . �5 "?
reprocessing plant at West V.llev NY w H j
The only other one on the horizonBarnwelt S C " '
stiff opposition and may never open W.ihou7'�.J '
there is not . prayer in the world That Z�"
pay for itself. P��fr can npr
There is a completely different road to t.kr A m.i ,�-
study by none other than the Ford fZSSSZi
could, w�h simple conserv.t.on measure cu, )u ' '
sTpl,tn ,n .ha,f wi,h minim' "� - our D :ergv
l9;e!eher,hUS 'U " � ZZZT
�sion
TRENDS EDITOR
Steve Bachner
rvuNTAiNMEAD is the student newspaper of East
Carolina University sponsored by the MedteSoard of ECU
and Is distributed each Tuesday and ThursSy (weekly
during the summer). y tweewy
SrW?9 lddri m t�th itt,Wm�' illllHlaU. N.C.
Editorial offices: 7S7-6M8, 757-SJS7, 7S7-630S.
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni S6 annually.
"� " a" "�"�� of the ��, �n,ury � �
wh"T7.�'JTr f,cedof"��'��"�i-H
I�r��.p.rfecUoX600r.UrC,U " b' "�d ��
The ���.� V�l�n� of pure indulgence
o�r V?e'�.r k T '� � And like � a�"��c Hie
do. TSrT JL"c0" - iBdi"d�"
" Me"� other Cr��.cei.�k'�,er S � � "�d.y.
t
Sunn
w�iilMii.r�uiw�i
� mm - m





r i f f t
��
THE RAIN CONTINUED m &�
��'W to oW '� a " Gnvdle as students
ARTWORK
led from p. I
About the artwork, judge
1. "Color work in
' REBEL was exquisite.
" rv section contains
' '�� �� the most subtle
variation in tone we've seen.
Tl magazine offers a
balance ol serious art for its
sake, and professional
illustrations for the sake of
individual layouts. This is
certainly a tribute to the
editing of the magazine
Fiction and poetrv in-
cluded in The Rebel were
also rated excellent. Judge
Dan Krotz declared the
tr "topnotch singling
out Tim Wright, Ray Harrell,
and Gene Hollar for their
pacing and rhythm. Sheila
Turnage was also praised for
her story "Thelast Indian in
the tt hole Wide World
which won first place fiction
�n the magazine's annual
literary contest.
Lav year's staff con-
Kay Parks,
rl Director and Allison
Thompson, Associate Editor.
The Rebel is published
annually each spring. Stu-
dents are encouraged to
submit poetry, short stories,
essays, and non-fiction to the
magazine for publication.
This year's deadline is Dec.
15. Submissions should be
mailed to The Rebel,
Mendenhall, Greenville NC
27834, or they may be
brught by the Rebel office
in the publications building.
' LIT CLASS WAS
ThwCUttS NOTES mate rr
Mf LIT CUltf if BREEZy
CAUSI SUSAK TAKKS CLIVVS
HOME TO STUDy.
iw pSfSTFr,CULT wvtLf �"�
PRODUCTION MANAGER
NEEDED
Job involves:
maintenance and repair of Compugraphic
neadliners, developers, dryer, and other offset
production equipment; maintenance of ample
supplies for equipment and production; sizing
photos used in the paper; supervision of proof-
readers, and responsibility for the Flash page.
Would prefer someone with a background in
industrial technology, in industrial graphics
(not art majors), or someone with experience
in newspaper production or who is familiar
with offset production equipment.
This job requires approximately 20 hours a
week, with most work concentrated on Mon-
day and Wednesday nights. Must be will-
ing to work late on these nights. Applicant
must be mechanically inclined.
If interested, contact Doug White at
FOUNTAINHEAD, 757-6309, or at
752-8288 before Dec. 8.
Cvxx
BONANZA
FOR PIRATES ONLY
Bonanza is proud to present
the return of our fabulous
PIRATE SPECIAL!
Which includes a 5oz. Sirloin Steak,
Baked Potato , Texas Toast, Salad
from our FREE, all you can eat Salad Bar
and your choice of Beverage
( except milk, and Dessert.
All for $2.89

Otter good all day, every day
with presentation of ECU I.D. card.
