Fountainhead, November 16, 1978






Circulation 10,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina v 55 �-
16 November 1978
t
Slander charges against Newby dropped
By MARC BARNES , J -nnL T
By MARC BARNES
Assistant 'ews Editor
Tommy Joe Payne, Student Government Association
president, and Kieran Shanahan, SGA Attorney General
dropped formal charges they had lodged against Alonzo
Newby, at an emergency session of the Honor Council last
night.
Newb commented that he appologizes to Shanahan and
Payne tor any statements that were taken as personal attacks
He added he stood by his right to speak freely on the
operations of the SGA.
Payne and Shanahan issued a statement at the beginning of
the emergency session, saying that in light of the apology that
uas made, a prior agreement by both parties was reached to
drop the charges. The two representatives of the prosecution
added that the case be dismissed, because of the spoken
apology
The first hearing on the charges was held on Mondav night
in a session that 1 sted past midnivht.
Pawn- and Shanahan based their charge on Section V
sut X ofth SGA judicial handbook. This section states
hat a student will refrain from knowingly publishing false
information which is damaging to any member of the
yersity community.
Payne and Shanahan based their argument on comments
Newb) made at a SGA Legislature meeting on
S member 7. During the course of that meeting, Newbv
allegedly called both Payne and Shanahan a "liar" and he
reportedly said that Payne had "ramrodded the appointment
the new attorney general through an unsuspecting and
enenced legislature
Newb) also alleged that Payne's action was one of the most
rat abuses of power he has ever committed
Payne responded during the Questions and Privilages
lion of the meeting by saying that he "had been in the
slature lor a long time and he added, "I have never seen
ett) politics as I am seeing right now
ommented further that "Alonzo Newby stood here
died me a liar. All I can say is that if you are going to plav

