Fountainhead, November 28, 1978






Circulation 10,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina volssno.
28
Novemba
�mbr 1978
For possible Boston concert
By MARC BARNES
.Veu's Editor
Due to a schedule conflict, the much rumored Boston
concert will not be held early next year, according to Charles
Sune, chairman of the Major Attractions Committee.
Sunejsaid that negotiations with the promoter could not
begin, because of a conflict with activities in Minge� Coliseum.
"The promoter was reasonably sure that we could have gotten
on the tour Sune remarked. He added that ECU would have
been the only university in North Carolina to have a concert
featuring Boston during their upcoming tour, which will be
held during January, 1979
"Vv e made a substantial investment in the floor covering
Sune said He added that the Major Attractions Committee
should have a I igher priority that intramural basketball
Sune said that when the building was built. Chancellor
Emeritus Leo Jenkins set priorities for the use of the building.
According to Sune. Jenkins said education was to come first,
intercollegiate athletics second, and student programming
third. Since then, Sune said, intramurals has moved into the
third position.
:une said that long ago, the intramural program was a lot
smaller than it is no, but he said that he didn't feei using the
facility for a concert instead of the intramurals for one night
was unreasonable.
He said, "Considering we've spent $12,000 (on a floor
covering) and we only want to get into the facility twice a
semester. I don't feel that we're being unreasonable at all
Dr. Edgar Hooks, chairman of the Physical Education
Department, is in charge of athletic scheduling at Minges
-eum. Accormg to Sune. Hooks said that it wouldn't be
possible to get into Minges. because of the tight schedule
there.
Exam schedule
altered due to
re in increased usage by athletic
Everything else was already set up at the time of the
concert Hooks noted. He remarked that a system of priorities
is in effect at the facility, with academic matters coming first,
athletic matters coming second, and intramurals coming third
Hooks added that someone in the administration would
have to reset the priorities if and when they are reset. He
added that it was outside his realm of jurisdiction to change
priorities in terms of scheduling.
Rudolph Alexander, the associate dean of Student Affairs
and the advisor to the Student Union (the organization
responsible for bringing major attractions to ECU), concurred
with Hooks.
"Minges is heaviij booked during January and February "
Alexander said. He added that the universitv'had traditionally
stayed away from scheduling concerts during these months
because the facilities were in increased
groups and other- during the cold weather.
He commented further, "To my understanding, the same
thing has happened a, N.C. State and INCChapel H,L"
Dr. Hook -aid that during the cold weather months, it was
impossible to conduct classes outside, and the preparations for
a concert generally take most of the day. He added that it was
not feasible to cancel classes for a concert. He added that both
men and women's basketball teams practice in the coliseum,
and the facility will be in use during the evening hours for
intramural activ ities.
Hook- commented further that the ideal times to schedule
concert- is in the warmer months of fall and spring, because
the classes can be moved outside while the coliseum is readied
for a concert. "We are trying to be as practical as we can he
noted. Hooks commented further "In the past, we have asked
student not to schedule concerts in January and February
Hook- went on to say, "I am in favor of student concerts,
but we didn't have the scheduling times
See MINCES, p. 5
�:�
may
wl
be
Bv RICK1GLIARMIS
Veil s Editor
c
The Independence Bowl,
which has been scheduled
December 16, has caused
quite a bit of controversy
among the student body at
ECU and among the facultv
because of the bowl-final
exam conflict.
According to Dr. John
Howeil, vice-chancellor of
academic affairs, a conclu-
sion has not yet been
reached as to how the exam
dule will be altered or if
it will be altered at all.
Howeil did say however
that there has been dis-
cussion on the subject and
the administration is trying
to come up with a solution to
the conflict.
"We have not at this point
� up with a workable
nion to the
problem said Howeil. "I
am meeting tomorrow (Tue-
sday) with representatives of
the faculty senate in order to
present a proposal to Dr.
Brewer on Wednesday Dr.
Brewer will have the final
say as to the alteration
according to Howeil.
Howeil feels that a
drastic alteration mav in-
convenience more students
than it will convenience.
"We can't quite foresee a
proposal that will aid every
student. When you start
changing a schedule, that
usually generates a lot of
conflicts said Howeil.
"We will certainly be
working out an accomodation
that won't inconvenience
many students said How-
ell. "When a schedule is not
followed, vou have the
problem of mesing up
vacation plans
Howeil explained that
one idea that has been
brought to the administra-
tion and an idea which is
being considered thoroughly
is the possibility of giving
students who have tickets to
the game an official excuse
for the exam- which are
missed.
Howeil said that, by
attending the bowl game, the
student will act as an official
representative of the univer-
sity and will be entitled to a
university excuse for the
exam.
The students missing
exams will take an incom-
plete for the course and will
take the exam at a later date.
Hcwell said that this sug-
gestion will be recommended
to Brewer and is not yet the
official decision. Howeil said
that this suggestion may-
convenience the student and
in turn, inconvenience the
faculty member.
Attendance at this bowl
game is an important factor
to the school and to its
chances of being considered
for future bowl games. When
Howeil was told this he
agreed that attendance is
important and the exam
schedule may hamper the
turnout for the game.
"That's a good point
said Howeil. "That's, why
we're trying to work out an
arrangement that is suitable,
so if people really want to go,
they can go
"We just don't want to
disrupt other people's
plans said Howeil.
Howeil did say that a
decision will be reached this
week and that the welfare of
the students and faculty will
be considered when making
this decision.
Student ski trip planned
The Travel Committee
has voted to sponsor a ski
trip to Snowshoe, W. Va.
jan. 1-5, during Christmas
break. The price of the trip is
$169 which includes bus
transportation, accomoda-
tions at Spruce Lodge, a 4
day lift ticket, 4 breakfasts
and 3 dinners and hotel
lodging in Roanoke, Va. on
the return trip. The Snow-
shoe Ski trip participants will
depart from Mendenhall at 8
a.m. on Monday, Jan. 1,
1979. After traveling all day,
except for lunch and rest
stops, the bus will reach
Snowshoe Ski Resort at 5
p.m. The group will depart
from Snowshoe at 2 p.m. on
Friday, Jan. 5 for the return
trip to Greenville after
spending the night in
Roanoke, Va.
Snowshoe is a mojor ski
resort on Cheat Mountain in
Pocahontas County, W.Va. A
unique feature of Snowshoe
i- that all lodging, the major
centers and all ski activity is
located at the top of the
mountain at an elevation of
nearly 5,000 feet with spec-
tacular scenic views.
Snowshoe has over six
miles of ski slopes and trials
featuring the greatest ski
slope vertical drop, 1,000
feet, in mid-America. The 21
slopes are serviced by four
triple chairs. There are also
10 miles of maintained
crosscountry ski trails.
The Cup Run Slope
System is located in the
northwest slope system with
the famous 7,500 foot Cup
Run Slope, a 1,500 foot
vertical drop.
There are 42 places
available on the Snowshoe
Ski Trip. Register at the
Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall, before Dec. 1,
1978.
Minges not available
DIE TO A schedule conflict at Minges Coliseum, the possible
Boston concert will not take place. If ECU had been able to
stage the concert. ECU would have been the onh orth
Carolina school on Boston 's tour.
SGA vote upholds veto
By ROBERT M.SWAIM
Advertising Manager
The Student Government
Assoaation (SGA) legisla-
ture voted overwhelmingly
Monday night to uphold the
veto on the appropriation to
the Marching Pirates that
was imposed bv SGA
President Tommy joe Pavne.
The bill was an appro-
priation of some $5,400 to
the band for the 79-80 school
year.
In his address to the
legislature Payne said that
the SGA should not be "an
academic and athletic care-
taker
TOMMY JOE PAYNE, SGA
president
Payne said that the band
is an athletic responsibility
and should not be funded by
the students. He also pointed
out that the athletic dept.
had a budget of 1.5 million
dollars plus gate receipts and
television revenue.
Payne is confident that
next year the Athletic
Council will take on the
responsibility for the band's
funding and said that he as a
member of the athletic
council will "be the first one
to get up and recommend
funding for the band
Only a handful of
legislators opposed Presi-
dent Payne and voted to
override his veto.
Nicky Francais, senior
class president and legis-
lator, said that he was glad
the legislature voted to
uphold the veto since the
Athletic Council will be
funding the band next year.
"Tommy Joe should be
commended for taking a
stand against appropriations
made by the legislature
which student fees should
not be burdened with said
Francais.
"Student fees
should go to things that
directly affect and directly
benefit students instead of
being a financial crutch for
organizations that should be
funded by the university
Legislator Guy Lucas also
praised Payne's actions.
"The president acted in a
wise and responsible manner
tonight in vetoing this bill
since the appropriation was
unnecessary said Lucas.
The Athletic Council will
fund this group in the future
and therefore free up over
$5,000 in student fees to be
appropriated to organiza-
tions that are legitimate and
SGA responsibility
Steve O'Geary, day
student legislator, commen-
ted that it should be noted
that the same legislature that
voted just a week ago to
appropriate money to the
band voted by a substantial
majority to uphold the
president's veto.
"The rea-on tor this is
that the pre-idetn brought in
new facts ami shed a new
light on the issue with his
comment- concerning the
overall administrative
view -aid O'Gearv.
During new business lh
legislature received a re
quest from Bill Barf .
secretary general of the ECl
Model U.N for a line item
transfer within the M�,j,
V !S budget
Barbee requested
money previously appropri
ated for a -peaker be Iran-
ferred to fund trip- :��
conferences for member
the club.
See SG I.
NICKY FRANCIS,
class preside t
scnio-
Biology chairman dies at 45
DR. JAMES McDAMEL,
Photo by Marianne Baines,
ECU News Bureau
By RICKIGLIARMJS
News Editor
Dr. James S. McDaniel,
professor and chairman of
the ECU Department of Bi-
ology, died Sunday at his
vacation home in Beaufort
County, according to William
Shires, ECU News Bureau.
McDaniel died of a heart
attack while raking leaves at
the age of 45.
McDaniel had been el-
ected editor of the national
scientific journal BIOS, last
week.
What's inside
A SKI TRIP it scheduled for the students at
ECU during Christinas break at Snowshoe,
W. VaThe deadline for registration is Dec.
1.
Billy Joel's latest is a bitter disappoint-
ment. For a reviewsee p. 6.
Barry Manilow's latest album is review-
edsee p. 6.
Lack of sleep evident at ECUsee p. 3.
Acuff speaks to Inter-Varsity Christian
. Fellowshipsee p. 3.
eCU defeats UNC-Asheville and St.
Leo'ssee p. 8.
Lady Pirates open season tonightsee p. 8.
McDaniel has been at
ECU since September, 1967.
During this time, he has
traveled across the United
States on behalf of the
biology department and has
won numerous honors.
As a specialist is parasite
physiology and ecology, Mc-
Daniel oubiished results of
his research in several sci-
entific journals. In addition,
he has been a consultant in
aquatic sciences and fish-
eries to the United Nations
Food and Agricultural Or-
ganization according to the
ECU News Bureau.
McDaniel co-authored a
research report published by
the Elisha Mitchell Scientific
Society in its journal. In this
report McDaniel and his
assistant, James R. Coggins,
observed parasites of the
common coastal North Caro-
lina snail.
McDaniel read a report
on their research before the
Association of Southeastern
Biologists meeting in Mo-
bile, Alabama.
McDaniel also traveled to
Kansas City, Missouri to
attend the meetin of the
American Society f Parasit-
ologists.
McDaniel was cited in the
1972 "International Scholars
Directory The directory,
published in France, gives
the bio-bibliographical list-
ing of noted academics
throughout the world, ac-
cording to the new- bureau
Among the academic and
professional honor- bo-tow -
ed upon McDaniel are
& ho's M ho Among Students
in American Universities and
College. 1956-57; Out
standing Student Award
(Ortenburger Award). 15:
Consultant. Food and Agri
cultural Organization of the
United Nations, 1967-1978;
American Men and Women
of Science; Personalities of
the South; and Outstanding
Educators of America.
University services bv
McDaniel include Dean
Search Committee. I'NC-
Faculty Assembly, Graduate
Council, Governance Com-
mittee, Chairman of Facultv,
1971-72, and Faculty Senate.
McDaniel also belonged
to several professional so-
cieties.
McDaniel received his
B.S. at Kansas State College
in Pittsburg, Kansas in 1957
in Biology. He received his
M.S. from the University of
Oklahoma, Norman, 1961 in
Zoology and received his
Ph.D. at the University of
Oklahoma, Norman 1965 in
Zoology.
McDaniel was married to
Dr. Susan McDaniel, as-
sistant vice-chancellor for
academic affairs at ECU.
1
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V
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P�g� 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 28 NovamtMr 1978
Concert
John Prine VvTll be in
concert at the Roxy Music
Arts & Crafts Center on
Thursday, Dec. 7 at 7 p.m.
and 10 p.m. Get tickets early
as we have limited space.
Tickets will be available
today at 5 p.m. at Apple
Records and the Tree House.
Alpha Sigma
Mpha Sigma Phi is a new
and growing social fraterm'tv
on the LCI campus. We are
offering a different and
exciting way to enhance and
complete vour academics
and activities. We extend an
open i h illcnge to get
involved and make things
happen. Look for our name
Alpha Sigma Phi. If you are
interested or have some
questions, rail Alpha Sig at
758-8310; 752-1499; 758-
8514; or 756-0893. Alpha
Sigma Phi i "something
special Call today and find
out u fiat's happening.
Biology
Track
All persons going on the
field trip to Wilmington Fri
Dec. 1 are to meet in front of
memorial Gym at 12 noon.
All persons leaving Sat
v Dec. 2, are to meet in front of
Memorial Gym at 9 a.m.
For further information
consult the Biology Bulletin
Board in the Biology Reading
Room (C-201) or contact
Anne Warren (756-8898).
Leadership
Come by leadership
Training Class. We are
having International Vision
Nite.ur guest speaker is a,
missionary from Scotland.
He's an excellant speaker,
join us as he relates some of
his experiences in Scotland.
All are invited this Thurs.
nite at 7 p.m. in Brewster
B-102.
Mendenhall Student Center Presents
The Third East Carolina University
COLLEGE BOWL
Medical School vs. AFROTC
Semi-finals Thursday might, November 30
� �
Greenpeace I Winners Will
The Coastal Carolina
Track club of Greenville
invites you to participate in
our weekend "Fun Runs"
held in Greenville. We have
two runs everv weekend; on
Saturday morning at 7:30
a.m beginning at the ECU
Track. Thi run is held with
the long distance runner in
i Me cover distances
m six to 20 miles on these
Saturday morning runs. The
course extends through the
Brook Valley development.
tinuing through Eastern
I'mr- and bark to Greenville.
Tin- i- a very scenic run, and
the company i always good!
On Sunday mornings, at 8:30
�' rn , V�- track c�V offers a
"Joggers Special begin-
ning at EB Aycock Jr. High
track. The purpose of this
run i to help people who are
interested in jogging get
started, with the motivation
ol having others to run with.
The distance varies accord-
ing to the interest. So if
you're interested in losing a
Hid or just getting in
ape, come join us!
Also, the track club is
sponsoring two races to be
held within the next several
month the North Carolina
Marathon Championships
are to be held on Jan. 13 in
Hthel. There will be a
marathon (26.2 miles) and a
mini-marathon (13.1 miles)
conducted, as well as a two
mile Fun Run. On April 1, we
will sponsor a 10,000 meter
(6.0 mile) race through
downtown Greenville. If you
can t run. come on out and
cheer on a runner!
There will be no formal
meeting for Greenpeace this
week. All members and
interested persons are asked
to call Jerry Adderton (758-
6259 after 5 p.m.) for latest
news and information.
Any outside information is
needed and welcome. Thank
vou.
rl 131 cut Team
In The
Ski
Psi-Chi
Psi-Chi will have a
meeting Wed. night, Nov. 29
a: 7 p.m. in Speight 129. Dr.
Durham from the ECU
psychology department will
present his dissertation on
suicide. This should prove to
be a very interesting meet-
ing.
all members and inter-
ested persons are invited.
Refreshments will be served.
The registration deadline
for Snowshoe Ski trip is Dec.
1. this Fri. For $169
you get transportation,
lodging, meals, and a four
day lift ticket at Snowshoe
Ski Resort, one of the south's
best ski resorts. New slopes
Sign up now at CTO in
Mendenhall.
Omieron
Omieron Delta Epsilon
will hold a meeting on Nov.
30 at 4 p.m. in Rawl 103.
Members are requested to
attend. A movie on the free
enterprise system will be
shown. Two articles on the
social responsibility of bus-
iness will be distributed.
Finals and Coaches Match
December Mendenhall Student Center
In
REBEL
Give every NEWBORN
the advantage
MARCH
OF DIMES
Tuesday
IS SPACE COHTRIBUTl BY TH� PUBUSHE
The REBEL is now
accepting litereary submis-
sions for the 1979 magazine.
The deadline for submissions
is Fri Dec. 15. All
work should be typed and
include the author's name,
address, and telephone
number. The author should
keep a copy of submissions,
as the work will not be
returned unless accompan-
ied by a self addressed
stamped enfelope. Submit
work to the Rebel office in
the Publications Building.
There will be two $100
awards given for best prose
and best poetry. The awards
will be granted to work that
has been accepted for the
1979 REBEL. Prize money is
donated by the Attic and
Jeffrey's Beer and Wine
Company.
Pi Omega
Pi Omega Pi, the Busi-
ness Education Honor Soci-
ety, will meet Tues Dec.
at 5 p.m. in Rawl 304.
Workshop
There will be a workshop
for Community Health ma-
jors and intended majors
concerning jobs. It will be
held Wed Nov. 29 at 4 p.m.
in Brewster B-103. CoHe
students are sponsoring the
workshop. All Majors and
intended majors are en-
couraged to attend. Re-
freshments will be served.
This Week at the
ATTIC
Wednesday-Nov. 29
SPECIAL NY STRIP STEAK
RIB EYE STEAK DINNER
or
CHOPPED BEEF DINNER
Just
$�19
(R� lpToS2.99)
Thurs. fiP Fri.
e�
Sat. & Sun.
Razz
Ma Taxz
IWr. inch. Urg,
INCLUDES FREE
SALAD BAR
STEAK HOUSE
264 By-Pass
Phone: 756-5788
Classifieds
Male Graduate student in
Business needs a place to
live. Prefers own bedroom
but willing to share. Call
752-0865 and ask for Lee.
FOR RENT: $80 per month
plus utilities. 3 blocks from
campus. Female. Prefer
non-smokers. Call 758-3545
after 5 p.m.
ROOMATE NEEDED: To
share large 4-bedroom house
near Downtown. 156.25 per
month plus V4 utilities. Call
758-1321.
ROOMATE NEEDED: Male
to share three bedroom
trailer. !50 plus utilities
monthly. Call Jimmy at
758-6712.
fcrscte
m
FOR SALE: '75 Dodge Colt,
automatic with air. Good,
condition. $2000. Call
746-3102.
FOR SALE: One pair Bom
901 ns. Asking $300. Call
758-8999, 758-8957. Ask for
Phil or leave message.
FOR SALE: Minolta SR7
35mm camera; wide angle
28mm lens; !125. Call
758-8724.
FOR SALE: Corduroy couch
$125; Wardrobe closet $40;
Rocking chair $35; Must sell
bu December 15. Will nego-
tiate price. Call Leigh at
756-8132 or 757-6366.
INSTRUCTION: Piano and
guitar lessons by Richard J.
Knapp. Call 756-2563.
MID EASTERN DANCE:
(Authentic Belly Dancing)
taught by Sunshine � ex-
perienced teacher and per-
former in Ohio, Mexico,
Atlanta, and in the D.C.
area. Classes are now form-
ing. Call 756-0736.
YOGA: Hatha yoga is now
being taught by Sunshine.
New classes forming. Relax-
ation, realization, weight
loss. For more infor. call
756-0736.
THE PORTRAIT GALLERY
Would you like to have your
portrait taken, Senior
resume pictures, weddings
or art portfolio? We do
color or black and white
prints. Think ahead for
Christmas presents! Call us
758-0962. If answering
service is on, please leave
your name and phone no.
WANTED TO BUY:Used
refrigerator or freezer or
combination. Call 756-8245.
TYPING SERVICES: Fast,
professional, reasonable
rates. Call Michelle at
758-7854 MonFri, 10 a.m. -
2 p.m.
WANTED: Rock and Roll
band needs experienced
light and sound man. Call
752-1715. If no answer call
752-2604.
PORTRAITS. By Greg Moll.
(I'm back in town from
California). Life-size pencil
drawings-$20. 18" x 24"
watercolor painting - $35.
Great idea for Christmas
gift. Call Greg at 752-5736
after 6 p.m.
Another Boo GaGa mishap.
A girl wearing rainbow
suspenders, psychedelic
shorts lost, purpie knit hat
while hitchhiking hope. Do
you remember giving 3 crazy
girls a ride to Greenville?
Maybe you know where my
hat is. If so please. PLEASE
call Lisa at 758-7675.
A jungle-girl accidentally
gave away her magic rock
(she picked it up while
climbing Mt. Shasta - it's a
lsva rock.) �t the Boo GaGa
Party around Halloween '
when she was giving away
pieces of myrrh. Would love
to have it back! Valerie
758-7675. "
ArT ;vhe RoxM�
Arts .�d Craft, Center on
Jhurs Dec. 7th fro two per-
formance. at 7 and 10 p�.
Peae get ticket, early be-
�� we have limited sp.ee
� are sellinf ticket, on a
��rst come first serve basis.
Please caU The Tree
Hotme at 7S27H3 �r Apple
Record, at 75142? for
tlcet information.
John Prine will be
in
t
rrv





