Fountainhead, November 7, 1978






Circulation 10,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, North
83
Vol. 55 Ho.p
7 November 1978
Newby attacks Payne
at recent SGA meeting
By LUKE WH SNA NT
Staff Write-
in a prepared speech to
the Student Government
�Association Legislature
Monday evening. Legisla-
tor Alonzo Newby accused
SGA President Tommy Joe
Payne of "ram-rodding"
the appointment of the new
attorney general through
an unsuspecting and "in-
experienced legislature
The new attorney gen-
eral. Kieran Shanahan. was
approved by the SGA at last
jveen s meeting.
Newby called Payne's
action "one of the most
blatent abuses of power he
has ever committed
second only to the Media
of
last
Board tragedy
year
"He (Payne) has lied
repeatedly to this body
said Newby.
Newby attacked Shana-
han as a liar and accused
him of "abusing his power
of office through harass-
ment Newby was refer-
mg to a harrassment charge
brought against Shanahan
last year by an ECU
student. The charge was
later dropped.
Shanahan was also ac-
cused of receiving the posi-
tion of attorney general last
year as a political payoff for
working in the Sessoms
campaign, and of attempt-
ing to increase the attorney
general's salary.
Tommy Joe Payne re-
sponded to the charges
during Questions and Pri-
viliges. "I just want to say
that I've been in this legi-
slature for a long time
now Payne said, "and I
have never seen such petty
politics as I'm seeing right
now
"Alonzo Newby stood
up here and called me a
liar said Payne. "All I
can say is that if you're
going to play those games
with me. you'd better come
at me full force, because
I've been there before, and
I'm going toget you
Shanahan did not com-
ment on the charges.
Regular business
In other business. Ap-
propriations Chairman
Brett Melvin reported that
(
What's inside.
Henry Doskey. School of Music, recently
gave a recital in Carnegie Hall. For a
review see p 6
Jean Genet s overwhelming play The
Balcony is a Special Film Presentation
this Wednesday at Hendrix. For a
preview see p. 6
ECU trounces Appalachian see p. 8.
Appalachian beats ECU in soccer see p.
8.
Fall Special Olympics coming soonsee
p. 3.
the Consolidation Bill has
been tabled pending a
decision on the money from
last year's BUCCANEER.
There is a possibility that
the BUC money would
revert to the SQA General
Fund.
Legislator Lenton
Brown introduced a motion
to ammend the Consol-
idation Bill, to allow the
SGA the option of passing
individual organizations'
budgets instead of passing
all the budgets in one vote.
The amendment passed.
An emergency bill was
introduced to provide im-
mediate funding for the
Visual Arts Forum's Cer-
amic Workshop, scheduled
for Nov. 8-10. After ex-
tensive debate, the $400
appropriation passed.
CORRECTION
Several names men-
tioned last week in a
FOUNTAINHEAD news
story about the Review
Board were erroneous. The
correct names of the mem-
bers and alternates of the
Review Board are as fol-
lows: Chairman, Howard
Newell; Alonzo Newby,
Murray Bullock, Valerie
Chaffin, Liz Hanby, Ed-
ward Walters, and Diane
Gray. A Iternatesare Danny
Safriet, Telena Lester, and
Pete Meyer.
Circle K rocks for 39 hours
By MARC BARNES
Assistant News Editor
A Rock-A-Thon. spon-
sored by the campus Circle
K club was held last
weekend at Pitt Plaza.
Members of the club rocked
in shifts over a 39 hour
period of time.
The Rock-A-Thon ended
Saturday night after the
ECU-Appalachian State
football game. The fund
raising event was held to
raise money for the annual
Pit County United Way
campaign.
According to the pre-
sident of the club, David
Barber, the group had
originally hoped to reoeiv
about $2,000 in all, and, as
aof the middle of Saturday
afternoon, Barber estima-
ted that approximately $400
had been collected.
This is the second year
that the club has sponsored
the Rock-A-Thon. Last
year, the club raised ap-
proximately $300, and it
has sponsored activities
such as a Halloween party
for retarded children this
year.
Barber added that if
anyone on campus wanted
to donate money to United
Way, they could get in
touch with Paul Breitman,
who is the assistant ad-
ministrator at Mendenhall
Student Center. The group
has also helped the local
Kiwanis club with various
service projects.
The group began rock-
ing at noon until 3 p.m on
Friday in front of the
bookstore. From 3 until 8
Friday afternoon, they wre
rocking in Greenville.
They went to Pitt Plaza at 6
p.m on Friday, and rocked
�until 6 Saturday afternoon.
The group then proceeded
to Ficklen Stadium, where
they rocked in the end zone
until the end of the football
game.
According to Barber,
the Appalachian State Uni-
versity chapter of the Circle
K club also helped with the
project, as did the Delta XI
sorority.
"I was pleased at the
response the students gave
us while we rocked on
campus Barber said.
Club member Crystal
Hendrix said, "It's a
worthwhile cause, and it's
good to help out other
communities, even though
I'm not from this commun-
ity. Roseann Turner added,
"Circle K is a great ex-
perience
Meetings for the club
are presently held every
Tuesday night at 6:30 p.m.
The meetings are held in
Wright Annex, but the
location may soon be
changed, because of the
lack of access at that
facility. Barber commented
that the club might move to
another building which has
ramps to acoomodate
wheelchairs.
"We would like to see
some handicapped students
in our club he said.
4:10 p.m. kick-off
ABC to cover
homecoming
THIS UCHTENSTEIN IS on display with
many other great works in the Wellington B. Gray Gallery
of the Jenkins Fine Arts Center. More on p. 6.
Photo by John H. Grogan)
By MARC BARNES
Assistant News Editor
A report released Mon-
day said that the ABC
Television Network would
televise this week's home-
coming football game in
Ficklen Stadium which pits
ECU against William and
Mary.
The kickoff time is to be
moved up. The new kickoff
time will be 4:10 p.m.
