Fountainhead, November 14, 1978






Circulation 10,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina 'vd.MMo.jr- umm�mtm
SGA appropriates funds
By LEIGH COAKLEY
Production Manager
The agenda for the Student Government Association (SGA)
on Monday evening was devoted almost 'entirely to
appropriations tor several campus organizations.
The organizations oted on were the Drama Department,
the North Carolina Student Legislature (NCSL). and the
student transit system
Preceding the reading of the minutes, a question and
answer session began with Senior Class President, Nicky
Francis -peaking to the legislature concerning behavior at last
week's meeting. Francis, also the parlimentarian for the
legislature informed the group that they all have a right to ask
son to sit down provided they are out of line and prove to
uptive to the group.
In the meeting of Nov. 6, Alonzo Newby made accusations
lummy Joe Payne and Kieran Shanahan, accusing
� ram-rodding" and Shanahan was called "a liar
Francis referred back to the bill voted on unfavorably last
senior class gift, and said that "there are 1.936
luating this tall and they pay $630 a semester and a
ibout $100,000 during their four years in college to the
He mentioned that he planned to bring the bill up
tut lire.
Student Legislator Wiley Betts appologized to the
ir walking out of the emergency session called last
: broke quorom. Two other legislators also walked
nations were still being made when the emergency
session was adjourned and is designated to be taken up first
thing the next meeting.
Lester Nail, freshman class president, went before the
legislature to take an official stand on the Media Board
decision that "it was a question of morals, and that in
actuality, the legislature as a body should receive the $42,000
now belonging to the Media Board.
Rudolph Alexander, associate dean of student affairs, was
questioned about a converstaion between Chancellor Thomas �
Brewer and himself, which he refused to comment on.
Appropriations began with positive and negative debates
for $3,969 to be allocated to the Model United Nations for their
1978-79 budget. Bill Barbe spoke in behalf of the organization
and explained the reasons for the need of this money. The bill
was passed favorably 28-8.
The next bill to be considered was that of the ECU
Playhouse. Katherine Vollmer presented the bill to the
legislature. According to Vollmer, when the Playhouse bill
initiativ came up, it was as if they were getting "the bottom of
the barrel
Alter smaller clubs and organizations budgets had been
voted on, some favorable and some unfavorable.and the extra
amount of money was alloted to the Playhouse bill. The ECU
Playhouse is approximately currently $22,000 in debt and the
amount of the bill ($7,530.12) will be used to assist them in
paying these bills.
Preston Sisk, representative for the Playhouse, said that
they were counting on the money being supplied by the SGA,
as it has in the past, and that they cannot begin working on
productions until they know if they will receive this money. The
bill was passed and the money will be used to aid the
Playhouse in getting out of its present debt.
The North Carolina Student Legislature (NCSL) bill for
$901 was presented, and an amendment was made for an
additional $1200 to be added to the $901. Marc Adler provided
the legislature with information regarding NCSL and the
convention held in Raleigh. He emphasized their needs for this
money and that the organization did not have the time for
fund-raising activities because the time was needed to devote
to legislative writing. The bill for $901 was passed, but the
additional $1200 was not.
After a short recess, the legislature voted favorably on a bill
for $60,415 for the Transit System. Robbie Rogers, transit
manager, presented the legislature with figures to reinforce
the extreme need for this money. According to Rogers, transit
system is one of the only ways in which students can use and
see where their activity fees are going.
Although a majority of these bills passed through the
legislature today, it was by no means given away or an easy
decision to allocate these designated amounts. The legislature
emphasized emphatically that the financial situation is not
substantial enough to meet all the wants and desires of the
organizations on campus. The SGA would like to be able to
meet these needs, but more fund raising activities are going to
have to be undertaken. The burden cannot fall any longer
totally on the SGA because the money just won't go that far.
The Legislature was adjourned and another meeting was
called for Tuesday at 5 p.m.
Greenville City Council meets;
Payne reports on ECU activities
By MIKE ROGERS
e r
Council of
- I last
Nov. 9 with
R. C v
D.iring the
g, SGA President
luminv joe Pavne,
uncil first
12 and
. - - Vfter the
itv manager
report.
iwing the report,
I e Payne, ECU
Representative to the
Council, gave his
report of ECl activities.
Payne reported, among
other items, that ECU
alumni are sponsoring a
telethon Nov. 13.
fter Pa ne's report, iht
City auditor reported that
the city had -pent more
monej than it earned. He
I inted out, however, that
the city had an excess of
fund- from last vear.
He also reported that the
city had lost money on
public transportation, but
this had been torseen and
prepared against.
Under the first item of
old business, the Council
approved appointments to
certain committees. In the
5ond item, Kenneth
Whichard wanted rezoning
of his 'and from RA-20 to
R-6, R-9.
On September 27, the
Planning and Zoning
Commission approved his
request, and sent it to the
Council. One individual
presented the Council with
a petition containing 271
names opposing the
rezoning.
He stated that he
personally was not opposed
to the rezoning, only it
would open a dead-end
street in the Belvedere
Subdivision. This, he
concluded, would bring
through more traffic, thus
jeapordizing the children
and bicyclists living there.
Over six individuals
strongly opposed opening
the road in question.A
representative of Which-
ard's presented the Council
with a map that showed
that the road was not a
short-cut, and would not be
opened.
Several individuals then
asked what would prevent
Whichard from selling the
land to a developer who
would open the street. At
this point, the Council
decided to table the
discussion until the next
meeting.
The Council then
approved a request to
rezone the A.J. Speight
property to approximately
24. 650 square feet from the
downtown commercial
fringe, to Medical Arts.
The Council also
approved a request to
rezone the T.J. Williams
property.
The Council also
accepted the results of a
canvas of election returns
onthe Public Works bond
referendum, worth $1.9
million.
Other awards given
Lamm chosen as queen
Bv RICK1GL1ARMIS
V-u.s Editor
Homecoming . 1978,
then "New Horizons"
- held this past weekend
-ignitying the new leader-
t Dr. Thomas Brewer.
During the past several
ths, preparations for
iming have been nu-
merous.
As a special treat for this
year's homecoming, the
ECU-William and Mary
game was regionallv tele-
vised by ABC.
A new homecoming
queen was chosen Saturday
night at halftime. Suzanne
Lamm, who was represent-
ing the Intra-Fraternity
Council was crowned Home-
coming Pirate. The first
runner-up was Sheila Men-
1978 79 HOMECOMING PIRATE SUZANNE Lamm, who was
crowned during halftime of the ECU- WUliam and Mary game.
Photo by Steve Romero
doza, representing SOULS
and Allison Fuentes, repre-
senting Clement Dorm, was
second runner-up. Tommy
Joe Payne, SGA president,
Dalton Denson, IFC presi-
dent, and Dr. Thomas Brew-
er presented the awards.
The other five girls who
were chosen to be on the
homecoming court were:
Sarah Floyd, Sigma Sigma
Sigma; Vicky Clark, Greene
Dorm; Kathy Dreyer, MRC;
, Sylvia Honeycutt, Chi Om-
ega; and Ann Thompson,
representing Alpha Phi.
These girls were voted
onto the court last week by
the student body.
During homecoming the
dorms displayed their home-
coming decorations and
these were voted on. The
winners were announced at
halftime of the football game
Saturday night. Fletcher
Dorm was the winner of the
dorm decorations with Cle-
ment Dorm coming in as the
runner-up.
The float awards were
given to Industrial and Tech-
nological Education for first
prize and to Alpha Phi and
Lambda Chi Alpha as second
runners-up.
The house decoration
awards were presented to
Alpha Delta Pi for first place
and to Delta Zeta for second
place.
The four new members
who were inducted into the
ECU Hall of Fame were Jim
Johnson, Richard Narron,
Jim Mallory, and Tom Mi-
chel. These four men re-
present outstanding a
chievement in athletics while
at ECU.
What's inside
DRUMMER STEVE PRICE
of Pablo Cruisesee p.6
For a review of the Pablo � Cruise
concertsee p. 8.
Livingston Taylor talks candidly about
himself and his musicsee p. 9.
A photo essay depicts homecoming "as it
wassee p. 6-7.
Pirates under bowl considerationsee p.
12.
ECU defeats William and Mary - 20-3 in
televised homecoming gmesee
STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATIO SGA President
Tommy Joe Payne presides over SGA meeting.
Phi Sigma Pi
attends meeting
The Council also
accepted the five-year-old
Capital Improvement
Program.
In other business, the
Council granted an
ron-premise beer privilege
license for Blimpies, an
on-premise beer and wine
privilege for Tippy's Taco
House, and a renewal of an
on and off premise beer and
wine license for the
Greenville Golf and
Country Club.
The Council then voted
to have a child pedestrian
school safety study costing
approximately $67,000.
By RICKI GLIARMJS
Neus Editor
The Tau Chapter of Phi
Sigma Pi held its national
convention in Atlantic City,
NJ on Oct. 19,20, and 21.
Fourteen members of the
ECU honor fraternity at-
tended.
The members of Phi
Sigma Pi National Fraternity
who attended the convention
were: Reed Warren, pre-
sident of the fraternity and
chief delegate at the con-
vention; Guy Taylor, Jean
Murdock, Caroline Block-
well. Hal Sharpe, Mark
McCov, Bill Balance, Ernie
Stine, Linda Barber, Mike
" Morse, John Gilchrist, and
Dale Pirr, members of the
fraternity; Dr. Jack Thorn-
ton, faculty advisor; and Dr.
R.C. Todd, past faculty ad-
visor. Any member of the
fraternity wishing to attend
the convention were allowed
logo.
During the convention,
elections were held for na-
tional officers of the fra-
ternity according to Jeff
Fleming, member of the fra-
ternity. Dr. Thornton. fa ulty
advisor, wa- elected national
vice-president. Dr. Todd was
also re-elected as the na-
tional alumni chairman.
The theme for the con-
vention was "New Vitality
Fleming explained that the
theme was chosen to encour-
age vitality in the individual
chapters of Phi Sigma Pi and
for the national organization.
During the convention,
meetings were held to di-
cuss the progress oi the
fraternity and plans were
made for future dealings of
the fraternity
Next year tht t invention
will be back in Washington,
D.C. where it wa held last
vear.
Colcord sentenced
to five years
ECU cheerleaders compete
By KAY WILLIAMS
Staff Writer
The ECU Cheerleading
Squad plans to compete in
the National Collegiate
cheerleading Competition
this year, according to
Frank Saunders, cheer-
leading coach.
This is the first year the
ECU Squad has entered the
competition.
Only cheerleading
squads from NCAA
Division One Football
Teams are eligible to enter.
There are approximately
151 squads that are eligible
to enter the competition,
according to Saunders.
An important part of the
entry is a five minute
videotape of the squad.
WNCTTV is filming the
tape. Ron Snipes of WNCT
is advising the group on the
tape.
The squad went to
Belhaven Monday to film
the opening and closing of
the tape.
A panel of collegiate
cheerleading experts will
judge the tapes and rank
the sixth through twentieth
place squads. The top five
squads will go unranked
and will then compete for
honors on the CBS
televised National Colleg-
iate Cheerleading Champ-
ionships.
Each squad will be
rated in nine categories.
The categories are:
neatness, general appear-
ance, personality, smiles,
cheer routines, npvelty
material, uniqueness of
novelty material, rapport
with music, organization
of the five minute entry,
and performance overview.
The squad is made up of
twelve students, one mas-
cot, and one pirate. Susan
Paris serves as head cheer-
leader.
The squad came to
school one week before
registration day to practice
their routines. They also
practice several afternoons
each week during the
school year.
Besides cheering at the
football and basketball
games, the group also
judges high school cheering
contests and holds a
workshop each spring for
area high school cheering
squads.
The squad is funded by
the Student Government
Association, the Student
Union, and the Athletic
Department. These funds
are used for travel
expenses and uniforms.
Saunders said that his
group is trying to be the
best so the students,
alumni and faculty at ECU
will be proud of their
squad.
The top twenty squads
will be announced Dec. 29.
Scholarships and other
honors will be awarded the
winner of the competition
and the four runners-up.
By JERRY ALLEGOOD
Staff Writer
Raleigh News & Observer
An as-
sociate professor at East
Carolina University was sen-
tenced to five years in prison
Thursday after pleading
guilty to injuring a Green-
ville man by dropping gas-
oline-filled bottles at his feet.
Joashley Marshall Col-
cord, who testified in Pitt
County Superior Court that
he had intended only to warn
the man to stay away from
his wife, entered the plea
under an agreement that re-
sulted in dismissal of a
charge of damaging property
with an explosive or incen-
diary device.
The 53-year-old defen-
dant was charged after a
May 17 explosion and fire at
Tarheel Truck Rental Co. in
Greenville that injured the
operator, G. Vinson Howell.
Colcord could have re-
ceived from five to 30 years
on the malicious injury
charge and 10 years to life
imprisonment for damaging
property.
Judge Robert D. Rouse
Jr. of Farmville approved the
plea agreement that also
called for Colcord to pay up
to $15,000 in restitution.
About $3,500 would go to
Howell and the remainder to
insurance companies for
property damage.
According to testimony in
the three-day trial, Colcord
had dropped two gasoline-
filled bottles and caused a
fire that temporarily trapped
Howell and an employee in
an office area. Howell test-
ified that he and Mrs.
Colcord were close friends.
- - - , m 9-
� - 0? ��� � � � - -
mmmmmmtoim
JOASHLEY COLCORD
Defense attorneys pre-
sented evidence to show that
Colcord's ability ti know
right lrom wrong wa� im-
paired because of stre� that
resulted from a relation-hip
between his wife F-K n, and
Howell, a family friend
After roting their cast-
but before making final
argument to the jurv f
eight women and 'four men,
the three defen.se attorney
began negotiations with
state prosecutors that lasted
more than two hours.
Colcord, a certified public
accountant who taught ac-
counting at ECl , testified
Wednesday that he did nut
fully realize the consequen-
ces of his actions because he
was upset after learning that
his wife was seeing Howell
after he thought the rela-
tionship had ended.
He said he had not taught
since the incident.
Dr. H.D. Lambeth, a
counselor at the ECU Coun-
seling Center, told the court
Thursday that Colcord dis-
cussed his problems with
him. He said he felt that
stress could have caused
Colcord to act without know-
ing right from wrong or the
consequences of his actions.
I