games with me, you'd better come at me full force,
ise I've been there before, and I'm going to get you
nahan made no comment to the charges.
:huck New was appointed Acting Attorney General for the
or Council since the case at hand involved the present
rney General.
New prosecuted the case and Newby appeared alone with
-ervice of a court appointed counselor.
Acting Chairman Mike Ball asked Newby if he understood
his rights. Newby replied that he did and the meeting began.
' L� Vf�rof WX C0NTEMPlA TES the outcome of the honor
incU. Photo by Pete Podeszwa)
�tTYttJ0E PAmESG4 ��� �njers �ith Chuck AW,
acting attorney general and Shanahan during the course of
Newby was formally charged with lying and during his
response he protested the presence of FOUNTAINHEAD
photographer Pete Podeszwa. He added that in a "court of
law photographers were not allowed.
Ball called the first of many recesses to ponder the
question. The Board concluded that it was not a court of law
and it set certain limitations on Podeszwa's activity.
Ball told Podeszwa that he could not move around the
room and create a distraction. Podeszwa replied that he
already had all of the pictures he needed.
Opening arguments included a debate over a registered
tetter which was reportedly sent to Newby informing him of
the time and place of the Honor Council meeting Newby
denied getting the letter. 3
Newby was then allowed to read the controversial speech.
He made cop.es and distributed them to the Council and to the
prosecution. After he read the speech aloud, he cited a
Supreme Court ruling, Sullivan is. V. Y. Times.
Newby asserted that according to the Supreme Court,
public officials cannot bring charges of libel and slander unless
actual malice is proven.
Shanahan countered with the observation that the Honor
Council was not a court of law. He added that both he and
Fayne were students and not "public officials
Newby said that he was protected by the Bill of Rights
which he said was interpreted by the Supreme Court The
chairman said that in this case, he didn't see that it had
particular meaning. One of the members of the board
remarked that the Student Handbook was based on the Bill of
Rights.
The Chairman then ruled that while use of Supreme Court
cases was appropriated in a court of law, it was not appropriate
in an Honor Council meeting.
Shanahan then stated that he wished for Newby to prove
Newbv h r I"6 HarS- THe Chairman remed
Newby to be concise. Newby said that a misunderstanding was
evident to him, and yielded the floor.
Mon. night's honor council. Photo by Pete Podeszwa
S aPParen"y ref8 '� � N� - eell
. , " Fdri mat the speech wa� a "o
harS" a�"ck - T��r J� Pamela ttsffi
In the letter, Alexander added .hat " have never witnessed
needMob " " "? Sh�'h� 1T"t ere
needs to be a stop put to this kind of thing
Shanahan �id that his repntation had been hurt and he
Nla,�1 "hiCh aPPe"red " FOUNTAINHEAD1
.he s � zizr. �rfir &r ale-He -d ,h"
v "Ml ii ; , ,rom r�yne � I m going to aet
you. Newby alleged that Payne was referring to h,m
personally. �
Payne denied the charge, saying that he was speaking to
the legislature as a whole, Payne added "At no time did I say
this to his face. J
Ball asked Newby if he thought Payne was in fact speaking
t0 "m"6 .legiS,atUre' and not to him Personally. Newby
replied No, I did not Shanahan went through the speech
pointing out specific examples of where he said Newby had
One of the instances involved Newby's alleged statement
that Shanahan had received a position on former SGA
President Neil Sessoms' cabinet as a favor. Shanahan called
former SGA vice-president Reed Warren, as a witness.
Warren said that to his knowledge, Sessoms and Shanahan
were notacquainted, and that no political favors had been in
lorce during the former president's administration.
At this time, the chairman had to call for order This
prompted a recess, to consider the meeting order It was
subsequently decided that every charge had to be presented
point by point.
Both sides were also afforded an opportunity to summarize
their case. A serious proposal was made to table the meeting
until the following week, but it failed.
in ,� T81 the Charges that he had " m� were
in the speech and he added, "We are prepared to go through
each charge of lying ��uKn
is berebchT.P�nd,edrby S3ying' fed m'V Personal ch�er
� being challenged. I am ready to answer any charge " He
then requested a member of the board to step down He
ZT 3t 1 i�,identif tHe member He Rented and said
hat he wished Marsha Hamilton to step down, because he
a leged that she might be biased in her judgement Hamilton
thatT,tewlfKng m0tu�came UP a and Newby charged
ema ked T� inlrodud "ew element. Newbv
remarked, I Just want t0 go tQ bed , waRt
co�le�b ,Clime,d th3t the B'Ue Ribbon Committee - a
committee to decide on a new Attorney General never met
He went 0n to claim that another committee from the SGA
legislature had voted Shanahan down
ShanaTb addeVhat a uo"�" -as not present, and that
Shanahan could therefore not be considered for the post th.
ne now occupies. K
In a statement issued Wednesday night, Newbv said "I
applaud their decision to drop the charges He added "I
consider it a victory for students who attempt to report
anything they feel is improper
Payne also said in a statement, "I believe our case was very
solid and strong. I also believe that the legislature is the proper
place to voice opinions concerning legislative actions, but it is
not the place for personal attacks, charactor assasinations and
v.ndict.ve feelings which I believe the attack Alonzo Newby
made on Kieran Shanahan and I was. I hope this is the last of
this petty politics from last year
sayinhr!TKSherr0d' ' Da echoed �W's views
saving, The integrity of the legislator demands th. 7s
pod.um WI , not b used fQr that it s
Saber rattling will not be tolerated m the future
Shanahan said, "Speaking as Attorney General, I know all
those involved in the judicial process know that mv character
and conduct is aboce reproach. He added "As for his personal
attack against me, I only need to ask you to consider the
suurcci
To students
KEIRE SHANAHAN. ATTOREY general, along uith
Tommy Joe Payne, SGA Pres. dr ps charges made against
Newky. Photo by Brian St oiler)
Legal services available What
By ANN THARRINGTON
Staff Writer
Cl students can receive free legal advice from a iawver
�pte,ed bv the SGA, according to Libby Lefler, SGA speaker
According to Lefler, the SGA sends out an open letter
to a ,he law firms in the Greenville area each year in January
1 be letter outlines the services which the firm will be expected
to offer and the salary for the position. The law firms then reply
VMth their resumesto the Executive Council.
From the Executive Council, a committee of three persons
i selected to interview the candidates for the position. This
-ornrr.ittee narrows the field of candidates to about five. They
eturn their recommendations to the Executive Council which
then votes on the lawyers. Their selection then goes to the
legislature for approval.
The contract is for one year only and begins the fiscal ye.r
�n March.
The law service which is in its fourth ye.r, is offered to .11
�tudents who seek advice on appartment leases, traffic court
cases, domestic cases, or other legal problems.
This year's lawyer is Charles L. McLawhorn, Jr. He
graduated from ECU in 1971, and en e.sily relate to problems
wncerning ECU students. He was editor-in-chief of the
in 1976m� CUy UniversUy Review whi,e attending that school
v I977, McLawhorn received his M.ter of Uwsd from New
tork University. He was also graduate editor of the Tax Law
Keview, publication of the tax law faculty at the university
McLawhoro's contract with the SGA states that he is not
allowed to represent students outside his office. His purpose is
to give legal advice, but he is not permitted to accompany a
student to court. 7
Appointment, en be made by calling the SGA Scret.ry
Mdhe Murphrey .t 757-6611, extension 218, between 8 a.m
�na 5 p.m. Mrs. Murphrey will then contact McUwhorn'a
oince and set up the con.ult.tion.
Mrs. Murphrey said that students seem to be pleased
with he service. In fact, she said that there have been no
complaints. Students using the service average about �Tper
H,fraWhu�rn fS accefible to th� indents ten hours a week.
Wednt? on8 " M�nday 3"5 P-m" Tue8dy 2-5 p.m
St h nm-und Thrday 2'5 Pm- However, "he is
wiling to be flex.ble with his hours if extenuating
circumstances prohibit a student from meeting with him
during his regular office hours.
His office is located on the third floor of the Minges
Building on the Evans Street Mall. g
McLawhorn explained that appointments are set up for
one-half hour consultations. In the consultation, he determines
if he student actually needs a lawyer. If he does, McLawhorn
Sudr t0 thC bC9t I,WyCT 8t thC ,Ca8t 00,t t0 thc
"I also try to give students helpful hint, on how to
f.wve'r or ZTf " Pre8Cm at t0 thei'
lawyer or .judge if necessary said McUwhorn.
Accordmg to McUwhorn, about one-third of the cases he
handles tnvolv.ng ECU students are traffice violations
Sir he haa a,8� hand �� for students involving
orobl tenant.d,8pUte8' dru� � ��uh. domesti?
problems, shophft.ng, and public drunkeness.
McLawhorn said it is important for students to bring . copy
of the le.se a traffic ticket, or other physical evidence when
hey come to d.scuss . cse. Students often forget to bring this
type of material to the consultation and there is little to di.cuM
without this material for reference.
LpfW rv hwiwd that the service is totally free to the
�tudents. It ,s offered with the hope th.t students who .�
generally forced to operate on a limited budget may have the
services of a lawyer available to them when they need them.
McUwhorn also handles other matter, for the SGA Me
handles the collection work for paat-due account. for
Chen"10' Md 8tUdent k8' referrcd t0 him b7 �he
He is also available to the legislature to make lectures on
topic, such as apartment teaaea, liability for towing, and .the
legal matters.
PETER FIRTH STARS in
"EquusSee p. 7.
Student Union Films Committee
presents the taut psychological thriller
Equus this Fri. and Sat. at the Hendrix
TheatreSee p. 7.
A new Sexauer exhibition opens in
CharlotteSee p. 6.
Eastern North Carolina's own Nantucket
will perform this Sunday nightSee p. 6.
ECU faces Marshall SaturdaySee p. 9.
Fearless ForecastSee p. 10.
Harlem Globetrotters in Greenville on
Nov. 21 at Minges ColiseumSee p. 3.
Greenville
utilities
meet
By GLENN THOMAS
Staff Writer
The Greenville Utilities
Commission met Tuesday
night
at
7:30 for their
Media Board
Funds still in question
By LEIGH COAKLEY
Production Manager
A Media Board meeting
wa� called Wednesday at 3
p.m. Tommy Joe Payne
announced the next meeting
will be held with Chancellor
Thomas Brewer and the
Board Thursday at 3 p.m.
Rudolph Alexander, dean
of student affairs, and Tom-
my Joe Payne, chairman of
the Media Board and prea:
idem of the Student Govern-
ment Association, attended a
meeting with the Chancellor
last Friday. Chancellor
Brewer requested that Dean
Alexander present him with
figures that had been taken
into the Media Board from
the SGA.
Dean Alexander discus-
sed with the Board that
Chancellor Brewer is greatly
concerned about very serious
short-run problems that now
exist with funding in the
student government.
The Media Board met
last Wednesday and voted in
favor of keeping the $42,000
from the 1977-78 BUCCAN-
EER within the media for
distribution rather that con-
verting the money back to
theSCA.
The Board discussed the
meeting that will he held
with the Chancellor, as well
as possible solutions to the
problems at hand.
Member, of the Board
expressed their concernabout
the situation that the SCA is
involved in at present, hut
maintained their stand con-
cerning this matter. Jerry
Wallace, MRC president,
said that the fund, should
remain within the media.
monthly meeting.
Among the major topics
was a review of a proposed
bond program. The bond,
which will be approximately
24 million dollars, was
agreed upon by the com-
mission in the amounts of
$14 million for improvement
of water facilities, $5 million
for improvement of sewer
facilities, and another $5
million for electrical im-
provements.
The bond, calling for a
new sewage treatment plant
and a new water treatment
plant, could raise the cost of
water.
A handout given out at
the meeting reads, "The unit
cost of water could increase
from 10 to 30 centa per
hundred cubic feet (ccf). The
average monthly residential
usage is 10 ccf
In other business, the
commission approved $3$
thousand for water man
extension, in �nd around
Greenville. The move is part
of a pkn directed at keeping
up with the growth of
Greenville.
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P��e 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 16 Naimbt 197
Writers
Pong
The Writers Guild will
meet on Mon Nov. 20 at 7
p.m. in Austin 207.
All persons that have
attended or are interested
please attend.
Backgammon
The MSC All-Campus
Backgammon Tournament
will be held Mon Nov, 20 at
pm. in the Mendenhall
Student Center Multi-Pur-
pose Room.
The tournament will
determine the one winner
who will represent ECU in
the Association of College
I Dions - International reg-
ional tournaments in Knox-
Mlle. Tennessee in February.
All expenses for the tourn-
ament will be paid by
Mendenhall.
Full-time students may
register to participate in the
tournament at the Student
Center Billiards Center. The
registration deadline is
Fri. Nov. 17.
If you enjoy playing
table tennis, stop by the
Mendenhall Student Center
Table Tennis Rooms each
Tuesday evening at 7 p.m
when the Table Tennis Club
meets. You will find players
of all levels of ability
participating. Various acti-
vities such as ladder tour-
naments are often sched-
uled. AH ECU students,
faculty and staff are wel-
come.
Journalists I Alpha Sigma
Band
Anyone interested in
trying out for ECU Marching
Band Winter Color Guard
should report to Susan
Market in room A200 of the
Music Building at 3 p.m. on
Mon Nov. 20.
Republicans
Bicycle
Anyone interested in an
"moon -ocializing on two
wheels should participate in
Bicycle Club's bike ride
Sun Nov. 19.
Interested persons
�uld meet at the fountain
in tmnt of Wright Audi-
mi at 1 p.m. The group
will leave at 1:15 p.m. for a
15-25 mile hike
The bicycle club invites
ail ECl students to join us in
this pre-holiday ride. We
�o invite people from the
in- rmation. call Tom at
752-9847.
ECU College Republicans
have their next meeting on
Thurs Nov. 16 at 7 p.m.
The meeting will be held in
Brewster C-103. All inter-
ested persons are invited to
attend. Refreshments will be
served.
Tournament
Scheduled for Mon Nov.
20 is the All-Campus Back-
gammon Tournament to be
held in the Multi-Purpose
Room at Mendenhall at 7
p.m. Introduced at the re-
gional tournament for the
first time last year it met
with such success that the
event will be continued. The
ticipate in the regional face-
to-face tournament.
The Society for Collegiate
Journalists will meet Tues
Nov. 21, at 7 p.m. in front of
Austin (across from the day
student parking lot). All
members and pledges must
attend this meeting or con-
tact Kay Williams or Ira
Baker.
Any member who is con-
sidering going to Kentucky
for the National Convention
must get their name on a list
at the Nov. 21 meeting.
Turkey-shoot
Win your Thanksgiving
dinner at the Mendenhall
"Turkey Shoot Thursday,
Nov. 16 between the hours o(
7 p.m. and 11 p.m the MSC
Bowling Center will be the
site of an old-fashioned
turkey shoot with a slight
difference. An entry fee of
11.50 will give you the
chance to bowl one ball on
ten consecutive lanes.
If at least eight pins fall
on each lane, you win a
turkey! Enter as many times
as you like. Limit three
wins per person.
Alpha Sigma Phi is a new
and growing social fraternity
on the ECU campus. We are
offering a different and
exciting way to enhance and
complete your academics
and activities. We extend an
open challenge to get
involved and make things
happen. Look for our name -
Alpha Sigma Phi. If you are
interested or have some
questions, call Alpha Sig at
758-8310; 752-1499; 758-
8514; or 756-0893. Alpha
Sigma Phi is "something
special Call today and find
out what's happening.
Leadership
Come to Leadership
Training Class for some fun,
fellowship, and practical
insights into the exciting
Christian life. LTC is every
Thurs. nite at 7 p.m. at
Brewster B103. Sponsored
by Campus Crusade for
Christ.
Military
Red Pin
Win a free game of
bowling every time you make
a strike when the red pin is
the head pin. Try your luck at
"Red Pin Bowling" every
Sunday evening from 7 p.m.
until 10 p.m. at the
Mendenhall Bowling Center.
Alpha Phi
Democrats
The Young Democrats of
ECU will meet Tues Nov.
21 at Mendenhall Rm. 248 at
7:30 p.m. The speaker will
be Ms. Tlehrt Johnson,
assistant district attorney.
Refreshments will be served.
The Alpha Phi Alpha
Fraternity, along with the
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority
will sponsor its Annual Can
Food Drive for the needy on
Sat. morning, Nov. 18.
We will be going to all
dorms and ask that at least
one can of food be donated
per room. This drive will
help area needy families of
Greenville enjoy a happv
Thanksgiving. All donation's
will be appreciated.
Gamma Beta
Gamma Beta Phi will
meet Thurs Nov. 16 in
B.olopy 103 at 7 p.m. A�
members are urged to
attend.
First, take a young per-
son in military service,
probably away from home
during the Christmas season
for the first time; mix with
some mail. Then add an idea
conceived by concerned Am-
ericans, and you have a
continuing campaign called
"Military Overseas Mail"
(or M.O.M as sometimes
known) - to serve our military
personnel not only overseas,
but Stateside as well.
In the previous Christmas
programs, thousands of
pieces of mail, primarily
Christmas cards with notes
and letters of support and
encouragement written in-
side, have been collected
from the public. This mail in
turn has been distributed all
across the U.S. and around
the world, to let our young
military people know that we
as individual Americans do
tare about them. (If you have
a friend or relative in military
service, who would apprec-
iate some extra mail at
Christmas, send in the name
and address, and M.O.M.
will see that some mail is
sent to them.)
I his is an ideal Christmas
project for students and their
families, either as indivi-
duals or as members of
organized clubs or other
groups. For information on
how you or your group may
participate in this very
worthwhile event, please
end a stamped self-
addressed envelope to-
MILITARY OVERSEAS
MAIL
Box 1787
Baltimore, Md. 21203
Also, please mention how
ou learned of M.O.M.
PS. This recipe is sure-
lire and never fails. It's
topped with the warm feeling
that you've made a young
American serviceman or
woman, many places in the
Stales and around the world,
a little happier at Christmas
Car Wash
Phi Sigma Pi is having a
car wash at the Exxon
Station at the corner of
Charles Street and U.S. 264
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Saturday.
Mendenhall
An exhibition of works by
Mendenhall Student Center
Crafts Center members is on
display in the lower cases of
Mendenhall Student Center.
The majority of these items
were made by new members
who have begun if crafts for
the first time this semester.
The show will be on display
until Sun Nov. 19.
Banking
Chess
All persons interested in
playing chess are invited to
stop by the Mendenhall
Coffeehouse each Monday
evening at 7 p.m. wheri the
Chess Club holds its weekly
meeting. Competition is at
all levels and everyone is
welcome to attend.
Burke Barbee, a vice
president of Personnel for
the Wachovia corporation,
will speak on career oppor-
tunities in banking this
Mon Nov. 20 at 3 p.m. in
Rawl 103. Everyone is
welcome.
A special invitation is
extended to prospective
members. Membership dues
are $7 per year and an
initiation banquet is sched-
uled for late February.
Business
Pi Omega Pi, the Nation-
al Business Education Tea-
cher Honor Society, will
meet on Tues Nov. 21, at 5
p.m. in Room 304, Rawl
Building. All members are
expected to be in attendance.
The major discussion topic
will be the national conven-
tion.
Crafts
An exhibition of vorks
by Mendenhall Student
Center Crafts Center
members is on display in
the lower bases of
Mendenhall Student
Center. The majority of
these items were made by
new members who have
begun in crafts for the first
time this semester. The
show will be on display
until Sunday, Nov. 19.
Sigma fan
Sigma Tau Delta, the
English Honor Society, will
meet Mon Nov. 20, in the
Coffeehouse, at 7 p.m. There
will be a guest speaker and
refreshments, so please plan
to attend.
ACEI
Festival
Folk Music Festivle will
be held Thurs night from 8
till 10 p.m. in the art building
Performing will be Carolina
Bluegrass Band with the
hottest fiddler in North Car-
olina; Pinewood Ramblers,
East Carolina's own all
female bluegrassold-time
band; nationally known
Creengrass Doggers and the
newest square dance team
alive. Everyone is welcome,
admission is free.
rAfE1 (Association of
Lnildhood Education Inter-
national) will have a bake
sale Mon Nov. 20, from 9
jm to 2 p.m. in front of the
Student Store. Your support
WiM be greatly appreciated.
Lon,e and get some goodi
ties.
FCA
Th� Student Ualoa Cotfh�� Commlttaa
The Family Child Assoc-
iation will meet Tues Nov.
21 at 5 p.m. in the Home Ec
Building, Rm. 143 e wiJ,
have Mr. Furney James from
the placement office to speak
to us about jobs available to
Child Dev. Family Rel.
majors.
'Lightning'
presents
Mike Wells
Thurs. & Fri.
Nov.i6 & 17
at 8:30 & 9:30
Room 15
Mendenhall
Admission
50 cents
Free snacks
Bowling
"Rent-a-lane" is avail-
able every Saturday from 12
noon until 6 p.m. at the
Mendenhall Bowling Center.
ou can rent a bowling lane to
use for one hour and it costs
13.00. Stop by and try it out;
you can't afford to miss it.
Pre-med
Alpha Epsilon Delta,
premedicai honor society,
will hold a meeting Tues
Nov. 21, in Flanagan room
307 beginning at 7:30 p.m.
The lecture series of
"Problems in Medicine" will
be continued with guest
speaker, Dr. James L. Smith
of the Department of Philo-
sophy, speaking on the sub-
ject of euthanasia.
Classifieds
forsde @
FOR SALE: DY76 Alvarez
Yairi 12-string with herring-
bone inlay, only a few
months old, including rein-
forced piuahlined case, only
1500. Call Concepts In Wood
during business hours at
756-8686.
FOR SALE: Labrador Re-
triever pups. Excellent
bloodline. Born Oct. 9 Ci
752-0406.
FOR SALE: Anyone inter-
ested in buying a New York
City trip ticket, call Keith at
752-8129 tonight. Must be
male to be acceptable.
FOR SALE: White Magic
Chef refrigerator. Excellent
condition. Need to sell im-
mediately. Only $100. Great
for apt. or trailer. Call
757-6407.
FOR SALE: 1973 Honda
Civic Hatchback. Manual. In
excellent condition. Call
752-7227 weekends and after
5 on weekdays.
FOR SALE: Two ladies
smoky topaz rings. 10K
yellow gold setting. Perfect
shape. Never been sized.
Call 758-7429. $25 each.
f&-SALE: Suuj P9 1100
table with new Pickering
jaaed dtist covftv
Only $40. Call 752-81;
tor tut
ROOM FOR RENT: Spa-
cious room to rent to non-
smoking female needing a
quiet place to study across
from campus. Available Dec.
1st. $75 monthly. Call
752-5528.
MALE ROOMMATE: Wan-
ted to share 3 bedroom house
close to campus. Rent $60
plus utilities. Call 758.6903
peisonolg)
FOUND: Bracelet found on
intramural field behind Fick-
len Stadium. Call to identify
752-6388. 7
TUTOR NEEDED: Intro-
duction to Physics (1250).
Prefer student now enrolled
in this class. Call 756-7234
MID EASTERN DANCE:
(Authentic Belly Dancing)
taught by Sunshine - ex-
perienced teacher and per-
former in Ohio, Mexico,
Atlanta, and in the D.C.
�rea. Classes are now form-
ing. Call 756-0736.
INSTRUCTION: P�ao ,nd
guitar lessons by Richard J
Knapp. Call 756-2563.
YOGA: Hatha yoga is now
being taught by Sunshine.
1dasses torming. RehT
lor'Froermat,�n'rWeight
756-0736 m�re ,nf�r- ��
�� for Whit tnd
Portrait taken qV01"
re��, .Ken. Senior
resume pictures w
�" portfolio? W
c�lor or black . j do
Uck �d white
T" -I lank heft1
Chnstma. pre.en,?.11
758-02. If r
y��r name and �klet
rae �d phone bo.
-I
f
�i til mi in in
-
-
� �





f I '
r f t
ECU
receives
16 November 1978 FQUNTAINHEAD Page 3
research funds oooreSi?miRT)ooooo5

IURIFS, GLOBETROTERS 1AK Ores, Aurtv, Sm,ies
�hl
all in front of record crouds ever)
ECU News Bureau
ECU received a total of
$1,150,295 in outside fund-
ing during October. The
funds will support 13
research and service projects
at ECU.
Most of the funds origi-
nate from state and federal
government agencies and
are intended tor programs in
the health fields.
An award of $40,000 from
the N.C. Dept. of Human
Resources went to the School
ot Allied Health and Social
Professions lor its south-
eastern N.C. Family Devel-
opment Center planning
project.
The ECU Division 0f
Health Affairs recent.i
�360,277 from the Eastern
Area Health Education
Center tor a subcontract
ai rangement, and a contract
between ECU and the N.C.
Dept. of Human Resources
will be supported b a grant
of 9428,492.
The IS Public Health
Service awarded $88,965 to
the School of Medicine and
$71,984 to the School of
Nursing for capitation grant
programs.
The School of Nursing
also received other grants for
its training programs, from
UNCChapel Hill, the Craven
County Health Department
and the Public Health
Sen ice.
Other projects receiving
funding are to he directed bj
faculty members in the ECU
Department of Sociology and
Anthropology, the Depart-
ment (if Science Education,
the School of Business, the
Division of Continuing Edu-
i ation and the Institute for
Coastal and Marine Resour-
ces.
Globetrotters at
Minges Coliseum
Globetrot-
g to
� game onh
M
irt. s
re than
� rts and

I
the
. m
a �
nerlin
� �
-n.
� ; :� see
m. With
the
��� the
the
� �
But
lo It,
- As the
try unfolds,
� ubt, the
- will st-t
� n in
rts
le who
� irtg, 'larlem
i Geese
� I have
can come
�! take it
in awhile
- Court
. "1 can't
HAMLET
before
. tes always the right
Anen you need
�andmg literature
educators Easy to
uSe T � as a.a.iarjie now cover
ove- 200 'reouentiy assigned
plays and novels
Available
At:
USE
09U Book E.chan
Downtown
' Acrow Cotanche
from GirU Dorms
allow myself that luxury
Ausbie notes that there is
a tremendous difference
between seeing a Globe-
trotter game and seeing an
H game.
'It you go to a pro
sketball game, you want to
the best. If the gam. is
lousy with a lot of turnovers.
st likely you'll forgel it
I wait tor the next name.
it can't be like that for
Globetrotters says
Geese. "People come to see
from miles around. It may
their only chance that
" to see us. We jusl can't
them down with a had
performance
Ausbie is proud of the
fact that he is jusl as popular
Sydney, Australia or
Paris, France as m Seattle.
Washington or Portland.
gon.
Even though we 'lav
every night, and for us it's
just another game in another
ity, 1 keep reminding myself
that for the fans, it's
nething special ty see
i millions of fans
around the world know just
special Geese Ausbie
reallv is
it sic
a pen
irk( ���� �� .
ml
Not if I mart ���
' i �'
" - �;�. .
i two. tc hav
it youi . - k ston
M
fineHne marker pens
-�� �; 46 fob
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j
t





Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 16 November 1978
Insolence mars trial
This week's Honor Council trial of Alonzo
Newby should never have taken place,
becauese Libby Lefler, Student Government
Association (SGA) speaker, should not have
allowed the speaker's podium to be used for
personal attacks.
It is standard practice for a Speaker to ask
anyone wishing to speak during Questions and
Privileges the nature of their speech, and
informed sources say that Lefler requires the
text of a speech before she allows anyone to
use the podium. If this is true, then she has
behaved even more disgracefully. Allowing
Newby to speak, when she had full knowledge
of what he would say, is a travesty of
parliamentary procedure and should not be
tolerated by the legislature.
Newby's speech was a farcical example of
political grandstanding. He had nothing to
say. but felt the need to say it before a public
body where he was sure to get the attention he
craved. On an ominous note, few people
realize that Newby is a member of the Review
Board, the body charged with hearing appeals
from the Honor Council. This board is
supposedly non-partisan, but if Newby is an
example of the make-up of the board, then
there can be no question as to the board's
political preferences.
Newby at least had the decency to
apologize for his tirade, even though the
damage to Payne's and Shanahan's reputa-
tions has been done. Newby's vague and
unfounded charges, and their subsuquent
(justified) prosecution, did little more than
create a brief stir and waste the time of all
parties concerned.
Newby should step down from his position
on the Review Board, since his impartiality is,
to put it mildly, questionable. Lefler should be
chastised for allowing a mockery to be made of
the speaker's podium and should screen future
speakers more carefully, limiting the use of the
podium to those who have valid statements on
current issues, and denying it to petty politicos
whose only purpose is to draw attention to
themselves.
f hociouI L�r'i see oe
"rVt,rrVt6 Pbttoipinfi pf�r-
f We fiMf TUte �fcrvs
JWP f TBRTYl -PKP6R
PUS.
TSJL '
rYorf4
SHdW�V&i V
vk fra j
�nu.
rAi
31