There was no immediate
word on whether or not the
other homecoming activi-
ties would also start at a
later time. According to
Sports Information Director
Walt Atkins, Vern Lunguist
will do the play by play for
the game, and Terry Han-
ratty, who was a star
quarterback for Notre
Dame and the Pitsburgh
Steelers will provide the
color commentary.
ALONZO NEWBY, LEFT, alleged that Student legislature. Newby charged Payne with being a "liar and
Government Association President Tommy Joe Payne, he added that Payne was abusing his powers as sga
right, "ramrodded" the appointment of Kieran Shanahan president,
as the new attorney general through an "inexperienced"
Pre-release and Aftercare
Prisoners receive training
By RICKI GLIARMIS
News Editor
Pre-release and Aftercare, a program designed to aid
prisoners in their re-entry into socitey, has recently been
established in Greenville.
This program is provided for prisoners who are not
eligible for parole, usually those who are within a one-year
sentence.
According to Ann Bennett, training coordinator for the
program, an urgency was felt to start Pre-release and
Aftercare when 60 of those prisoners holding year
sentences were back in prison within a year of their release.
Bennett emphasized that many of these prisoners, once
released, had nowhere to go. Because of this, many would
turn todrinking.
Matt Brewington, assistant training coordinator,
explained that each inmate which is not eligible for parole is
first interviewed by one of the filed counselors within
program.
This field counselor must then investigate to see that the
inmate has a place of residence which he can return to when
released. The counsejor observes the prisoner's family, if
he has one, and if suitable, the inmate may return. If the
surroundings are not suitable or if he has nowhere to go,
the counselor will help the inmate find somewhere to live
once out of prison.
The third preliminary stage involves the job. The inmate
is interviewed to determine what job abilities or interests he
has. The program stresses the inmates' needs to find jobs
after released from prison.
After these three steps prior to the Pre-release and
Aftercare program, the prisoners who choose to, begin the
four-week training period.
As outlined by Brewington, the period begins with one
week of self-assurance training. This segment deals with
the importance of self-worth, dependence on one's self, a
building of a stronger self-image, and group involvement.
The second week of training involves the family and how
it has progressed since the prisoner's absence. Brewington
explained that many times the inmate's role in the family
has changed since he left.
Vocational training is next which involves interview
techniques and basic procedures when looking and
applying for jobs. During this week of training, resource
people from Pitt County are present at the sessions. Also,
the inmates take part in role plays involving interviews
where they are videotaped. This enables the inmate to view
himself during the interview.
The final phase of training iscommunity resources. This
enables the inmate and his family to become aware of the
resources in the community. Also this gives the inmate
somewhere to turn to when making his re-entry into society
According to Brewington, the community is being very
cooperative providing training and volunteers toward the
program
Following the four week training period, a graduation
ceremony is held for the inmates as explained by Bennett
and Brewington. The graduation will hopefully be held in
volunteering churches in Pitt County. Bennett said that the
inmates will be responsible for planning their graduation
program and for picking their speakers during the
ceremony.
Brewington explained that during the sessions there will
be no custodial power The reason for no prison protection
is that too many of the trainees are near their release date
and an attempt to escape would double their remaining
sentence.
The Greenville chapter of Pre-release and Aftercare has
been established since Sept. 1.
According to Bennett, in I974, the federal government
appropriated money to start an experimental program
because of the 28 percent increase of crime in the South As
of this year, the N.C. General Assembly voted to fund this
program making North Carolina the only state to do so
Pre-release and Aftercare is under the State Depart-
ment of Corrections within the Division of Probation and
Parole. '
Greenville is the sixth city in North Carolina to begin a
program such as Pre-release and Aftercare.
The first four-week training session will begin on Jan
10, 1979. Anyone interested in volunteering may call
758-6040 or 758-6041.
At press time, a source
for ABC Sports said that no
final decision had been
made.
Bob Perry, who is the
Executive News Producer
at WCTI the local ABC
affiliate in New Bern, said
that Channel 12 would
definitely carry the game.
The game will be regionally
televised, and it is thus
immune to the blackout
rule.
The last time that ECU
football was featured on
regional television was on
Thanksgiving night in 1976,
when ECU was pitted a-
gainst Appalachian Slate
University.
If schedules for any of
the other activities are
changed, it will be reported
in the next issue of FOUN-
TAINHEAD, which will be
available Tureday night,
Nov 9.
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY students beck the Pirates
at the last televised football game, which was held at the
University of South Carolina at Columbia last year. USC
won the dose yame, but the Pirates will hopefully win big
on this Homecoming weekend with the TV cameras
present. Photo by Pete Podezwe
i- w ��
N
-
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"� ��- - -����.





78 FQUNTA1NHEAD Pag� 3
Fall Special Olympics scheduled
-�� e �L anvnnft interested t
the
be
. 8
RICKIGLIARMIS
News Editor
The fall phase of
Special Olympics will
held in Greenville on Nov
and 10
The two sports involved
,n the tall Olympics are
basketball and a new
category, bowling.
According to Marcia
Goughnour. volunteer co-
ordinator for the Special
Olympics, she is expecting
over 100 participants for
this year's games.
Basketball will take
place on Nov 8 This year
the basketball competition
will be played at the West
TICE
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Greenville Gym on Fourth
Street. The competition will
begin at 9 a.m. and will end
at 2 p.m.
On Nov. 7, there will be
a meeting at the Elm Street
Center in order to orient the
volunteers as to their
responsibilities during the
Olympics.
Bowling will be held in
the Hillcrest Bowling
Lanes. This event will be
held on Nov. 10 from 9 a.m.
until 12 noon. On Nov. 9,
there will be another
orientation meeting for the
volunteers which will also
be held at the Elm Street
Center at 4 p.m.
Bowling is a new phase
of competition according to
Goughnour. The bowling
program has been in effect
in other areas which
sponsor the Special Olym-
pics but this will be the first
time the event is sponsored
in Greenville.
Goughnour explained
that during the spring
Special Olympics, the age
of the participants vary
from eight through adults.
Goughnour believes that
during fall Special Olym-
pics, there will be more
school age participants.