Socio-Anth
Wed Nov. 15 at 7:30
p.m. in BD-302 The
Sociology-Anthropology
Club will present a special
program with Dr. Marcus
Hepburn UNC-W on the
ethnography of Harker's
Island All interested,
welcome. Refreshments
u ill be served.
Leadership training
class provides good fun and
fellowship in addition to
helping you learn ,more
about the Christian life and
how to grow spiritually.
Classes are now going on
every Thursday night at 7
in. in Brewster B-103.
Come check it out.
Sponsored by Campus
Crusade for Christ.
Recreation
Check our "Discount
Da" at the Mendenhall
Student Center recreation
area Every Monday
afternoon from 2 p.m. until
5 p.m bowling, table
tennis, and billiard prices
are 1 3 off. Bring a friend.
catch the savings, and have
some fun.
Trivia
The Intramural Depart-
ment in its never ending
search to provide various
competition for the college
student again offers a unique
opportunity, baseball trivia.
Thi competition requires no
physical strength or stamina,
just intelligence of the his-
tory of professional baseball.
Registration begins Nov.
13-16 in the Intramural Of-
fice. Rm. 204 Memorial
Gym. Plav begins Mon
Nov. 20. SIGN UP The
intramural program is only
a- good a the people who
participate.
Graduate
Attention all first sem-
ester graduates. Delivery
dates for your caps and
gowns will be Nov. 28-30 at
the Student Supply Store.
These Keepsake gowns
are yours to keep providing
the $10 graduation fee has
been paid. For those re-
ceiving the Masters Degree
the $10 fee pays for your cap
and gown, but there is an
extra fee of $7.95 for your
hood. Any questions should
be referred to the Student
Supply Store, Wright Build-
ing.
Health
There will be a
workshop for Community
Health majors and intended
majors concerning jobs. It
will be held Wednesday,
Nov. 29 at 4 p.m. in
Brewster B-103. CoHe 4000
students are sponsoring the
workshop. All Majors and
intended majors are
encouraged to attend.
Refreshments will be
served.
SLC
There will be a meeting
of the Sign Language Club
at Brewster B-204, 6:30
p.m. Wed Nov. 15. The
meeting is open to
interested students and
faculty who are taking or
have taken sign language
courses or have some
knowledge of sign
language. Guests of the
Greenville community are
welcome to attend as well.
There will be no meeting
the following week due to
the Thanksgiving holiday.
Meetings are held every
Wednesday night.
Crafts
An exhibition of jworks
by Mendenhall Student
Center Crafts Center
members is on display in
the lower bases of
Mendenhall Student
Center. The majority of
these items were made by
new members who have
begun in crafts for the first
time this semester. The
show will be on display
until Sunday, Nov. 19.
Festival
Folk Music Festible will
be held Thurs night from 8
till 10 p.m. in the art building
Performing will be Carolina
Bluegrass Band with the
hottest fiddler in North Car-
olina; Pinewood Ramblers,
East CArolina's own all
female bluegrassold-time
band; nationally known
Creengrass Doggers and the
newest square dance team
alive. Everyone is welcome,
admission is free.
The Graduate Record
Examination will be offered
at ECU on Sat Dec. 9.
Application blanks are to be
completed and mailed to:
Educational Testing Service,
Box 966-R, Princeton, NJ
08540.
Late registration deadline
is Nov. 15. Applications may
be obtained from the ECU
Testing Center, Rm. 105,
Speight Building.
P�fl� 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 14 November 1978
Banking
The banking fraternity,
Beta Kappa Alpha, urges
everyone with an interest in
banking to attend our
meeting and hear noted
professionals in the field of
banking speak on topics
ranging from job oppor-
tunities to discount points.
In addition to gaining
first-hand knowledge from
practitioners, members
have an opportunity to
meet potential future
employers on an informal
basis. The only require-
ment for membership is an
interest in banking. Come
by and check us out at our
next meeting, Nov. 20 at 3
p.m. in Room 103-Rawl.
Biology
The Biology Club will
hold its second meeting
Wed Nov. 15 at 7 p.m. in
Biology N102. Dr. Smith
will discuss the Biology
faculty and their interests.
Plans for the field trip (Dec.
1,2) will be discussed and
the constitution voted on.
Evervone is invited.
Backgammon
Scheduled for Mon Nov.
20 is the All-Campus Back-
gammon Tournament to be
held in the Multi-Purpose
Room at Mendenhall at 7
p.m. Introduced at the re-
gional tournament for the
first time last year it met
with such success that the
event will be continued. The
first place finisher will par-
ticipate in the regional face-
to-face tournament.
Fellowship
Want to join in a time of
fun, fellowhip, and
learning? Come to
Inter-Varsity Christian
Fellowship this Wednesday
night at 7 p.m. in
Mendenhall 221. Mark
Acuff, staff worker for
NCSU and Duke, will be
speaking on the topic:
"Vital Signs of a Campus
Ministry:Dead or Alive
All are welcome!
WE ARE PAYING
CASH
FOR CLASS RINGS
(REGARDLESS OF CONDITION)
OTHER GOLD RINGS
(REGARDLESS OF CONDITION)
ANY GOLD OR SILVER OF
ANY KIND AND
TOP CASH PRICE PAID FOR
SILVER AND GOLD COINS
COIN COLLECTIONS
BRING TO "COIN MAN"
HARMONY HOUSE
SOUTH
ON THE MALL
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
Classifieds
- automatic with air. Good
condition. $2000. Call 746-
3102.
FOR SALE: '72 obile
home 12 x 60 14500. or
13000. equity and assume
$1500. loan. Abo 3 ft. old
Khishor Husky- beautiful
dog - $50. Call 756-3054.
FOR SALE: '75 Dodge Colt
ROOMATES NEEDED: To
share 3-bedroom brick
home on 3 acre lot 1 12
mile from Bell's Fork.
Fireplace, dishwasher
included. $70 a mo. For
more information call
Carolyn or Leigh at
756-8132 or leave name and
number at 757-6366 and
your call will be returned.
Couple preferred to share
one room.
ROOMMATE NEEDED:
To share large four-bed-
room house near
Bowling
Win your Thanksgiving
dinner at the Mendenhall
"Turkey Shoot Thurs-
day, Nov. 16 between the
hours of 7 p.m. and 11
p.m the MSC Bowling
Center will be the site of an
old-fashioned turkey shoot
with a slight difference: an
entry fee of $1.50 will give
you the chance to bowl one
ball on 10 consecutive
lanes. If at least 8 pins fall
on each lane, you win a
turkey! Enter as many
times as you like. Limit 3
wins per person.
Tournament
The All-Campus Bowling
Tournament will be held
Thurs Nov. 30, with the
women's competition getting
underway at 8 p.m. at
Mendenhall. The top five
winners in each division will
represent ECU in Knoxville.
Republicans
ECU College Republicans
have their next meeting on
Thurs Nov. 16 at 7 p.m.
The meeting will be held in
Brewster C-103. All inter-
ested persons are invited to
attend. Refreshments will be
served.
Science
Good at Science?
Chi Beta Phi scientific
Iraternity is looking for you.
Thursday, Nov. 16, 7:30
p.m Biology Rm N102.
The fraternity and pledging
w�l be discussed.
SCEC
There will be a special
meeting of the Student
Council for Exceptional
Children Wednesday, Nov.
I!� at 5 p.m. in Rm. 129
Speight. Val Carmine will
be the guest speaker on
"Inside-Out" and plans
will be made for the
Caswell Choir Concert on
Dec. 11. All members and
interested persons are
urged to attend.
Phi Sigma Pi will hold
its monthly dinner meeting
Wed. Nov. 15 at 6 p.m. at
Parkers BBQ. All brothers
and pledges are urged to
attend.
Volleyball
The Volleyball Clojb will
have a practice meeting at 9
p.m tues Nov. 14 at the
stadium end of Minges
gym. Students, faculty and
staff interested in joining
the club may do so at that
time. I.D. cards should be
taken to this meeting. The
club will meet again on
Thursday night.
Ski
You can ski for 4 days,
eat 4 breakfasts and 3
dinners, stay in the Spruce
Ski Lodge, use your 4 day
lift ticket, travel to and
from SnowshoeSki Resort
all for $169.
The Snowshoe Ski Trip
will be during Christmas
Break, Jan 1-6, 1979.
Registration deadline is
December 1. We are half
full now, hurry and sign up
at the Central Ticket Office
in Mendenhall Student
Center.
Patronize
FOUNTAINHEAD
Advertisers
��� 3 ��.
St SHOPS m GREENVME and NAGS �CAO. NORTH CAROLINA
Wed. is
Dollar Day at
Newby's
V Sub for $1.00
with purchase
of a soft drink.
All tfajr Wad. Every Wad.
Mendenhall
The campus level recrea-
tional qualifying tourna-
ments to determine the top
men and women in the
, events of bowling, billiards,
backgammon, chess, and
table tennis, are now under-
way. The tournaments,
sponsored by Mendenhall
Student Center, are some of
several hundred being held
at colleges and universities
around the nation in the
qualifying round for the
intercollegiate champion-
ships conducted by the As-
sociation of College Unions
� International.
The campus winners in
each event will participate in
the regional 5 tournament
with the champions from
approximately thirty other
schools from the states of
Kentucky, Virginia, North
CArolina, Tennessee, and
South Carolina. The ACU-1
regional face-to-face tour-
naments will be held Feb.
8,9, and 10, at the University
of Tennessee in Knoxville,
Tennessee. The trip to the
regional competition for the
ECU representatives will be
sponsored by Mendenhall
Student Center.
Qualifying tournaments
were conducted in each dorm
to determine dorm winners
who will participate in the
All-Campus tournaments.
Day-student representatives
were selected through tour-
naments held in September
and October which were
conducted by MSC.
F8SF
Poetry
The Poetry Forum will
meet this Thursday at 8 p.m.
in room 221, Mendenhall.
You are welcome to come
and share you own work.
Several poets will be read-
ing.
Brothers and Sisters in
Christ, "Let us hold fast
the confession of our hope
without wavering, for He
who promised is faithful,
and let us consider how to
stimulate one another to
love and good deeds, not
forsaking our own
assembling together, as is
the habit of some, but
encouraging one another;
and all the more as you see
the day drawing near
Heb. 10:23-25. Time is
fyg� people are dying
without Jesus, and He is
soon coming back!
Therefore, let's gather this
Thurs. Nov. 16 and
encourage one another by
sharing the testimonies and
talents God has given us,
and pray for each person's
needs. Everyone is invited
to come this Thurs. night
and fellowship with us in
Mendenhall 212. 7:30-9:30
p.m. Come Expecting'
Miracles! This is
puitaored by the ECU
chapter of the Full Gospel
Student Fellowship.
Turkey-shoot
Win your Thanksgiving
dinner at the Mendenhall
"Turkey Shoot Thurs
Nov. 16 between the hours of
7 p.m. and 11 p.m the MSC
Bowling Center will be the
site of an old-fashioned
turkey shoot with a slight
difference. An entry fee of
SI.25 vilt give you ihe
chance to bowl one ball on
ten consecutive lanes. If at
least eight pins fall on each
lane, you win a turkey! Enter
as many times as you like.
Limit three wins per person.
Writers
The Writers Guild will
meet on Mon Nov. 20 at 7
p.m. in Austin 207.
All peron that have
attended or are interested
please attend.
MRGWRC
On Nov 8, last Wed
nesday. Men's Residence
Council, MRC, and W
men's Residence Council,
WRC, had a Homecoming
week Pig Pickin Concert
226 tickets were sold to the
event with the door opening
at 4:40 p.m. B&D Cafe
served six pigs, beans, slaw,
hushpuppies and drinks. The
whole event was supposed to
be at the top of the hill, but
because of rain, it was held
in the basement of Aycokc
dorm. Afte everyone helped
themselves to the meal, they
sat at tables inside. Farm
and Home Blue Grass Band
began to play at 6 p.m. They
consist of four people: Tony
King-inger, guitar: Bob
Gaddis-banjo; Dan New-
man-bass; Paul Garvey-
mandolin. They have been
together since April of '78
and enjoy playing for all
types of groups. They will be
playing this week at Farmers
Tobacco vl arehouse in
Greenville for the Tobacco
Farmers Festival.
Greenpeace
The third organizational
meeting for Greenpeace will
be held Wed No. 15 at 6
p.m. in Rm. 248 Mendenhall
Student Center. Anvone mav
attend. For more infor-
mation, call Jerry Adderton
at 758-6259 after 5 p.m. on
weekdav.
e -EpKre
are trademarks of CBS inc C 1978 CBS inc
Live,
andgetliv.
Treat yourself to lyrics that
flutter the heart. To a voice that
triggers sighs and smiles.
Livingston Taylor's new album
"3-Way Mirror" generates the
kind of spirited, Tifegiving quali-
ties you would expect from an
original.
Livingston's first album on
Epic (and his first release in 5
years) contains nine Taylor made
tunes, and one he's chosen to
interpret. Backed up by Maria
Muldaur on "No Thank You
Skycap Liv proves once again
that the love song is alive and
well and waiting to be heard.
Livingston Taylor. Identifiablv
his own man.
"3-W�y Mirror
Livingston Taylor's
new album featuring
"L.A. Serenade" and
"Going Round
One More Timer
On Epic Records and Tapes.
Mana Muldaur appears courtesy of Warrr Bros RecontTerlbyN!
Company E.ecut.ve Producer Charles Kopprtrrwn Representat.orV KM MaSer,? c� ���
downtown. Private
bedroom $56.25 per month
and 14 utilities. . Call
758-1321.
Kimberly,
pei8orial(J)
LOST: 1 Minolta SB 102
camera at Homecoming
game in student section.
Reward offered. Call