Remember Great Things Happen
at Bonanza and ECU
30 November 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Pay S
From ROTC to tradegy in Guyana
By ELISSA McCRARY
Associated Press Writer
FORT BRAGG NC (AP)
Lt. Col. Alfred L. Keyes,
a logistics officer with the
18th Airborne Corps,
thought his years of heading
up emergency missions all
over the world were over, but
orders from the State
Department Monday sent
him 1,500 miles to help
recover bodies in Jonestown,
Guyana.
Keyes received orders
several weeks ago to report
in January to Central State
University in Wilberforce,
Ohio, where he will be an
ROTC professor. He said he
thought his last few weeks at
Fort Bragg would be routine,
but the call Monday put
him in charge of a 100-man
task force in the jungle of
Guyana.
U.S. Army teams put the
last of at least 900 bodies
from the People's Temple
commune at Jonestown on a
helicopter Saturday after a
three-day recovery mission.
The bodies were flown to
Dover Air Force Base in
Delaware for identification.
Keyes, 412, who had
managed to get only a few
hours of sleep since leaving
for Guyana Monday, arrived
back at Fort Bragg Sunday
morning.
He said, in an interview
with The Associated Press
Sunday, that no incident in
his 17 years' of experience in
the Army could compare
with the scene of the mass
suicides at Jonestown.
"I first saw the suicide
site from the air, about 200
feet up Keyes, said.
"Visualize a space about the
size of two or three football
fields, with people jammed
in like at a rock concert, and
then imagine that they all fell
over dead at the same time.
It was unbelievable
Keyes said as the small
plane swooped down for a
closer look, he could see that
people were piled on top of
one another, with some
linked arm-in-arm in death
�nd mothers and fathers
holding their children.
"The temperature stayed
90 or 95 degrees with 90
percent humidity. The
bodies had already started to
decomposeKeyes said.
"The stench was no-
ticeable even in the plane at
200 feet. I have never seen or
smelled anything so grue-
some in my life
Keyes, who is a veteran
of many Army rescue and
recovery missions, was told
Monday morning that he had
been chosen to head the task
force and that he had to leave
on the first flight out of Fort
Bragg Monday afternoon.
Keyes said he initiallv
picked about 140 troops,
including two women who
had the skills necessary for
the mission. But after arm
ing in Georgetown and dis-
cussing the situation with the
commander of the entire
operation, he decided to cut
the number of Fort Bragg
troops to 75 or 100, including
grave registration special-
ists, medics and supply
personnel.
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Or just about anywhere eise you d like to ao For
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nv u
Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 30 November 1978
Rodin 9s Sculpture is
a 'major collection'
U �l ! IV

li
'
li nl mind � followed.
seemingly fir-t and foremosl,
iwn tastes and fancies
ver ihi i nurse ol nearlv $5
year, during which she at
t'd I lie impressiv e selet
iguste Rodin's
k than 70 -in

Her choice was remark
Before Rodin's death in
the following
Q40's, she
hand. sm h statuary thus de
!n a in i - impe cable execu-
tion; artists' reputations
were often made with thi-
-urt ol work.
I he Ago "I Bronze"
and s; John the Baptist"
relate direct!) to the re-
quirements ol "academic"
or ' ollicial" sculpture fa-
Salons ov rr the
course ol the Nth centurv.
I hese works illustrate a
Art
first ui Rodin
m ihoe nearest
� - . plasters a rl�!
among them not
-l III!
tis hut also manv
esl
- lUi.

� � � � asen
teresl

Rod tir-t
J � g IB
Baptist
j
a a
�. the most popular
i')th iturv
� portrav
� - ised a - sul
-
A t h
sculpture der-
ived front classical art ami
reinforced from Renaissance
days onward: a tradition
placing the human figure,
preferably nude, at the verv
"I the arti-t pre-
- -t uipl ure.
R diii ne er left the
ire a- hi- onlv subjet t. vet
ated
that en-
� . rathei ;han
- ; ' i '��: a :
ne.
ttl . :� estures, pi
i r a - 111
situation
the i harai
ie sculpt
� thi ,ei
ultant
isly an art in itsell and a
n ��.�(�) a purely plastic ami
�thetic - � tt it also
� � �
H depicting Venus or
D pi sents
l: in Sparticus,
i- port raved. Ro-
� �. leans upon
traditional concepti
. � ure, expressing some
message while at tin- same
time leaving the viewer tlie
greatest freedom on inter-
pretation.