Goughnour believes that
the age category during
this week's Olympics will
include those from age 8
through 18.
The winners from
Greenville's Special Olym-
pics will advance to the
state competition. In turn,
the winners from the state
division of the Olympics will
be selected to attend the
international games which
are held every four years.
Goughnour said that the
games are scheduled to be
held in 1979 and plans are
being made to hold the
international games in New
York City.
Goughnour said that
many people supported the
spring Special Olympics
last year when she also
served as volunteer coordi-
nator. She expressed the
need for volunteers for this
fall's games and urges
10 Discount to all ECU Students - Greenville Store Only
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anyone interested to parti-
cipate. Goughnour hopes to
set up a one-to-one rela-
tionship between the vol-
unteer and participant.
Goughnour explained
that the volunteers will be
responsible for watching
after the participants. They
will have to have the
participants at their event
at the right time, help
them fill out their score
cards, and do other odd
jobs for the participants
and the referees.
Anyone interested in
volunteering for the fall
Special Olympics should
call Marcia Goughnour at
758-7788 as soon as
possible.
IT'S A DOG'S life, 'tis true, but along
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-





Pag. 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 7 November 1978
ILO
The International Lan-
guage Organization will be
meeting in Mendenhall, rm
248 on Thurs. November 9,
at 6 p.m. We will discuss
the international Christmas
party, among other pro-
tects
Insurance
Joe Goodson and
tgan Insurance Agen-
tsures the Greenville
Center. He will speak
about the types of msur-
available for artists
eir work on Nov
er 10 in Jenkins audi-
Lim.
Lecture
M es Cartrette. a stu-
.vas searching for
ace of mind through
gs found Jesus Christ
He wants to share
- xpenences with you
S Thurs from 7:30-9:30
in Rm. 212 in Men-
Student Center.
Real Estate
The next meeting of
Rho Epsilon is Thursday
the 9th at 4:00 p.m. in 22I
Mendenhall. Anyone plan-
ning to major in Real Estate
and not yet a member of
Rho Epsilon is invited to
attend. CD. "Pop" Beas-
ley from New Bern, N.C.
will be speaking on Resort
Development. Present
members are urged to
attend. Members are also
reminded to begin making
plans for the Fall Banquet
to be held this month. The
dinner banquet will be at
the Greenville Country
Club on November 30th at
7.30 p.m. The cost will be
$7.75 per person and
$15.50 per couple. Mem-
bers can obtain more infor-
mation by attending the
meeting on Thursday.
Computer
There will be an Asso-
ciation for Computer Ma-
chinery meeting at 7:30
p.m. Wed November 8th
in Austin-202
The program will be on
the regional programming
contest that was held last
weekend.
Bowling
The MSC All-Campus
Bowling Tournament sche-
duled for Thurs Nov. 9
has been re-scheduled for
Thurs Nov. 30. The wo-
men's competition will be-
gin at 6 p.m. and the men's
competition will begin at 8
p.m. at the Mendenhall
Bowling Center.
Ski
Beech Mt. Ski Group
must pay their fees on
Thurs November 9 at 4
p.m. in Memorial Gym, rm
108.
Printing
The Print Group will
have cards and note paper
with university scenes for
sale beginning Mon Nov-
ember 6. Contact any print
maker in Rm. 1105 Jenkins
bldg.
Greenpeace
The second organiza-
tional meeting for GREEN-
PEACE will be held Thurs
November 9th, at 6 p.m. in
room 221 in Mendenhall
Student Center. Anyone is
welcome. For more infor-
mation, call Jerry Adderton
at 758-6259 after 5 p.m. on
weekdays.
Turkey shoot
Win your Thanksgiving
dinner at the Mendenhall
"Turkey Shoot" Thurs
Nov. 16 between the hours
of 7 p.m. and 11 p.m the
MSC Bowling Center will
by the site of an old-
fashioned turkey shoot with
a slight difference. An
entry fee of $1.25 will give
you the chance to bowl one
ball on 10 consecutive
lanes. If at least eight
pins fall on each lane, you
win a turkey! Enter as
many times as you like.
L.mit three wins per
person.
Pablo
The Student Union Ma-
jor Attractions Committee
will present Pablo Cruise
with special guest Living-
ston Taylor on Turs. Nov. 9,
at 8 p.m. in Minges Col-
iseum.
Tickets will be $5 for
ECU students ant $7 for the
public. All tickets are avail-
able from the Central Tick-
et Office in Mendenhall
Student Center. In addi-
tion, public tickets can be
purchased from Apple Re-
cords, School Kid's Re-
cords, and the Music Shop.
Only public tickets will be
sold at the door.
Economics
The student section of
the American Home
Economics Association will
meet Mon November 13
at 7 p.m. in the Van-
Landingham room of the
Home Economics Building.
An interesting program
on today's fashions will be
presented. All home econ-
omics majors and any other
interested persons are
urged toattend.
Leadership
Leadership training
class is a good Thurs. night
place to be when you're
looking for answers to life
and living. LTC will help
you understand what it
means to be a Christian and
will help you learn about
growing spiritually in the
Christian way of life.
Good fun, good teach-
ing and it doesn't cost a
dime. Check it out this
Thurs 7p.m. in Brewster
B-103. Sponsored by Cam-
pus Crusade for Christ.
Ceramics
A workshop will be held
in the Ceramics Depart-
ment of the Jenkins Fine
Ats Building on Thurs. and
Fri Nov. 9 and 10 from 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. Mr. Richard
St. John will be giving
demonstrations both days
and a slide presentation
Thurs. night at 7 p.m. in
Jenkins Auditorium. Mr.
St. John is currently teach-
ing ceramics at Wichita
State University, Wichita.
Kansas
Bake Sale
Psi-Chi is having a bake
sale Wed Nov 8 from 9
a.m. until 4 p.m.
good.es will be on sale
infront of the student book-
store.
All Psi-Chi members
who were initiated In Oct
should come by the mam
Psychology office to pick up
your membership certifi-
cates.