.iawmMn�
REWARD: for an all black
male cat loat in the Jarvis
Willow Street area. He was
wearing a white flea collar.
Missing since Nov. 7. Nice
reward - call Kim at
752-2024.
Wanted to buy . used
refrigerator or freezer or
combination. Call 756-8245.
MID EASTERN DANCE:
(Authentic Belly Dancing)
taught by Sunshine � ex-
perienced teacher and per-
former in Ohio, Mexico,
Atlanta, and in the DC.
area. Classes are now form-
ing. Call 756-0736.
YOGA: Hatha yoga is now
being taught by Sunshine.


New classes forming. Relax
ation, realization, weight
loss. For more infor. call
756-0736.
THE PORTRAIT GALLERY
Would you like to have your
portrait taken, Senior
resume pictures, weddinas
or art portfolio? We do
color or black and white
prmts. Think ahead for
C�"stmas presentslCaUuT
758-0962. If ,D
service is n� i
vourT ' PleaSC ���'�
o�r name and phone nn.
r�





ii��nu�, 1aT. F0UNTANHEAn
VJl-PCO concerns customers
I
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP)
V�rginia Electric A Power
r-t in u- North
Carolina service area,
hih includes 22 north-
'�aslern counties, have res-
niu-1 r up in
lents and
� he mood of the peo-
h' � '� 22-count) area is
'(' concern ami
said state Sen.
M'lvin R. Daniels Jr
' ! "beth Cit . "Some of
!l things people are talk-
iboul are r alarm-
Wpco's rates are 23
til higher than those
1 � Power & Light
higher
Powei Co
' the Public
-late I tilities
1 irolina
Commission awarded
� � " � a . , H percent rate
increase on Sept. I.
On Sept. M). in Federal
Energ) Regulator) Com-
mission allowed Vepco to
increase it wholesale rates
bv 20 percent tor the power
ii sells to municipal svs-
lems ami rural coopera-
tives. epco's u hotesale
rate- are higher than those
"I the other companies.
five chambers of com-
merce in Vepeo's North
Carolina service area are
eireulating a petition pro-
s' -ling the rates and hope
lo get more than their goal
"t 25.000 signatures. The
petition will be given to
0o . Jim Hunt, the utilities
commission and the Fed-
eral Energj Regulator)
i ommission.
Meanwhile, the Public
Stall is investigating the
reason for Vepeo's higher
rates. It should complete its
report in a month to six
weeks, according to Hugh
A V ells, the staffs exec-
UIV' director.
Vepco customers are
planning to ask the federal
regulatory agency for a
-imilar investigation, Dan-
iel- said. And there is some
laik among the people near
the edge ot Vepeo's service
ol switching lo CP & L.
'Many of us, as legisla-
tors, are frustrated because
n �� don't know why the
disparitv in rates exists
Daniel- , ij
Peuple are pushing for
legislative change, perhaps
along the lines of allowing
no more than an annual
rate review or the concept
"I equal rates statewide
1 outh charged with extortion
S VXFORD. N.C. (AP) A
San ford vouth
� today and
xtortion,
rts con-
. v de-
iwlul burning,
IP � De-
ls lead
esl f Ki nneth
A - itn a
to the de-
: stat-
ad
it)
' - -� t ott if
hand
fied drop
Sal night, police
Sanford variet)
e was ca iut 8
mb had
in the -111 re
and set to go off at It) p.m.
Police and fire department
lorces evacuated the store
and surrounding buildings
and conducted a search but
no bomb was found.
n uninhabited house
in adjoining Jonesboro was
set on lire Sunday night.
police said. A police
-poke-man said informa-
tion received during an
n estigation led to Shinn's
arrest.
Graham concerned
about FTC
SHINGT0N (AP,)
Katharine Graham, pub-
her ol I he w ashington
Post, says she i- verv
� i rned about the Fed-
I 1 rade Commission's
Meral tendencies to
push further and further
into the realm ol informa-
tion and its marketing
In remark- to an adver-
tising industry luncheon
here Saturda. Mrs. Gra-
uim cited FTC action last
-ummer against the Los
Vngeles Times in which the
agencv challenged the
widespread use of volume
discounts in newspaper and
��liter media advertising
rate She said a free
-ocietv -hould continue "to
i itrusl a lot of judgments
the marketplace, instead
ol having them preempted
bv Congress and the agen-
STL'DENTS RECALL DAYS of yesteryear
as they ride through the streets of modern
day Greenville. This car was entered by the
Sigman Phi Epsilon fraternity. Photo by
Steve Romero
Savings and Loan in no rush
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP.) The
-tale's -aings and loan
institutes will be in no rush
l" otter checking on sa ings
I l�an account accord-
industn spokesmen.
.1 n
in
I don't see il coming
into Mir industry real quick-
I) lore said James H.
spi irman, a member of the
N. Savings and Loan
Co urn issii.n ' I don't see
that w can make monev
wi 'i it
Payment
order
accounts
� hat the sa ings and
Iojii � .Mild actuallv offer,
mitl rule- proposed la-t
month h) the Federal
Home Loan Bank Board,
are special "payment order
accounts" that would allow
savings and loan customers
to w rr�e checks on interest-
hearing savings accounts.
I lie accounts would pav
5 percent interest instead of
the 5 I 2 percent paid on
regular passbook accounts.
It's not strictly check-
ing said a bank board
-poke-man. "but it looks,
smells and acts just like
necking She said the
hank hopes to write regula-
lions allowing payment
order aeeouritfl bv earlv
war.
hi -erv ice is intended
nip. te with the bank-
iLr industry's automatic
Iransfer account which
� ink- have been allowed to
�tier since Nov. 1. Transfer
ii counts in effect allow
i u-tomers to write checks
"ii savings accounts bear-
ing interest of 5 percent.
W e cannot allow com-
mercial banks to enter the
marketplace with an unfair
a�l ant.ige aid bank
board chairman Robert H.
McKinney .
Technical hurdles
There are several tech-
nical hurdles before the
service can be offered.
Among them is the
question of whether state-
i bartered savings and loans
may offer the service. The
hank board authorized the
service only for federally
chartered savings and loans
and lor -tate-chartered sav-
ings and loans and for
-tate-chartered savings and
loans in states without
conflicting laws.
There are 43 federal
savings and loans and 157
stale facilities in North
Carolina.
Supreme Court
reviews case
By RICHARD CAHELLI
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON (AP)
The Supreme Court today
agreed to decide whether
states may bar newspapers
from publishing the names
ol juveniles charged with
crime
The justices said they
will review a ruling by the
w est Virginia Supreme
Court that struck down
such a law as an unconsti-
tutional "prior restraint"
n free press right
The test case grew out
ol the fatal shooting of a 14
year-old student at Hayes
Junion High School in St.
lbans, W. Va last Feb.
').
That day, 14 year-old
Stewart Perrock was deter-
mined bv a Kanawha Coun-
fv iu'lu io be "delin-
ui tit in connection with
the slaying.
In ii- editions the next
m urn i rig, the Charleston
Gazette newspaper identi-
fied Perrock as the alleged
assailant, That afternoon,
Perrock also was identified
in a story appearing in the
Charleston Daily Mail.
Both papers were
charged with criminal mis-
demeanors for violating the
West Virginia law, and
both successfully asked the
-tale Supreme Court to set
aside the charges.
The state court noted
that in the pa-t, the L S
Supreme Court has told
government officials th-
almost never mav prevent
publication or broadcast of
information journalists al-
ready have obtained.
Efforts to prevent dis-
semination ot information
alreadv obtained generally
are referred to a- prior
restraints.
Ill seeking Supreme
Court review, Kanawha
County prosecutor Clctu-
Hanlev argued that none ol
the Supreme Court ruhng-
precisclv lit- the fact- n
the Perrock case.
Black studies needed?
GREENSBORO, N.C. (AP)
Students from 19 North
Carolina universities sav
they will push to make
black studies a mandatory
part ol all college curricu-
lum
"VI bite students are not
going to take the black
studies courses on their
"wi. so we should require
them. It the only wav thev
ire going to learn about the
-indents they are going to
be leaching said Dr.
Herman Norman, professor
�I fro-American and Afri-
can Studies at the L'niver-
-f" �' Nnh Carolina at
i "in
,�" Morton, presi-
de "I the N.C. Black
"Mud- ni Coalition, -aid Sal
� r.f i . thai (he i oalition , ill
� i . IWI- It) the N C
' 'f.t.l . o. e "II Bia. k Sllld-
. "in -��- iii.iiii.ii"r
i.i k and wbite �tuileni
� i w tot a -trmig
i k -lulu - pnigrum a- a
� 'i . " � -d part "I ev erv
nbiiii Iki au-e even -
I w ill have In .leal w ith
I people, and these
�"('�-�- w ill help HTt"n
i I.
����� pmteors have
�I black -III.lie- pr��-
J IHI - IIIIIHl . irv H Utl-
1 � �! - �' i olh-ge- hav
I i i" 'I lie ir program
� � in� 2.u rt'mtiining m
I h. �u n t rv . atvnrdmg j�
Norman.
You too
"�.i�,
'm
l
if could become
a collector's item
Make your YEARBOOK PORTRAIT
potntment NOW at:
APPOINTMENTS
BEING TAKEN NOW
COME BY
OR
CALL THE BUC OFFICE
AT 757 6501
PICTURES WILL BE MADE
FROM
MONDAY, NOV. 6
UNTIL
TUESDAY, NOV. 31
FROM 9 a.m. TIL 5 p.m.
THIS IS
THE ONLY TIME
PICTURES
WILL BE MADE
THIS YEAR!
.
t
r
-�Jr; '���� �






1
The purpose of SGA
ve GorMoTm
Touch doum)'?
I DOtT
Every fall, the question pops up again.
What exactly is the purpose of a student
government association? What areas should
they be involved in, and what areas do they
have no business in?
One line of thought states that, since a
student government is, theoretically at least,
representative of all students, then it should be
involved in anything which students are
involved in.
There are, however, a number of areas
involving students in which a student
government has no business. Some, such as
campus media, should be untouched because
of possible infringements of a free press.
Others, such as academic areas, should be
rightfully funded by the state legislature or by
the university, not by student fees.
The most glaring examples of this are the
art. music, drama, and athletic related
programs. Should the Student Government
Association (SGA) and the Student Union be
required to fund the cheerleaders? The
Athletic Department, almost exclusively, de-
rives the benefits of a good cheering squad.
The Marching Pirates are funded by the
SGA, the Student Union, and the Athletic
Department. The obvious omission here is the
School of M usic. Why are they unable to fund
a required course in their department-? What
business does the SGA or the Student Union
have in this area? None at all.
The ECU Playhouse should be able to
support itself through public and private
grants and through ticket revenues. Again
student fees should not be involved in this
area.
Last year, the SGA, through the Visual Arts
Forum (VAF) bought several pieces of
equipment for use in the workshops and
classrooms, and a number of books for the
School of Art library. These purchases should
have been funded by the university, not the
students.
The SGA should concern itself with
providing services, such as the legal aid
service, interest free loans, refrigerator
rentals, and the transit system, and with
representing the student body to the outside
community and to the administration. The
SGA should be an advocate of the students, not
the philanthropist who funds their classes.
ANOTHER T0UCH00U)(VJ
Forum
Commentary
Pros and cons of Proposition 5
When
girl
woman
By HESTER PETTY
ippity Women of Greenville
Faint memories. Experiences I thought had been forgotten
I ne are there. In between the pictures that are clear.
have handled that.
Connecting
Remembering
When I was 15 years old (I believe it was 15, but i, could
have been at another age) I began to menstruate. My mother
took me into her bathroom, handed me a (now famili)Wue
box. and showed me how to use a sanitarv napkin. She looked
at me, smiled, and said "Now you're a woman "
After she left me alone in the bathroom, I began to ponder
over the situation. 1 was now a woman. For some reason it was
no. verv clear to me why this mess, this inconvenience, th.s
pain meant that I was a woman.
After some thought I decided that the study of the
relationship between menstruation and womanhood was better
left to philosophers and scientists. I zipped up my pants and
walked out of the bathroom into my new life as a slave to the
paper products industry.
Acts of agression. Acts of disrespect. Acts of hate. I hadn't
seen the last of them at age 11. I'd only seen the first.
My attitudes about the agressor and the agressed upon
hanged completely ,n the years following that experienced I
know what the crimes of rape, wife-be.ting and sexual
harassment are. I know many of the reasons for their existance
and many of the reasons why they nourish. I know that the
blame should be placed on the agressor. And I know that I
wasn t that little girl's fault.
((
Connecting
Three months ago I finally got around to looking up the
definmon of woman in the dictionary. "A woman is a girl who
menstruates Hmm.
Thmk about these words for a minute. A woman is a girl
who menstruates. Thmk about your last conversation that
included a reference to a member of the female sex. Was she a
girl or a "woman"?
I've noticed that most people use the word "girl"
regardless of the age of the female person in question. I've
heard references to girls who were in their 20's, 30's and even
W s (after that you get promoted to "lady").
But where you might hear of a 30 year old girl, you never
hear of any 30 year old boys (except in cute little phrases like
boys will be boys" or "out with the boys" ).
Three months ago I began to wonder why I was still called a
grl and why I still called most women "girls The word
girl is used in place of the word woman by almost everyone It
� a learned speech response. It is a habit. It is not thought
about. It is a reflex action.
But it is improper use of the word girl. A woman is a girl
who menstruates. Why do we wait 10 or 20 years after the fact
to apply the word woman?
rnalIseTdhaS,CePar;Cy " leSS �ture h"
males. That .mphcation is registered ,n our subconscious and it
makes us feel msecure about what a woman is, and more
importantly, whether we are one or not.
Three months ago I began to use the words "girl" and
woman properly. I had to correct myself quite often (which
can be somewhat difficult to do in the middle of
conversations), but now I find that I have little trouble using
these words correctly. My mother.was right
. . . walked out. . . into my
new life as a slave to the
paper products industry"
My reaction at 11 to the plight of my neighbor was not
enlightened but ,t was understandable. What is not
understandable is that that same reaction is so prevalent
among adults. K
Send comments, suggestions, etc. to Hester Petty, Uppity
Women of Greenville, P.O. Box 1373, Greenville, NC 27834
Attention
T�: Any woman who can spare four hourg g
might be interested in joining a consciousness-raising group
INo experience necessary.
From: Us. We are four women who meet every two weeks
to talk about our experiences. But, four limits the range of our
discussions. Therefore, we are inviting you to our next
meeting. J
For information call Hester at 752-6912 after 7:30 p.m An
exchange of ideas is what awareness is all about. Sharing
experiences brings us to an understanding of the common
experiences we all share in as women. Our next meeting is
open to you and what you have to say.
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
The commentary below
i�, in essence, a rejoinder to
David Armstrong's "Amer-
ican Journal" article en-
titled "Smokers' 'Rights'
Threatened" as published
in the Oct. 26 FOUNTAIN-
HEAD. I wish to direct
your readers' attention
mainly to some misconcep-
j tions which the health
. aspects of the article may
have created.
I am familiar with these
since I have been actively
involved in smoking and
health research for the past
12 years. Obviously, Mr.
Armstrong is a proponent
of California's Proposition
5, which I take it is mainly
directed towards prohibi-
tion of smoking in public
areas. His use of quotation
marks around "rights" in
the title gives his senti-
ments away. We are a
society preoccupied with
the rights of individuals,
e.g women's rights, child-
ren's rights, minority rights
and gay rights. Why not
smoker's rights?
Although I am a non-
-smoker (my father's razor
strap disabused me of such
notions at an early age) I
sm keenly aware of the
importance of the "habit in
helping the smoker cope
with life's stresses. The
question in focus is whether
the rights of the smoker to
smoke takes precedence
over the rights of non-smo-
kers to breathe clean air.
In practical terms, and
for better or worse, the
iaaue seems to be focusing
on how harmful "passive
smoking,4 i.e the non-
-smoker inhaling air con-
taminated with sidestream
(non-drawn) cigarette
�moke, really is.
I can partly understand
Remembering
When I was about 11 years old, I began walking my next
door neighbor home from school. She was a year or two
younger than I and I would not have been walking with her if
my mother had not asked me to do so.
My mother made the request because the little girl was
being bothered by some little boys on her way home from
school. Mother told me that they were throwing her on the
ground and sticking handfulls of grass into her genitals.
My reaction to this news was immediate. I did not want to
walk her home. It wasn't that I was afraid of the boys, but
rather that I didn't want to be associated with her.
I thought that she was dirty or bad or both. It was her fault
(those boys could not have done that without some reason).
And most of all, she was a reminder that it could happen to me.
Mother should have told me that she had the Plague. I could
Fountainhcod
Swing the East Carolina community for over 50 years
EDITOR
Doug White
PRODUCTION MANAGER ADVERTISING MANAGER
Leigh Coakley
TRENDS EDITOR
Steve Bachner
NEWS EDITORS
Ailie Everette
Ricfci Gliarmis
Robert M. Swaim
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newepepei
SPORTS EDITOR
Sam Rogers
East
sWattsrr5 - -w�!
27834 �ddrtt: �W �� Building, Greenville,
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni $6 annually.
N.C.
why many, including the
opponents of Proposition 5
prefer to sidestep the medi-
cal issues. This involves
the relationships of tobacco
smoke contaminated air to
human diseases, or their
exacerbation, a subject
which is presently a ,
morass, with no clear cut
answers as yet.
Those interested in a
recent consensus of this
field, including the incredi-
ble complexities involved,
would do well to read the
report of a workshop en-
titled "Environmental To-
bacco Smoke Effects on the
Non-Smoker edited by R.
Rylander, held in 1974, and
published in the Scanda-
navian Journal of Respira-
tory Diseases, Supplement
91, 1974. This is available
at the Health Affairs Li-
brary.
It has a simple summary
easily understood by the
non-scientist. In essence, it
concludes that aside from
some obnoxious aspects of
inhaling someone else's
smoke and some obvious
irritation to the eyes and
respiratory passages, the
impast on health of envi-
ronmental levels of tobacco
smoke, compared to other
pollutants, is rather limit-
ed, unless one spends all of
hisher time in smoke-filled
rooms.
Much more research
and epidemioiogical studies
are needed before any
definite indictment can be
made of passive smoking.
Armstrong's figures on the
greater amounts of carcin-
ogens and other noxiants in
sidestream compared with
mainstream smoke are es
sentially correct, but mis-
leading. The smoker in-
hales non-diluted main-
stream smoke and gets the
full brunt of the noxiants.
The non-smoker inhales
very dilute side-stream
smoke, whose chemical and
physical properties are so
different (mostly less harm-
ful) than mainstream
amoke that the dangers toy
the smoker from main-
stream smoke that the
dangers to the smoker from
mainstream smoke far ex-
ceed that to the non-smoker
from sidestream smoke.
' I presently favor limit-
ing the amount of smoking
in enclosed public places
but I would carefully rfcad
Proposition 5 to determine
how I would react to this
iaaue were I a California
resident. Largely through
the efforts of a noisy?
minority, as the opponents'
of Proposition 5 contend,
our individual rights ore
being eroded by legislative
fiat, supposedly because it
is the will of the majority.
If we are serious about
democracy, the constitu-
tional rights of the individu-
al should be preserved. As
long as we don't blow-
smoke in our neighbors
faces, and we have no clear
scientific evidence that
smoking in hotel lobbies
poses a significant health
hazard, let's be tolerant of
the "rights" of smokers
however obnoxious their
habit may be to us.
As Armstrong indi-
cates, perhaps peer pres-
sure and educational efforts
would be more effective
than legislation.
Finally, one more com-
ment on another issue
raised in Armstrong's arti-
cle, concerning tobacco in-
dustry supported opposi-
tion to Proposition 5. I find
it hard to believe that all
the wealth of the entire
tobacco industry in the
world could compete a-
gainst the legislative and
regulative muscle of the
United States government,
whose current anti-smoking
campaign has been well
publicized.
This issue, more than
any other in recent times,
emphasise the continuing
controversy over the
"rights" of the individual
when these are at odds with
majority sentiment.
Alphonse J. Ingenito, Ph.D
Professor of Pharmacology
ECU School of Medicine
Bathrooms serve as
information center
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
I once heard it said
that people who wrote on
bathroom walls were sick.
"Hew gross can someone
be it was remarked by
one of those people who
genoine1ycares about btlf-
ers.
� t the time, J- was
forded to agree because
taking a defensive stand
woqld have revealed too
much about me. Outward-
ly, I condemned such
people, and laughed with
the rest. But inside, I
cried.
This particular conver-
sation centered on homo-
sexuality, h seems that
nany homosexuals use the
bathroom stalls as an infor-
mation center. Most
people feel that this use is
horrendous, but then most
people think homosexuality
is also. Writing on walls is
then, for most, an out-
growth of some deeper
darker sin.
Well, I wrote on a
bathroom wall once, and
I've hated a part of me
since that time. It is a
tragic commentary on life
that people are forced by
loneliness to do things
which are wrong.
Having wVitten on a
wall, I understsnd the type
of homosexual who uses
them. As a last resort, a
sad and lonely person ad-
vertises on a stall. Desper-
ation makes even the heat
of us do things we regret
later.
Being homosexual my-
�elf, I can empathize with
those homosexuals who
write on walla, Toadmh to
homosexuality is to invite a
sugma that remaina with
one until dearth.
AH my life I have lived a
he. I have conformed
outwardly to a predomi-
nantly heterosexual world,
while inside, IWe revolted
I have struggled endlessly
with myself - trying to
change me to fit someone
else's standard of light-
ness. I'm no longer like
that.
I accept myself now as I
�m. I know the things I
need most in life and I am
aware of those people who
can help me find them The
stall seems to he the only
safe way io find others.
I thought once what a
horrible person I waa, that I
oved differently. But then
never decided to he as f
�m- 'Juatam. Iknowllore
as deeply as anyone else I
care.
1 tr7 no lo�f er to worry
thmk about me. What I
fear is the collective hate
which people harbor in
their heart Eveiyday I
hear joke, about "qneori
Th�etetrme,pirtintidt
i hide, not because I'm
ashamed but because I'm
sfraid. �
I s� aa lonely now as I
andVr bCen " M ���.
and I have no acceptable
way to meet people like me.
There i. no avenue open to
,ffle which, d� �ot jepper.
due my livelihood and m.
name. y
Nevertheless, you won't
find my name on a bath-
room wall anymore. And
yet, I can't cope with this
onelineM much longer.
It s sad that I choose to take
�y nsme off the wall, only
to have it placed over �
�r.ve. At itmM y
wnt realise j�� am
lonely I ass. "