Rodin the "realist"
Rodin says ol himsell as
regard working with the
nude, "I am rather a realist,
like the Ancient instead of
trvmg to correct, 1 applv
mysell to rendering the
admirable architecture of the
human body. That first game
me my "Man ol the Age of
Bronze a ver exact and
ery rigorous naturalism . "
Rodin s St ulptu" i- an
exi client cntical catalog ol a
major collet lion, o! the ma-l
er s work. I a i h piece is
phi itographed Irom al least
t ii angles, w it h a detail ami
i i asjimallv .tfi accompan-
ying artist workingsketeh.
The photograph) ol the
sculpture is dramatii and
expert, catching all the ex-
pressive qualities ol the light
as it falls in different ways
onto the surfaces ol Rodin's
work. I he details, often ol
the sculpture's head, render
unforgetahle pici ures I thi
ii -
mmentarv on i
work i- inf : i d anil sen
� � - often including quotes
Rodin himsi ul the
part it ular si uipture it
� � is ideas on
the
lh most valuahh aspect
H i - St uipture � I hough
i- that in treatii ion
size ol theSpreckle's one
gain a full pi lure ol the
riesis and growth of H
dm - work Bv ng a
� .tfi the full repre-
n ' � euvres
present I his i atalog,
an gel a true feel
; In able word for Rodin)
this master unique,
tininumeiit.il genius.
1 Gl STE ROOM'S "Till Age
H
. '�
Buffalo DJ struggles
STYUD
miss rot
DOLBLEUPLIFT
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When the Whip
Comes Down'
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$3.50
OmtM ��� �m aua &wnv
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Back cover of The Rolling Stones' pedaterrestrially conceived Some Girls
LF replete with doubly uplifted catalogue groupies and kinky liner notes.
about two months ago. a hot selling record called
Kiss You -ill Over' appeared on his plavlist 'I played it on
m show and hated it. .It was blatantly sexual and it went way
past my tolerance level I complained to my bossand he
accused me of being hung up on God and spiritualism That
really hurt, tf hen you're the dominant radio personality in
ur market, people identify you with the music you play,
if ell. 1 refuse to be identified with Kiss You All Over or with
Some Girls by Mick Jagger and the Rolling Stones. So it was
an easy decision for me to make. Ther was absolutely no
agonizing. I just resigied
with Top 40 sex-rock
Bv i.ARi DEEB
Special to FOl STAlSHE ID
The rock music industrv is leading millions ol ic - ai
and vuuiit; adults down the evil path- ol drugs, sexual
promiscuity ami social irresponsibilitv So says Jack Carey, a
former top-rated dis jocke) in Baltimore and Buffalo, who
recentlj made national headlines hv quitting hismorningshow
at (jH'A Radio in Moline. 111 because he got tired ol playing
"blatantly, sexual" record- such as "Kiss You ll Over" bv the
rock group Exile.
Music
"I'm not a square Care) said. "But I hail to be true to mv
morals I had some verv stern feelings inside me that had to be
accounted tor. 1 had to quit
(larev is a might) intriguing fellow. Ju-t 30 years old, he
has spent 1(1 years in radio and has done quite a bit of
moonlighting as a singer. While in Baltimore, he was good
enough to perform frequent!) at the local Playbov Club.
But two years ago, arrested on a statutory rape charge
because he had sexual relation- with an underage female
listener, he became a horn-again Christian. For the first time,
he stopped thinking of mone) and popularity as his sole quests
in life.
"It was the summer ol 1976 Carey recalled. "My wife
was just the sweetest little lady to ever tome down the pike.
But she left me and was bv ing with another man. That's when I
got arrested for my involvement with the girl. 1 denied the
charge for eight months. Meanwhile, my wife continued living
with this other guy, and it just broke my heart.