American Journal
Forum
Compromise urged in media issue
To KOI NTAINHEAD:
r rom ihe time 1 transferr-
EC1 tin- -ummer, the
Media Board
a� l�tfi�-�i i�. T first I
.signed it as a board of
inaging editors attempting
� � quality of the
n campus
Much to my dismay, I
discovered that its function is
to allocate funds to the
anous media from about 50
percent of student funds.
Even more distressing was
the fact that the chairman of
the board was also the
Studenl Government Associ-
ation (SGA) president.
According to FOUN-
TAINHEAD. the Media
Board wa created to end the
media's tear of a "vengeful
legislature and enable the
SGA to enjoy a free press.
I detect a note ot reverse
revenge when 1 venture to
think of the controversy over
the fate of the $42,000 BUC
appropriation.
Board ha- sel
attitude
The Media
fishly adopted
an attitude of "We've got
the money, and you can't
have it
And all of the media
heads are jumping on the
bandwagon. It seems ironic
that complaining at one time
of having to grovel at the feet
of the "vengeful legislature"
the media heads are now
groveling at the feet of the
Media Board. But now their
possible benefactor is on
their side, even though the
board is unwisely hoardin
hoarding student funds.
(And then I flash on
Tommy Joe Payne's threat to
Alonzo Newby for attacking
Payne's integrity: "I'm
going to get you)
Revenge is not the issue
here, and it is upsetting to
see grown people being so
uncompromising and selfish,
and equally ignorant of the
student body's wishes. Is
there no room tor compro-
mise in the power-plays of
these student organizations?
Students enjoy the pro-
ductions of the ECU Play-
house, and it is certain that
the various media could use
some improvements. So why
not reach some sort of
compromise?
After all, if the BUC had
materialized, the other med-
ia would have gotten along
without the $42,000 some-
how. There is no reason why
they need all of that money,
or that they should give it
back to the SGA.
Surely the M�di : Board
could give a judicious sum
back to the SGA (for speci-
fied use, of course) without
establishing a precedent of
bailing out other organiza-
tions.
But if the board keeps all
of the money, as it now
seems to be doing, it is
setting a precedent of self-
ishness and disregard for
total student welfare.
Richard Green
BUC demise is no surprise
Fa
n
ma
il
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
I wish to express appre-
ciation and commend you on
the article concerning Char-
lotte Marshburn, an ECU
graduate in Peace Corps.
It is only through the
media such as FOUNTAIN-
HEAD that Peact Corps is
alive and well and that the
dedication, service, and sac-
rifices of one idividual may
be broadcast.
Again on behalf of Peace
Corps and this office, thanks.
David B. Jenkins
Coordinator
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
I am writing in reference
to your front page article and
editorial concerning the
$42,000 left over from last
year's BUCCANEER.
The demise of the BUC
surprised me in no way. I've
yet to see one in the two
years since I've transferred
here. The way the money will
be used does shock me.
I'm sure it will do every
student's heart good to find
that campus media organi-
zations will have renovations
done on their offices and will
get new lighting. I shake to
think ol what would happen
if the typesetter broke down.
No FOUNTAINHEAD?
Horrors!
hile you are having
you offices made more
conto die, your new
phoni installed, your new
carpel- put down, think for a
moment of the ECU Play-
house. There will probably
be no more productions for
lack of funds.
If there are no more, the
drama majors will be
affected. Some of their
classes (set design, lighting,
etc.) depend on the produc-
Where is the BUC?
tions.
Thev get "on-thejob"
training. Let's not worry
about that, it's only a class.
We wouldn't want anyone to
be uncomfortable just to
make sure someone gets an
education.
Of course, what the
general population of stud-
enis thinks doesn't matter.
After all, it's only our fees
that support he media (and
that.are the leftover BUC
funds).
It doesn't matter that the
students voted overwhelm-
ingly against the Media
Board in the first place.
What matters is comfort.
Enjoy your new environ-
ment.
Ann Dorffeld
Midwifery re-emerges
in America only
years ago. Today,
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
Women in recent years have fought for the right to decide if
and when they will bear children. To those struggles may soon
be added another over where and how children are born.
Almost unnoticed among the causes and counter-causes of
the late 70's has emerged a new and potentially significant
trend towards home birth. With that trend ha? come the
rebirth of midwifery.
Women immersed in the traditional body of knowledge
� � L1 prcgnaawy�and childbirth, midwives were driven
to the edge of ex- w.
tinction
several
they are growing in number,
education and influence �
even as they remain illegal or
severely restricted in most
states.
At the turn of the cen-
tury, more than half of the
babies born in the United
States were delivered by
midwives. Eighty percent of
the world's children still are.
By the 1930's, however, a
massive public relations
campaign by mostly male
doctors aimed at persuading
women to have their babies
in hospitals portrayed mid-
wives as unclean, ignorant
crones only a step removed
from witches.
Over time, the campaign
was devastatingly success-
ful. By 1970, there were only
23,000 home births � many
of them attended by phy-
sicians � recorded in the
U.S five percent as many as
in 1950. Pockets of midwifery
survived here and
theremostly in rural areas poorly served by doctors and in the
south and southwest where tradtional cultures placed high
value on midwifery; but most of the remaining midwives were
aging and unwanted. The future looked bleak for this ancient
helping profession.
Midwifery was revived in the early 1970s with the surge of
interest in feminism and natural lifestyles. Today its popularity
appears to be spreading to non-radical women, as well.
According to Suzanne Anns, the author of Immaculate
Deception, a slashing critique of hospital birth practices, there
were 30,000 home births attended by midwives last year, "and
the number is doubling every year. In the next five to 10
yearsArms said in a telephone interview, "as many as 10
percent of the babies in America may be born at home
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Our initial reaction ,to the
latest half page ad con-
cerning portraits for the
BUCCANEER was one of
both humor and disgust
Forum policy
Forum letters must contain the name, address, phone
number, and signature of the author(s) and should be typed or
neatly printed.
Letters are subject to editing for brevity, obscenity, and
libel.
No more than three letters on any subject will be printed in
one issue.
Letters should be limited to three typewritten,
double-spaced pages.
Letters must be received by noon on Mondays and
Wednesdays either at the FOUNTAINHEAD office, second
floor, Publications Center, or at the information desk in
Mendenhall.
Author' names will be withheld only when inclusion of the
name will embarrass or subject to ridicule the author (such as
letters discussing homosexuality, drug abuse, etc.).
Looking back aper the pas
few years (but only through
our memories for we have no
yearbook) we have seen the
production of just oru? JUJC.
Perhaps the � yearbook
should be .renamed "The
Flying Dutdnman" for it,
too, has apparently disap-
peared into an oblivian. Or
perhaps we are caught in
ECU's own Bermuda Tri.
angle; the money roes in but
nothing comes out.
Our rn&uhf question is
"Why have IheW been no
yearbooks?" We would hate
to suggest that this is due to
the incompetency of the
�BUCCANEER staff; how-
ever, viewing "their past
record, it appears that they
really "don't give a buc
Richard Walters
Kent Love
Eddie Astin
Mark Wheeler
Fbuntainhead
Serving the East Carolina community lor over 50 years
EDITOR
Doug White
PRODUCTION MANAGER ADVERTISING MANAGER
Leigh Coakley KpWSEDITOrS ��berl M. Swaim
Ailie Everette
Ridci Gliarmis ���
SPORTS EDITOR
Sam Rogers
FOUNTAINHEAD ie the student newspaper of East
Carolina University sponsored by the Media Soard of ECU
and Is distributed each Tuesday and Thursday (weekly
during the summer).
ggjj1 ��� OW Sopth Sulldlng, Greenville. N.C.
Editorial offices: 757-6SM, 767-637, 7S7-M0S.
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni 8 actually.
TRENDS EDITOR
Steve Bachner
By Arms' count, there are approximately 2,000 licensed
nurse-midwives, who work mainly in hospitals under the
supervision of physicians, and several thousand more lay
(unlicensed) midwives, who work mostly in their clients'
homes. They are concentrated on the west coast, in the south
and northwest and in New England, though isolated midwives
also practice elsewhere.
Home births often imply the presence of lay midwives.
Many doctors will not perform home deliveries since they are
usually not insured. Many women, seeking alternatives to the
soaring cosmfMavy niediealMn anaUmperaonality of
hospital delivery rooms, feel
more comfortable giving
birth in familiar surround-
ings in the company of
women trained for the task.
Unlike obstetrician-gyn-
ecologists, who routinely o-
versee a number of hospital
births simultaneously, mid-
wives work with one woman
at a time, and they generally
stay with her longer � be-
fore, during and after labor.
And unlike hospital births,
which can cost up to $3,000,
home deliveries with mid-
wives in attendance are re-
latively cheap, seldom going
over $300-400.
The response of the med-
ical profession to the rebirth
of midwifery has been gen-
erally hostile. Even certified
nurse-midwives often en-
counter opposition from doi
tors, who view midwives as a
challenge to their authority
and a threat to their profits
American obstetricians make
anywhere from $50,000 to
$200,000 a vear
The law has also come down hard on lay midwiferv In San
Luis Obispo, California recently, Marianne Doshi � ,v
m.dw.fe, was charged with second degree murder when a babv
she delivered m ,ts parents' home died of complication, five
days after being rushed to a hospital.
r.f.Ugh thC !?fmS' ParCn,S Pr,i8ed Doshl's forts and
refused to press charges, authorities prosecuted the midw.fe
ZhUn�C�8eihr��ed national attention On
Oct 20, a judge dismissed the charges, handing the alternative
woln"rirtV0Crm "V victory .A J��T
SokeeLi WhCr nrd h�W 8he Wi b,rth.
r? 3hc nation from home birth becoming,
��� 5ZE' hV.el0PeneA"h�' �"ey call "Biath.ng rooms
b�mThl08P r��mS �redew��l " ook like home
standard Z Tl HT9 more P�' - ��
o�e?he? l�dVr9- Ther ' bby �" �"���� �� -
ogether and hosp.tal stays are shorter. The tab ia lower
too-though no, a. low with home births. The quality of ��
is what Arms describes as onlv � .� quality ot care
that riven .� hrJ.il I . �PProm�e facsimile" of
.� ! home by empathetic midwives.
midwife���.8remmoWre "El her"lf J
texts, tTST S
doctors when do�ors will lk ta?ur ��i�e, quu
b.ck-uP at the first ��.1!f 2f. " "�
bras Jttrs r rnt of �"
h.ve o�,midwi�rrrort�,�" �� ,h� �"�� �" ��
bint wi,ho�, Z�U .tT" f�?P T "�" hor
�uae people were having home
and go
'fthe door, of 8h0tt,d
�rytilklgtneykllow, lu �" .nd teach the midwives
-W !LI�3JP h��,fto deiop their skill.
observations and com. TT " � "ade m7
P that are noT ,l�der����uifa about the awtb
Pctice, auapj. bJlJT " ���� "�
because they woT ��?. Uken ��� ����� �
�!��'
mmmmmt" - �� s





Greek Forum
16 November 1978 FQUNTAINHi
ByRlCKlGUARMlS
Mews Editor
hecomingstalugrd aynng
. M�y of the houses were
ed the parade �
�Cs F USeVecral Greek
"���. Ficklen Stadium was
-J Greek banner"
lhe h�niecoming cour
r "Presented the fraternities
sororities well.
U the largest minority
7 campus, the Greeks
"�ECU ,his past week-
1 Wh�l involvement was
�bom Congratualt.ons to
'raterrut.es and sororities
ln��r excellent partici-
on.
Announcements:
The Aplha Xi Deltas held
their annual Thankagivin
houn8r tm sday nht � �2
memL lumni �
"ember, were present for
this festive occasion
The Aplh. Xi pledges has
a successful happy hour
Monday n.ght at the Chapter
the cTS thC happy hour-
witt.a Dolly Parton contest.
The Alpha Xi pledges are
busy this week preparing for
the.r philanthropic project.
The P,ed8 will go ,o the
I0�' I and Uke -nady
and cookies.
The Chi Omegas would
Ike t0 ngratulate Suzanne
?m� for being named
Homecoming Pirate.
The Kappa Deltas were
represented in the home-
commg parade whh a float
After the game Saturday
n�ght, the sisters had a party
for their alumni who at-
tended homecoming.
During the homecoming
festivities, the Kappa Deltas
entertained their big bro-
thers at a cookout Friday
night.
Wednesday night, the
Kappa Deltas presented the
Sigma Tau Gammas with a
door plaque. The Kappa
Deltas sang to the Sig Taus
while presenting the plaque
congratualting the fraternity
on their new house.
The Alpha Phi's won the
award for the best banner
during the game Saturday
night. The banner was dis-
played at Ficklen Stadium
AUTO SERVICE SPECIALS
dQJN
(I
�W
Starting Nov. 13
monM Tuei & W�d.
8-11 4oe
Starting Nov. 30&31
Thnrs.& FrI.
3f � 4-7 3f �
All canned BEvERag
Come see as, Relax and
enjoy the bast music
in Town.
THERVCTS:
1 HUNDREDS OF
THOUSANDS OF WOMEN
USE ENCARE OVAL.
Encare Oval' was introduced to Ameri-
can doctors in November 1977. Almost
immediately, it attracted widespread phy-
sician and patient attention
Today Encare Ova! is being used by
hundreds of thousands of women, and
users surveyed report overwhelming sat-
isfaction Women using Encare Oval say
they find it an answer to their problems
with the pill, lUD's, diaphragms, and aero-
.sol foams
EFFECTIVENESS
ESTABLISHED IN
CUNICAL TESTS.
Encare Oval" was subjected to one of the
most rigorous tests ever conducted for a
vaginal contraceptive Results were
excellent�showing that Encare Oval
provides consistent and extremely high
sperm-killing protection This recent U.S.
report supports earlier studies in Euro-
pean laboratories and clinics.
Each Encare Oval insert contains a pre-
cise premeasured dose of the potent,
sperm-killing agent nonoxynol 9 Once
properly inserted, Encare Oval melts and
gently effervesces dispersing the sperm-
kiHing agent within the vagina
The success of any contraceptive
method depends on consistent and
accurate use Encare Oval is so conve-
nient you wont be tempted to forget it.
And so simple to insert, it's hard to make
a mistake
If pregnancy poses a special risk for you,
your contraceptive method should be se-
lected after consultation with your doctor.
The Alpha Phi's would
like to congratulate their Big
Brothers on their football
victory over the Alpha Delta
Pi big Brothers by a score of
30-14. The Big Brothers won
a keg and are planning a
party with the sisters.
The Alpha Phi's are
planning a cocktail party for
Christmas.
The Sigma Sigma Sigmas
would like to congratulate
Sarah Floyd for being on the
homecoming court.
The Sigmas are planning
their pledge formal for
December 2 at the Brent-
wood Country Club in Wash-
ington, N.C.
. fhfJSLgma Pie Throw will
be held Tuesday, Nov. 21
from 4 p.m. until 7 p.m. at'
he Chapter X. Advance
"ets are 25 cents and
tickets at the door will be 50
cents. Buying a ticket will be
a chance to win the raffle
"h.ch will also be hdd
during the Pie Throw.
The Phi Kappa Taus were
very busy during homecom-
ing weekend.
Sunday morning, ,he
Pledges cooked breakfast for
the brothers and alumni.
After breakfast the alumni
nad a meeting.
AS FOOTBALL SEASON comes to a close, some lovers
of the sport never glle it up. Phote hy Stev(, Romero
and
52 � -COUPON : tc��"���
HEAVY OUJY
SHOCKS
Hy 01�� Amc.n .pSS �
Icoupon-
TUNJE-
995
. . rlntt I