N��e witkheU by
t





t
-gfegLme FouMTA,Mue.P
Mobility for handicapped
relatively barrier - free
CHRIS FARREN
Staff Writer
The results from a study
made bv a group of students
on campus, show that
mobilit) for the wheelchair
handicapped student at ECU
18 reiativel) barrier free.
This stud) was made by a
committee from a Business
�nd Technical Writing cUsa
,n tHe Department of
English, and concerned itself
specifically vMth the service
buildings on campus. The
committee used an experi-
mental subject in a wheel-
chair to gather their data and
the stud) included access to
ramj entrances, upper
tloors and rest rooms.
01 the eleven buildings
investigated (i.e. Croatan,
Infirmary, Mendenhall, Spil-
man, Student Supply Store
ECU
marshals
chosen
By RICH sTH
V( s Editor
ECI students
U n
is university
for the academic
B-1979, according to
jhum, Dean oi
its were sei-
- war, she
sele lion is made on
- iperior aca-
iverage.
I J ryler, I! is
- i hie! marshal
Marga � � L nn Daniel
assist ml Other
D u Vbbott,
ta Arthur. Katherine
Lynn Bell. Bren-
Dana Drag-
It. Barbara Lew is. Laurie
re, Michael Morse,
Pinkham, Christina
Priestly . Emily ! aytor, B�n
iTiee. Reed
Dianne Wil-
� serve as
is lectures,
i iuation
Re � ntiy helped
ion of the
with the
H Mi n lenhall held
tf�M�3�aS3�
NEEDTOKELAXAFTEK
A DAY IN CLASSES?
THE SUNSET
119E 5th STREET
SAADS SHOE REPAIR
113 GRANDE AVE.
at
COLLEGE VIEW
CLEANERS
ARf 1 NAVY STORE
1501 S Evdns
B-15. Lumber, field.
deck, flight, snorkel jackets
Back Packs
ACCOUNTING AN
FINANCE MAJORS
LET US HELP YOU PLAN
13 of USA
CHARLOTTE 704-375 3051
CLASSES BEGIN MOV 27
CPA
REVIEW
fright, Joyner Library,
Security building, Whichard,
Jenkings Placement Service,
Wright Annex) only two
presented major problems to
the wheelchair confined
individual.
Neither the Whichard
building or Wright Audi-
torium have a ramp or any
other handicapped facilities
allowing the accessibility of
those buildings to the wheel-
chair student. According to
the committee, these two
buildings are vitajo stu-
dents and should Wmade
accessible to the handi-
capped even though they can
received the services withing
these buildings elsewhere.
Other than these two
buildings it was found that
mobility in a wheelchair is
basically unhindered. Except
for the Spilman building, all
upper floors were accessible
and at least one bathroom
per floor was equipped for
the handicapped.
In the recommendations
section of the report, the
committee suggested that
future telephones be in-
stalled at a lower height, and
that all water fountains be
equipped with a cup dis-
penser.
Serving in Kingston Jamaica
ECU graduate in Peace Corp
GLENN THOMAS
Staff Writer
Charlotte Marshburn is
alive and well and living in
Kingston, Jamaica. Char-
lotte, a 1977 graduate of East
Carolina, began serving with
the Peace Corps last August.
After five weeks' job
orientation in Kingston and
Port Antonio, Charlotte was
t'lrmallv sworn into service
in late September, at a
ceremony at the residence of
the U.S. Ambassador to
Jamaica, the Hon. Frederick
Irving.
Charlotte, who received
her degree in Home Eco-
nomics Education, is cur-
rently teaching everything
from Math to Physical
Education, in a school for
girls from low-income fami-
lies.
Although there are still a
few things she misses,
Charlotte is making the best
of it. She writes, "Jamaican
people are very nice and
friendly once you get to know
them. I've discovered what a
small island it is. Everyone
knows everyone, and the
people do so much for you
Charlotte spends much of
her free time writing friends
in the U.S. "I must have
written 100 (letters) by
now She writes, "It's a
way of improving your
chances of getting a letter a
few times a week
One of the things that
Charlotte comments on
frequently is how wasteful
Americans are. In one letter
she writes, "I wish that
everyone could have this
experience and they would
be able to realize what life is
really about
Another subject that
Charlotte comments on is
minorities. She finds herself
hundreds of miles from
home, and a member of a
minority now.
Charlotte is an ECU
graduate that we can all be
proud of.
Hunger Coalition takes
in day of fast
Bv
EDWARD M0LNAR
JOHN GARDNER
Hunger Coalition
Have you ever been
really hungry? For an esti-
mated 460 million men,
women and children this an
everyday experience.
In order to share for one
day what those millions
experience each day of their
lives, the Greenville Hunger
Coalition invites you to par-
ticipate in a day of fast on
Nov. 16, the Thursday before
Thanksgiving.
This "Fast For a World
Harvest" is sponsored by
OXFAM-America, an inter-
national organization which
funds projects to help hungrv
people become self-reliant.
A table will be set up in
fron of the Student Book
Stroe with more information
concerning OXFAM-Amer-
ica. One example of their
projects is the Solarpure
Windmills for water project
to provide a water supply for
an Indian village.
You can help support
OXFAMs projects by con-
tributing wyat you saved by
fasting. Donations may be
made at the Hunger
Coalition table or amiled to
OXFAM-America, 302
Columbus Ave Boston,
MA
In relationship to this
concern for World Hunger
there is a special series of
programs on public televi-
sion, The Fight For Food. It
will be aired Nov. 12 and 13
at 8 p.m. and Nov. 16 at 9
p.m.
The Greenville Hunger
Coalition meets on Mondays
at 4:30 p.m. at 608 E. 9thst.
We need people. Anyone
interested in joining the
Greenville Hunger Coalition
is more than welcome to
attend our meetings.
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re
quired to be readily available for sale
at or below the advertised price in
each A&P Store, except as specifi
cally noted in this ad.
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU WED. NOV. 15 AT AAP IN Greenville
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GOOD THRU SAT. NOV. 18 AT AAP IN - BAG
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Total
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112 �i





Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 14 Nwmibw 1978
Homecoming opens " New Horizons
ff
Photo by Steve Romero
v
Photo by Chap Gurley-
Photo by John H. Grogan
Photo by Steve Romero
J
Photo by Chap Gurley
Photo by Chap Gurley
Photo by Joe Grogan
Photo by Joe q
rogan
I





floats, decorations receive awards
Photo by Joe Grogan
Photo by Steve Romero
A
��� �imm I.W�.J
7
DELTA ZETA
Photo by Chap Gurley
fym A
Photo by Steve Romero
Photo by John H. Grogan
Photo by Chap Gurley
Photo by Steve Romero





Page 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 14 November 1978
Pablo Cruise
Band's act was 'island-flavored'
in
�r Lerios of pop hand Pablo Cruise
Bv CHRIS FARRE1N
Staff ft ritet
Equipped with plastic
palm tree and a sunrise,
irablo Cruise brought their
island flavored art to Minges
Coliseum this pasl Thursday
night, lor an evening of
energetic music. Livingston
I iv lor opened the show and
in the end proved to be a
very special evening.
H 6:30 p.m. there was
.Irti a line forming at the
entrain � to Minges. and one
could already sense that this
would I a night not soon
gotten. Vv hen the doors
opened shortly before 8 p.m.
and the crowd began swarm-
ing for the best seats, I
remember thinking th.it in
my tmr years at ECL I had
never witnessed an audi m
with so much enthusiasm
. i uning into the i on ert.
Play ing to a neai i apai it
crowd, Lu ingston got the
crowd mo ing w ith his new -
found energy and expressiv e
appearam e.
ti-r a lid encore bv
i ay lor, the roadies took to
the stage and began setting
up for : he main cv ent. � -r
ITin- beautiful w hite grand
pian. i was rolled into pla( e,
rees were
strategically positioned t.
produce tin- right effi �
X hen v it thing w a- -�
lo Cruis ame one, i
greeted with
I hi- i- one hand w hose
mi ii c and smiles on
stage an- totally sincere. It i
obviou from the -tart that
they enjoy what thev an
doing, and thai same feeling
i- quit kly red to
.i nd ience.
I he energy and n sp.
were strong from the I i
ginning on. They moved
swiftly and i ah ulati
through a show thai
bined their
popular material, w ith m
"I their older tut
popular material with m.�
of tl ler tun�'s
Dav id Jen!
of the

w a s i


vv K i n d A
W ay, inii-ii ,ill t tie instru-
� he highlight of
( i, . an
le � � . � i- t classii Pablo
David Jenkins'
guitar and Cory
i n o p 1 a v i n g
intensifiers. Never
� I seen anvone play the
i no w nil so mui h authority
' -till ho much conlrol and
"Zei I Sixtv In Five"
�r known
. �� ! to the
audieni e
Many o
.� progress! i �
� ney an
' play,
I �
� �. - � fou r
V . � - �
Brui e
1 ry Lerios-kev

iuls
- ii. isic,
� I id v. ant to have a goo I
iblo Cruise played four
ngs worth ' ei ores
ending with the rhythi
"Good Ship Laid Cruise
Bv this time the crowd I
rammed themselves as
close t" the age a-
sible, and pra In ally no
in their seats. The b i
exited to the sound ol over
tie-thousand Cn envillites
ing thank- in their i
tl wav.
I � � sound ighting
were surprisingly
"lit the -h iw ,ind the
ra l very
Pal Cruisi
� ��- not tiI a- rnii-n ians
but as All in all.
� �
erl In a :nter iev aft i
show : I
it 1
� � � -�
FKRK H w did
ivlor makes comeback
ii Pablo Cruise concert
I


'� as losl m the way ol .lever stu
mpensated for in term- ol si
ment. The audience was wired-up,
i i fed ii I.a. k to them in the
� him were drummer Steve Zarretski, bassisi
'A ; t V incent Quinn, and Kenny White all
ml union with faylor's lead vo
i very spe ial come ba k ol a talented
� again on the upswing.
CA II WIST I) il IIf.kh!
"i
md Irownim
rt with �
ree prev
LP Thret H
-

1 S'(
� '�'�'�� . .
U He In Love If ith )
imental
is in
�-�
� Road w ritten
�. a Da v.
er w ith which he i hose
' � crt
� mon
� �
timing point in T.i v lor's
ting liver the five
. md the
� become
ords almost a- it
II' ol the slipping low
� tice or careful
easily mis For that ol his
i unmistakable identity
- writing It tend- now to have
I hn e again Livingston
iring on the radio, and perhaps this
their own.
I Livingston Faylor's Over
in rei ord ,hop in the
ils. S � md civ i os attention
� rics. Rainbou is a better
pver put out Hut Thursday
luced few I my) parallels between hi
w rK of his brother
performance ol new songs losl verv little in
See GODDAM, p. 9
New book explores Jewish origins
Bv JOHN LDE.
Staff U rin t
nti-Semitism it Jew - are not really
I-hi- is the thought prov oking quetion
�-� ned author Arthur K nellei
'�'�'� � �" s, Koestler has proven thai
lew- arc de-� endant- ot a Turkish warrior
K I aar- lhal i onverted lo ludai-ni during
the Darl
- historical research has uncovered quite a bit
ioi I oi ate.I in southeastern Europi
1 �� in the seventh i enturv and grew lo
ire wa- responsible lor holding of I the
' v during their Holy crusade into eastern
� i military power w ithoul riv al and had a
their major advance. I to Khazar nation
ithoul a major religion K ing Bulan, who
ntury . knew his . ountrv pagan
' ' hind the nine His empire nei ded
� ould raise them above the heathen
! I ' respei led by both the Christians
M usiims alike
lually d ide.l inv ite a Christian, a Muslim,
' � 'I ourl Eai h man would arue for his
' ' ' '�� hoever . ould . onv in. � the king . ould
y ir empire to his faith
men cami and argued for days in front of the
1 ,1; King Bulan Milled each man aside and
I" which of the other two religion- was
ith
Hie I hristian told him that the Jewish beliel was closer
1 than Mohammedism. The Muslim also replied
ludaim was truer than Christianity. The Jewish
if, had outscored the other religions two to
ir king thought it over and chose to convert
n to Judaism -
Hi -ever. Koestler points out that politics also played a
�" il (art in the king decision. Had Bulan chosen
� i I
in.
' hi- km
the
n a Roman
Mohammedism. he and his
� I iliph tor their
; o n , a I
hi- people to
how m u

Books
i u K
u h�'i Jews o other nation- heard ol this new Jewish
� �" a-lern f urope, many ol ihem immediately
' ' ' igrating toward it
H,u ;l '� I the mosl popular thing in the
Xl"l'�h ge e-pecially in Christian countries. Jewish
�i-talltlv pi-rfi uled tor their dltteren! faith.
11 ' K' '�'�" 'Hi pit. off. red to them a safe haven, for which
practice their religion- behet- without
. � i a m en � Iron e
lew brought with them a superior
Hire, whnh ihey taught to the uneducated Khazars
tier In -t and trading tc hniques helped lo give
1 ,m" h ��'ded It to the weak Khaar economy W ith
I I' u- Khaar empire turned into a
adv anted state
W Ion the Khaar empire began to decline in the 10th
ir x)- ,n' nation, ex epl for,a small minority ol
! ' ri-tian and Muslim, could safely be called Jewish
I he emperor ol Byzantine knew this well and felt that he
i"uld mi longer ir�-t fr old friend The Creek armv, now
alii, d with the new Ho- nation to the north went about to
"u-tl ,h' Khazars Vlthough the Khaar- fought back
y; "K aR�insl the two nation- and held them off, the
ipire was i umplelely -battered hv the i onflicl and
as K i
i
�'����
tie am ii .
K' ,
K
Kui m , u,un s
' ' r�n had �
'n ah�"t Khazar
�.m ha,i iit,e glu
"nough r K
k , 1ar ' '�
ii.i a r e in !
H it.ri, ,
Mi K
; � i
'� � in �
-