Homecoming
Alpha Kappa Alpha
Sorority will sponsor a bake
sale, Nov. 8 from 10 am.
until 3 p.m. in the lobby of
the Student Bookstore.
Tickets for the Pre-
Homecoming Game Cele-
bration at the Ramada Inn,
264-By Pass will be sold in
the lobby of the Bookstore
Wed Nov. 8 and Fri Nov.
10. In advance, couple
tickets are $3, singles $2.
At the door, all admission
will be $2.50.
The celebration will be-
gin 10 p.m Fri Nov. 10
and last until 2 am The
affair is semi-formal.
Ping Pong
The MSC All-Campus
Table Tennis Tournament
will be held on Tues , Nov
7 at 7 p.m. m the Menden-
ahll Multi-Purpose Room
The winners of the Day-
Student Tournament I
Dorm-Student Tour-a
ments will be competing m
both the men's and wo-
men's divisions The n
and woman who finsin I
in their divisions will re-
present tournaments to be
held m Knoxville. Tenne-
ssee on Feb 8.9. and 10
Free Flicks
There will be a Sped a
Film presentation of Jear
Genet's The Balcony "
Wednesday night at 8 p n
in the Hendnx Theatre
The Free Flick t
Friday night only win
Woody Allen's Annie Hall
The film will be shown a
7 and 9 p m m the He- I
Theatre
There will be a spec a
double feature this Satur-
day night at times to be
announced
The Student Union Coffeehouse Committee presents �
Carolina Bluegrass
along with
Frank Hunter
Fri. & Sat. Nov. lO & 11
at 8:30 & 9:30 p.m.
Room 15 Mendenhall
On Sat. night, Carolina Blnegrass will perform In the snack bar while Frank Hnnter
the Coffeehouse.
FREE
performs in
East Carolina University
Student Union Major Attractions Committee
presents
With special guest Livingston Taylor
Thurs Nov. 9, 1978 8 p.m
Minges Coliseum

Tickets:
ECU Students $S.OO(ln advance)
t Public $7.00

ONLY TWO DAYS
LEFT






L) A
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 7 November 1978
Media, SGA at it again
When the Media Board was created last
January, it was hoped that the long standing
feud between the media and the Student
Government Association (SGA) would at last
die a quiet death. After years of neglect and
hostility, it was hoped that both sides would
end up more or less satisfied. The media
would no longer live and work in fear of being
annihilated by a vengeful legislature, and the
SGA would enjoy a fair press. Such, however,
was not to be the case. The feud continues.
The most bitter contest at the moment is
the $42,000 originally appropriated for the
BUC and who will get a chance to benefit from
it. Many legislators would like to see this
money given to SGA, to do with as they please,
while more responsible students realize how
wrong it would be for one major campus
organization to bail out another.
Since prices will continue to rise and
enrollment will soon peak and begin to decline,
the SGA will have no more money next year
than this year, perhaps even less. Will they
expect another $42,000 gift then? Should such
an awful precedent as what is being discussed
ever come about, there would be no end to the
requests.
The SGA is the only major student
organizations with no savings to speak of.
Legislatures in the past have made it a point to
spend every penny alloted them and the future
be damned. Consequently, many small
organizations receive a disproportionate share
of student fees.
When the Student Union Major Attractions
Committee bankrupted two years ago, the
Student Union had accumulated enough
savings (more than enough, in fact) to fund one
more year for the committee, a "make or
break" year.
The new floor covering for Minges,
the purchase of which removed a major
obstacle in the path of having concerts was
paid for out of the Student Union savings.
If the SGA will ever realize that the Media
Board is here to stay and that SGA can spend
only the money it is allotted, then perhaps they
may learn to handle their finances in a more
responsible manner and not have to go
begging to other organizations with equally
pressing needs. The legislature needs to be
more far-sighted in its decision making and
abandon the "spend, spend, spend" philoso-
phy which has dominated in the past.
Commentary
mag
HESTER PETTY
Uppity Women of
Greenville
The premiere issue of
Male Chauvinist magazine
(October 1978 became
available' to the general
public m September 1978.
The cover art is a photo-
graph of two women kissing
the feet of a man seated in a
throne-like chair.
The articles include
advice on "How to Cheat
on Your Wife" and "Ten
Ways to Keep a Woman in
Her Place
I did not find Male
Chauvinist half-hidden be-
hind the plywood screens
on the pornography racks. I
found it in the general
reading section. I bought it
and read it because its
existence illustrates several
points I'd like to make
about sexism in our culture.
It is my hope that this
article will dissuade you
from feeding the misogyny
industry through a pur-
chase of Male Chauvinist
magazine.
I cannot proceed with-
out addressing the notion
that perhaps Male Chauv-
inist is not meant to be
serious, that it is satire. If it
was ever meant to be
satire, that intent has been
well-disguised by extreme-
ly poor writing.
The writers do not
express contempt or ridi-
cule for the sexist material
in their articles. Their
writing ranges in tone from
"take my wifeplease" to
"a slap tn the face, that's
the only language a woman
understands "
If Male Chauvinist was
meant to be a joke, it has
failed miserably to come off
as such. Some of the
material is too close to the
prevailing sexist attitudes
of this society to be
considered a joke. An
example of one joke that
was written by a masculist
woman in this magazine is
"Women just sit back
getting lazier, dumber and
more demanding - and at
the same time richer
So what is Male
Chauvinist if it is not satire,
it te a serious (albeit
disguised) attempt at
�lengthening the mlsoyn-
r.iat and atxist attitudes
that people have about
women.
But this can be said
about pornographic publi-
cations such aa Hustler and
Playboy (and don't tell me
you buy it for the articles
because that't the biggest
line of crap I've ever
heard.) So what makes
Male Chauvinist different9
The difference is that
the non-pornographic na-
ture Male Chauvinist gives
it a respectable Image that
most porn magazines don t
have. You are not subject to
the feeling of guilt that
grips you when, while
flipping through the nude
photos in Penthouse in the
local bookstore, a 60 year
old woman or a mother and
her kids walk by.