"After our last phone conversation. I was so distraught that
I grabbed the Bible, which I had used only as a decoration on
my bedroom dresser, and threw it on the floor. It opened to Job
22:25, which says: "The Almighty shall be thy defense
"well, 1 just couldn't believe that God would speak to me
hke that. 1 don't know if you believe in miracles, but God told
me to admit my guilt. So I told the truth, went on trial, and got
a suspended sentence and probation. That was the beginning
of my new life
Carey them moved to Winston-Salem, , and eventually
to Illinois, where he began wwrking for W Ql A
"For two years everything was in my favor at that station, '
he said. "I was making good money, I had plenty of vacation,
the ratings were up. I really believe I could have stayed there
� her 21' years ar -� .
rhe only cloud on C.arev horizon wa
sexuality ol certain r rd - he had n his i
The lyrics were in sharp conflii
Finally, about two months agt . a hot-selling rt
Ki i -u !l Over" appeared on his plavlist
T played it on mv -how and I hated it Care said 'It n as
blatantly sexual and it went va past mv toleran
complained to my boss an I he said I k Jack, vou and I
know, .there's . d that stuff in this industry ' He tl
accused me ol being hunt: uj n G spirituals
real!) hurt.
when you re I minant radio pers
market, people identify you with the musk vou pla Wi
refuse to be identified with K ss u All Over' or with S
Girls'by Mick Jagger and the Rolling Stones Si it
decision tor me to make. There was ibsolutely no a a
jusl resigned
Carey i- convinced the rock musit is t has b
jressively more irresponsible in the message
it- young tans.
I find it disgusting that the industry I hurnm
thi- punk rock material fie said. "All they -eem to ar- at
i K ill it sell? tlaniit Records, which distnbutt I Some
Girl bv the Rolling Stones, is a perfect exan
company that ignoring it- responsibility to societv Thev haw
no regard for good lalt
Listen, I love the music business. But 1 have to condemn
the industry's mi-u- ol its obligation to serve people Mick
Jaggar doesn'l havi to write music that degrading .in �
at doped-up, mtxed-up people Vv hv make hav al the exp
ol people v ho arc wallow ing in miserv '
"It just not necessary When they express crude wot
crude thought- in their music, do thev think they're expressing
their artistic freedom? Look at John Lennon and Paul
McCartney. Now, 1 don't condone everything they did in their
personal bv and ! don't think every song they composed wa-
a masterpiece or socially redeeming But I still re-sped their
writing ability Thev were great artist-
But how can you compare Lennon and McCartney with
Mick Jaggar and thi- piece of garbage he turn- out called
Some Girls- The B. .ties had seething going aS an art form
But this Jaggar thing cannot poblv be construed as art I do
love pop musk, but whv can't we see the need to mincer a-
human being to human being?"
Since quitting, Carey ha- received lots 0f prai,e f
leners. plenty of guest shots on T and radio talk shows and
R batch of speaking engagements. So far. however no iob
offers have trickled in � JOh
"Of all the letters I've gotten from listeners. ai! but two
have been favorable he said. "Meanwhile Ora I
about $36,000 ,n gross revenue because two verv L
car dealers have killed all the.r eommerc al l2 J
.0 do some speaking on behalf of Youth7or Ch� , 7 7
so happy that I can't s,t st.ll ' l m honestl





r i
1 r t t r r t
Lucifi
of
Hammer
30 Novmbr 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Pap 7
team
I� WCek that Hot FudSe Sunae fell on Tuesdae'
T"nds Editor 1? 11' Uncertain ��� down in the middle of with .k. pu .u. . .
fiv BARRY CLAYTON
���� rre�rf, Editor
Editor' note Thi. �
"�"�� would hit Earth
nead-an were one la a
��. Then one in a
'nousand. Then n�-
' ten one m a
hundred
And then.
On
J��� 15, 19U ,he
S,7,d ���� rushed past
K,r!ha.ad,s,ancewhich.in
ronomic.1 terms a, least -
;an described only as
mK nervousl) dose.
Xt �he time, there was a
1 speculation about the
fHWMb"j of a collision,
' "h the expected
'heworld rattle-sha-
v :� follow was the
,ivpn� of the comet Ka-
tek, which wM rumoured
produce the best displav
vlestial pyrotechnics ever
b) man, due to its
"n rumored) close ap-
1 '� our planet.
nd once again there was
� ' ��lk of collision.
course, as it turned
Kahoulek passed us at a
stance, and the
tial pyrotechnics"
course, a definite
maybe that should
'S feel sate, because
when our best astrono-
thought that a Hying
of rock and ice
plum hum perilously
� fragile world, it
stead to ignore us
- by on its sunward
i al a considerably safe
uld we, on the
Oboeflute
recital
Friday
Bn SUSAN CHESTON
Staff Writer
Lisa Clo,flutist, and Lucy
Midyette, oboist, will per-
form in Senior Recital at A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall this
night at 8:15. Ad-
ssion is tree and the public
- im ited to attend.