t
La
falling,
28 November 1978 FOUNTAiNHEAD Page 3
f sleep evident at ECU
LEIGH COAKLEYr
Production Manager
The lack of sleep and
�f- general health and well
bemg seem often to be topics
conversation between stu-
dents at ECU.
In a recent study at the
"n,v"s,ty of Chicago. i� w.8
ported that one out of
�even college students had
d�fficult, falli�g and s.av.ng
"7 �� night. Approii-
m�el 14 percent of the
entire population was found
10 h' worried about their
"leepmg habits, and the
incidence of sleep trouble
as discovered to be rela-
tive!) higfier among females.
There seems to be a mis-
conception about sleep re-
quirements One ECU stu-
dent reported that his poor
performance on an account-
ing test was the result of a
sleepless night that had left
him groggy and unable to
concentrate. On the other
hand, several of his class-
mate, had only gotten a few
hour, of sleep themselves.
yet performed wonderfully
si and felt no side
effects
w hat is an adequate
amount of sleep tor one per-
son ma) not he efficient for
another The adequacy and
normal. : sleep cannot be
judged bj comparison. How-
ever, when there is a notice-
able change from normal
patterns and when there is a
continuous feeling of fatigue,
then one should begin to
worry about their sleeping
habits.
External pressures, ten-
sion, anxiety, and nervous-
ness are contributing factors
to the student's inability to
sleep, whether it be from
worrying about a failing test
grade or about a boyfriend.
This loss of sleep may leave
the student exhausted both
mentally and physically.
It has also been reported
the poor sleeper suffers more
trom psychosomatic ailments
and adjustment problems.
These were the students that
were sick continuousiv and
showed signs of emotional
difficulty.
Food, drink, and the
college environment effect
the quality of one's sleep.
Coffee, cigarettes , colas,
alcohol, exercise, and bed-
time habits are all hinder-
ances in sleeping adequateh
Bedtime habits are gen-
erally passed on from one
generation to another. 200
college students were asked
about their bedtime habits,
and the majority of them had
none at all. They said that
they had had some habits
before coming to college, but
that each night at present
was completely different.
Many nights they were so
exhausted that they didn't
even brush their teeth before
going to bed.
Many students take
stimulants to stay awake all
night to study for a test, to
complete a paper, or just
"get through the day" after
being awake all night. These
drugs excite the central
nervous system, increase
blood pressure, diminish the
appetite, cause paranoia,
and makes a person less
sensitive to pain and fatigue.
Continual usage of stimu-
lants may cause cardiova-
scular problems, cramping,
sweating, and irregular heart
rhythms.
Sooner or later, the
sleep-deprived student may
go through a series of phy-
sical and mental changes.
Perception may deteriorate
resulting in a poor perfor-
mance on tests. There may-
be a shifting of moods
(laughing for no reason
one minute, depressed and
irratable the next). A com-
plete loss of motivation and
energy may be present, and
socially, they may become
listless, hostile and negativ-
istic.
There seems to be a
host of "residuals" after
excessive loss of sleep.
Internally, a continual
loss of sleep will cause
changes in brain wave rhy-
thm. A person may be ex-
tremely sensitive to alcohol
and will not tolerate their
usual level of pain. Most
important, is the real-mem-
ory loss from lack of sleep.
This in itself could ruin a
students entire college car-
eer.
No one knows of the
long-term effects caused by
sleep loss in early life and
whether or not it will show its
effects with age.
According to some thera-
pists, "some students do not
know when to let their day be
over
Many times when
alarm clocks ring, one may
lie in bed rather than get up
immediately. It is during this
time that one is planning and
worrying about all the things
to be accomplished that day.
One is already exhauted by
the time he gets out of bed.
An alternative to this habit
would be to write down a
schedule of events the night
before and disregard it until
the following morning.
Some therapists . also
point out that what is often
referred to as a sleeping
problem is really a "waking
problemIt is in sleep and
the twilight zone of sleep
that a person isvulnerableto
the letting down of defenses
which are maintained at a
conscious level while awake.
One fears dreams while
facing elements in life and
circumstances as sleep
is sought.
The Counseling Center at
ECU offers relaxation ther-
apy that can help in getting
restful sleep. By tensing and
relaxing muscles, one learns
to discriminate between the
relaxed muscles and the
tense muscles, and teaches
"what not to do while
relaxing A student can
also, through counseling,
identify some of the factors
that may need to be dealt
with at a conscious level.
Other means to aid in es-
tablishing good sleeping
habits are Yoga exercises,
techniques of Zen medi-
tation, (both require a great
deal of practice) and gen-
erally any type of regular
exercise. Society today does
not give us even a fragment
of the physical activity nec-
essary to release our natural
physical energy so it must be
aquired on one's own.
Common sense tells us
that a sound body that is
given proper food, rest, and
daily exercise is bound to
function better than one that
has been bombarded with
junk food, cigarettes, alco-
hol, drugs, etc
If one still has difficulty
falling asleep, the best ther-
apy of all may be to pick up a
textbook that is really
boringSleep becomes an
escape!
THE LA CK OF sleep for students at ECU is quite evident
Acuffspeaks to Inter-Varsity Christian group
B CHRIS CAGLE
Stuff Writer
c
Mark cuff, staff worker
Inter-Varsity Groups at
�rth Carolina State and
Dukt Universities, spoke to
the ECU chapter of Inter-
Varsity Christian Jimtbmihip.
cuff spoke on the topic
"Vital Signs of a "Campus
Mmistrv: Dead or Alive" in
the Mendenhall Student
Center, on No. 15.
Inter-Varsity Christian
Fellowship is a group of
students and faculty mem-
bers from across the United
States who come together at
local universities to proclaim
and praise God.
AcufT began his talk with
questions: "What are
the vital signs of a healthy
campus ministry and what
does it mean to be a follower
i Jesus? He based his talk
on the Apostles' teachings in
cts 1:42-47 of the New
Testament.
The members in a
campus ministry should
check the vital signs to see if
their fellowship is sick or
healthy, dead or alive, or
diseased commented
A cuff.
The vital signs of a
campus ministry are bible
study, fellowship, simplicity
and sincerity of the member
according to Acuff.
A healthy campus mini-
stry has corporate and
individual bible study. Cor-
porate bible study is meeting
with others, teaching and
learning about God. Persons
involved in individual bible
study practice the scriptures
and interpret them into their
daily lives.
When a campus ministry
has an active fellowship, it is
a positive sign of a healthy
group. Fellowship is one wav
the members can become
accountable for one another.
They develop the attitude
of "What happens to you is
what happens to me, and I
have the responsibility of
what happens to vou said
Acuff.
He told the members to
measure their fellowship.
"One way to measure
fellowship is to see if the
members pray or have
prayer during regular meet-
ings remarked Acuff.
There should be 25
percent of the members
involved in a weekly fellow-
ship, according to Acuff. "If
your fellowship has not
increased in number with
��'i tijca that c
sickness he added.
There is a great deal of
responsibility involved when
a person becomes a follower
of Jesus. A person should
have an active prayer life and
become active in caring and
sharing with someone else,
according to Acuff.
Acuff ended his talk by
encouraging members to
find the sickness in their
campus ministry. "If there is
sickness or disease, ?gr
over with the basics of God's
teachings he said.
Angelo Chandler, presi-
dent of the ECU chapter of
Inter-Varsity Christian Fel-
lowship, made the following
comment: "1 am excited
about this and T feet ��
something good will happen.
We have speakers at our
meetings every week
Thursday Family Night
ALL YOU
CAN EAT
TROUT$I9$
SHRIMP$395
OYSTERS $4.25
FLOUNDER$35
Dinner meal includes Golden Crisp
French Fires. Cole Slaw. Tartar Sauce and
the world's best hushpupp.es.
FRIDAYS
1$Q0 Sun-thru Thurs. 4:30-9:00
$f flfctflff FrL & Sat' 4:30'10:0�
Friday's Seafood
(The management reserves the right to D� � !VdflS Ct
refuse excessive reordering)
Messick honored
Bn GLENN THOMAS
Staff Writer
The ECU Air Force Re-
serve Officer Training
FROTC). celebra-
tel the r 30th anniversary
last aturday.
The ceremony was in
honorof Dr. John Messick,
a former president of the
University, and founder of
the AFROTC unit here.
Turing the ceremony medal
The ceremony was in
honor of Dr. John Messick,
a former president of the
Univeristy, and founder of
the AFROTC unit here.
During the ceremony, Dr.
Messick was presented a
commendation medal and
was made an honorary
colonel in the United States
Air Force.
In honor of Dr. Mes-
sick's contributions to F IV
and the Air Force, Nov 18
has been proclaimed E U
Air Force ROTC Day.
BIMBO'S LOUNGE
Disco Every Wednesday Night
Membership
$1.00 (for one year)
Cover Charge
$1.00 Admission Special
Draft 30 all night
Brown nagging Permitted
Live Entertainment on
Fri. fiP Sat. Nights
Located on Pactolus Highway
jnst off N. Greene St.
Wiener King
A TASTY OFFER
THAT REALLY MAKES
THE GRADE
WE ARE PAYING
CASH
FOR CLASS RINGS
(REGARDLESS OF CONDITION)
OTHER GQLD RINGS
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ANY GOLD OR SILVER OF
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TOP CASH PRICE PAID FOR
SILVER AND GOLD COINS
COIN COLLECTIONS
BRING TO "COIN MAN"
HARMONYJHOUSE
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DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
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512 Greenville Blvd.
Open 11:00 11:00
Mon. thru Thur.
Fri.�PSat. 11:00 12:0
Sun. 12:00 11:00
WEEKDAY
LUNCHEON SPECIAL
$1.59
MON. thru FRI. 112 fiP 5-8
Dr. Pepper, Beer, Pepsi,
Ml Dew, Tea, Coffee
We nitdly Accept Personal Checks.
ifce Taco Cid Iron -on Patch
with $4.00 food order
Enroll in a course in good eating at
Wiener King. Order our footlong
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and a small soft drink and pay just 99c
with the coupon below. Then put it to the
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Our footlong Frankfooter is a full 12
inches long and its taste really measures up
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Plus you'll enjoy an order of our own
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All this at your Wiener King restaurant for 99�
So take advantage of this Wiener King offer and
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One footlong Frankfooter, Mi
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Wiener King provides you with taste that never fails. So clip
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(local address pubsef)
Please present this coupon before
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. , n DATE Is'lYl
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Pag 4 FOUNTAINHEAO 28 November 1978
Boston falls through,
Hooks to be blamed
Well students, the Boston concert that
almost was won't be because of the unyielding
policies of the Physical Education department
and the uncooperative attitude of the intramur-
al program in deciding who shall have access to
MingeS Coliseum.
According to Dr. Edgar Hooks, chairman of
the Physical Education department and the
man charged with deciding who can use
Minges when, the system of priorities in effect
at the facility ranks academic matters first,
intercollegiate athletic matters second, and
intramural activities third. Concerts are
ranked fourth.
When the facility was built, then Chancell-
or Leo Jenkins outlined his own list of priorities
for the building's use. He listed academic
matters first, intercollegiate matters second,
and student programming ranked third. His
list differed from the current policy in that
intramurals and student programming were
reversed.
Intramural
Granted, intramurals have grown tremend-
ously since Jenkins drew up his list, but is it
unreasonable for the Student Union to request
the coliseum only two times per semester? Is it
unreasonable for them to expect some
concessions after spending $12,000 for a floor
covering because the PE department complain-
ed of damage to the floor in M inges?
In addition to these conciliatory measures,
the Student Union also donates $600 annually
to the cheerleaders, since the Athletic