f �
14N��mbTl�T�1frT
EAO
t
1 don ' give a goddam
b�� the timesTavh
continued from p. 8
Immediately after the semnA
-re ushered i�to the m� � �m�ll group of us
earmarked as the dressing Z f- T-��m l,Ut had ��
� -ere introduced to the otheTm LkmngSt0n Tr. There
coup's leader was no, in .�hl " �f ,He band' bu� the
The other mus.cians drifted off a
humed in. Introductions were laH mA�lnt ,a,er T
.mmedktely; "Let me ask the r " br�ke in
H- i. vour brother J.s do VT' he �red'
around). James do,n8? (mild laughter all
W us wh ied o'd b�leS �f P"ri" ���.
hat couldisav' I K -J ��
though I had seen the 60 tT b�tt,e of Per
the fiO-Af��aie story on this newest of Jet Set
I opted for the Perriprc f�- r .
� -alsrnr;rh;te:r�rgra'ion's sake-We
;re:
F- I, I i j ,LUK- ' had an excellent time.
- oha e- VVrd'd- H � -7 -itmg. That's k.nd of
firsfrnow, eXCement 'n �Ur �from the
o, I? OU kD?W' Whe" vou �� UP on age and vou've
Zt up crowd �i -��� to be s too;So we
F: Would you rather play this sort of thing, or a smaller
inulSmal1 " frealu"th- g is great, too. The most
� mporunt thing is to play where vou're welcome
: hen I bought your first album back in 1972 (it was
-leased ,n 70), I nipped out. I really enjoyed it, and it's 3
one of my favorites.
LT: Thank you.
F: The next year you did the second album. Then there was
Over the Rainbow ' which was such a great album. And then
there vsa. tour years of nothing (Actually, it was .Ire years -
Rainbow was cut in '73).
LT: Four (five) years of nothing, and that's because I
needed to wait to find a kind of recording environment
F: Had you lost mat environment after "Over the
Rainbow? '
LT: Uell, I finished up my obligation with Capricorn
records and I just didn't want to stav there anymore. That was
not a good label for me.
F: How about your new album(7Vee-JTav Mirror)? Do you
sec changes in your music?
LT: Obviously I do. It has less - far less - (innocence). It
doesn t have the innocence of the first album. It's
slickermore polished.
F: It seems like many of the songs on Three Way Mirror"
arc more "in rock oriented.
LT: fcell. you have certain mediums to use. You use them
I see no reason to play an album verbatim. Here I have players
who can play it that way, the crowd wants to hear it that way.
Let s let 'em go. We've got a wired-up crowdlet's lean on
them.
F: Do you think you're following the times more?
LT: I don't give a goddam about the times. I do what I do
m conceited, and I'm arrogantand I've been doing it
performing) long enough that I don't have to follow the times
It doesn t upset me if people don't like me. It's just something
that doesn't worry me that much. I do what I do. I've been in
plenty oi situations where people haven't liked it. That's fine.
That's their option.
F: They certainly seemed to like it tonight.
LT: I think they did enjoy it. And that gives me great
pleasure. So, I'm (not) saying it doesn't give me pleasure that
people enjoy what I do. It does. But I don't change, searching
for what people will enjov.
F: I think we can see some jazz influences, especially with
the instrumental "Rain And then all of a sudden the banjo.
h$n did you take up the banjo?
LT: It's something I've played for a long time. It's
something that I love the sound of. I knew what it did to me
when heard it and I figured it would do the same thing to
other people when they hear it.
F: It is immediately exciting
LT: Yes, it is immediately exciting. But that's not to say
it's long-lasting moving. Which happens to be a very different
thing. It's very difficult to move people in this type of
environment. It's very easy to excite.
F: Do you think it was easier (to move people) a few years
ago?
LT: It's never easy.
F: I mean easier than it is todayIt seems like James'
songs were a little more mellow, .little more introverted than
they are today.
LT: You know, James Taylor is James Taylor, and I really
think he s magnificent. I am a tremendous fan of his.
F: Do you resent the comparison?
LT: No I don't. I think the comparison is natural. But I do
Know one thing: every person has got to make it on their own
tvery person has got their own crosses to bear and their own
things going against them.
Well, maybe James Taylor is a cross that I have to bear
But Livingston Taylor is Livingston Taylor. I have complete
confidence in him in a sense that he can handle himself
F: I was lookin for parallels tonight. I didn't see very many
and I was sort of surprised. Do you or your brother ever
collaborate on albums?
LT: We haven't as to date. We're very close as brothers,
but 1 m very manical about the fact that James Taylor has said
some very beautiful things and Livingston Taylor has some
things to say as well. He's going to say them. And he's going
to say them without there being any confusion about who is
saying them. And that's the way I see it
I have a sister Kate who sings very well and a brother Alex
who sings and writes beautifully. James and I have the
advantage that we play. And I have the advantage that I have
the energy of four people all wrapped up into one.
You're going to progressively hear more from Alex and
Kate as they learn they can have a great deal of energy and it
won't hurt them to put out all the time. That's something
you've got to learn.
F: What about Livingston? Are we going to hear a lot more
from him?
LT: Yeah, you're to hear a great deal from me for a lone
time. B
F: So you're really excited about this � uh � well, I don't
want to call it a comeback but that's really the only wav'you can
put it
LT: Well, that is a word that comes to mind though I don't
see it as any comeback. What I feel about mvself is that I've
always been here and I've always been good. What I did learn
was that if I get turned down by a company I sav to myself
They're crazy Either I have to be no good or they have to be
crazy. Well, I'm a reasonably intelligent man and I couldn't
see anything but the fact that they were crazv. And eventually
somebody dideventually I found a recording environment
that was very exciting.
F: You had a concert yesterday in Boston
LT: Yes.
F: And flew there from another engagement. What was
that?
LT: We flew from Washington up to Boston. I had to rent a
jet.
F: How long have you been touring at this pace?
LT: I've been working at this pace for about eight months
F: I know that on "Over the Rainbow" you did a couple of
UVWeSTON TAYLOR: -WHEN ,He �W � mred up, ��,�. � fc "
tunes on the piano. Do you still play the piano?
LT: Yes I play the piano when I write. I write alot of songs
(with piano), about fifty-fifty.
F: But you don't play when you sing?
LT: Naw! Christ, I've got Kenny White to plav piano for me
now.
F: Do you ever do any solo engagements now? How about
then, did you play the piano then?
LT: Oh yes, I played the piano then. It's a very different
type of show. I talk a great deal more. I tell long stories. I wear
a three-piece suit.
F: With a gold watch and fob?
LT: No, I don't wn,r a gold watchthough I mav next time.
P k. r �- 7 0U OUr Performance � "arm-�P act for
rablo Lruise?
Photo by John . Grugan
notio'1' PerKapS' PerhapS; but ' ,ake v� -r 'he
no on of being an opening act. It's terrible to hase an opening
act that won t do what you say.
They (Pablo Cruise) have the headline. They were ,n
Florida two n.ghts ago and the, attracted a voung crowd. The
a tact a f crowd They haye not J
their own right. Sort of like Leo Saver.
F: One last question. I couldn't get the name, ol all the
people who were playing with you tonight
Mi hT: i�ilhue drummer ,s S,eve Zarretski, the bass-player
MnAael Wafeh, the guitar-player Vincent Quinn. the pianis.
Kenny v, hite.
n F: !hP'ae "0t ,Ke w appear with vou on
lnree-K ay Mirror.
LT: No. I use studio musicians in Los Angeles. 1 use th.
best musicians who plav
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2JSss!Smimi�0
Mobility for handicapped
relatively barrier - free
CHRIS FARREN
s�il Wr.ter
Th ��ult. from . stud,
fPus, .how tha,
b!Ht e wheelcha.r
MPH student .t ECU
,s relatively barrier-free.
I) was made bv a
� - Busing
�"�l Writing cUss
Department of
i,ui concerned itself
,CN with the service
Wu�gs on campus. The
'��'� "sed an experi-
subject in d wheel-
ather their data and
) included access to
mran es, upper
and rest rooms.
the eleven buildings
nvestigated (i.e. Croatan,
M ndenhall, Spil-
Studenl Suppl) Store,
ECU
marshals
chosen
B RlCfn SMITH
lsj.san Veu-5 Kditor
ECI students
as university
academic
according to
"ght, Joyner Library,
Security building, Whichard,
Jenkings Placement Service
bright Annex) only two
presented major problems to
the wheelchair confined
individual.
Neither the Whichard
building or Wright Audi-
torium have a ramp or any
other handicapped facilities
allowing the accessibility of
those buildings to the wheel-
chair student. According to
the committee, these two
buildings are vitajyto stu-
dents and should W made
accessible to the handi-
capped even though they can
received the services withing
these buildings elsewhere.
Other than these two
buildings it was found that
mobility in a wheelchair is
basically unhindered. Except
for the Spilman building, all
upper floors were accessible
and at least one bathroom
per floor was equipped for
the handicapped.
In the recommendations
section of the report, the
committee suggested that
future telephones be in-
stalled at a lower height, and
that all water fountains be
equipped with a cup dis-
penser.
- lor
1979
-
ulgtium. Dean of
were sel-
vear.
she
E
IS made on
superior aca-
poinl a erage.
: I Tyler, 11 is
marshal
Margaret Lynn Daniel
- is assisl ml Other
are: Diane bbott,
' ' ur, (Catherine
Bell, Bren-
izzi, Dana Drag-
Barbara Lew is, Laurie
Mi I � . Morse,
nkhai . Christina
' '� r mih Taylor, Bon-
�' Tire. Reed
Dianne Wil-
- serve a
- lectures,
iduation
helj
of the
with the
M n lenhall held
NEED TO RELAX AFTER
A DAY IN CLASSES?
THE SUNSET
' 19 E 5th STREET
3Cfc3KjOtX30tat300t383pR
SAAD S SHOE REPAIR
113 GRANDE AVE.
at
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1501 S Evans
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Back Packs
CHAR
LOTTE 704-375-3051
CLASSES BEGIN NOV 27
CPA
REVIEW
Serving in Kingston Jamaica
ECUgradu
GLENN THOMAS
Staff Writer
Charlotte Marshburn is
alive and well and living in
Kingston, Jamaica. Char-
lotte, a 1977 graduate of East
Carolina, began serving with
the Peace Corps last August.
After five weeks' job
orientation in Kingston and
Port Antonio, Charlotte was
formally sworn into service
in late September, at a
ceremony at the residence of
the U.S. Ambassador to
Jamaica, the Hon. Frederick
Irving.
Charlotte, who received
her degree in Home Eco-
nomics Education, is cur-
rently teaching everything
from Math to Physical
Education, in a school for
girls from low-income fami-
lies.
Although there are still a
few things she misses,
Charlotte is making the best
of it. She writes, "Jamaican
people are very nice and
friendly once you get to know
them. I've discovered what a
small island it is. Everyone
knows everyone, and the
people do so much for you
Charlotte spends much of
her free time writing friends
in the U.S. "I must have
written 100 (letters) by
now She writes, "It's a
way of improving your
chances of getting a letter a
few times a week
One of the things that
Charlotte comments on
frequently is how wasteful
Americans are. In one letter
she writes, "I wish that
everyone could have this
experience and they would
be able to realize what life is
really about
Another subject that
Charlotte comments on is
minorities. She finds herself
hundreds of miles from
home, and a member of a
minority now.
Charlotte is an ECU
graduate that we can all be
proud of.
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re
quired to be readily available for sale
at or below the advertised price in
each AEtP Store, except as specifi-
cally noted in this ad.
rTESlolSSJlRKSWED N0V15ATAp�NGiwwllle
�TEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVA.LABLE TO OTHER RETA.L DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
Open 24 Hours A Day 7 Days A Week 1
JGreenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville Blvd Greenville, N.C.
Hunger Coalition takes
in day of fast
BONE-IN
Bv
EDWARD MOLNAR
JOHN GARDNER
Hunger Coalition
Have you ever been
really hungry? Eor an esti-
mated 460 million men,
women and children this an
everyday experience.
In order to share for one
day what those millions
experience each day of their
lives, the Greenville Hunger
Coalition invites you to par-
ticipate in a day of fast on
Nov. 16, the Thursday before
Thanksgiving.
This "Fast For a World
Harvest" is sponsored by
OXFAM-America, an inter-
national organization which
funds projects to help hungry
people become self-reliant.
A table will be set up in
fron of the Student Book
Stroe with more information
concerning OXFAM-Amer-
ica. One example of their
projects is the Solarpure
Windmills for water project
to provide a water supply for
an Indian village.
You can help support
OXFAMs projects by con-
tributing wyat you saved bv
fasting. Donations may be
made at the Hunger
Coalition table or amiled to
OXFAM-America, 302
Columbus Ave Boston,
MA
In relationship to this
concern for World Hunger
there is a special series of
programs on public televi-
sion, The Fight For Food. It
will be aired Nov. 12 and 13
at 8 p.m. and Nov. 16 at 9
p.m.
The Greenville Hunger
Coalition meets on Mondays
at 4:30 p.m. at 608 E. 9thst.
We need people. Anyone
interested in joining the
Greenville Hunger Coalition
is more than welcome to
attend our meetings.
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IN CASH PRIZES!
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Total
number q
IKi�5
�MIS CNU! mum N0VEMKR 12.
104 640
112 381
ooos
1
VISIT
1 n 244 375
1 '� J6 54"
1 -
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13
VISITS
� 18 798
ODDS
-
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5
I