Lisa Clo is a senior in
Music Education and Music
Therapy. She has performed
the ECU Symphonic
ind Ensemble and the
ECl Orchestra, as well as
Marching Band, Sym-
ni Band and a variety of
imber ensembles.
xhe has also been an
ve member of the Music
Therapy Club. She has
served as historian for the
� two years.
Clo plans to student teach
m Wilmington next semes-
After graduation she
will complete a six month
ternship in Music Therapy.
� is from Gloversville, NY.
Clo will perform the
Handel "Sonata No. Ill in G
Major accompanied by
Meg James on harpsichord.
Pianist Donna Roman
accompany her on the
ata for Flute and
Piano'of Robert Muczynski.
The program will close with
the Claude Boiling "Suite for
Jazz Piano and Flute
Movement 2, entitled "Sen-
timentale Melissa Ussery,
piano; Janet Reeve, string
bass; and Kyle McBride,
percussion, will assist on the
Boiling.
Lucy Midyette is a senior
in Music Education. She has
performed with the ECU
svmphonic Wind Ensemble,
the Orchestra, the Symph-
onic Band and the Marching
Pirates. She has been soloist
on English horn as well as
oboe. She will student teach
in Rocky Mount next
semester before graduating
in the spring.
Midyette is from Orien-
tal.
She will peform the
Handel "Sonata No. II in G
minor accompanied by
Susan Beck on organ. Pianist
Deborah Lambeth will ac-
company the "Sonata for
Oboe and Piano" of Camille
Saint-Saens.
A reception in the Faculty
Lounge of the Music Budd-
ing will follow the Friday
night recital.
other hand, feel uncem
and nervous, because the
finest of our astronomers
oould not track Kahoutek
with enough accuracy to
know even approximately
where it was?
"But why worry at all?"
one is tempted to ask.
Devastating collisions of
Earth and plummeting
mountains that fall from the
sky �s just a topic for
scienceftction, isn't it?
Mountains, maybe.
Good-sized hills? No.
There are precedents.
Crater Lake, and the tre-
mendous meteor-impact that
occurred in Siberia around
the turn of the century that
leveled trees for tens of miles
in every directiona blast so
powerful that many scien-
tists suggest that the meteor
may have been composed of
anti-matter.
The amazing thing about
the Siberian incident is that
not one single person was
hurt by that tremendous
release of energy. The
impact site was deep in the
northern wilderness of
Russia. Had the meteor
come down in the middle of
Manhatten, millions of
people would have been
killed.
Not a question of science-
fiction
A question of luck.
Last Sunday a disaster-
film made its premiere on
with the Earth, the larger the
comet the more devastating
the impact.
In the recent bestselling
Lucifer's Hammer, the
latest and best -product
of the science-fiction writing
team of Larry Niven and
Jerry Pournelle, the comet is
Books
television. Its title was A Fire
in the Sky and had to do with
a comet which impacted in
Phoenix, Arizona. As a
result, the city was totally
decimated.
It must have been a verv
small comet.
Comets are larger than
meteors. Much larger. And
since the amount of energy
that is released by a comet-
impact depends upon the
mass of the comet (a coef-
ficient of its size and density)
and the speed at which it is
travelling when it collides
a large one.
In fact, it is several miles
in diameter.
What are the chances
that a comet (or any other
large, fast moving body, for
that matter) might actually
strike the Earth?
No one knows for certain.
Dr. Robert S. Richardson
of the Hale Observatory,
Mount Wilson chose to put it
in these words: "No one
knows how many objects
ranging in size from a few
miles in diameter downward
may pass near the Earth
758-2211
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Well give each child (12 or under) a free
burger and fries for every meal an adult
buys.
ikKhn?�Wn !? there toentertain.
And he II have a Treasure Chest "grab
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each year without being
noticed
The average size of the
hard rock and ice comet head
is believed to be about one
and a quarter miles in
diameter, but some astro-
nomers feel that many
comets may be much larger.