Department doesn't see fit to fund them fully.
Dead end
In return, the Student Union has repeatedly
run into a dead end when trying to schedule
concerts in Minges. Perhaps the time has
come to further expand our university by
constructing a genuine coliseum, since the
present "coliseum" is hardly a coliseum at all.
Rather, it is an academic facility being
overused as a sports, intramural, and
entertainment center.
When Minges was built, ECU had an
enrollment of roughly 7,000 students. That
figure has almost doubled now to somewhere
around 12,000. The need for a new, larger
facility is obvious. Conflicts such as the Boston
concert further point to the need for such a
facility. If athletic and university backers can
come up with the over two and a half million
dollars needed to expand Ficklen Stadium, i
they can find the money to build a new
coliseum.
Forum
Gay books help open closet doors
Commentary
ourney through the past
By HESTER PETTY
Uppity Women of Greenville
Ailene Hester, my maternal grandmother, has lived on a
farm in southern Georgia for as long as I can remember.
I visited her many times during the first 18 years of my life,
but my involvement in these visits was always characterized by
a narrow curiosity, a tendency towards boredom, and a restless
intolerance of the heat of the summer. I learned little about my
grandmother's life or the Hester family.
After graduating from high school, I involved myself in a
college career. I saw grandmother rarely, and visited her in
her home only once, briefly, during a Christmas break. My
involvement in these visits was superficial. I was preoccupied
with higher education.
Two years later, my parents and I made another trip to
Georgia. This time it was different. This time was different.
And this time I was open to the gifts my grandmother had for
me.
It will be hard for me to try to explain what happened that
summer. I can tell you that we drove all around her county;
that she showed me the extent of what used to Hester land;
that she pointed out the houses where Hesters had lived or still
lived; that she talked about her life, the Depression, her
children, the plants in her garden.
1 can tell you that my great grandfather read law books and
that the people in the area came to him with their legal
problems. But that doesn't really tell you how I felt.
The only way to describe my feelings would be to say that I
gained a sense of my roots. Perhaps because I carry the family
name in my given name the connection to the past was easier.
But during that week I saw that I needed connection to the
past.
It was as if a void existed in my being that was asking to be
filled. My grandmother filled that void with her stories. It was
a tremendous gift.
I think we all look for a link to our past, our family, at one
time or another. We look for it in photographs (of our parents
as children, of our grandparents, and of ourselves as children).
We look for it in the stories that our parents and grandparents
tell.
We look for it, as Alex Haley did, in a physical journey into
the past. And when we gain some sense of our past, I think
there is always a gift-like quality to the discovery.
The connection to the past that my grandmother gave me
was not just knowledge of my family tree. It was also an
openness to that kind of discovery and an awareness of my own
need for it.
Two years after that Georgia summer, another gift of the
past was offered to me. This time it came from a complete
stranger, a woman I will never meet. It came in the form of a
book titled The First Sex. The author, the giver of gifta, is
Elizabeth Gould Davis.
She gave me a connection to my past as a member of the
family of woman. She took me to countries that have different
names now. She showed me civilizations that existed before
the ones that get the big write-up in the history books. She
introduced me to s religion that is 10 times older than the
religions we know today. She told me of a time when women
were revered.
The family of woman that she spoke of was not the one of
remembered or taught history. I was well-aware of the history
of women from the GreekRomanChristian days to the
present.
That is a past thr 11 do not wish to connect to. It is a paat
that saw women in bondage. It is a past that saw us degraded.
The family of woman that she spoke of waa that which had
existed for the 15,000 years that began with the onset of human
consciousness and ended with the patriarchal revolution. It
was a past that I could connect to.
It is (again) difficult to describe how I felt when reading
Davis' book. I had the same feeling with both the discovery of
my Hester family and the discovery of my family of women. A
void was filled. I gained a sense of roots.
I have read other books about the nature of the matriarchal
civilizations that existed in prehistory. These studies are
important to me for two reasons. I want to have a complete
picture of our history of women. And I want to know if the past
which was based on matriarchy can teach us anything todav.
The words matriarchy and patriarchy are antonymous. But
to assume that the matriarchal societies of the past were
structured like the patriarchal society we live in today, with the
only difference being that in the past women occupied the
positions men occupy today, would be a mistake.
Nowhere in my reading have I come across evidence that
men were treated in the degrading and injurious way that
women are treated in patriarchal societies.
But that is not to say that I wish to see matriarchy replace
patriarchy. Obviously, what we need is a balance. It is my
belief that many of the answers to the question of how to strike
this balance can be found in a study of martiarchal
civilizations.
There are many writers and scientists who have recorded
the archeological and mythological evidence needed to
reconstruct non-recorded history. Unfortunately most of them
have reviewed this evidence in a sexist manner.
They have taken the evidence that indicated a world-wide
Goddess religion and have called it a fertility cult. They have
misconstructed our past.
More and more of the archeological and mythological
evidence is being re-evaluated in an impartial manner. The
dirt is being shaken off of our roots. The connection is clear.
Like looking through old photographs, who's to say we won't
learn something?
Note: This article is hopefully the first in a series that
will deal with matriarchy.
Send comments, suggestions, etc. to Hester Petty, Uppity
Women of Greenville, P.O. Box 1373, Greenville, NC 27834.
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
This letter comes as a
response to the gay person
who wrote the letter in last
Tuesday's FOUNTAIN-
HEAD.I agree that there is a
stigma attached to being a
homosexual, but the psycho-
logical benefits of being
�he something you arenot.
I came out of the closet
several years ago. One rea-
son that I chose to remain
out is that I could help other
gay people and educate
heterosexuals more easily.
When 1 first came out I
had no role models to follow;
I did not know what it was to
be gay, I had to get my
thoughts together and assess
all the information of 18
years. All that was available
to me was the local book-
store.
I began to read anything
that I could find on being
gay. It has taken me a long
time but now I can say that I
am gay and proud. I would
like to make available the
information that I gathered
on my own.
I realize, though, that
there is an even longer road
ahead of me. On the other
hand, I can never forget what
I have been through to get to
where I am today: a fun-
ctioning person. I remember
that there are others who are
going through those times
right now. They are the
people I want to help.
As I said before, I read all
that I could come across on
being gay, including: Loving
Someone Gay by Don Clark,
Ph.D which was a most
inspiring work; Gay Source:
A Catalog For Men by
Dennis Sanders, a book of
gay lists.
If you are Catholic and
gay, a very well written book
is The Church and the
Homosexual by John J.
McNeill, S.J which restores
some of the faith that some
of us as gay Catholics have
lost. This is only a start, but
one must begin somewhere.
These books are of a
great help in finding out who
you are. There(is oneprob-
lenstill unMtvi: noXTIIttrr
how much you read and
educate yourself, you are
still on vour ownalone.
One way of meeting other
homosexuals is to organize a
group of committed workers
who want to see a better
world for gay people. I have
been toying with the idea of
starting such an organization
that would work to educate
these individuals as well as
others; one that would serve
as a supoprt jftStup or other
g�ys who have not had the
courage to come out, along
with helping any straight
people who are concerned
with human rights learn
more about the gav culture
and work to better the gav
community for all the young
homosexuals who will be gav
adults some day.
For anyone who is in-
terested in working and
formulating such a group,
there will be an organ
LzanqpsJ meeting on Dec. 4
at 7:30 p.rorhe meeting wil'
be at 608 E. Ninth Street.
C. Hughes
Gay organization is needed
To FOUNTAINHEAD
I am concerned for the
welfare of the person who
wrote the letter published
Nov. 14, about being gay and
feeling alone. I would like to
say to this person, and any
others like him, you are not
aione.
There is a large gay
community in Greenville
with two easily accessible
outlets, the Eastern Gay
Alliance and the Paddock
Club.
The Eastern Gay Alliance
was founded in 1975 and
works on a grass roots level
for gay rights in eastern
North Carolina. The EGA
has connections with other
state and national groups.
The speaker bureau of
the EGA is popular in that
they have had over 100
speaking engagements in
Pitt and surrounding coun-
ties in the last few years. The
Alliance also functions as our
information and referral
service. Personally, I like the
good conversation that can
be had at EGA meetings. For
more information call: 752-
4043; or write: Eastern Gay
Alliance, P.O. Box 7291,
Greenville, N.C. 27834.
The Paddock Club is
Greenville's gay bar. If you
like disco and lights you're in
for a treat. The Paddock Club
is open Wednesday through
Sunday night and is located
at 1008 Dickinson Ave.
The need for a campus
organization for gays at ECL
is demonstrated by the Nov.
14 letter. This is no
farfetched idea. Many uni-
versities, including UNC
CH, have giy organizations
on campus.
Not only do such organ
izatiop� educate the public
on gay issues, but they also
lend mental, moral, and
spiritual support to men and
women coming out of their
"gay closets Anyone
interested in a campus
organization please contact
the EGA.
N
ame withheld by request
Photographer's flash draws fire
Rxntainhead
Serving the East Carol inn community for over 50 years
EDITOR
Doug White
PRODUCTION MANAGER ADVERT 13 NO MANAGER
Leigh Cookloy E0TORS Robert M. S�aim
Julie Everetle
TRENDS EDITOR
Steve Bechner
Hki Gliarmis
SPORTS EDITOR
Sem Rogers
of East
of ECU
FOUNTAINHEAD Is the student
Carolina University sponsored by the Media .
and is distributed each Tueaday and Thursday weekly
during the summer).
Malting addrees: Old �oath Sulkting, Greenville, N.C.
27834
Editorial offices: 757-6300, 757-0367, 757-6309.
inscriptions: $10 annually, alumni 66 annually.
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
I wish to take this
opportunity to praise the
College Bowl tournament
that has been staged here
at E I).
I regret that nine tenths
of the student body and
faculty have missed out on
this exciting activity, and
hope there will be more
exposure next year.
I do, however, have one
suggestion to make. I don't
find any fault with the
Please
write
To FOUNTAINHEAD: -
I am now incarcerated
at the federal prison at
Butner and I am seeking
correspondence with any stu-
dent that would like to
establish a pen pal relation-
ship if possible. My address
is:
Jimmy Reachord
P.O. Box 1000 96990
State Unit
Butner, NC 27509
program itself; it was well
organixed. My complaint,
rather, is to be registered
with the photographer that
came to the Nov. 16 match.
I'm sure he didn't realixe
what the flash on his camera
did to my concentration.
College Bowl is an extremely
spontaneous sport that re-
quires total concentration
with no distractions.
My suggestion applies to
more situations, other than
this tournament. I believe
the photographers here
should consider using faster
film without a flash.
I, therefore, ask that all
photographers keep this
suggestion in mind at all
events that involve some
type of performance. More
respect should be given to
lectures, musicians, and
even people in quick re-
sponse events, such as the
College Bowl tournament.
Kathy K ilmarun
Forum
Forum teller. ��, MltiB lke dd
Lmm -�� be receded b, m. .
i