Buy maybe you don't
recognize the misogyny in
the above-mentioned pub-
lications. Maybe you do not
consider yourself a woman-
hater or sexist just because
you purchase (or look
through) these magazines.
Then let me ask you this.
Would you purchase a
magazine called White
Racist? Would you read
and chuckle through an
article about "Ten Ways to
Keep a Negro in His Place"
or laugh at a statement
such as Negroes just sit
back getting lazier, dumber
and more demanding - and
at the same time richer"? If
you find these ideas funny,
you are racist. If you find
Male Chauvinist tunny, you
are sexist.
The lack of human
rights, the lack of equality,
the rape and the explitation
of one group of people by
another group of people is
not funny. It should not be
a sexual turn-on.
Male Chauvinist does
not attempt to present
much information that is
based on fact (all things
considered, the reader
should be thankful for small
favors). In one instance, a
writer did include some
statistics from the Kinsey
reports on sexual behavior
but it was used incorrectly
to prove that it is natural
and expected for men to
have affairs outside of an
established and monoga-
mous relationship.
In another article,
"Women ARE Ruled by
Their Emotions the
writer tells us that a
woman's feelings reactions
ate. are completely con-
trolled by her hormones
and the moon. Quite a lot of
space is devoted to a
description of the hormonal
changes during the men-
strual cycle. The descrip-
tion is accurate.
It can be found in
almost any book that
contains information on
female physiology. The
conclusions drawn from
this information are anoth-
er matter. Serveral studies
are cited but not by name or
date Which studies?
Whose studies? When?
No mention is made of
male hormonal cycles.
There is no comparison of
women and men based on
the effects of our respective
cycles. The information is
shallow, inconclusive and
slanted Can we believe
what the author says about
women when a statement
menopausal women such as
"Women can become
intolerant (when aren't
they)" is juxtaposed with a
statistic from a (unnamed)
studey?
Unfortunately, the fact
that this material is in print
in a slick-looking magazine
is enough credence for
many people. It sounds
goodhe always wanted to
believe it therefore it's
true.
If you have seen a copy
of Male Chauvinist and you
found it inoffensive, you
may accuse me of having no
sense of humor. It is one
accusation that is leveled at
most feminists (that and
the accusation that we're
all dykes).
Actually I do have a
sense of humor. A pretty
good one I might add. But
there are some "jokes" I
don't find very funny at all.
Like the one about the
woman who walked into the
police station and told the
officer on duty that she'd
been raped to which the
officer replied "Who would
want to rape you?"
Forum
English prof rebuts exam story
10 joke
Or the one about the
public official who, when
discussing the question of a
need for a house for
battered women, said "If
the county takes in a
woman who is abused, then
what are we going to do
when some farmer calls in
who can't tame his wild
horse? Are we going to
tame it for him?"
And of course you've
heard the one about the
married man who, after his
extramarital affair ended,
was worried about his lost
loving until he was re-
minded that "After all, you
can aiways jump back in the
sack with your wife. That's
what wives are for "
Male Chauvinist maga-
zine is not a joke. Its
existence reinforces the
misogynist stereotypes that
run rampant throughout
the mass media.
If this was not the
original intention of the
publisher, I suggest that he
close down his offices and
leave the magazine pub-
lishing business because he
does not have the judge-
ment or ability to work in
that profession.
A true story docu-
mented in Against Our
Will: Men, Women and
Rape by Susan Brownmiller
(1975)
A true story docu-
mented in Ms. (August
1978)
�"Sexist garbage from
Male Chauvinist (October
1978)
Send any comments
suggestions to Uppity
Women of Greenville, P.O.
Box 1373, Greenville, NC
27834
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
In the Oct. 24 issue,
FOUNTAINHEAD ran a
front page story on the
English Department Exit
Exam. I cannot comment on
the accuracy with which the
writer, Ricki Gliarmis,
reconstructs her discussion
with the two members of
the Computer Center staff,
Mr. Little and Mr. Bolonde,
but I feel that many of my
own comments, as well as
the facts concerning the
exam, were reported inac-
curately.
It is true that there were
several problems on the
last Exit Exam (I really
wonder, though, why a
story that was old news two
weeks ago was run as the
lead article under a screa-
mer-style headline, espec-
ially in view of the fact that
the faculty and students
involved with the test were
notified of these problems
as soon as they were
discovered and scores were
adjusted accordingly.).
It is also true that I
attributed these problems
to a combination of circum-
stances, including time
pressures, crowded work
areas, and the great volume
of material that had to be
typed, duplicated, circu-
lated, and evaluated. In
other respects, however,
the article conveys serious
misconceptions which can-
not be allowed to go
unchallenged.
First of all, the sensa-
tionalism of the headline,
the implication that a
massive number of com-
puter errors occurred and
the juxtaposition of my
words with those of Mr.
Little aril Mr. Bolonde all
create tfje impression that
the English Department
and the Computer Center
are pitted against on
another in a continuing
controversy over who is to
blame for mishaps on the
last Exit Exam. In actuality,
Fajntainhead
Serving the East Carolina community tar over 50 years
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Leigh Coakley
TRENDS EDITOR
Steve Bachner
I
EDITOR
Doug White �
ADVERTISING MANAGER
NEWS EDITORS Robrt M' 9"lm
Julie Everette
Hscki Gliarmis SPORTS EDITOR
Sam Rogers
FOUNTAINHEAD Is the student now apse sr of East
Carolina University sponsored fcy the Media Board of ECU
and is distributed seen t mi ad it and Thursday (weekly
during the summer).
Msiting address: Old Sooth Building, Greenville, N.C.
27634
Editorial offices: 757-636, 757-6367, 757-6306.
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni 66 annually.
no such controversy exists
except perhaps in the mind
of the writer.
Although I do not know
Mr. Bolonde. I have worked
with Bill Little on previous
exams and have always
found him to be extremely
cooperative. Thus, if I felt
that a complaint was
warranted. I would have
arranged a meeting with
him at that time and
discussed the situation with
him personally.