All of this makes excel-
lent�and nearly untapped-
material for disaster stories.
And it is material that
Larry Niven and Jerry Pour-
nelle use masterfully in their
newest novel.
Lucifer's Hammer is not
a short work. It is fully 640
pages long, which turns out
to be just barely long enough
to handle the multitude of
characters they have chosen
to people their story with.
Yet, so subtly have they
woven this masterwork of
modern story-telling that,
despite the unusual length
of the story, the reader is
never left to become bogged
down even in the scientific
explanation scenes.
The number of major
characters in itself is
impressive: close to fifty in
all. Enough to warrant a
glossary. And one is
thoughtfully provided by the
authors in the front of the
book.
The first impression
when one cracks the cover
and sees this Dramatis
Personae is that this gath-
ering of individuals is too
much for the authors to
handle (and perhaps too
much for the readers to
digest) in one story. But
Niven and Pournelle manage
them quite well without
becoming bogged down and
tiring.
Throughout the novel we
see the characters first indi-
vidually and then as small
groups, as they meet and
pool their talents and
resources in their desperate
(and in some cases hopeless)
attempts to survive the
series of catastrophies that
follow the comet-strike.
Gradually, they drift
toward a common refuge in
the hills of southern Cali-
fornia where some vague
semblance of civilization
remains, bolstered by the
foresight of California Sen-
ator Arthur Jellison.
The story opens at a
cocktail party with the new-
of the discovery of a 'new'
comet by amateur stargazer
Timothy Hamner, who an-
nounces, ironically, that his
comet might even get close
enough to Earth to become
visible to the naked eye.
It does indeed.
There, Hamner is intro-
duced to Harvey Randall,
producer-director for NBS
Television, a man almost
neurotically concerned with
his job-security at the
network, and at the same
time profoundly unhappy
with his life-style.
Randall agrees to do brief
documentary on the new
comet and Tim Hamner, its
namesake.
�"� (he second installment
this rvneu see Tuesday's
vditinn ofFOl IMlll II)
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1
Page 8 FOUNTAINKEAD 30 N
ov ember 1978
Campbell dumps Pirates;
Thompson scores 27
� Walt
i i
'A
in.) M

rii�-
i
i
hi
Pirate wrestlers
open dual season
against Wolf park
Lydia Kounim'
n sets sights on personal goals
m
I
Ml h Ted INieman
�J
Clarence Miles
Tyson and Miles
Rookies pace Pirates
.
- ! R()(,F Rs
. i- i I
Sure wins (
W illiam md Mar, In �
-��
' ' '
grit games
' ' ; ' 12 pan �
pla
l . � ! Ml' v'
' ' I Ml
underdog in som � .
�'���� ' '�: til pla "
horM arence Miles,
"� " ani .ng tl
season II f 1 I
1 fl ' rilej Hi, ,�rtM
ids in the Pirat.
' M ' I 14 point, again
; ' " ' perl rmances agams. St
n,�hl 'th M'lermg 12 points and s�a
i im high nine
prs? "N"l not me explained Tyson wl
'2 rebounds , gam, it Conle,
a little nervous, but being freshman doesn't
h re '�
forMil� ! �h hav, been just a little nervous but
' � " � ' ft" adrenaline started flowing and I forgot
trying to piav well Once I got ,m hand on
' todick on the Root "
1 ' ! �d Miles looked more like seasoi

Cillman H
.mil ii
Mil,
i
nor !
il 1
i M
Ml
!
lk � me
-
i with I
iverw
(.urn i
" ' I id h
- I V! '
�III- I � .
� � R illiam and Marv team oi �
irsl oi seven i
I in
'�"� � md Mai
bothth. Hatter and I Coi irnan
M )'1' lm, what w,
all along in praitin , 1l(. u , , v j
i atu nt l got ti. mal
B �
of pa
I a u 111
i� ll I ),





ParichilTselub 'depleted'
ECU faces Indians
WE ARE PAYING
CASH
FOR CLASS RINGS
(REGARDLESS OF CONDITION)
OTHER GOLD RINGS
(REGARDLESS OF CONDITION)
ANY GOLD OR SILVER OF
ANY KIND AND
TOP CASH PRICE PAID FOR
SILVER AND GOLD COINS
COIN COLLECTIONS
BRING TO "COIN MAN
AT
HARMONY HOUSE
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iritis Hrisnuui
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top-ranked
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at Marshall
BIMBOS LOlXii;
Disco i V c(l ncsria v Night
Membership
SUM)for ii
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SUM) Admission Special
Draft 30 till night
Brown bagging Permitted
1.1 v , F.ntertal n incut on
Fi Sat. Mg
itcd oi 1 his High
just off . (ireene St.
csrfere
lime m-the-rocks:
tofMfare artifyiaDv s wee
the perfect non-alcoholic cocktail.