Monsoon season hits ECU
RI.G THE past e. j
1 � few days, this u
'er scene has been a familiar one at ECU.
Mingesbooked
continued from p. 1
Hooka aaid he realized that the students wanted to see
Boston, diid he added that a concert is not a priority like a class
udeat program like intramurals. He said that if one night
ut intramural basketball games was set aside, the schedule
would leave the program with a 12-21 game deficit at the end of
'he season.
According to Sune, Chancellor Brewer was called after it
became dear that Minges would not be available. Sune said
thai 3rewe� came up with the idea of holding the intramural
games for the night of the concert at a local high school
gymnasium, thus freeing Minges from scheduling conflicts.
Brewer was not available for comment yesterday, but his
assistant, Mr. Charles R. Blake said that the Chancellor's
office made an inquiry to the City of Greenville, and the city
air ad) booked up the gymnasium for all available dates the
i rs; two months of next year.
Blake added that the city was very cooperative with the
� iversi!y. but that it was impossible to reserve the gym for the
. ed.
�ught up with the planning (of the Boston concert)
In said. Blake added "there's not ample facilities to do
everything we'd like to do when we want to do it
Blake said that Dr. Brewer would like to see additions built
to Minges, and that he had already discussed the matter with
the Advisory Budget Commission, for possible state funding.
Blake added that the most suitable arrangement would be
to build an entirely new complex to help out with the
overcrowding problem.
Blake went on to say that the facilities in use now were in
use when 5,000 less students were enrolled here. He said that
approximately 5500 students participated in intramurals each
year at ECU.
He said that in addition to inside space, more and better
parking areas were needed outside the Minges-Ficklen
complex.
Fran
cais: Senior class is not a club
quest was ques-
several legislators
11 he mone) would
spent if used for it's
.ma! purpose of bringing
a well-known speaker to the
- ' � all the students
motion to transfer
was defeated b
the legislature.
Senior class gift
Msi : tiring new business
Class President Nickv
Francais moved to suspend
'he rules to consider an
appropiration for the Senior
Class gift.
The appropriation for the
Senior Class gift had been
previously defeated by the
legislature.
Francais augued that the
Senior class has over 1,900
students that will graduate in
1979 from ECU. and there-
tore should be given more
consideration than a club.
"I feel that the Senior
Class of ECU should not be
considered a club since it
constitutes 20 percent of the
student body and therefore
should not be subjected to
the same funding restrictions
as other organizations fun-
ded by SGA said Francais.
"The Senior Class has
devoted four years to this
institution and has paid some
$88,000 in student fees to the
SGA and we should be
afforded the privelage of
leaving a lasting impression
on the university
Francais said that he
moved to suspend the rules
because he did not want the
bill to "get caught up in
committee where it's chan-
ces of being passed would be
hurt
Patronise
&
&
advertisers