As I explained to Ms.
Gliarmis. two of the errors
on the computerized print-
outs were the resolt of
mistakes that occurred
when test answers were
marked on the standardized
answer keys - before the
keys and tests were sent to
the Computer Center
Obviously, these errors
were not the fault of the
Center, and to the best of
my knowledge, no one in
the English Department
has made such an accusa-
tion.
Unfortunately, these
facts were not mentioned in
the article. The "extra work
load for professors by the
way, amounted to about 5
or 10 minutes - the time
required for rechecking
two questions on the
answer sheets of the
relatively small number of
students who were within
two points of a passing
score.
Equally misleading is
the statement (erroneously
ascribed to me) that links
these grade adjustments
with the isolated case of
one section print-out wh'Ch
recorded the 20 extra
answer grids at the end of
the answer sheet as
omissions. No students
were affected by this error
because a passing score is
determined by the number
of correct responses. Fur-
thermore, not a single
print-out contained the
combination of errors
mentioned in another
misquotation, which reads:
" On a few tests the scanner
neglected to score some of
the questions Instead, the
computer added questions
that did not exist
Another error that was
mentioned prominently in
the story but actually
affected only a small
number of students occ-
urred on the print-outs for
three sections. In these
sections, the scores re-
corded for some students
did not match those which
were obtained when the
test were hand-graded by
the instructors.
The corrected totals
used, of course, to deter-
mine whether those stu-
dents passed the exam.
These were the tests that I
was referring to when I told
the interviewer that a few
sections might have been
misfiled and thus scored by
the wrong key.
For these reasons, then,
I do not feel that the picture
of mass confusion and
animosity painted by the
writer is an accurate
reflection of reality.
I was also disturbed to
find that many of my
comments about the back-
ground and purpose of the
grammar exam were either
misquoted or taken out of
context. There is a great
deal of difference, for
example, between the
unqualified generalization
in the sentence "Kirkland
explained that high
school seniors were not
getting the attention they
needed' and what I
actually said: that some
high school students had
weak backgrounds m basic
language arts skeils
The writer's phrasing is
equally imprecise and
misleading in the state-
ment. "The students are
also allowed to stay in the
English 1100 class if they
wish " The implication
seems to be that the
English Department would
like to get rid of all the
students who failed the
test. On the contrary, the
departmental policy is to
encourage students to
remain in the class so that
they can continue working
on grammar and punctua-
tion while developing other
essential skills m compo-
sition.
I would also like to
emphasize that even
though an individual tea-
cher might use exam
results m determining
border'ne grades, the test
is not intended for that
purpose it is designed to
measure competence in the
editing skills that aiiwnters
need in order to evaluate
and revise their own work
Thus I do not feel that
gramma and composition
are mutually exclusive
concerns as the writer
implies m her conclusion
My intent in writing this
letter is not to gloss over
the problems that occurred
on the last Exit Exa
There were several mis-
takes, and l apologize tc a
. no were affected by them
But I do hope that the next
time FOUNTAINHEAD
does such an article the
reporter covers the story
when it happens, gets the
facts straight, and reports
them responsibly and
accurately At the very
least, anyone who writes
about the Grammar Exar-
should learn how to spell
James K irkland
Director of Fresh
Com posit i or
NCSL seeks ECU
student support
ToFOUNTAINHEAD:
Help Me I need the
ECU student's support
Why, I am old enough to be
your father.
Who am I? I am the
NCSL. That is the North
Carolina Student Legi-
slature. I am 43 years old.
But I am the oldest and
most prestigious organiza-
tion in the entire United
States.
The students involved
in my student legislature
can possibly mature to
become North Carolina
State Legislators. I have
fathers students to become
leaders in the state of North
Carolina
Off the top of my head I
can think of the following
leaders who have been
involved in the North Caro-
lina Student Legislature.
They are: Gov. Hunt, Sen.
Morgan, and Mayor Ken
Harris of Charlotte.
ECU students may
wonder what do I do? i
teach students about the
legislative processes of
government. This is done
by showing these students
how the rules of procedure
are used. 1 also show them
how to debate and apeak in
front of 200 other students
Furthermore. I teach
them how to write itqai
legislation I know ha:
sounds like a mou'hfulbu' n
simple termsail this is, isto
write resolutions and bills
Forty percent of my bills
have been enacted into
North Carolina State Law
It is true that students in
this state do have a say on
how laws are made.
Do you know that to
have me on your campus
adds prestige to the degree
which you will receive when
you graduate? Chancellors
of colleges look for acti-
vities such as this to de-
termine the quality of each
school.
Admissions boards to
law schools. graduate
schools, and other pro-
fessional schools look kind-
ly on extra-curricular acti-
vities such as this.
All an ECU student
needs to have is an interest
in state government. Also
each student needs to have
� G.P.A. of a 2.0 or belter
to join. That is alt an ECU
student needs to join me.
I hope to see you on
Nov. 7 at 7 p.m. at
Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter.
MarcAdler
t





7 Nobr 1978 fqunta,nhead Pftffft s
According to physuxd therapists
Nautilis equipment superior
8v MARK ADLER
Staff Writer
Nautilis, one of Green-
s'S health clubs is open
anyone including ECU
students mtetested in im-
proving their own health
and physical condition, ac-
) Don Wheat ley
� the club
MHEPA
president
elected
ECU News Bureau
as-
Bowman
i of the ECU
of Personnel.
� president of the
Higher Education
� Association
He was elected at the
innual fall NCHEPA
n Boone The
irew 40 represen-
ts from public and
campuses fth
a. all of whom hold
sonnel-re-
taff � ' ns
ECU ��� SO repre-
I I
s. director
J Office of Equal
-ograms, and
assistant
director
� meeting featured
address by Frank Men-
executive director of
the i1 nai CoHege and
rsity Personnel Ass-
ociation
-lected of-
ficers are Roy S. Jones.
assistant director of per-
sonnel services at Appala-
chian State University, vice
president for programs.