In yourfavorite fruit juice: A refreshing nei
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In a Perrier Spritzer: Adds new lightness
Enjoy it in good health.
� '?
ik
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1 X
N
�"�"�
1t1�'1
Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 30 November 1978
Oilers' Campbell leads League, draws praise
BCHARLES CHANDLER
Assistant Sports Editor
How good is Earl Camp-
bell? Everyone concerned
with the National Football
League seems to want to
know this of the Houston
Oilers star rookit running
back.
One thing is tor sure,
Campbell has come upon the
NH. scenewith more success
than any other rookie back in
league history. The ll77
Heisman lYophy winner
from rexas lead- the NFL in
hing alter i games with
a total I I265 yards. He has
12 touchdowns and an im-
pressh c I 9 yards per carry
i g e.
V � all tin- i- so despite
1 ampbeil missed
imi earlier in the
year due to an injury, and
half of another one. Camp-
bell's "speed with power"
style reminds many of the
style of the immortal Jimmv
Brown, who ruled the
League when he ran for the
Cleveland Browns in the
early 60's.
Brown i generally con-
sidered by all to be the
greatest running back in NFL
history barring none, even
the great O.J. Simpson. Yet
Jimmy "the Creek Snyder,
football's Mr. Know-it-all,
-as bluntly, "Earl Campbell
i- greater than Jimmy
Brown Perhaps his remark
i- a little premature, but the
"Greek" knows a good thing
when he sees it.
What does Brown sa? "I
think Earl will be the great-
est running back in history
Chandler, Maready
Forecast champs
Sports Editor
ndler and David
the champ-
bis vear's
N I VINEH VD's Fear-
was
mot
� Maready
i w inning per-
ship, iuit
ral weeks
the
wins
15 2

� vith a
;e. Hen
- � with
' tees.
ionships was close and were
not decided until the final
Forecast weekly predictions.
Herndon came oh so close to
taking the "most wins"
championship. Three games
that lie and Chandler (lit-
tered on, Southern Cal-Notre
dame. Duke-UNC, and Ari-
zona-Arizona St. were all
ided in the final seconds.
('handler predicted right in
each ease, hut a few come-
backs or last second field
goals not oeeured. Herndon
could have been co-champ
with Maready .
Going into last week's
games Maready held a simi-
lar edge over Chandler in the
percentage raee as was final.
et it Chandler could have
picked one more game right
and Mareasy one more
wrong last week. Chandler
could have won the percen-
tage championship.
Rogers, who led early in
the year, saw his record drop
when several toss-up games
went against his predictions
in the middle of the season.
before he finishes his
career said Brown. "He's
truly remarkable
Not only is Campbell
gaining accolades from all
corner of the NFL, but he
deserves them all. Just this
past week, he broke the
record for most ards gained
in a season by an NFL rookie
back. And, remember, he
did it in only twelve games,
not fourteen like the old
record holder, Don Woods,
ol San Diego did.
The simple facts are this:
barring injuries Campbell
has as much potential as any
hack who ever played in the
National Football League.
Ten years from now his ac-
complishments may be of
such heights that no back
w ill ever conquer them.
But didn't everyone say
that ol Brown's accomplish-
ments But then along came
Earl, and with a little luck
This week's NFL games
are pre iewed below.
PITTSBURGH 21
HOUSTON 17
This game could go either
way. It rates as one of the
real classics of the year. The
Oilers are playing great of
late, and own Mr. Campbell.
, Yet the Steelers seem to
have no weaknesses. Terry
Bradshaw should direct his
team to victorv number 12.