State employees
may ignore Carter
10 Discount to all ECU Students - Greenville Store Only
Excluding Contact Lenses and Oscar Specials
RALEIGH N.C. (AP) Of
state employees1
ers' groups say
the aren't Hilling to "bite
ne" and mav
President Carter- 7
� ' v oluntan wage
guideline, if other groups
flout the voluntary figure.
te budget officials say
a holding pattern
in rig a pay hike
nendation because
U ashington ha- been vague
anations of whether
guideline includes merit
and ge ity increases
"We'll -tick with it (the 7
f,nt guideline) as long as
other segments of society
are -aid Arch T. Laney,
executive director of the
�.rolina State
�rnment Employees
ssoi iation. "l ere, not
going to accept a 7 percent
without a tight it voluntary
reak down.
"We bit the bullet in '75
when the national increase
was v percent and we got
sero Lan continued.
"The -tate employees are
not willing to bite the bullet
alone again
Lloyd Isaacs of the state
N.C. Association of Ed-
ucators said the 7 percent
figure would be acceptable
only with a cost-of-living
increase on top of it.
"Teacher and state em-
ployees have been the vic-
tims of inflation and cut-
backs Isaacs -aid.
They received a 6
percent raise for 1978-79.
Representatives of both
groups have expressed con-
cern over whether merit and
longevity increases must be
included in the 7 percent pay
hike guideline. Merit and
longevity increases are worth
about 2.5 and 1 percent,
respectively, on an across
the board basis to the 65,000
state workers and 45,000
teachers.
"If it includes those
said Laney, "it's going to be
rough for our folks
vXovt-
ie y
OPTICIANS
Adjacent to East Carolina Eye Clinic.
opticians
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PHYSICIANS QUADRANGLE
OFFICE HOURS
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purchase of any sub
Offer good Nov. 28-Dec. 4th with coupon only
752-6130
Georgetowne Shoppes
26 Novema 1978 FOyNTaium
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re-
quired to be readily available for sale
at or below the advertised price in
each A&P Store, except as specifi-
cally noted in this ad.
rTRJ�is�!FFECT,VE THRU SAT. �ec 2 at a&p in Greenville
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Ws follow- up to Stranger is 'disappointing
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Grease is a
'pastiche'
Columbia record' m�h golden boy: recording arii.t Bilh Joel
Marathon'33 depicts the
'frenzy' of marathon dancing
Drama

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Summer flotsam, Grease, 'reinforces
temperate climate of disco seventies'
28 November 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
By STEVE BACH NER
Trends Editor
Special appearances by
.tarl,keEveArden,Frankie
alon, Sid Caesar and Sha-
-Na are of a little help in
Jst.fyiag ,he Stigwood stu-
I - latest rock-movie,
"rase, as a con incing
�ties period piece.
Even supercharged cars,
her jackets and a lot of
is tall short of obvious
J eml.elhshnents
' Newton-John and
rravoka.
Original M,ngs like
' �' i he one that I
int" an,I "Hopelessly De-
tfou" are catchy but
urther reinforce he
I rate cl-mate of he
i oriented seventies.
Music mogul Robert
producer of
G ind the highly sue-
Vight F.e-
�und the talented
;i a profitable com-
Stigwood prett �
much dictates a flamboyant
Hollywood infusion that car-
ries over into Travolta's per-
formance as well as the per-
formances, save for one, of
the rest of the cast.
The Hollywood influence
in Grease is part of a trend in
ience. Instead of being able
to assume the interest of
habitual filmgoers, produ-
cers like Stigwood are mak-
ing films like Grease for
audiences who will pick and
choose.
For those who choose a
Cinema
a number of summer films �
junk films that sport big
names and the promise of
the kind of entertainment
available to audiencesin the
1930'sand 1940's.
But the position of Hol-
lywood in the seventies is
totally different from what it
had been in the great years
ofthe 1930'sand 1940's"
The arrival of television
took away the unreflecting
masses who had traditionally
been the movie's main aud-
Grease filmization that is de-
void of the flavor of the
fifties, there is at least the
presence of a bonified star,
Travolta, who is on his way
to being as big a screen
personage as any matinee
idol in Hollywood's heyday.
No consideration of the
Hollywood influence in con-
temporary film is possible
without reference to its ma-
jor stars. As the present
vogue in pop music shows,
stars like Olivia Newtonjohn
can exist without the cinema.
If we think of the en-
tertainment world's stars of
the 1960's, h is immediately
apparent that a newer twen-
tieth-century technical mar-
vel, the long-playing stereo
record, has been just as
efficient at creating stars as
the cinema ever was.
The Beatles have made
films but, like Grease, they
are in no way a product of the
true cinema. Once again,
pop stars of the day are
capturing audiences as fig-
ures and stereotyped char-
acters who are seen re-
peatedly on the screen.
Travolta's character has
.changed little from Kotter to
Saturday Night Fever to
Grease. Unlike the Valen-
tinos and James Deans who
preceeded him, Travolta will
dominate the cinema for
awhile and be replaced by a
similar figure.
The cinema is conse-
quently changing and devel-
oping new techniques. Mod-
Message from Spac
funny9 Japanese Star Wars theft
;h
If