W- a Galloway, director
of ersonnel at N.C.
State University, vice-pre-
sident for publicity: and
Wiiwam L. Clement, per-
sonnel director at Fayette-
� State University, se-
cretary-treasurer
Bowman joined the
ECU staff in 1973. after
eviously serving as a
personnel officer for the
Duke University Medical
Center and the N.C. De-
partment of Community
Colleges. He is an alumnus
of Campbell College
Nautilus, located at
1002 Evans St. opened
June 15. 1976 Wheatley
said.
Since the opening over
1.259 members have re-
gistered of which 450 fe-
males have joined, he said
At this time in the year
estimate there are 200
active memberswheatley
said
Nautilus equipment is
used by professional ath-
letes and seems to be "the
test thing" for body
conditioning according to
Sports Illustrated in the
il 21. 1975 issue.
Not only are profes-
sional athletes using this
equipment but so are many
er people.
Wheat I y added, "We
are always looking for
males and females willing
to compete in weightlifting
competition
Throughout the year
there is various competition
in the state and the south-
east region.
According to Sports Il-
lustrated the Natilus Com-
pany is rapidly growing in
popularity for two reasons.
The Natilus weightlifting
equipment is safer to use
than regular barbells, and
the complete muscle is ex-
ercised by a person and not
just part of the muscle.
The result is minimal
excercise time and max-
imum muscle growth with
strength gain according
to Sports Illustrated
According to Wheatley
the Nautilus in Greenville
offers 12 exercise ma-
chines
Wheatley said the ma-
chines cost approximately
$26,000 when purchased in
1976.
"Since that time these
machines have consider-
ably increased in value
added Wheatley.
Wheatley stated the
Nautilus Club offers the
following services: A whirl-
pool, four showers, a
sauna, a lounge area and
refreshments.
The nine month mem-
bership is $120 for male
students and $75 for female
students.
"Female membership
rate is lower because they
have fewer hours to work
out than do the male
student members said
Wheatley.
According to Sports Il-
lustrated, surgeons and
physical therapists find
Nautilus machines superior
tools for rehabilitation
work
ROSIE THOMPSON AND Lydia Roundtree take advantage
of the services that Nautilus offers. The local health club is
equipped with weightlifting apparatus, a whirlpool and
sauna, showers, and a refreshment area. It is recommended
by physical therapists as a way of keeping physically fit.
A3S303�VVVVVWS3t3��W3W3�

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Chamber ensemble
Tashi 'playedas one'
Clarinetist Richard Stoltzman of the acclaimed chamber ensemble TasM
-
t.een making news internationally as the new ways to exploit the potential of his instrument, the
� the clarinet, the performer who has found acknowledged clarinetist supreme
Doskey 'flawless' in N.Y.
By SUSAN CHESTON
Staff Writer
The acclaimed chamber
ensemble Tashi performed
in Mendenhall Student
Theatre last Wednesday
night. Tashi presented a
program for clarinet and
string quartet as part of the
Student Union Artist Series
of recitals.
Two years ago Tashi
appeared through the
Artist Series in a memora-
ble performance of Mess-
aien's"Quartet for the End
of Time The Messaien
piece features the unusual
combination of violin, cello,
clarinet and piano. Tashi,
Tibetan for good fortune,
was originally created with
this work in mind.
This year Tashi pre-
sented a more traditional
program, featuring Stra-
vinsky, Beethoven, and
Brahms. Although none of
their selections allowed the
same unabashed fervor that
made the Messaien an
unforgettably thrilling per-
formance two years ago.
Tashi traded dramatic
effect for impeccable mus-
ical taste in their program
last Wednesday.
The recital opened with
the Stravinsky "Concertino
for String Quartet" (1920).
In this piece, noted for its
primitive rhythms and
ruthless power, Tashi
played with intensity and a
perfection of ensemble
playing rarely heard. Des-
pite some intonation prob-
lems that, unfortunately,
recurred throughout the
program, particularly in the
The Beethoven "Sere-
nade in D Major for String
Trio, Opus 8" featured
violinist Theodore Arm.
violinist Ik-Hwan Bae, and
cellist Fred Sherry. The five
movement work was arti-
culate and well balanced, if
a bit restrained.
The sweet tone quality
of Arms Amati violin was
lovely in the graceful
Music
cello, the Stravinsky was
effectively fiery and power-
ful.
'Without pomp'
One advantage of string
instruments is that so much
of the playing is visible,
and the visual presence of
four intense musicians
added to the overall
experience. Throughout the
program Tashi, in relatively
casual dress and without
the affectations common on
stage, presented them-
selves without pomp, but
with an air of serious
musicianship that well
suited their music.
Menuetto. The Allegretto
all polacca was playful,
teasing and downright
amusing at times. The
entire Beethoven was
characterized by lightness
and precision and good
taste.
Stoltzman
After intermission, cla-
rinetist Richard Stoltzman
and violinist Ida Kavafian
joined the trio for the
Brahms "Quintet in B
minor for Clarinet and
Strings. Opus 115
Stoltzman has been
making news internation-
ally as the popularizer of
the clarinet, the performer
who has found new ways to
exploit the potential of his
instrument, the acknow-
ledged clarinetist supreme
With his performance of
the Messaien two years
ago. there is httle doubt
that he deserves his fame
His performance of the
Brahms, however, is more
controversial One of the
beauties o the Clarinet
Quintet �s the contrast of
the lush strings with the
darker, mellow sound of the
clarinet Stoltzman's inter-
pretation featured a com-
mendable variety of tone
colors. However, his use of
vibrato was inappropriate
In the Messaien two
years ago. Stoltzman's
vibrato was startlingly
effective. In the Brahms, it
interfered with the musical
performance
Otherwise. Stoltzman's
extraodmary control was a
real asset to the Brahms
The ensemble played as
one and. with the exception
of intonation problems, did
justice to the classical
Romantic beauty of the
quintet
Tashi s performance,
while not as electrifying as
their earlier appearance,
was tasteful and well wcrth
hearing.