All size
tires
available.
OFFICIAL NORTH CAROLINA STATE INSPECTION STATION
WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS
�TOoodrieh CoqqinsC
TIRE CENTER
KM MMfll.
UL�M M
756-5244
321 Wist firmrfllf Mfi.
SMtNT
mi kM.m i�j
Thursday Family Night
ALL YOU
CAN EAT
TROUT$,
SHRIMP$
OYSTERSs
FLOUNDER$ j
Dinner m1 lnci�das o.ld.n Crl.�
m.h Fir c.l. Sl.w, T�.r s.uc. .��
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1
Sexauer show opens
(CHARLOTTE, N.C
Printmaker Donald Sexauer
will unveil hi?, latent portfolio
during a one-artist exhibition
here Nov. I 3 through Dec. 1.
The new portfolio of
intaglio prints is entitled
Charlotte: A Celebration It
was commissioned jointly by
North Carolina National
Bank and McDonald Art
Gallery of Charlotte.
The portfolio will consist
of six drawings of old
Charlotte neighborhoods
that are important in the
current movement toward
restoration and preservation
in the city.
The neighborhoods
featured by Sexauer in the
IF
ECl PR1NTMAKER DONALD Sexauer
latest portfolio for a
one artist exhibition in Charlotte that will
run through Dec. 1.
portfolio are Fourth Ward,
downtown, Dilworth, Eliz-
abeth and Myers Park.
The portfolios and indiv-
idual prints will be offered
for sale beginning in mid
November. Edition size for
the portfolio will be 150.
NCNB's Permanent Col-
lection of Art consists of
2,100 works, including 59 by
Sexauer. This sampling of
his life's work will be the
basis of the Sexauer ex-
hibition in the lobby of
NCNB's headquarters build-
ing at Trade and Tryon
Streets in Charlotte-
Three other Sexauer
portfolios from the bank's
collection will be featured in
the exhibition, including
'Mecklenburg: A Bicen-
tennial Portfolio It was
commissioned in 1975 by
NCNB and Carter and as-
sociates, co-developers of
NCNB Plaza here and illus-
trated a book by Danny
Romine.
Sexauer undertook ex-
tensive research into the
history of Charlotte's early
residential neighborhoods in
the preparation of his new
portfolio, reading in depth
from local archives and in-
terviewing several local
historians.
Knox sex study shows dissention
throughout socio-racial strata
ByFRANCEINE PERRY
t(. I News Bureau
Whi,e quality between marriage partners is more
- ted b) today's high school students than
a decade or two ago, students who are white,
r f middle class are "more equalitarian" in their
naritai role expectations than those-ho are black, male and of
rking lass background, sa two East Carolina Unviersity
gists.
The conclusions are based on research by former
raduate student Kathy Moore and Dr. David Knox of the ECU
ilty.
Moore-Knox study involved 252 high school students
th urban and rural North Carolina schools
the subjects reponded to various situations, either
ng or disagreeing, and their responses indicated an
lalitarian" (both spouses as equals) or "traditional"
(husband a breadwinner wife as homemaker) outlook.
Replies were examined according to the sex, race and
ioeconomic status of the respondents, in seven areas auth-
-nt. homemaking, child rare, personal characteristics, social
participation, education and emplovment.
In general, both sexes tended toward equalitarian views of
marriage roles, although female students showed more liberal
expectations than males.
"Forty-seven percent of the boys agreed that the husband
should be 'boss' in a marriage, but only 23 percent of the girls
agreed noted Ms. Moore.
Both -exes indicated that homemaking should be shared,
but a gender bias was observed: 90 percent of the girls agreed,
ipposed to 70 percent of the boys.
Students of both sexes said responsibility for child care
should be divided, but about 70 percent of the boys noted that
the husband's major responsibility to his children is "to make
a good living while less than half of the girls agreed with
this.
The male's provider role was again emphasized in the
are of personal characteristics said Dr. Knox.
"Both sexes affirmed that any marriage partner should be
congenial and interesting, but 48 percent of the boys felt that
'if the husband is a good worker, respectable and faithful to his
farnilv other qualities are less important, but only 34 percent
of the girls agreed vnth this
students valued education for each spouse as important
for "Successful Family Living"but in the areaof employment
boys again displayed a tendency to believe in the traditional
male breadwinner role) percent said they would have to
earn a good living of they expected "love and respect from the
family. Only 36 percent of female respondentsagreed.
When the students' replies werre analyzed by race, Knox
and Moore discovered a trend toward more traditional
viewpoints among the black students.
For instance, only 5,1 percent of the white students through
"the wife should fit her life to her husband's in contrat to 80
percent of the blacks.
Black sutdents also expected a traditional division of labor
within the home, 53 percent saying that cooking and cleaning
were "exclusively the wife's duty as opposed to 21 percent
of whites
The male breadwinner role was found to be more firmlv
entrenched in the expectations of black respondents, with 85
percent agreeing that a husband's major responsibility was to
provide a good living.
Fifty-eight percent of the blacks also said it is more
important for a husband to be "ambitious" and "a good
provider" than to be kind and understanding. Only 16 percent
of the whites agreed.
"Significant differences in role expectations were observed
between the middle class and the working class said Knox.
"Again the majority of respondents from both classes
tended to have equalitarian views of marriage roles, but
middle class students were more equalitarian than those of the
working class
Moore and Knox undertook their study to update and
expand an earlier survey done by sociologist Marie Dunn in
1960. "Our study suggests, as did Dunn's, that marriage
expectations are becoming increasingly equalitarian Ms.
i
Moore said.
"However, the family is one of the most conservative social
institutions, in that there is still a fairly sharp division of labor
by sex within the family
Dr. Knox added that the "greatest shift" towarraTTelteftTr
equality between the sexes is in the area of employment.
"Increased concern about the female's being educated and
pursuing a career is, no doubt, related to the women's
movement, smaller families and inflation
Results of the study are reported in an article which
appears in a recent issue of the journal Family
Perspective.
Researchers Knox and Moore believe their findings have
value to marriage counselors, parents of high school-aged
children, and especially to school guidance counselors.
The fact that most repondents placed importance on
women's education and careers should be considered by
educators and counselors who ere in a position to provide
"encouragement and opportunity" to female students to enter
previously all-male fields, they advised.
Kathy Moore is at present a lecturer in social science at
Sampson Technical Institute. David Knox, an associate
professor at ECU, is an active researcher and author of
numerous articles on aspects of marriage and farnilv relations
Miket UnJ, Tommy Redd, Kenny Soule, Eddie Blair and Mark Downing of Nantucket
Eastern North Carolina's own Nantucket will appear in concert this Sun. Not. 19 at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
'Miserable goings-on' earmark
J ft
i
genuine drive-in schlock film'
By DARREN BERGSTEIN
Staff Writer
Practically any simple soul can tell from the television
previews that Blackout is a genuine drive-in schlock film.
Obviously made on a small budget and not offering the
greatest cast in the world, Blackout appears to be the kind of
film that would be worth a quarter, or maybe 50 cents �
possibly a buck-fifty � but in no way would anybody with any
common sense shell out an outrageous three bucks for it.
Perhaps if one is a bit, let's say stoned, then maybe he or
she could blow the money and just sit in and laugh. That's the
kind of film Blackout is. It's better if you go in an unstable
frame of mind, because that way you couldn't take the
miserable goings-on seriously.
I didn't expect an Academy Award winner. Actually, I
didn't expect an even half-way decent picture. What I got was
a film depicting the animosities that go on during a major
power failure that was semi-realistic, using personalities that
were not generally spoken in the same breath as Brandon
Pacino, orRedford.
Blackout, naturally, concerns the plight of Nev York when
Con-Edison blows a rather big fuse. Many subplots are tied in
with the major theme, and all are eventually tied together to
form what the producers hoped was a coherent, intelligent
whole.
We follow the misgivings of four wanton criminals on their
way to the nearby penitentiary; a pregnant woman on the brink
of birth; a joyous Italian festivity abhm with wine and gaud)
See BLACKOL T. p, 8
No 'chop-socky-hocky' in Lee's Dragon
A CHINESE MOVIE poster depicting a
scene from Bruce Lee's "Enter the
Dragon "Warner Brothers has decided
to redistribute 'Enter' at this time in
order to test the marketability of "Game
of Death the last Bruce Lee film and
one that has been locked away in cold
storage since the time of his death. "
By DAVID MILLER
Staff Writer
As long as there are
action films, Bruce Lee's
performane in "Enter the
Dragon" will be considered a
classic. The film will be
playing on a double bill with
"Five Fingers of Death"
through this Friday at the
Park Theatre in downtown
Greenville.
As is apparent from the
title, "Enter a 1973 re-
lease, is the vehicle that was
designed to introduce Lee to
American audiences and
make him an international
star.
The film has grossed over
one hundred million dollars
at the box-office, making it
one of the top forty leading
money-makers of all time.
Even though it is over
five years old, Warner
Brothers has decided to
redistribute "Enter" at this
time in order to test the
marketability of "Game of
Death the last Bruce Lee
film and one that has been
locked away in cold storage
since the time of his death.
"Game" is to feature
fight sequences betwee
5f7" Lee and 72" Kareem
Abdul Jabbar, as well as
with Danny Inosanto. who
was Bruce's chief pupil.
'Game of Death" should be
released sometime in De-
cember.
"Enter the Dragon" re-
ceived surprisingly good re-
views for a film of this genre.
The New York Times in an
August 18, 1973 article said
that "Enteris expertly
made and well-meshed � it
moves like lightning and
brims with color
Something that the 77mes
did not realize when cred-
iting "the pounding pulse of
Robert Clouse's direction"
and script- writer Michael
Allin's "crisp dialog" how-
ever, is that if one were to
remove Bruce Lee and his
influences from the film,
"Enter the Dragon" would
be no better than any other
chop-socky-hocky fare.
In addition to Lee's damn
near unbelievable fighting
abilities (which at times are
so effortlessly poetic that
they could make Nureyev
appear to have all the grace
of a jackhammer operator)
and charismatic aura, he
wrote nearly all of his own
linea. In an early scene while
instructing a young male
student, Lee wants to be sure
that the youthful martial
practitioner understands the
true vaiue of his teachings
'It is fik� � fitjfcr
pointing away to the moon.
Do not concentrate on the
finger (as he cuffs the
wayward pupil for
improperly focusing his at-
tention on the protruding
digit), or you will miss a the
heavenly glorv He also
directed, designed, con
structed and choreographed
all the action sequent es
Even the title, "Enter the
Dragon vas �s
The details of the plot are
of no importance. Something
is murmured about an island
fortress, a renegade fiend
(this lime a Shaolin priest
turned bad), and a martial
arts tournament he holds
once every five years
It is basically the sarm
old James Bond.an splri.�
with a few elbow-wrenching
twists applicable to ,n
fighting format. Yet. dew
� so-called "slick" HolK
wood script that � indeed
only slack. "Enter the Dra
gon, since i, j. Bruce Lee's
Best showcase to date U
brain-suzlingexpenencn
e nnssed
It is impossible to M.
trough this film for the fir
��mew,thou, drawing ea
audible breaths '
amazement.