oi
ttn CLAYTON
� 1 rends Editor
brief lifetime of
ret vices.
� articular that
e it a rule to ne er
lite company.
it is al�o mv
t at least, it
rite oi the secret
1 'tut ion.
S , when I had my choice
of any several fine movies
showing in town, I
ins � gee fes-
�a � �� Sp : �
uriosity, I had
StO look over the
po- advertising the
fih .ivumed from the
till.
sc
m
M
- ,i low-budget
film, and m v
in stopping at all
in a little
-pending a few
-� King ovej the
p I had changed mv
n � m as an image of
a g Spanish- gal-
It : -tar-ship rem-
iniscinl t Roger Dean's
crati n the cover of Fragile'
If I here were also some
h -pace-ships
in a laser-battle.
Ji � � stuff!
I iition, highlighted
among the cast were Vic
Morrow who had convinc-
ingly portrayed the cruel
overseer in the immensely
successful Roots, and Sonny
Chiba who had kicked and
punched his way through one
of those innumerable ex-
poses of Bruce Lee's true but
previously untold life-story.
Even if the science-fiction
aspect fell short of my hopes,
1 was still in store for some
reasonably good acting, or at
the very least some hardcore
martial-art violence.
Wrong again.
As it turned out (and it
'turned out' early in the
film). Message from Space is
a Japanese version of Star
Wars. After the film was
over, I paused once more at
the promotional poster for a
dosser look.
Sure enough, in small
print at the bottom of the
poster, the film was admitted
to be "a joint production of
Toei Comp. LTD. and
Tohokushinsa Comp. LTD
Neve r mind the big United
Artists logoas far as the
qualify of the film was
concerned, it didn't mean a
thing.
There is not much sense
in going into the film's plot.
If you've seen Star Wars
(and who hasn't?) then you
already know Message from
Space's story line first hand.
The film is not even as
good as one might expect a
Japanese rendition of that
epic American adventure-
classic to beespecially
when one considers that the
Japanese already had a
complete George Lucas
screenplay to draw their
material from. The United
Artists pressbook exhalts
Message from Space as
being in the same league
with "such box office trail-
blazers as Godzilla, Mothra,
Battle in Outer Space, and
Invasion of the Astro Mon-
ster. "
They have, in so doing,
hit the proverbial nail
squarely on the head.
Still, Message from
Space, heralded (by United
Artists) as "a new peak of
achievement" in the realm of
science-fiction motion pic-
tures and movie special
effects, may have some merit
in that it reveals the essential
difference between the
American and the Japanese
approaches to a (normally)
innovative film genre. And
anyone who sits through
Message from Space with
this purpose in mind may-
find himself suitably re-
warded.
Also, the film is rich with
guffaws and smug laughter
at the trite deliveries and
simplistic (are they actually
shallou?) character motiva-
tions. There is much to
chuckle at in this cut-rate
adaptation, but the definite
impression issadlythat
the producers were serious
about the most humorous
parts.

ft
�S
Taylor dance group
in Raleigh Dec. 2
Triangle Dance Guild
wi me of the world's
foi - iance groups, the
Pa. i a lor Dance Company,
for � -how only on Sat
Dr 2 The performance will
be ai 8 p m. in Raleigh's
Memorial Auditorium.
Now in it- twenty-first
ve ll � Paul Taylor Dance
Company is at the fore-front
f th lance world.
The Company's statistics
If impre-Mve: it has
itneed in over 200 cities in
h I nited States: has
completed twenty-two over-
- tour nine of which
v. re sponsored by the U.S.
lepartment of State; and has
�presented the United
it ites in the arts festivals of
him five nations.
i ross the country,
j�untless college, university
tni civic groups have hosted
h- Company under the
lance Touring Program of
h National Endowment for
h- Arts.
In fact, the Raleigh
ingagement is supported in
3art by a grant from the
orth Carolina Arts Council
with funds provided by the
National Endowment for the
rts, a federal agency.
The Paul Taylor Dance
Company has enjoyed major
elevision exposure.
CBS devoted an entire
'Repertoire Workshop" to
fee Company. NET has
4own the award-winning
tocumentary film, "Paul
fivlor: An Artist and His
ffork repeatedly. The
Company taped a "Dance in
America" program for
NET's "Great Performan-
ces" series which aired in
this area last January.
Tickets are still available
for the Company's Raleigh
appearance. Students and
Senior Citizens will receive a
discount. More information
may be obtained and ticket
reservations may be made by
calling 737-3105.
SUB SHOPS r, GREENVILLE and NAGS HEAD. NORTH CAROLINA
Wed. is
Dollar Day at
Newby's
V Sub for $1.00
with purchase
of a soft drink.
All day Wed. Every Wed.
DINNER SPECIAL
4:30-7x30 p.m. Monday-Thursday
n MT�T

'V
10 North Greene S�
Greenville, N C 77834
Phone 'J19?'j ' b!J
wcaiMwu
Restaurant
1 Meat, 3 Vegetables,
Coffee or Tea. $2.2$
OR
Spaghetti wmeat sauce,
Salad, Coffee or Tea.
COME SEE US! 92.25
em methods of shooting,
using freer camera work,
real settings and more com-
plicated plotlines, demand
different qualities.
Old stars were a product
of a hot-house studio at-
mosphere: their names sold
seats in movie houses and so
film-making was built a-
round their needs and whims
as was done for John Travolta
and Olivia Newton-John in
Grease.
Audiences today are ma-
king the same demands
again and the stars are being
put back up front.
The older audience who
at one time went to the
movies twice a week to see
their favorite stars are now
staying at home to watch
television.
The younger audience
turns its attention to today's
pop scene. And films like
Grease, no matter how
flawed, are bringing the pop
scene to the silver screen.
College Bowl
this
Thursday night
NEWTON JOHN AND Travolta hoofing in a scene from the movie Greas
10th ft Evan Street
Budwelaer. Schlltz.
MITIer, Stroh's no cm $7.88
Miller Ute ,���. $7.96
Piels �,� $1.49
Budweiser, Schlitz,
Miller, Stroh's Kegs $34.00
50 Lbs. Ice $2.75
OPEN 24 HRS
. 3rd ANNUAL
GREEN GRASS CLOGGERS
DAY CELEBRATION
Saturday December 2, 1978
Agnes Fullilove School
corner of Manhattan and Chestnut Streets
Greenville, North Carolina
CLOGGING, OLDTIME, and BLLEGRASS MUSIC
Featured Guests in Workshops & Concert
SQUARE DANCE
J2 N�0Njo 12 MIDNIGHT
TICKETS: $5 all day
50 children senior citizens
For Information Call:
919-752-2791
to 11a.m.
specializing
in large
country hamorsansage
biscuits. Hot cakes. Scrambled
eggs with country ham or
sausage. Our 14 lb. beef
burgers are ground from fresh
Western Chuck. We have pure
soft served ice cream. Also
serving ham and cheese,
chicken fillets, hot dogs, chili
and beans, french fries, apple
turnovers, and a variety of soft
drinks. Located on the corner
of 5th and Reade St. and on
Hwy.SO in Washington.
?

INC
SUPERMARKET
Fresh Ground Beef $l.29lb.
Golden Grahams
cere�l 2S1.00
10 oz. box reg. 89 each
Cheerios 68 reg. $1.09
15 oz. box
Mug-O-Lunch 2 boxes88
reg. 59c box
RC soft drinks $1.28 plus deposit
carton of 8 16 oz. bottles
Jamboree
grape Jelly 99 reg. $1.59
48 oz. jar
Dixie Dew
pancake syrup69 reg. $1.39
24 oz. bottle
VISA
1000 123 15b 181
master charge
THE INTERBANK CARD
FREE CART
SERVICE AVAILABLE
t
� ����,�! - -





Aggressive Pirates open with 89-73 win
Rosie Thompson

�" �' '� ��� � � the season
en ECl s to Buies
� � I a . i Pirates u ill play
BvSAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
"They were very, very aggressive defensively said
I NC-Asheville coach Bob Hartman. "I'd have to say that thev
played as fine a man-to-man defense as I've ever seen
Anv observer who watched the Pirates porous man-to-man
defense last season would have laughed at Hartman's post
game observations.
However, the Bucs soundly out shot, out rebounded and
most importantly outdefensed UNC-Asheville to post an
impressive 89-73 victory in ECU's season opener in Minges
Coliseum Saturday night.
"It's always nice to win smiled ECU coach Larry Gillman
after the game. "I thought our defensive intensity was really
something in the first half. Things got a little ragged there in
the second half, but it was certainly a good learning experience
for our young players. And heck we're 1-0. We might not be
that way for long, but right now we're undefeated
Oliver Mack, freshmen Al Tyson and Clarence Miles along
with George Maynor and Greg Cornelius all scored in double
figures as the Pirates opened up a 14 point lead near the end of
the first half and assumed a 36-25 advantage at the break.
Mack, Cornelius and Tyson keyed a first half surge which
saw the Pirates jump from a ten point lead at 20-10 to a
comfortable 30-16 spread with 5:23 remaining in the first
period.
Cornelius, who started at center, snared 11 rebounds and
-cored nine points in trve first half, as he dominated play under
both backboards. The 6'9" center missed most of the second
half because of an upset stomach and a reoccurring back
injurv.
Cornelius was much more physical tonight than he was
Lady Bucs open with Campbell
1 he re an
plav tonight. It's
� � sting be-
i- will be their first
what thev
ie op-
w ive a fast ball
getting much
ed and used to
'w i re pleased
Ri, �
1 ur
P
new
lor th� girls
"(ur st)
lifferenl from
what they're used to. We like
to see iVi.ii move ii- ,a
k for their bi si shots.
. ard, Lydia
ever played
has turned
: at that
1 '
Mama
Lv nne (En
� n). nstantl) impro-
ile) Kerbaugh and
R� an- good sh
are I. dia arid Rosie
truzzi pointed nut that
bell, 1 NC-G, Duke and
w aki r ret all had very
recruiting cam-
( ampbell pi ked
ll-state players this
ir w � beat them last
war Thev like to fast break
alt Thev plav man-to-man
all through the game where
as manv teams often go to a
zone; thev are in good shape.
"Thev plavd Longwood
and beat them 87-56. Their
guards combined to score
2 between them. Thev score
l of points
ndruzzi's outlook for
the team is best i atagorized
as guard d iptimism She
tes, We're a young team
but we're a good team But
adds, ft e have to keep
"ur turnovers down. This
program is a challenge to
me. 'Wr- have a tight nucleus;
we have a lot of potential
The Lady Bucs travel to
Raleigh Thursdav to face last
season's AIAW second place
team, the Wolfpack of N.C.
State. "We've seen State
play several times savs
ndruzzi. "I see them as a
team with a lot of talent.
They are a poised and an ex-
perienced team. They are tall
up front and the substitutes
the) bring in are just as tall.
Thev have a whole lot of
depth
"We've been fortunate;
the girls are in very good
shape comments Andru-
zzi. "They're very strong
Foursome heads
Heisman candidate
NSON
i
the i i
the
I It I H
'A
� ill be