Four events are
slated for ECU's
Fletcher Hall
ECU News Bureau
Growing from the ground up is an American tradition. It
also has been the experience of the National Opera Company,
md so, in its beginning ome thirty-eight seasons ago, it called
; Crass Roots" Opera Company.
This completer? equipped, professional troupe, which
b bringing opera in English to both rural and
metropolitan areas of North Carolina, advanced vears ago to
ional tours covering as many as 36 states.
The com pan v will appear here in the A.J. Fletcher Recital
Hall of the ECU School of Music at 8 p.m. on Sunday,
November 19, and will perform Von Flotow's Martha.
The troupe will he performing with complete orchestral
mpaniment, costumes, and scenery. Tickets for the
irmance are S3 and are on sale in advance at the Central
t Office, ECU, 757-6611.
From its avocational beginning in early 1948 using local
touring in one station wagon, and using modest
the National Opera Company of Raleigh, North
has developed into a highly' skilled professional
,tss" -w lu trm as faraway as Vienna and South
ilth ugh the majority are Americans.
G with Us trad.t.ons, the National Opera Companv
gain vitalit) and polish by performing the first past
'ii at the "grass roots" level.
lew troupe performs for students in the schools
North Carolina where its singers sharpen their
learn to capture and hold the attention of young
In so
� as
the develop a whole new generation of opera
well a- an ensemble spirit among themselves that
la- performances for more sophisticated adult
combining an English subject, a French ballet,
text. Martha will be performed here in English,
its tirst American presentation at Niblo's
1852.
Ultn such celebrated ensembles as the
'� and the "Goodnight Quartet the
Opera's troupe of young artists will be able to display
ed ensemble singing that has become a trademark of
4uditions held for Iolanthe
' r V, bertand Sullivan's Iolanthe will be held
wed Nov. 29, and Thurs Not. 30 in Room
fMus . ECU.
g for chorus or soloist may sing works of
tioning specifically for the chorus will
nly.
a specified role are requested to
H ss, School of Music, 757-6331: they will be
selection Irom loanthe, scores for
FACULTY PIANIST PAUL Tardif will perform in recital Tues
Nov. 14, at 8:15 p.m. in the A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
which will he on file in the Music Librarj .
Don Wilder is the Music Director of the National Opera
Company, which was founded b) A.J. Fletcher of Raleigh.
Anyone needing to arrange a specific time for the audition
ma also contact Clyde Hiss.
n accompanist will be furnished for singers who do not
bring their own accompanist.
Performances of the work are scheduled for February 22
23,24, and 25.
Paul Tardif performs French program
Music by five French composers will be performed bv ECU
faculty pian.s, Paul Tardif Tues Nov. 14, a. 8:15 p.m. in the
A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
The recital, free and open to the public, features some of
the best French impressionistic keyboard music
Tardif will perform Erik Satie's "Deuxieme Gyronopedie"
and HeuresSeculaires et Instantanees Dubussv's "Suite
Bergamasque Chabrier's "Bouree Fantasque Faure's
Barcarolle in E Flat Major, Opus 70, and Impromptu in A Flat
Major, Opus 34, and Ravel's "Le Tombeau de Couperin
Stage Band performs jazz convert
The ECU Mag Band under the direction of Dennis Reaser
w.ll conduct a Big Jazz Concerl at Fletcher Rectal Hall on
wed Nov. 15 al 8:15 p.m.
Selection, to be presented are Nestico's "The Mag
Hea. ' (ireene'v "Slidework" in minor (which will feature
Glenn Johnson as soloist), and Figg's 'The Meanage" with a
solo bv Sandi Thomas.
JO PIRATES
Pr 10 FOUNT CAn 14 No�bf 1
978
Pablo Cruise 'superb'
continued from p. 8
break up, and we weren't
about to do that, so we
nothing to lose. We just kept
going for it.
F: Then was the more
commercial sound of A Place
In The Sun a planned thing
or did it just happen? �
PC: No, it just kind of
happened that way. I mean
as the albums went on we
started learning how to make
records better and it just
turned out to be accepted.
F: K ith this progress in
each successive album then,
do you think Worlds Away is
your best album?
PC: Yeah, as far as
knowing what we're doing in
the recording studio and as
tar as writing songs are
concerned. Yeah its really
better, and our next album
will be even better.
F: Why did Bud Cockrell
leave the band after A Place
In The Sun?
PC: Bud wanted to put a
hand together with his wife.
He was getting pressure
from his wife, she really
wanted to sing, she's Pattv
Santos from A Beautiful Day.
She was anxious to get going
and (Jo ome singing, so he
had to make the choice
between her and the band.
"Really killer"
r: How does the next
album look?
PC: Well, we're starting
to get some musical ideas
together that are really killer
and it looks like its gonna be
a great album. We haven't
Marled recording, but we've
been writing, in fact, since
the last album came out.
Vv e were recording in
January and February, we
released in March and we
started rehearsing in March
and started touring in April,
and we've been working
solid since then. We've been
touring solid all summer
long.
F: How do you feel about
the difference between
opening for an act and head-
lining?
PC; Opening is nice
because whatever happen
if you're lousy, well, then
you were only the opener;
but, it you're the headliner.
there's more pressure, but
it- nice because you can use
your whole production. Its
our show. We can put up all
our palm trees and do all the
lights and everything we
want to do.
F: w here have you been
and where are you going?
PC: Yesterday we spent
15 hour- filming at Di
nevworld. We did a Chr
ma- -penal that- gonna be
on Dec. 10. and then �
chartered a little Lear jet
this two week tour M
Livingston Taylor and flew
tonight. V e play tomorrow
in Blackburg. Va .
10 Discount to all ECU Students- Greenville Store Only
Excluding Contact Lenses and Oscar Specials
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PIRATE VICTORY-AFTER GAME.





14 November 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 11
Leander Green unloads pass to
'��?�' . �
THEECl QUARTERBACK had another fine performance in
Pirates 20-3 victory over William and Mary Saturday
Green completed six of 11 passes for 92 yards and one
hdown and rushed for another 64 yards. Green received
the R. U . Moore Award and was also named the top offensive
player m the game by the ABC telecast crew. Photo by Chap
Gurley
Sweet revenge for Bucs
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Issistant Sports Editor
eet revenge. The ECU
Pirates had this on their
minds as they approached
Saturdays homecoming
game with William and
Mary. Thoughts of last
year's heartbreaking 21-17
�s to the Indians inspired
the entire club.
The defense remembered
Indian quarterback Tom
Rozanti literally picked them
irt last vear. The Pirate
ense Was determined to
�'��pay the Fairview, Pa.
native and his teammates.
Revenge the Pirate de-
se definitely got, as ECU
-ted to an easy 20-3
rv in a regionally
televised game. The defense
was simply devastating.
:ants was held to only 26
yards rushing on nine
His passing totals
even worse. The four
r tarter was held to a
mere 11 yards passing as he
completed only 5 of 26
passes, including two inter-
ceptions.
The thing that made the
Pirate defense so effective
was, aside from an obvious
emotional attitude, was the
fact that they were aide to
keep Rozantz guessing, and
running, all nighl long.
The Indian now 5-4-1,
could gain a total of only 139
'yard for the evening. ECU's
shifting, ever-changing 50
defense was something that
Kozantz and company never
adjusted to.
T attribute this win to
one of the smartest coaching
staffs around said Pirate
linebacker Tommy Summer,
who was named by the
ABC-TV broadcasting crew
as the defensive player of the
game. "They decided to use
the 50 this week in practive.
It's designed to guard
against the outside run. It
really did the job tonight
ECU coach Pat Dye
seemed pleased with the
play of his defense also. "I'd
sa) we did a pretty good
number on them tonight
said Dye immediately fol-
lowing the contest. "Rozantz
was running for his life all
night. Their defensive sec-
ondary deserves a lot of
credit lor the pass defense,
but the line and the
linebackers play pass de-
fense also
The Pirate pass defense,
which was ranked second
nationally entering the
game, never looked better
than it did Saturday night.
Even when Rozantz was able
to avoid the awesome Pirate
pass rush, he seldom found
any receivers open against
the stingy Pirate secondary.
ABC announcer Terry
Hanratty told the television
audience before the game,
"The Pirates rank second
nationally in pass defense,
but have yet to be reallv
tested a they should be
tonight After the game
Hanratty appeared con-
vinced. "That pass defense's
record is no fluke. They're
amazing, truly amazing
v illiam and Mary head
coach Jim Root seemed awed
by the ECU defense also.
Lacking from his'post game
comments were the usual
excuses that accompany the
locker room of a losing team.
"East Carolina's pass
defense was just too good for
us today said the Indian
mentor. "I attribute our
inability to execute on
offense directly to their
defensive play. I think ECU's
defense is very comparable
to Navy's
Root was asked if he
thought the muddy field
conditions affected his
team's offensive perfor-
mance. "Heck no he
replied, "East Carolina was
the problem. In a nutshell,
we got whipped by a very,
very good football team
The Indians were also
whipped by a very, very
emotional team. Ah, sweet
revenge.
Pirates scalp
William & Mary,
ECU wins 20-3
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
The clever sign posted on the student side of Ficklen
Stadium was aimed directly at the William and Marv bench.
And don't think for one second Jim Root and the rest of his
Indians didn't notice it before the end of the game.
"Everybody knows Indians never win on television read
the witty banner.
With a regional television audience and an enthusiastic
homecoming crowd of 26,000 watching the Pirates generally
bent, folded, and mutilated Tom Rozantz and company as ECU
scored a convincing 20-3 victory over William and Marv. And
as Pirate head coach Pat Dye noted after the game, it could
have been alot worse.
"It certainly wasn't any accident that we won said Dye,
who's Pirates are now 7-3 overall with one game remaining on
the schedule against hapless Southern Conference foe
Marshal
"I think it could have been a lot worse too. But the way the
weather conditions were out there today, the game was just
conducive to playing defense
And it was defense the Pirates played. ECU limited the
Indians to 128 yards on the ground and only 11 yards while the
Pirates amassed 358 total yards including 266 rushing.
"It was our best game of the year and certainly an
emotional win for us noted Dye. "It was mightv satisfying
for us especially after last year. But I'll tell you, our defense
did a number on them today
Other th�n a Steve Labassi field goal from 39 yards out in
the second quarter the Indians only threatened once more in
the game.
That came in the third quarter when William and Mary's Al
Tafro returned a put 32 yards which gave the Indians excellent
field position.
But the Pirates thwarted the drive when on fourth and goal
from the ECU two yard line, Rozantz was run out of bounds
short of the goal line and the Pirates took over.
"That was a big goal line stand there because if they had
scored it could have really changed some things said Dye
"We used a totally different defensive scheme than we did last
year. We disguised a lot of our defenses which obviously gave
Rozantz some problems.
"Last year he picked us apart, but I don't think he had The
tools he had last year. He spent a lot of time tunning for his life
out there. And I have to give our pass defense a lot of credit
Actually, the only points the Pirates needed to upend the
Indians came midway through the first quarter when halfback
Eddie Hicks went off tackle on the "blast" play and scooted
down the left sidelines 71 yards for a touchdown. Bill Lamm's
conversion was good and ECU led 7-0.
ECU's second touchdown drive came in the second quarter
when quarterback Leander Green lofted a perfect pass over
William and Mary defenders to Billy Ray Washington in the
end zone for a nifty 21 yard scoring play. He covered 75 yards
in just six plays and the Pirates led 14-3 at the half.
"I just rolled outside and got behind my man and Leander
lofted me a duck explained Washington who caught two
passes for 54 yards in the game. "Leander couldn't get enough
on the ball so he just lofted the ball over the defenser. It was a
great pass Not to mention an unbeliev able catch.
Gallaher and Washington
PIRATE RECEIVERS TERRY Gallaher top and BUly Ray
Washington below made some spectacular catches in ECU's
20-3 victory over William and Mary Saturday. Gallaher caught
three passes for 55 yards while Washington snared two for 34
yards. Photos by Pete Podeszwa and Chap Gurley
Lamm added two field goals from 21 and 27 vards to round
out the Pirates scoring in the fourth quarter. Hi firs! came
with 8:51 in the final period after John Hallow recovered a
fumble on the Indians 12 yards line.
And his second three pointer came with 7:17 remaining in
the game.
"I'm mighty proud of Leander Green praised Dve "He
did an excellent job executing our offense. Since he ha. finally
gotten healthy, he has played some great game for us during
the last three weeks
Green rushed for 64 yards and completed six of II passes
for 92 yards. He recieved the R.W. Moore Award a- ECU's
most valuable player in the game and was also honored as
Cheverolet's Offensive.Plaver of the Game.
"Leander was just a lot more confident todav -aid split
end Terry Gallaher who grabbed three passes for 55 vards "I
think he was concentrating much better because of the poor
field conditions. We played a great first half although thing-
got a little sloppy in the second half which was probabh
because of the field conditions
And what's left for the Pirates? A bowl game is -till a
remote possibility and even Dye feels there are no. too mam
teams better than ECU around.
"I don't know what the future holds, but I know we have a
very good defensive team and a good offensive team sajd
Dye. "I know we can play with anvbodv. Outide the top 15
teams you could just put the rest of the teams in a hat. .hake
them up and pick them out
Bowl hopes loom ahead?
A surrounded Indian
ECU SAFETY GERALD Hall II puts the clamps on William
and Mary quarterback Tom Rozantz in Saturday's homecoming
contest. The Pirate defense held Rozantz to just four
completions for 11 yards and intercepted two of his passes.
ECU also Urn ited WUliam & Mary to 139 total yards. Photo by
Steve Romero
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
Just what does the future
hold for the ECU football
team?
With one game remain-
ing this season against hap-
less Southern Conference foe
Marshall, the Pirates should
finish the year with an im-
pressive 8-3 record. Any
other school would all but be
making their hotel reser-
vations for a post season
bowl game, but unfortun-
ately the Bucs are still
waiting and hoping and even
doing a little praying.
"I don't really know what
the future holds for us, but I
do know that we're a good
offensive football team and
we're a very, very good de-
fensive team said head
coach Pat Dye after ECU's
convincing 20-3 victory over
William and Mary. "I don't
know whether we'll get a
bowl bid, but outside the top
15 teams in the country, you
could put all the teams in a
hat, shake them up and I'd
think we would fall in there
somewhere
The same William and
Mary Indians ended the
Bucs' bowl hopes last season
with a 21-17 upset in the
Oyster Bowl classic in Nor-
folk, Va. Many observers felt
the Pirates all but had a
Peach Bowl invitation in the
bag before the Indians
spoiled things last year.
But even with bowl talk
constantly circulating around
the ECU campus, the Pirates
have put together two fine
offensive and defensive
games in its last two outings
which should certainly merit
some consideration from
bowl scouts.
"This was just a great
opportunity being on tele-
vision and doing what we
had talked about doing all
season long explained split
end Terry Gallaher who had
one of the finest games this
season with three catches for
55 yards. "We wanted to set
straight a few things with
William and Mary from last
year.
"The field conditions
were really sloppy out
there, but I think if we had
played on a dry field we
would have reallv exploded.
If we can play a reallv good
game next week against
Marshall, I think we could
still get an invitation to a
bowl game
After being slowed by
injuries early in the season,
Eddie Hicks has reallv ex-
ploded during the latter part
of the year. The speedy
halfback rushed for more
than 100 yards and scored
three touchdowns last week
against Appalachian State
and added 99 yards and a 71
yards scoring run against
Wilium and Mary Saturday.
"We had a lot of survess
running right at them earlv
�n the game observed
Hicks, "but they plugged
thing up in the second half
But our offensive line wa-
really coming off ,ne ball
well todav
Een sports commenta-
tors Vern Lundquist and
Terry Hanratty were stunned
when Hicks went through a
big hole on the left side
broke a tackle and ran right
past the William and Mary
bench 71 yards for a touch-
down in the first quarter.
"That's our blast play
said Hicks later in the locker
room. "I ran by two people
and I thought they were
going for my legs so f started
highstepping to get past
them. Anthony Collins threw
a great block to spring me
outside and it was clear
sailing after that
t
gOMMgt�4
" � "�����-�
1
I