Crafts
Fair
slated
rhe Carolina Designer
Craftsmen, a non-profit
ftsmen's guild will hold
ir 9th Annual Crafts Fair
the Scotl Building on the
t�nh Carolina State Fair
�nda in Raleigh 0�
rhanksgiving Weekend,
v- vember24 26
Crafts Fair will be
Friday, N. 24
10 P � on Sat'
25, from It) am. t g
and on Sunday, Nn . 26
n t t) p.m.
dail) admission
adults, $1 for
'i handicapped
and children
�' admitted
: ' ompanied b)
group rates are
' e,I in this juried
� r including
dolls, en-
' ibric
-
"�ign.
jewelrj.
ither, metal,
� 'rcelain,
tied glass,
'dworki
es include
music and
� � -�" gift
�url through-
Designer
- one i ihe
crafts-
in 1970 b) a
in the Tri-
� Carolina
it
all
I irohrid
I arolina,
IVnnessee
ark is rig
"� quality in
lisciplii
ad pur-
toui
- opei
ipportii
.

i
'wt h in
crafts.
,ni lude na-
regi mal awards,
I merit
u Is, pur-
nent
- in res-
sts,
shows.
EQUUS
Fri. and Sat.
�m
CLYDE GOBBLE. WINSTONSale
throws a pot in preparation for the 9th
Annual Craft, Fair sponsored by the
(arolina Designer Craftsmen. The fair
will be held in the Scott Building on the
North Carolina State Fairgrounds in
Raleigh on Thanksginng Weekend,
November 24-26.
FREE
BURGER
AND
FRIES!

FREE
GIFTS!
"V
y
4
&
� A
v
B
Night
r;
We thought it was time kids had their
' . liicN sPecial n'Kht. And that's why we've made
� Thursday night Kids' Night.
; Jj We'll give each child (12 or under) a free
burger and fries for every meal an adult
buys.
Jack the Clown will be there to entertain
And hell have a Treasure Chest "grab
bag" so the kids get a little surprise, too.
r y Thursday Night. Kids' Night at Jacks.
Cf ; W hat could be nicer than good food and
good fun?


I

JACKS
STEAK HOUSE
Phones 756 5788
264 By Pass
Tonite at the
BOO RMM
TENTH A VE.
Fri. Beat Marshall
Pep Rally
Sun. - Ladies nite.
40 off on WnlUura
iKcLidiing CkiUtma LtM.m.i.f
cMon.&WU. 12-6
Oum.l. Ofiux DxL tl-6
752-076 toS OrV. iotk �t.
jaexoi fxom. tLt cHM$ �toxJ
ycwr
GREAT
MEXICAN
EATERY
512 Greenville Blvd.
Open 11:00 11:00
Mon. thru Thur.
Fri.Sat. 11:00 12:0
Sun. 12:00 11:00
WEEKDAY
LUNCHEON SPECIAL
$1.59
MON. thru FRI. H-2 & 5.3
Dr. Pepper, Beer, Pepsi.
Mt. Dew, Tea, Coffee
W� Gladly Accept Personal Checfct.
Free Taeo Cld Iron -on Patch
with $4.00 food order
16 Ncmbtr 197� FOUNTAINHEAD �rQT 7
proudly presents
EQUUS
" The success of 'Equus' cannot be �
questioned. A gripping movie.
Powerfully-acted, deeply-memorable
-David Sterritt. The Christian Science Monitor
tUJOTT KASTNlft �t LISTER PtRSKV preset
RICHARD BURTON
(sj�� "EQUUS"
JSwiHoC2LIN BLAKELY-JOAN PLOWRIGHT
Owcudb, SIDNEY IUMET
tutmurm
S��gaaapg V United Artists
Fri. at 7 and 9 p.m. and Sat. at 2 p.m. only ln the HendrIx
BIMBO'S LOUNGE I
Disco Every Wednesday Night
Membership
����������$1.00 (for one year)
Cover Charge
����������$1�00 Admission Special
Draft 30 all night
Brown bagging Permitted
Live Entertainment on
Fri. fip Sat. Nights
Located on Pactolns Highway
Just off N. Greene St.
WE ARE PAYING
CASH
, f0R CLASS RINGS
(REGARDLESS OF CONDITION)
OTHER GOLD RINGS
(REGARDLESS OF CONDITION)
ANY GOLD OR SILVER OF
� ANY K,ND AND
TOP CASH PRICE PAID FOR
SILVER AND GOLD COINS
COIN COLLECTIONS
BRING TO "COIN MAN"
HARMONY HOUSE
SOUTH
ON THE MALL
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
STUFFY'S
Good Stuff
SPECIAL
25 t off
PURCHASE OF ANY ONE OF
STUFFY'S FAMOUS SUBS
offer good Nov. 16 23 ,1978
with coupon only
We deliver on campus
Georgetowne Shoppes
7526130
i
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i

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i
�. �





f
PW 8 FOUWTAiNHEAD 16 Novmbr 1978
California Suite
comes to Stewart
Theatre this SaL
�m
Carolyn Jones and James
Drury star in Tom Mallow's
new National touring pro-
duction of Ne,J Simon's hit
comedy, California Suile,
which comes to Raleigh's
Stewart Theatre on Sat
Nov. 18, tor performances at
3 and 8 p.m.
Neil Simon' California
Suite concerns different
people occupying suites of
'fie Beverlj Hills Hotel at
different times for different
purposes.
The hit comedy bj
merica's foremost play-
wright ran tor 445 per-
formances on Broadway. Re
Heed of the New york Daily
" s called it the best of
Neil Simon NBC- Gene
Shalit found it "a big hit.
Suite is a er.
very, verj funny play. You'll
��' cardiac arrest from
ighter
( arolyn jones is most
widely recognized for her
rtrayal of Morticia on the
g unning television ser-
s Family. She
eived an Vademv Award
mination tor her perfor-
mance in the film. Bachelor
and won wide acclaim
the star of the National
' Harol Pinter's The
ig.
James Drury portrayed
man of the
' ' � in The Vi,
SA
REPAIR
jRANDEA V E
at
COLLEGE VtEW
Cleaners
ginian on television for nine
years. He began his career in
stock and off-Broad a v
before heading for Holly
wood where he made his film
debut in The Blackboard
JungU- followed b) The last
V agon. Love Me fender and
others.
California Suite is the
second National touring
production of the season for
Tom Mallow's American
Theatre Productions. Cur-
rent!) touring Nationall) is
his smash success and
record-breaking production
"f The Whiz. Following
California Suite, he will tour
Vinnette Carroll's Your
Arms Too Short To Box With
Cod.
Ticket- are now on sale
lor the 3 p.m. Matinee at the
Stewart Theatre box office in
the North Carolina State
I niversti) Student Center.
For reservations, call 737
3105.
Now Playing At
264
Playhouse
264 Bfv Pass
Greenville
DUSTY
IS BACK AND SHE'S
GONE DISCO!
Grade B' Blackout wastes competent cast
continued from p. 6
people; an average run-of-the-mill city cop who happens to
come upon the carnage that follows; a rich couple who have
various quabbi.ngs and whose main concern is the fate of an
irreplaceable Picasso; a man and a woman trapped in a stalled
elevator; and finally, a woman taking care of her sick husband
machine " C�meS ' " artif'C,al hg
These people are all more or less brought together and
united, the blackout being the catalyst ,n the sdiemfofthin "
The begmning of the film introduces these people and their
- uat.ons and ends up taking place in a mode high-rLe
where the four criminals have escaped their crashed van, and
taken refuge in the apartment building.
killing? lH'by S ubdUmg ' emranCe gUafd' and eventually
wing hlra. Then thev proceed upgtairg int J
botmg b) an attractive young woman (portrayed by Belinda
Montgomery), who captures the sights of one of the bad guy.
who also happens to be a convicted rapist. He attacks her and'
"h
M is 'a'eVS�Ted b' ,He C�P' P�rtraed by Chris
M H hum (who doesn't have much to say but "Halt "Hands
behind your head or "Freeze"). '
She then makes a rather quick adjustment and proceeds to
accompany him. (Hmm. I've always concluded that rape w s
- Human act that when perpetrated, leaves the victim in a
tate ot mental and physical distress. Miss Montgomery
recovered as fast as ,f she had fallen and skinned her knee 1
UkS
U.S.A.
ALL MEW
SHE'S GOT THE
HOTTEST FEVER YET!
24 Hours a day
Large homemade biscuits with
HamSausage-Steak
ChkJcen��heese-Butter
Also Combinations
-Dinners-
Fried Chicken Tubs and Buckets
also Drive thru window
For take out call 500N.GreeneSt
758-7607
maybe he didn't rape her, after all).
From then on the film takes a headlong dive and drowns in
ts a tempt t b rescued. Surprisingly, Robert Carradine, as
he leader of the convicts, turns a not-bad performance,
spmmg curses here and there, throwing in a bit of aristocracv,
and wield.ng his gun with the skill of a true criminal
Cinema
Carradine seems to have landed roles that offer him little
exploration. His characters are introverted and menu v
erratic (as in Coming Home). mentally
Carradine also comes from a distinguished family of
well-known performers. His brother David had a rathe
�mpromptu TV series (Kung Fu), a number of films in the 'B'
category (Death Race 200, Deathsport); his older brother
Keith, has starred in Robert Altman's Nashville and one of the
mostcroversia, fllms of the decade e
her John ,s a veteran of the old Universal horror films, and ,
fU lUctive as an actor today, having appeared in over 450
Chris Mitchum is the son of Robert Mitchum, a respected
actor in his own right. Unfortunately, Mitchum, Jr. has landed
in Blackout, a role which may hamper him from securing better
more interesting characters.
Oh, another familiar face was in the lineup: Ray Miliand.
and why he took part in this farce is an unaswerable question
He hasn't been blessed with the best films lately, and this
certainly isn't one of them. I doubt seriously that he needs the
money that badly.
Nevertheless, he is the best one in the whole scenario,
though his eccentric wealthy character has been done to death
However, he manages to add a little depth to his portrayal; by
facing the criminals sternly and oot giving in to their demand
Clap a bit for Mr. Miliand please. (It saddens me that he ha-
stoop so low as to accept this role. The man is one of the few
genuine Old Masters that we have, and his acting ability
enables him to do his very best, despite who he has to portrav)
Strike what I said. Give Mr. Miliand some applause.
Adding a bit more injury to injury, the �hots of New York'
skyscrapers turned dark, at the opening of the filmlook like
film that was taken during the actual blackout not too long ago
St,ock foot age? In this day and age? Sure. Schlock film
specialize, as a matter of fact, revel in it.
One of the true ironies about a film like Blackout is that it
will probably do fairly well at the box-office. Maybe when th-
lights go out in the theatre, during the run of Blackout, th- him
will break. Funny that particular thing happens to th' g
films.
Con-Edison signing out.
FOR PIZZAS AND
SUBS AFTER THE
GAME CALL OR COME
BYCHANELO'S
758-7400
You too
g&&t.
liuuji
n
i could become
a collector's item
Make par YEARBOOK PORTRAIT
appointment NOW at:
APPOINTMENTS
BEING TAKEN NOW
COME BY
OR
CAL �?? BUC 0FFICE
AT 757 6501
PICTURES WILL BE MADE
FROM
MONDAY, NOV. 6
UNTIL
TUESDAY, NOV. 21
FROM 9 a.m. TIL 5 p.m.
�� THI8 IS
� ONL Y TIME
PICTURES
WJJ� BE MADE
THIS YEA R!
I