tw
' Notre
� sented
D intown
� .
I nited
r sent out
-ig . the vot
) a m ESI
md� race ap-
se with
leading can-
Three ol them were on
ii television over the
weekend lor one last glance
� quarterbacks Chuck Fu-
-ma of Penn State and Rick
Leach of Michigan and tail-
I k Charles White of
S il hern California.
The other top candidate,
f-back Bill) Sims of Okla-
ma, finished his regular
-� ason a week earlier as the
nation leading rusher with
school rei ord 1,762 yards.
He also leads the nation in
iring with 20 touchdown
I tied a national record
� h three 200-yard game- in
IW
Fusina and Leach are
seniors, Sims and White are
juniors.
ft hue rushed lor 205
Is Saturday when South-
ern Cal edged Notre Dame
2 25 on a field goal with two
sei onds left. Already South-
ern Cal - top , areer ground-
trainer as a junior, White has
1,608 yards with one reg-
ular-season game remaining,
against Hawaii Saturday.
rn-ina. who holds or
-hares 17 Penn State passing
and total offense records,
completed 12 of 20 passes for
107 yards against Pitt, in-
cluding a key 15-yarder 'hat
helped set up the go-ahead
touchdown with 5:02 left to
play in the No. 1-ranked
Nittany Lions' 17-10 vicotry.
During Penn State's 11-0
regular-season, Fusina com-
pleted 137 of 242 passes for
1,859 yards and 11 touch-
downs.
Leach, Michigan's No. 1
quarterback since his fresh-
man season, has directed the
Wolverines to 38 victories,
more than any other quar-
terback in college football
history. He completed 11 of
21 passes for 166 yards
Saturday in a 14-3 triumph
over Ohio State.
His performance inclu-
ded two touchdown passes
and he finished with a
national record of 81 touch-
downs accounted for while
becoming the first quarter-
bac in history to gain more
than 2,00 yards both rushing
and passing in a career.
Others expected to finish
high in the voting include
running backs Charles Alex-
ander of Louisiana State, Ted
Brown of North Carolina
State. Vagas Ferguson of
Notre Dame, Willie McClen-
don of Georgia and Theotis
Brown of UCLA, quarter-
backs Jack Thompson of
Washington State, Steve Dils
of Stanford, Joe Montana of
Notre Dame and Steve Fuller
of Clemson, and UCLA line-
backer Jerry Robinson.
After selling the Heisman
to national television last
year, the Downtown A.C. is
reverting to its old procedure
of making the announcement
in a news conference at the
club.
physically. I don't think that
thev realize just how -trong
thev are. Ihev practice seven
days a week. They will have
to because we have one of
the toughest schedules in the
state
The Lady Pirates' first
home contest 0f the season
will be this Saturday against
the Duke Blue Devils "
last year against us noted Hartman. "He was certainly the
big difference for ECU in the first half. I noticed he didn't play
much in the second half, but it sure didn't look like they missed
him with Tyson in there
Tyson, the big 6'11" center from nearby D.H. Conley,
playing in his first game at ECU drew one roar after another
from the partisan crowd of 3,400 with his slam dunks and his
aggressive play inside. Tyson finished the game with 16 points
and was the Bucs second leading rebounder with nine
retrieves.
"There certainly wasn't any drop off in talent when Greg
came out of the lineup explained Gillman. "Things really
went right for Al out there. It won't always be that way, but he
gave the crowd a lot to cheer about.
"I know at times we looked physical, but we've got to
become more consistent with our play especially with our
schedule. I was pleased with our defensive play. We're using
the same concepts, it's just we have some bigger, stronger
athletes on the floor.
The Bucs also got excellent play from Mack and his cohort
in the backcourt transfer George Maynor. Mack, who missed
the I NC-Asheville game last year, was on time this go-around
and led all Pirate scorers with 22 points and handed out five
assists while Maynor gunned in 13 points and had six assists.
Miles was ECU's other double figure scorer with 14 points.
"Frank's game looked a little off, but Walter Mosely came
off the bench and did a commendable job said Gillman. "At
times we played with a lot of patience, but then again we
looked nervous in some situations. However since we played
no purple-gold games before the season, this was the first time
any of our players had played in front of more than ten people
at one time
Although UNC-Asheville never led in the game, the
Bulldogs were never out of it either and stayed relatively close
throughout the entire contest. The bulldogs shot only 38.4
percent compared to ECU's 47.3 mark but guard George
Gilbert gave the Pirates all they wanted with numerous steals
and spectacular moves inside.
Gilbert finished as the game's high scorer with 26 points
while center Phil Oakes added 15 and forward David Stickel
scored 14. ECU outrebounded UNC-Asheville 49-42.
"They were a good, quick team and they stayed with us the
entire contest said Gillman. "Gilbert gave us fits but I was
happy we only gave up73 points against them. We'll just take
them one game at a time and see what happens.
UNC ASHEVILLE FG
FGA FT
Stickel
Miles
Oates
Gilbert
Latta
Hill
Braxton
Grace
Farrington
Szymanski
Brewer
Redd
Emery
TOTALS
ECU
Gray
Hobson
Cornelius
Mavnor
Mack
Miles
Tyson
Moseley
McLaurin
Powers
Krusen
TOTALS
6
2
5
10
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
28
FG
1
0
4
5
10
3
7
2
2
0
1
35
10
10
8
26
7
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
2
73
2
0
5
6
3
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
H
6
'
5
6
3
0
0
4
1
0
2
2
TP
II
V
15
2
I

9
FGA FT
TP
8
7
i
8
15
6
13
I
3
0
3
74
1
3
3
2
6
2
0
0
0
0
19
1
16
1
19
Pirate injuries
Hill
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
Even ECU wrestling coach Bill Hill seemed a little
surprised to see how depleted the Pirate wrestling room had
become during the last several weeks for practice sessions.
Pushing for a pin
THE ECL VRESTLISG team begins Us
dual meet season Dec. 5 in Raleigh uhen
the Pirates face Atlantic Coast Conference
foe N.C. State. The Pirates open their home
schedule in Minges Coliseum Jan. 11
against orth Carolina.
Mona
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
Talk about your bargain basement
specials. It took most of the 5,400 fans in
Minges Coliseum the entire first half to
figure out just who or what a Saint Leo's
was and by that time it didn't matter.
ECU rolled to an 11 point halftime
advantage and won its second straight
game of the season with a sluggish 91-78
victory over the visiting Monarchs here
Monday night. Once again, the Pirates had
five players in double figures, but other
than the first five minutes of the second
half, ECU looked anything but the same
team that beat UNC-Asheville in its opener
Saturday night. "We played well in the first
five minutes of the second half and that was
just about it said Gillman after the game.
"We must did not play well tonight. We're
lucky we weren't playing William and Mary
or N.C. State or it would have been
curtains
After the Pirates held a 41-30 lead at the
half, Oliver Mack, Greg Cornelius and Herb
Gray keyed a second half spurt which saw
ECU increase its margin from 11 points to
22 at 58-36 with more thanl6 minutes still
remaining in the game. From there on in it
was clear sailing for the Pirates, although
the pesky Monarchs continued to battle
back.
Mack led all ECU scorers with 17 points
followed by Cornelius and Gray with 13
apiece. George Maynor and Clarence Miles
each scored 12 points. Freshman center Al
Tyson grabbed nine rebounds while Grav
and Mack each snared five apiece.
"There were times in the first half when
we played well and the effort seemed to be
there, but we just had too many break-
downs explained Gillman.
"We showed very few flashes of what
we're capable of doing, our kids have been
aggressive and they're trying, but we're
making too many mental errors. But the
best thing about tonight was that it was only
our second game
Although the Pirates led by as manv as
25 points in the second half, ECU
committed 13 turnovers and only held a
slim 43-40 rebounding edge over ST. Leo's.
The Monarchs started five freshmen and
their tallest player was listed at 6-5.
The Monarchs remained relatively close
throughout most of the first half with a
stingy zone defense, but simply succumbed
to the Buc's overwhelming depth in the
second period. Kevin McDonald paced the
Monarchs with a game high 21 points while
Pete Maccarone added 20 and Ken Allison
pumped in 12 points. Mlison was also the
game's leading - dnder with 10
retrieves.
"We would have liked to play more man
to man, but we were only so deep and had
to play a inn- - u 0f tne t;me noted St.
Leo's hea Norman Kaye. "ECU has
some excellent big men who also shoot well.
They dominated the boards, but probably
didn't clear out as fast as coach Gillman
would have liked. Their defense was pretty
tough at times, but it slacked off a little
there in the end
Last year's NCAA performer ic Northrup is out wil
knee injury which mav require surgerv while Butch Revw- is
suffering from bruised ribs. Frank Prewitt is out for the yeai
with a knee injury and heavyweight D T. Joyner mav wait until
next season to complete his final year of eligil becausj
the lengthy football season.
"This is getting ridiculous grimaced Hill before praei
last week. "It seems like everybody is getting hurt. If we . I
just get everybody healthy
Even the Buc's talented 158 pounder Steve Goode
for a moment before another workout to complain il
troublesome shoulder which continues to hamper him.
'Nothing serious, it just botl&ers me from time ta limw
explained Goode. a junior from Port-mouth. Va. "The tl
that bothers me more than anytning else i- that w . � c � an
excellent team this year, but we're never goir I be a
find out just how good we are unless everyb d) gets
before the end of the year.
"ECl has never had a lot of talerton their wrestlii g � an -
but we've always had the reputation as a gutsv
we started showing other teams what we're made - :
If Goode's shoulder has been a nemisi- �ar � - -
his opponents would never know it He current!) boasts
impressive 8-1 record and captured first place in the Y
Carolina Invitational two weeks ago with a hai I
victory over UNC's Carter Mario in the finals
Goode managed an escape with just 13 seconds on the clock
to score his second career win over Mario who was s
second in the tournament. "He thought he had riding time
me and when the match ended. Carter thought he ha I m
The officiating was terrible anyway
Goode's victory in the 158 weight class was the Pirate
only individual title in the two dav event although ECL had
several other place winners. And now. the muscula
aiming for a rematch against N.C. State's Mike Koob .
defeated him in the finals of the Monarch Invitational
Norfolk, V a. several weeks ago.
Koob, the number one seed in the Monarch tournev . v. .
Goode 8-5 which remains his onlv setback so tar this s,
The Pirates face the Wolfpack in Raleigh Dec 4 in . d
match and meet each other again Jan 20 in Minges Coliseum
Mike s just a good solid wrestler explained Goode Hi
gives me a hard match everytime I go out there He I
stay on my legs and he ndes me well which is something '�
just not used �. But I'll be readv for him
Goode attributes his quick strt this season to some pain
memories left m W.lllamsburg, Va ,n last year's Eastern
toefh�enNCAAe ri' m the 'I1 " ��!���� �d a tnp
to the NCAA Championships with teammates Vic Northrup
and D. I. Joyner. '
"I thought I should have gone to the finals and place act
my old high school coach Wayne Bnghi who refered the finals
felt the same way too, ' noted Goode who finished the season
with a 21-8 record including a sparkling 8-3 dual slate 'But I
put ,� ou, of my mind und began preparing for this season a
soon as the Eastern Regionals ended la-t vear "
Soon after the Eastern Reg.onals. Goode took first m the
Firs, Colonies Tournament and was named the Outstanding
Wrestler ,n the tournament. And with a ballvhooed recru 2
class. Goode .confident the rest of the team w, return
glory years back ,n the early '70's when the Pirates dem
virtually every team they faced. aemolhe,1
"We always seemed to have people hurt or sick I
during the dual season sd Goode "And we Zr F"
the lower we.ght classes. Bu, we've got some t p , "
the lower weights now and I think thev're going to " 17 "
us in the tough matches g � realK h
lelp
1978-79 Wreatling Schedule
Dec.
Dec.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Mar.
4
29-30
11
16
20
3
7
17
23-24
8-10
AT N.C State
�t W ilkes Ooen T�
NORTH CAROUNrarnenU
EASTSTOUDSBURc
N.C. STATE
�t William and Marv
�t Old Dominion '
� North Carolina
NCAA Regional Tourn.m.
NCAA t urn�nent
'LAA Tournament
1