ATLANTA 17
CINCINNATI 10
The Falcons are in po-
sition to win a wild-card spot
in the playoffs. The Bengals
are 1-12 and have nothing to
lose here. Yet the feeling
here is that Atlanta will keep
their post-season hopes alive
with a victory.
GREEN BAY 13
TAMPA BAY 10
The Packers kept their
Central Division title hopes
alive last week by tying Min-
nesota 10-10. A win over the
Bucs would certainly help
things for Bart Starr and
company. It should be a hard
earned one, though.
NEW YORK JETS 24
BALTIMORE 17
The Jets are also in
playoff contention with their
7-6 record. Another loss
would eliminate them,
though. The Colts may as
well discard this season and
look ahead to next. Injuries
have decimated) their well
above average club. Bert
Jones is still not well. Look
for the Jets to soar.
LOS ANGELES 24
NEW YORK GIANTS 13
The Rams looked bad
against Cleveland last week.
Things should change this
week, though. Of late every-
one had looked good against
the Giants, who have "fum-
bled" their season away.
MIAMI 21
WASHINGTON 20
Both these clubs are
struggling at present. Yet
Bob Griese should prove too
much for the Redskin de-
fense. He is the League's
premier quarterback, and
knows that his team must
FRIDAY�TGIF PARTY
3-7
SATURDAY-STEVE
HARDY'S BEACH PARTY
9AM-1AM
MONDAY-
CHAPTER X
PRESENTS
THE CATAUIEAS
win this one. The Redskins
had to win last week against
Dallas and didn't. These
'Skins get "griesed
MINNESOTA 16
PHILADELPHIA 14
Both teams are fighting
for playoff bids. But the
Vikings know what it's ail
about. Their mass exper-
ience should be a big edge
here.
KANSAS CITY 20
BUFFALO 14
Neither team will go any-
where but home when the
regular season ends. The
Bills have Terry Miller, but
the Chiefs have the home
field advantage.
ST. LOUIS 24
DETROIT 21
The Lions looked great
against Denver on Thanks-
giving Day. Yet Bud Wilkin-
son has his team playing like
the Cardinals of a couple of
years ago. This should be a
good one. Look for a narrow
victory painted red.
SAAD'S SHOE REPAIR
113 GRANDE AVE.
at
COLLEGE VIEW
CLEANERS
ARN'Y-i.AVY STCRE
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Back Packs
10th A Evan Straau
BudwaJaar. Scrilltz. c.0,
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Piels �.� $1.49
Budweiser. Scrilltz,
Millar, Strobs Kegs $34.00
50 Lbs. Ice $2.75
OPEN 24 MRS
NEW ORLEANS 23
SAN FRANCISCO 13
The Saints have collapsed
in recent weeks but should
regain winning form against
the hopeless 49ers.
OAKLAND 17
DENVER 16
This is the game. The
AFC West Division Cham-
pionship is probably at stake.
Neither team has had a very
good season. The Raiders
just plainly have the better
team, and the home field
advantage. These factors
should bring the divisional
crown back to California.
SEATTLE 21
CLEVELAND. 14
Again, this is a contest
between playoff contenders.
(The League schedule seems
full of them this week). The
Seahawks are a very closely
knit group led by super
quarterbakc Jim Zorn, who is
labeled "a left-handed Fran
Tarkenton The Browns
have a great halfback duo in
Greg Pruitt and the revi-
talized Calvin Hill The Set
hawks get the edge based on
their overall enthusiasm and
togetherness.
SAN DIEGO 20
CHICAGO 16
The Chargers vrr
out by Kansas Citv ts
week. This does not tit m
with Coach Tommv Prothi
DALLAS 28
NEW ENGLAND 24
This may be a pit m m
the Super Bowl. Both tei
appear the best ol the
spective conference! b
have few weakru-s-� - Ei
plosive offenses are found
both clubs, and should I �
ev idence in thi�- onti
Dalla- ha� been at their � i -�
for the last three �
When they are, say - I hv
announcer T-m Brook si
"they're the best team
ever played in th� Nl
The Patriots will pr i
quite a test, but somet I
here says Brook-hir'
may be right.
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Fulp's
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Located At
Greenville Country Club
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UNTIL
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FROM 9 a.m. TIL 5 p.m.
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Next Semester!

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Title
Fountainhead, November 30, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 30, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.529
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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