f
Page 12 FOUNTAINHEAD 14 November jaw,
ECU under consideration
Independence wants Pirates ?
Dye eyes bowl game
Photo bv John . Grogan
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
Dick Oliver, Commissioner of the Southland Conference
said. Monday ECU is one of several teams presently under
serious consideration for the Independence Bowl, a post
season classic played in Shreveport, La.
Oliver, who is also the chairman of the Independence Bowl
selection committee told the Raleigh News and Observer that
ten teams are under consideration right now, but the field will
be narrowed to three or four teams by Thursday. Louisiana
Tech, who has already captured the Southland Conference
championship will face an at-large team December 16.
The game will be played in 51,000 seat State Fair Stadium.
"We have followed ECU closely this season and we were
very interested in them last year said Oiver. "We are very
interested in ECU competing in the game. They've had a
mid-season lull, but lately they've reallv come on strong.
The NCAA prohibits any bowl committees to extend
invitations until after a team has completed its season. The
Pirates have a 7-3 record this year and have one game
remaining this Saturday at home against Southern Conference
member Marshall.
Oliver noted a bid may be extended as early as Saturday,
but he also mentioned that the committee may wait until the
following weekend before a final decision is made.
"I've been a long time friend of Bill Cain and Clarence
Stasavich and I know about the football program there said
Oliver. "We're a new bowl game down here, but we've had
pretty much success in the two years the game has been
played. We ve had no identity problems
McNeeae State defeated Tulsa in the first Independence
Bowl game before 18,000 fans and last year Louisiana Tech
topped Louisville 24-13 before a crowd of 26,800.
"We realize ECU has problems being an independent, and
a conference affiliation would certainly be the most helpful
thing for them said Oliver. "But it will not affect our final
decision.
The Pirates have defeated both Southland Conference
schools on their schedule this season. ECU desi oyed
Southwestern Louisiana 38-9 in Lafayette, La and :dged
Texas-Arhngton 23-17 at home. Southwestern Lot sian.
defeated conference champion Louisiana Tech later n the
season 24-6.
Many observers felt the Pirates were headed for thr Peach
Bowl last season, but the Bucs dropped a 21-17 decision in
the.r season finale against the William and Mary Indians in the
Uyster Bowl game played in Norfolk, Va.
ft ll!o �U5h ECU haS finished with seasons of 9-2, 9-2, 7-4
0 A, 9-2 and 8-3 over the past six years, the Pirates have yet to
earn a bowl invitation.
The last time ECU played in a bowl game was in 1965 when
former ECU coach and athletic director Clarence Stasavich
directed the Pirates to a 31-0 shutout victory over the
University of Maine in the Tangerine Bowl
R h� M-chusetts 14-13 in the 1964 Tangerine
Bowl ECU also defeated Northeastern 27-6 in 1963 to win the
now defunct Eastern Bowl.
Oklahoma
Bv HERSCHELNISSENSON
P Sports Writer
Ah
" hoa! X ait a minute
' �re making those travel
arrangements for Perm State
spend ,u Year's in
Miami. , ou're probably safe
Nebraska tor a trip to
� � but a funny thing
� pened to that anticipated
al championship Or-
Bowl showdown be-
N I ranked Okla-
runnerup Penn
Nebraska and Georgia
the flies in the ointment.
irth-ranked Nebraska
� � d into the driver's -eat
the Big Eight's
Bowl representative
� - ofl previous!)
ti Oklahoma 17-14.
' left Penn State, a 19-10
V 1!S'nrth Carolina
1V u n -1 a likelj
Okl a 1oma at the
nIVsso iated
�K U (�
r lorida24-22 and
tobeat Auburn
torepresent
Sfpm ionference
'� B,uiregardless
of what third-ranked
bam a does.
What Alabama did Sat-
urday was dispose of
lOth-ranked Louisiana State
31-10. Assuming that Penn
State will be No. 1. Alabama
No. 2 and Nebraska No. 3 -
and you can rareK rely on
assumptions where opinions
are concerned - the following
question would arise.
No. 1 If Georgia goes to
the Sugar Bowl, would No. 1
Penn State opt for third-
ranked Nebraska in the
Orange Bowl or runner-up
Alabama in some place like
the Gator or Fiesta Bowl,
where the money would be
less but setting up a rare 1-2
national championship post-
season shootout9 Some
triendlv television network
just might be willing to raise
the ante a few hundred thou.
2. And what if Georgia
lose- to Auburn1 Will Penn
State choose the Orange
Bowl - assuming Nebraska
beats Missouri next Saturdav
� or the Sugar Bowl? If it's
the latter, remember that
Alabama must still face
Auburn on Dec. 2 and a
Barna loss could put Georgia
right back in New Orleans.
And Penn State, of course,
still has to play No. 20 Pitt on
Nov. 24.
That's six days after the
bowl bids can go out, and
from past experience it is
more than safe to say that
most of them will indeed go
out. In fact, it is probably
afe to say that some alreadv
have gone out, but don't let
the NCAA find out about it.
"Had Oklahoma rem-
ained NO. 1, I'm sure Penn
State would have wanted to
go to the Orange Bowl
-ays Robert J. Fabacher,
president of the Sugar Bowl.
"It makes the Orange Bowl
picture a little different now,
so I suppose it changes the
picture for us. too.
"It does make things a
little more exciting. We'll be
out again next week. As you
know, 6:00 Saturday evening
is the golden hour
And what about the
Cotton Bowl, where eighth-
ranked Houston likely will be
the host team following a
10-7 triumph over No. 6
Texas? The Cougars figure
to move up a notch or two
and Penn State and the
Cotton Bowl people get along
awfullv well. Besides, you
Ultimates repeat as ECU
Co-Rec volleyball champs
B JOHN EVANS
Staff Writer
The Itimates repeated
as the East Carolina Co-Rec
Volleyball champions by de-
iting Kappa Sigma in the
all-campus finals last Wed-
nesday night in Minges
Coliseum. The Ultimates de-
feated Kappa Sigma in the
best-of-five playoff bv a
score of 15-4, 3-15, 15-12.
The champions got to the
playoffs by a first-round bye
and a narrow three-set vic-
tor) over the Spikers II. The
Kappa Sigmas reached the
playoffs by virtue of a first-
round bye and a narrow win
over the Bod) Mechanics in a
three-sel match in which the
final and deciding game was
decided by a 16-14 score.
It wa- the second year in
a row that the Ultimates and
Kappa Sitjma had met in the
final- of the all-campus
championships. The two
teams were the top two-
seeded teams coming into
the playoffs.
Intramural soccer enter-
ed its final week of the regu-
lar season and Belk Gola and
Pi Kappa Phi remined as the
only undefeated teams.
In the DormClubInde-
pendent division, the Golas
stand at 7-0 and hold l slim
edge over the International
Students (ISA) and the Scott
Roques. The roques are 7-1
on the season and ISA stands
at 6-1 on the season. The
Jones Cosmos stand in
fourth place at 5-2.
The Pi Kapps lead the
fraternity division with a 3-0
mark after downing Delta
Sigma Phi by a 4-2 margin
last week. In second place
are Kappa Sigma and Kappa
Alpha, both with 3-1 records
on the season.
In women's play, Flem-
t
ing Dormitory leads the
standings at 4-0 and Cotton
Dormitory stands in second
place with a 4-1 record.
Sigma Sigma Sigma stands
in third at 3-1.
The hard-lick team so far
this season has been the
Ay cock Kamikazes. Last
week, the Kamakazes lost
two games in overtime. Thev
lost to the tow top teams in
their league, too, losing to
Belk Gola on penalty kicks,
4-3, and to ISA on penaltv
kicks, 6-3. After the two
losses the Kamikazes stand
4-3.
The biggest upset of the
Breakfast
from 7 a.m.
to 11a.m.
specializing
In large
season in women's play took
place last week when the
Sigmas upset previously un-
defeated Cotten Dorm by a
4-1 score. Earlier in the
week, the Sigmas had been
handed their first loss of the
season by the Spirit of
Fleming, 3-1. Cotton had
downed the Alpha Phis by a
3-1 score.
Rain suspended games
for Wednesday and so this
week's games may carry ties
in the standings may have to
be broken by the use of
penalty kicks as in sudden
death.
country ham or sausage
biscuits. Hot cakes. Scrambled
eggs with country ham or
sausage. Our 14 lb. beef
burgers are ground from fresh
Western Chuck. We have pure
soft served ice cream. Also
serving ham and cheese,
chicken fillets, hot dogs, chill
and beans, french fries, apple
turnovers, and a variety of soft
drinks. Located on the
of Sth and Reade St. and on
Hwy. � In Washlngto
haven't forgotten Joe Pater-
no's displeasure a year ago
when the Orange Bowl
snubbed Penn State in favor
Arkansas as the visiting
team, have you?
"There are so many
factors, a lot of things to
consider the Penn State
coach says. "It would take an
hour to consider all the
factors. It's a lot for the
squad to consider. We want
to get it out of the way before
the Pitt game
Just what are the factors,
Joe?
"Which team is No. 2.
We'd like to play the best
football team, who the public
thinks is best. Hopefully,
Penn State can play the No. 2
team and in a bowl the kids
want to go to. We haven't
had a chance to talk about it
yet.
"Remember, we got here
10-0 because of them and not
because of me. We'll talk
things over in the next day or
two and see what the
sentiment is
Nebraska ended six years
of frustration at the hands of
Oklahoma when Rick Berns
and I.M. Hipp ran for
touchdowns and Billy Todd
kicked a tie-breaking 24-yard
field goal with 11:51 re-
maining.
Maor Ogilvie scored two
touchdowns while Jeff Rut-
ledge passed for one and set
up another to lead Alabama
over LSU while ,B�ma
defense held Charles Alex-
ander to 46 yards in 14
carries.
The Rose Bowl, of
course, doesn't have to issue
any invitations since it pairs
the Pacific-10 and Big Ten
champs. And both races are
still in doubt.
Fifth-ranked Southern
California and No. 9 UCLA
will settle the Pac-10 next
week. Southern Cal trimmed
No. 19 Washington 28-10,
but UCLA was upset by
Oregon State 15-13.
The Big Ten Represen-
tative will come from among
seventh-ranked Michigan,
No. 12 Purdue and unranked
Ohio State. Purdue is 5-0-1 in
conference play, the others
5-1 along with No. 17
Ellwood fired
at Marshall
From Staff Reports
Head football coach
Frank Ellwood who won only
nine games in four years and
has faced a succession of
personnel problems this
season, was fired Monday by
Marshal! University.
Athletic Director Joe
McMullen said the school
decided not to renew the
contracts of Ellwood and his
coaching staff at the end of
the season.
With a Saturday game at
East Carolina remaining, the
Thundering Herd holds a
dismal 1-9 record. Marshall
won its opener against
Toledo and since then has
lost nine straight games.
Ellwood compiled a 9-34
record in four years. His
woes weere complicated this
year by personnel problems
capped by the resignation of
four senior starters.
Michigan State, which is on
probation.
Michigan walloped
Northwestern 59-14 as Rick
Leach ran for three touch-
downs and passed for two,
giving him an NCAA career
record of 75 TDs accounted
for. Purdue blew a 24-6 lead
and settled for a 24-24
standoff when Wisconsin's
Mike Kalasmiki passed three
yards to David Charles with
25 seconds left and then hit
Wayne Souza with a 2-point
conversion toss.
Michigan State whipped
Minnesota 33-9 with Ed
Smith throwing to Eugene
Byrd for two scores and Ohio
State clobbered Illinois 45-7.
In the Second Ten,
besides Georgia's victory
over Florida, No. 13 Mary-
land downed Virginia 17-7,
No. 14 Notre Dame beat
Tennessee 31-14, No. 15
Clemson shaded North Car-
olina 13-9, No. 16 Arkansas
trimmed Baylor 27-14, No.
18 Navy was upset by
Syracuse 20-17 and No. 20
Pitt whacked West Virginia
52-7.
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Title
Fountainhead, November 14, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 14, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.525
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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