�� f
28 November 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 9
Sugar Bowl bound Penn State still No. 1 in NCAA
ByHERSCHELNISSENSON
AP Sports Writer
But There181;811 " �f ��Uc�e footb��-
pretenders chomp,� u!f?" n nati�nal chamPionsh'P
��piM.L-BoF3yin8? that lhe Nlttanv
the fiL?5ed02PeFlState C!me tVom behind lth 10 P��ta in
Runner L Alabamaa'V 5"? N�" ,5 K 171�
over the weeRenH &u S Oklahoma were idk
mpleted a 0 rP' . "�H"huhI Soo" have
California NVTu SeaSonwhile th.rd-ranked Southern
winner" llCh,gan and "th-ranked Clemson were
amhil;hoehgahdthbranked Notre DWa �
Vssociated P e" creeP,nK �P BteadU, in The
to R T1 S,ni" droPPin� th-r fi�" 'wo start.
rdan a 37-yard held goal with two seconds left.
'7 nd eraS,Hi a 24"6 defici with a furious
urth-quarter rail, and grabbed a 25-24 edge onK 14 seconds
Red Wilson to
replace McGee ?
RHAM, N.C (AP) -
niversit) administra-
ipected to meet
i with Red Wilson, the
- assistani athletic
ut the
im replacing Mike
head football
- been asked to
tthletic iiir
Butters He wa in-
ision alter
humiliated
B . Devils 16-1! -

In itement is-
S la) night, Butters
Id McGee that
-t interest of our
gram, he (Mc-
his resig-
� - with great
ach McGee
� lid imli idual and a
nine
T h � tsk for
M Gee's r n w as not
Duke's
North Carolina Satur-
- : to Butters'
the re-tiit ol a
en I felt we should
expei t. W
M ' ��'�
ae ishhi.
X hile McGee made no
announcement on his de-
cision Sunday, he was the
one who announced there
had been a requesl tor ln
resignation. He made thai
announcement on his tele-
vision show recapping the
season. His football contract
has two years remaining.
ilson, formerly a suc-
ach at Eton, � �
firmed Sundav that he will
meel with Duke
about tlie head b.
We will -ii down
talk about it he said. "I
want to di
Duke I niversit). It
the job, I would i ertaii
give it great on.
Rut I'm h g v Iwit
I
fifth lo�
He 1
mpiled a 37- 17
Ibi ar
BIui Devils I
1-7 aftei ��; ' ning
ed Georj
h and South Carolii
� Blue Devils lost n
y . �-
before Jordan's field goal.
Elsewhere, Michigan made it to the Rose Bowl for the third
year in a row, defeating 16th-ranked Ohio State 14-3 while
Clemson's Atlantic Coast Conference champs closed out a 10-1
regular season, their best since 1948, trouncing South Carolina
41-23
Besides Notre Dame, fifth-ranked Houston also dropped
out of the national championship picture. The Cougars, who
had won eight in a row after losing their opener, blew a chance
to become Notre Dame's Cotton Bowl opponent when they
were upet bv Texas Tech 22-21. They will, however, get a
eiond chance.
Hon on could slineh the Southewest Conference title with
a ictory or tie against 2-8 Rice next week. But if Houston loses
ami Texas Tech beats Arkansas, the surprising Red Raiders,
overlooked all season, will wind up as the Cotton Bowl hosts.
Meanwhile, Penn State will have to wait until Saturday to
learn it there really will be a 1-2 national champsionship
-hoot-out in the Sugar Bowl. Alabama must beat Auburn
Saturdav to become the host team in New Orelans while a loss
or a tie would send the Crimson Tide to the Bluebonnet Bowl
and put No. 12 Georgia into the Sugar.
Although Michigan held Ohio State without a touchdown
for the third vear in a row, the only reason the Wolverines are
going to the Rose Bowl is that 14th-ranked Michigan State,
which tied tor the Big Ten crown, defeated Michigan in
October and drubbed Iowa 42-7 Saturdav, is on probation and
can't make the trip. Ohio State will meet Clemson in the Gator
Bowl.
Meanwhile, llth-ranked Arkansas, headed for a Fiesta
Rowl date with UCLA, overcame a 14-0 first-period deficit and
beat Southern Methodist 27-1 1 The only other member of the
P fop Twenty to play over the week . I was No. 18 Purdue,
Hi IHAVE
ft4CH HU�IC NOW
4T
SCHOOL KIDS
RECORDS
i iifui
ii i i� i
llllv Stewart
far
Stcwrn
Hlllft lee
ii I i ii i i ill
�tC l ii I 4l��l II ut
SCW 4 I til Will II
4�iit�ti lef
I vi tivi !i��i�ill�
HI'II III 4 MS HUC
114 14 I I III 1144 II
I �14 ft I 4S 14 4 4
which recaptured the Old Oaken Bucket, beating Indiana 20-7
and will meet Georgia Tech in the Peach Bowl.
Elsewhere, Rutgers, the host team in the new Garden State
Bowl, was upset by Colgate 14-9; Arizona State, the visiting
team in the Garden State Bowl, edged Arizona 18-17; Liberty
Bowl-bound Louisiana State whipped Tulane 40-21; North
Carolina- State, Pitt's Tangerine Bowl foe, shaded Virginia
24-21; Texas A&M, headed for the Hall of Fame Bowl, shaded
Texas Christian 15-7, and Holiday Bowl host Brigham Young
downed Hawaii 31-13.
Paul McDonald's touchdown passes of 30 yards to Kevin
Williams and 35 to Randy Garcia helped Southern Cal to its
24-6 lead over Notre Dame. But Joe Montana, who had a poor
first half, completed 17 of 26 passes for 286 yards and two
touchdowns after the intermission.
A 2-yard flip to Pete Holohan with 46 seconds left put the
Irish in front 25-24, but a 35-yard pass from McDonald to
Calvin Sweeney set up Jordan's game-winning field goal.
Houston tied Texas Tech 14-14 on a 4-yard TD pass from
Danny Davis to Garrett Jurgajtis in the second period, then
went ahead 21-14 on Randy Love's 1-yard plunge in the third
quarter. However, Tech scored with 3:40 left in the game when
freshman quarterback Ron Reeves' 1-yard sneak capped a
six-play, 87-yard drive.
Reeves, who fired a key 49-yard pass to Brian Nelson at the
Houston 22, hit James Hadnot with a screen pass for the
urn.
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2-point conversion that produced the tying and winning points.
Michigan fell behind Ohio State 3-0, then rallied to gain the
Rose BNowl spot on Rick Leach's 30-yard touchdown toss to
Rodney Feaster and an 11-yard scoring swing pass to
Roosevelt Smith.
Baylor took advantage of nine Texas turnovers - three
fumbles, six interceptions-arid whipped the Longhorns behind
new quarterback Mickey Elam.
Lester Brown rushed for 121 yards, Steve Fuller gained 108
and Marvin Sims added 104-and Brown scored three
times-leading Clemson past arch-rival South Carolina
Carolina Coach Jim Carlen called the Tigers "the best team
we've played this season, with no reservations Ironically,
Carolina beat Georgia, which handed Clemson its only setback
Ron Calcagni scored one touchdown and passed tor
another, fueling Arkansas' rally againi SMI Ed Smith threw
three scoring passes and Steve Smith ran for a pair ol
touchdowns as Michigan State whipped Iowa.
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1





MMiAAflt
Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 28 November 1978
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Title
Fountainhead, November 28, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 28, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.528
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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