16 November 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 9
These cats ain't bad'�Dy
By CHARLES THAMni pd �
Gerald Hall
illir Holler
By CHARLES CHANDLER
tssistant Sports Editor
reached ��J�d Mary Saturday, ECU head coach Pat Dve
'��ked il rand I Ca,rUPwithanI,14Pictu.He
f��
,h n-tion iS Dass ' LCU f fense wh.ch ranks second in
I- d, four indude GeraJd
"eart�.Ruffin McNeill, and Willie Hollev.
fwrf T�;da" fT� -e, says Dye, is the
, , , ' dM k hose fell�meinatthe
e.s�� tT a11 Work�ard in the
i. 4 hi L7' dd,w,th, reaj enthusiasm- Tha-
savs'DTh7vSaaSpecifi, coseness among them
otht,r- lh al1 "�ve a great deal of confidence in each
KZhZ"V:Zt0theECl �' � .ha, all
zzri-zr-and -7�
pat .as- Hall rh i m"S' ever.vthi"g down
5�nk -� � �� �h- up. "Right now 1
find ,�vl I ursome ,n the nation You fust couldn't
T ' "�� to Pl� with than those otherthree guys
7Z;k:T T,� M,LauriI,an(i
' ' ' � contribute alot.
Ell wood out
of the graveyard
Hoy.whocomesfromthesamehiehschoolasHall, says thai
he has a great deal more confidence this year than ever before
I feel a lot better about everything this year he said "We
(the secondary) are a close knit group. We're all friends We
set some earl) season goals, one of which was to lead the
nation m pass defense. 1 guess we're doing okay "
Currently the ECU defense is allowing only 80 vards
passing per game, second only to the 74.1 yards allowed by
Jop-r.nk.ng Boston College. The Pirate secondary has
mtercepted 14 opponent's passes. Charlie Carter heads the
group with a total of five. Hall. Holley, and Perry all have three
each. Ruffin McNeill has also picked off a pass
Carter also attributes the Pirates' success in the secondary
to (he closeness the tour feel among each other. "We're really
good friends We do a lot of things together on and off the
field Everywhere we go. we always seem to end up together.
rootballjusi becomes second nature when you're that close "
M. Will sat across the table from Ins roommate Carter
listening intently to his words. "You know, that's right " said
����� Juniorsafety. "J always know I can count on them, i know
hal thej II do in all situations. I know Charlie and Willie will
be coming Hani from their corners and that Gerald will be
roaming and doing In- best
"I think we reailv got things together in the secondary in
last winter s conditioning said Carter
Yeah followed McNeill, "We'd run in groups and get
,0ge;her 3nd hLaVe l1" Pep talks. Through all that
conditioning, we kind of jelled into a reailv close group "
McNeill's specialty. He can be found

a
Man
Western
-� ason
� iss
on-
I i
i

irt
vears
� ,
� m't
sked to
�ire

barters
� � 'A I
ii k

son the
sees
Marshall
I'he
te quarter-
ere were two
w h v t he
g Herd has tailed
over the lat tour
One, inability to
lit the va it is
essary to build a prigram
� two, the team's losing
in.
e re not Incited in a
ipulated area and
irts recruiting said
i there's also
ill a persuasive
ng Mar-hall
tba All v ou hav e I
h ti the record
� -
Marshall has not had a
reason -nice the
season and the
Herd ha- failed
a Southern Confer-
I 1 attempts.
not gouigiouke then, for granted " Mmhu tt - re
A bowl i. mi-thino .� all haic .l
now �nai s our main objective
read, ,� extend a� ����,�� ,� ,� pV B�wl ��
��bowl representatives lootingelsewh�
rhts is the last Saturday's standards McNeill will � ,
Welj be correct. The defense g,�e u� ,�V ?'
Passing in � game. �� J J f"ds
also attnbntes a grea, deal of ,he sue, ,JZ -t
secondary back there " �� got thai gn.�
ntSPretx.r.Kestis,hTrd,r Hr
other, of his own version of Z'&ZZZZZ?�
Hi ?
It
Ruffin McNeil
Charlie (barter
ECU swimmers
ready to splash
' ' ' ��'�' � mpts 'o it), off the
Field goal frenzy
fierce Indian rush a, Lamm connects on the 28 yard
b Ste e Romero
try. Phot
Pirates face unknown
Any Thunder left for Herd?
By SAM ROGERS
SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
��ersit) football team dangerous?
ne would hardpressed to explain how a 1-9 team
�' - t,nal amt' 'he season on the road could be
-n-idered dangerous. However, with the announcement
Mar-hall head coach Frank Kllw and his stafl would be
tired at the end ol th� season, the complexion of Saturday's
contest between the Thundering Herd and ECl has changed
drastically
"Frankly, I'm a little scared about this team -aid Pirate
' Pa Dye Wednesda) at In- final regular season
press ronference. I he announcement has probabl) had a
mendous effect on the team. I expect a wild-eved hunch of
kl V u" hn' feeling guilty because ol the firing
I m surethev would like to go oul and win one for their
- It they play hard with that in mind, the, could reallj
P've u,s � problems. I reailv don't know how to prepare for
them. '
And despite Marshall's dismal record, the Pirates can ill
afford to look past the Thundering Herd, not with a shot at the
Independence Bowl looming directlj ahead.
Dick Oliver, the Chairman of' the Independence Bowl
ect,on committee said Monday ECl ,� "serious
sideration" for one ol the remaining team- which will face
Southland Conference champion Louisiana Tech Dec 16 in
Shreveport, La. The Pirates have already defeated Southland
Conference team- Southwestern Louisiana and Texas-
Arlington this season and would be an excellent draw for the
game which will be played in 51,000 State Fair Stadium
All 1 can sav at thi noint it tk u
ims point is that where ever we go. we 1
Vf1 f��tbf Lteam -a,d D- "We'll line up against
anybody because 1 think we've got some excellent talent both
offensively and defensively. And we'll sell tickets a well a-
any body, too.
The Pirates, now 7-3 overall. paed what Dve described as
our finest game ol the year" last week in the Buc 0-3
victory over William and Mary. Quarterback Leander Green
completed s� of 11 passes for 92 vards and a touchdown
rush fur 64 vards.
Offensively there was no question we moved the ball well
against a very fine defensive team praised Dve "We've
played much more consistently the last three weeks and the big
reason has been the play of Leander Green at quarterback
He s finally gotten healthy again and he make, a tremendous
ditterence
Defensively, the Pirates have played brilliantly all season
long and Saturday's game against William and Marv was no
exception. The Buc, limited heralded Indian quarterback Tom
Kozantz to just four completions for 11 vards and only 26 yards
rushing Wayne Perry and Willie Holley both intercepted
Passes while w illiam and Mary managed only 139 total yards
hLL now ranked third in the nation in total defense
allowing only 213.4 yards a game while the pass defense is
second nationally limiting opponents to just 80 vards per game
Uur en�re defensive scheme worked well against William
and Mary noted Dye. "But 1 reailv had no idea we would
dominate them like we did. We reailv took them out of their
offense which forced them to do a lot of things they didn't want
to. Kozantz ,s a great quarterback but he was totally frustrated
and spent most of the game running for his life
Bv JIMMY DLPKEr
StafJ 9 -
(,ne ol the most suc-
cessful programs in ECl -
athletii department ha- vr-dr
in and year out been the
swimming team- A en-
tering his 12th
head i - pjra
Rav Scharf ha- compiled
rail record of 73-43
The women Sq .
which in it- first seas i
year i omprized a dismal
mark, has a egun
along the trail to a su essfu
season The Lady B
2-0 rei ord with u tones . � -
CNC-C 86-45,
Mary's College 77-52.
I'm with their
progress this ' says
Scharf! "The
thi time are compar il
hotter that they were at the
end 'it last seasoi We are in
a building process and it just
takes a little time. The girl's
attitude, are very g
"�e had 14 or 15 girls
come nut but now we're :� w.i
to -even The girls train v
the men team, so they l I
a tougher workout that it'
thev were on their own
The men quad begin,
action this Saturdav with its
toughest opponent of the
season, Alabama. "Alabama
i- strong at every position
-aid Scharf. "Thev are sev-
enth nationally this vear and
en -�

a


lersl :
- harl X
si f the seas
11 11 11
h a i � - "
"Fortl
r b u d ge t. w
' th besi �� an -
� "up - Caroln
ast year a
- r-even '
size il our
After week i I -
matchup with the i ,
Tide, the m m - Hi
until D
thev compete
: � �
-quad i- intil De
1 -2 Thev v
the NCAIAVl Chan : i
hip- in Wilmingt n. N.C
1978-79 Pirate schedule
Nov. 18
Dec. 1-2
Dec 6
Dec. 8-9
Dec. 16
Jan 13
Jan 20
Jan. 27
Jan. 30
Feb. 3
Feb. 22-2
Mar. 1-3
Alabama
Pen- State Relav,
N rth Carolina
South Carolina Invita:
Old Dominion
Maine
Richmond
I L- w ilmington
N C State
Duke
V ilmington Invitational
Eastern Intercollegiate
Championships
H
H ��
H

H n �

Retirement finally sets in on No. 81
Terry Gallaher
Fifth year senior
Bv SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
Saturday afternoon Terry Gallaher will slip on his jersey
number 81 tor his final home game in F.cklen Stadium. Unless,
of course, he finds another loophole in the NCAA's endless list
of eligibility rules
But even Gallaher himself admits a sixth vear of eligibility
is simply out of the question. "Yep, I think this will be it said
the Warner Robbins, Ga native Wednesday as he put'on his
practice tog, for vet another practice session. And the fifth
year senior had seen quite a lew me he arrived on the ECU
football scene in 174
"Heck, Terry getting near the retirement age kidded
Tottie Robbins who was dressing across the locker room.
"He's had more interviews that the entire team put together
Indeed, Gallaher has managed his fair share of interviews,
pas, receptions and records during his five year career. In fact
with just one regular season game remaining this Saturday
night against Marshall, Gallaher can still grab yet another
career record. He already has the career touchdown and
yardage records and can surpass Dick Corrada's record with
nine receptions against Marshall.
"1 haven't thought about any of the records I've set since
I've been here explained Gallaher. "You don't really
appreciate them until after you're gone, but they're nice to
have and they're something you can always look back upon.
"I'm just glad I could contribute something to the team
while I was here. Everybody knows you don't pass much with a
wishbone offense, but I've always understood that
Gallaher has seen virtually every side of the collegiate
football scene. During his freshman season, he was a member
of the scout squad and saw no action the entire year. But with
no wide receivers returning the following year, Gallaher broke
into the starting lineup and has been there ever since.
"I've seen every side of the program since I've been here,
and believe me I've seen a lot of coaches and plavers come and
go admitted Gallaher. "But even after by freshman year I
always thought I was making steady improvement. AH I
needed was a chance to prove to people what I could do
Gallaher drew his first starting assignment against N.C
State in 1975 before 49,000 fans at Raleigh's Carter Stadium.
Although the Pirates dropped its season opener to the
Wolfpack, Gallaher came right back against Appalachian State
the following week to set a record which can still be found in
the NCAA books.
He caught touchdown passes tor 82. 59, and 72 vards even
though the Pirate, lost the game 41-25 From that point on. the
speedy split end has been regarded as one of the nation to,
deep threat, and ha, drawn more than his share of double
coverage.
"That game really has to �and out a, most memorable
one. said Gallaher. 'Those were the first three Pas,e l" I
caught and they all went tor touchdowns. 1 figured right then
mavbe I was going places
.nd011. fThed tKe SeaS�n Wfth Seven 'hdown grab,
and hauled ,n four more dunng his next two vears He now
owns the career touchdown reception record w ,th a total of 13
lerry s been a great player tor four vears and he's done
ervthing we ve asked of him praised ECU head coach P"
I've. He s a tremendous competitor
And Gallaher also insists his fondest memorv w,l be
playing under Dye for five years. "Coach Dve will alwavs be
the biggest thing I'll remember. He's .mproved th.ngs here
Sir" S rtaml �ne �f thP -achesn the
"I'm just real proud to say I was a part of the football
prrmhere and I know w keep hLd.ng ,n thright





I 1
Pag� 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 18 November 1978
t
CHARLES CHASm.FR ' �0 ' �
MARSHALL AT ECU
CLEMSON AT MARYLAND
DUKE AT N.C. STATE
VIRGINIA AT UNC
WAKE FOREST AT SOUTH CAROLINA
IOWA STATE AT COLORADO
MISSOURI AT NEBRASKA
OKLAHOMA ST. AT OKLAHOMA
GEORGIA AT AUBURN
PI HDUE AT MICHIGAN
SOITHERNCALATUCLA
TEXAS A&M AT ARKANSAS
CHARLES CHANDLER
(94-35-1)
ECU 27-7
Maryland
N.C. State
UNC
South Carolina
Iowa State
Nebraska
Oklahoma
Georgia
Michigan
Southern Cal
Arkansas
TERRY HERN DON
(90-39-1)
ECU 27-0
Clemson
N.C. State
UNC
South Carolina
Colorado
Nebraska
Oklahoma
Georgia
Michigan
Southern Cal
Arkansas
SAM ROGERS
(86-43-1)
ECU 28-14
Clemson
N.C. State
UNC
Wake Forest
Colorado
Nebraska
Oklahoma
Georgia
Michigan
Southern Cal
Arkansas
DAVID MAREADY
(61-23)
ECU 21-3
Clemson
N.C. State
UNC
South Carolina
Iowa State
Nebraska
Oklahoma
Georgia
Michigan
Southern Cal
Arkansas
ARTCHANSKY
Sports Editor
Durham Morning Herald
ECU 24-7
Maryland
N.C. State
UNC
South Carolina
Colorado
Nebraska
Oklahoma
Georgia
Michigan
UCLA
Arkansas
Hall of Fame hono�Wi�
Simpson, Tarkenton, Giles
Bv CHARLES CHANDLER
tssistant Sports Editor
r a mo
Oh
game.
Brow n,
Baugh,
i al
the Hal
' Fro Football Hall ol
is located in Canton,
ad honors the greatest
to ever play the
Greats such as Jim
Jim Taylor, Sammy
and Otto Graham
I been enshrined into
I. Little do viewers of
present da football realize
� some of the players they
watch each Sunday will
neda join Brown. Taylor,
d compam in the presti-
ius Hal! of Fame.
Foremost on the list, of
i- O.J. Simpson. The
Francisco haifbaek is
leed a spot as he
stan Is second onh to Brown
time rushing list.
" also hold- the re-
- yards gained in
n, a record he set in
n he gained an
2003 yards.
be considered
B i Griese, Miami
k; Fran Tarken-
"i. Minnesota quarterback;
B' - ich, Dalla
Is nearl) every
� Mitoman
I Staubach
' careers, and
d !n teams
Super Bhn victories.
iungsUTs such as Bert
ind K-ri Anderson are
�mpiling
Px" statistical careers.
Bu ' r the) will have a
' i Hal will not be
until the) get a few
sons under their
Ba ks other thatn Simp-
�" will warrant con-
lude Larry
Csonka, New York Giants;
Franco Ham Pittsburgh;
Walter Payton, Chicago;
Lawrence McCutcheon, Los
Angeles; Chuck Foreman,
Minnesota; and Lydell Mit-
II, San Di. go. Csonka had
somegreal sears with Miami
when the Dolphins built
mini-dynasty. Harris has
been the most consistant
back in the NFL for the last
-even years. His yearly
average is over the 1000
yard mark. Payton appears
to have to tools to be one of
the best all-time. He should
become one of the Top 20
rushers in this, only his
fourth pro season. The
others mentioned could be
weeded out, but appear to be
on the way to Hall of Fame
status.
Young backs who have
yet to have time to prove
their consistancy who may
someday enter the Hall
include Tony Dorsett, Dallas;
Earl Campbell, Houston; and
Delvin Williams, Miami.
A look at the receivers,
offensive lineman, and de-
fensive players who have
Hall of Fame potential will
be discussed in this column
next week. Below are the
predictions for this week's
NFL games:
OAKLAND 28
DETROIT 17
The Raiders are rounding
into playoff form, at least so
says coach John Madden.
The Lions have played ev-
eryone tough for the last
month or so. Ted Hendricks
and the Raider defense
should have young Lion
quarterback Gary Danielson
guessing all day.
DALLAS 23
NEW ORLEANS 14
The Saints are much
improved this year under
new coach Dick Nolan. Yet
they have not improved to
the point where they can
compete with the World
Champion Cowboys, that is,
if Dalla- is at their best. Tom
Landry's club has been very
consistent all year long. Yet,
they were at their best in last
week's 42-7 victory over
Wolfpack wins
state tourney
B JIMMY DLPREE
Staff Writer
With the 1978 NCAIAW
championship on the
line, it all boiled down to an
all too familiar confrontation
ol perrennial ACC rivals
North Carolina and N.C.
I he outcome of the
matchup turned out to be
1 lassie The Wolfpack de-
'iJ 'he fierj Tar Heels in
the final match 15-1, 15-9,
15-10, hut not before
Carolina gave them a scare.
State only easy round of
the tournament was the first,
where they received a bye.
The Pack met with the highly
strung Pirates of ECU in
second round action, emer-
ging a narrow 4-15, 15-13,
15-13 v ictor.
"The State match was a
battle of mental toughness,
and we lost said assistant
roach Debbie Tyson. "We
are a very inexperienced
team and tournament play
requires experience as well
a fundamental ability
State met with the Tar
Heels for the first time of the
tournment in the semifinals
and defeated the Heels 12-
15, 15-9, 15-11. Carolina
moved into the consolation
bracket where they easily
defeated eventual third place
Wake Forest 15-12, 17-15.
That set the scene for the
second confrontation of the
two inter-state-powers.
If the Wolfpack beat UNC
in this match, the tourna-
ment would be over. If thev
lost it would mean one last
match for all the marbles.
Carolina came from behind
to stun the unsuspecting
Pack 10-15, 15-4, 17-15.
With the momentum in
Carolina's favor, it was not
until midway in the second
game of the decisive match
that the bewildered Wolf-
pack began to show why they
were seeded first in the
Tournament's Division I
standings.
In Division II. the only
surprise in the top three
finishers was runner-up
Lenior-Rhyne. Top seeded
High Point cruised through
the Tournament losing only a
single game in the finals
615, 15-2, 15-3. Lenior-
Rhyne and Cuilford finished
second and third, respec-
tively.
For the host Pirates, it
was a disappointing con-
clusion to an otherwise
successful season. The Lady
Bucs consolation round loss
came at the hands of the
Demon Deacons of Wake
Forest, 15-13, 15-6.
"When we played Wake,
we weren't over the loss to
State analyzed Tyson.
"Fundamentally we are
better than Wake, we just
weren't ready. We had a lack
of mental and physical
leadership in that no one
stood up and took charge to
try to turn things around
"We eijd on a sad note
added h�d coach Alita
Dillon, "bui ue had a good
season overall (29-13). We
lose Rosie Thompson as a
graduating senior.
i
(
Green Bay. That game was
possibly the turning point in
their season. They played
like champions again, and
should also this week.
DENVER 17
GREEN BAY 14
The Packers soared early
as their schedule rarely
provided them with a for-
midable foe. But the last two
weeks, the Pack has lost to
powerhouses Minnesota and
Dallas. This week things get
no easier.
WASHINGTON 24
ST. LOUIS 21
The rejuvinated Cardin-
als should give Jack Pardee's
Redskins a real tough time.
Since Card quarterback Jim
Hart returned to health, St.
Louis has played verv well.
Meanwhile, the Redskins
have struggled, losing three
of their last five games. Yet
the 'Skins should win as they
have the home filed ad-
vantage, and the better
team.
MINNESOTA 20
SAN DIEGO 14
The Vikings are now tied
for the lead in the NFC
Central Division. Only a few
weeks ago. they were as
many as three games behind
the Green Bay Packers.
Then, Fran Tarkenton began
working some of his old
magic. The Chargers have a
good young club, led by
Lydell Mitchell, but will find
the cold of Minnesota and
the expertise of Tarkenton a
bit too much to handle here
LOS ANGELES 21
SAN FRANCISCO 3
One has to pity the poor
49ers. Their record is only
1-9, they've had two coaches
this year, they have lost their
only real star, O.J. Simpson
to injury, and they have no
efficient quarterback. Also,
they must play the Rams this
week.
SEATTLE 21
KANSAS CITY 10
The Seahawks are only in
their third year of existence,
but are at least three times
better than the hapless
Chiefs.
MIAMI 24
HOUSTON 21
This is the game of the
week. Plainly speaking, both
"I these clubs should be in
the playoffs at years eand.
The Oilers defeated New
England 26-23 last week with
a super second half come-
back. They have proven their
worth, and the worth of
super rookie back Earl
Campbell. The Dolphins lost
to New England earlier this
eyar when quarterback Bob
Gnese was still recuperating
from early season injuries.
Griese is about the best in
the business at his position.
and is fully recovered now.
He should pull his, team
through in a real thriller.
PHILADELPHIA 17
NEW YORK GIANTS 10
The Eagles are a team on
the rise. Coach Dick Vermeil
is building a real contender.
The Giants, on the other
hand, lack enough offense to
be a contender. The Eagles
will outclass them.
CHICAGO 13
ATLANTA 10
This is the upset pick of
the week. The Bears have
lost eight in a row. They are
long overdue.
NEW ENGLAND 28
NEW YORK JETS 21
The Jets certainly re-
member the 55-21 beating
they took at the hands of the
Patriots a few weeks ago.
They will be much more
ready this time. Yet they
should once again come out
on the short end against a
much superior team.
BALTIMORE 21
CLEVELAND 20
The Colts are playing de-
cent football again now that
quarterback Bert Jones has
returned after injury pro-
blems.
TAMPA BAY 17
BUFFALO 13
The Bucs have come a
long way. The Bills have
very long way to go.
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FOUNTAINHEAD
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Chansky
is guest
This week's celebrity Ui
the Fearless Forecast is Ar:
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Chansky has followH th�-
Pirates closely over the f,d�.
few years and i a vett-ru
the Atlantic Coast Cd
ence sports beat. Last wt ,
guest forecaster Jim Ma
finished with an imprest
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Assistant Sport- i-
Charles Chandler still
main- on top of tin
while Terr Herndon
ind pla ��
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Title
Fountainhead, November 16, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 16, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.526
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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