By'5R. CHARLES BATH
Special to
FOUNTAINHEAD
Henry Doskey. faculty
th the ECU School
� v presented a pro-
gram of piano music in the
Carnegie Recital Hall on
Thi � evening. October
12.
It was an exciting oc-
casion foi the performer as
well as for numerous North
Carolina friends who tra-
veled to New York to hear
the recital
Three sonatas com-
e evening's pro-
gram The opening work,
the Sonata in C minor, No.
33(UE). by Joseph Haydn.
was written in 1771.
This sonata is one of the
mposer's more dramatic
and expressive works of
this period, and it stands
apart from similar works of
an earlier year when the
"galant" style was more
inherent.
Most refreshing was
Doskey's treatment of the
modern piano in a delicate,
though always expressive,
manner that at the same
time reflected the character
of the eighteenth century
instrument. The work was
played flawlessly.
The attention to detail,
however, never took pre-
cedence over the musical
aspects of the performance
as Doskey was always
sensitive to the musical line
and direction of phrase.
The ornamentation, so
prevalent in the first two
movements, was executed
clearly and blended into the
context of the musical line.
The final movement was
played in a spirited manner
with the performer reveal-
ing digital dexterity envied
by many a pianist.
Virtuosity, though, ne-
ver took over, and the
sonata ended in a solemn,
dramatic manner reflecting
once more the character of
the preceeding movements.
The Sonata in B minor
by Franz Liszt was next on
the program This work,
published in 1854. stands
unique in the sonata reper-
toire in its lengthly, one-
movement structure as well
as in its enormous diffi-
culty. Doskey's poetic and
grand, bravura style of
playing captured the true
romantic spirit of nine-
teenth century pianism.
This sonata is a test of
any pianist as it abounds in
octaves, chords, and ar-
peggiated figures that en-
compasses the entire key-
board and that must be
executed with swiftness
and a certain amount of
daring.
Such pianistic displays
are reserved for a select
few. and one never que-
stions Doskey's ability to
keep all this in control.
The majestic and
grandoise D Major theme
and its many poetic trans-
formations were played
with fine awareness of
tone, line and phrase.
The fiendishly difficult
fugue was well-executed,
and from there to the end
Dorskey seemed to have an
unending source of energy
and stamina.
The performer held this
lengthy work together,
never strayingfrom its true
musical course.
The program concluded
with the Sonata in F minor
by Johannes Brahms. This
early work, Opus 5, was
Balcony is
Special Film
The Student Union Films Committee is presenting Jean
Genet's The Balcony, directed by Joseph Strick. The movie
will be shown Wednesday, at 8 p.m. in the Hendrix
auditorium.
Shelley Winters, Peter Falk, Leonard Nimoy, Lee Grant,
Ruby Dee, Kent Smith, Jeff Corey all highlight this
surrealist movie. Jean Genet's acclaimed play is the basis
for this critically acclaimed production, recipient of a
special screening at the Annes Film Festival.
In a nameless, revolution-torn country, business goes on
as usual at Madame Irma's bordello - a unique "house"
that dispenses fantasy within the confines of the television
studio it occupies.
Among those coming to escape reality by acting out
their dreams are the leaders of the revolution, a milkman
who becomes a general, and the chief of police who is out to
stop the revolution.
"An extremely funny, abrasive and outrageous work
The New YorkerRecommended without reservation as
hardhitting cinematic art according to The New York
Post. The music is by Igor Stravinsky.
LEONARD NIMOY STARS in this Wednesday's Special
Film presentation of Jean Genet's "The Balcony
DEKOONING IS NOW in the Wellington
B Gray Gallery of the Jenkins Fine Arts
Center. Along with works by other artists
such as Picasso, Matisse, Lichtenstein
and Villon deKooning's charcoal on
vellum, "Composition is part of a loan
exhibition, "Images: Women on Paper
from the Weatherspoon Gallery Perma-
nent Collection which Is now on display in
conjunction with "Ten Centuries of East
Asian Art This welcome opportunity to
view Oriental art was made possible by a
generous member of the Medical School
faculty. The shows opened with a
reception Sunday and will continue up
until November 22. More pictures and a
review in Thursday's FOUNTAINHEAD.
Photo by John H. Grogan)
one of the three sonatas
written by the composer.
The performer once again
had enormous demands
placed upon him, this time
by the very symphonic
concept of the work.
The sonata, unusual in
the fact that it have five
movements, is a "tour de
force" in terms of endur-
ance and strength, and
Doskey once more met the
occasion in no uncertain
terms.
The first movement be-
gins with full, sonorous
chords that require great
accuracy of execution and
facilitation from extreme
registers of the keyboard.
Doskey balanced this thun-
derous opening well with
the following lyric section
and tossed off with ap-
parent ease some extreme-
ly difficult, if not downright
awkward, writing in this as
well as the last movement.
The second movement,
an Andante, with spacious-
ness and lyricism through-
out, reached a magnificent
climax in the D-flat coda,
and perhaps in this move-
ment Doskey came forth In
his most eloquent and
poetic manner.
The third movement,
marked "Scherzo was
played in an athletic and
rhythmic manner. The
fourth movement, subtitled
See DOSKEY p. 7
Grover Washington, Jr. 's Reed
Seed sports 'excellent renditions'
By JEFF ROLLINS
Assistant Trends Editor
Grover Washington, Jr.
plays a laid back type of
jazz. His saxophones and
flute are expressive and of
course expertly handled.
Washington does rather
conventional arrangements
of conventional songs. But
what one enjoys about
Washington is not his mu-
sical innovations (for there
aren't any on this latest
album) but rather his easy
going, supremely pleasant
style.
His latest album. Reed
Seed, is a case in point. The
album is full of small-group
(seven at the most) basi-
cally acoustic jazz. There's
not a hint of avant-gardism
on Reed Seed, but that's
not to say he's old-
fashioned.
"Santa Cruzin" gives
Washington a chance to
show off a double-tracked
soprano and alto sax chorus
which really grabs you. The
beat is from the late 1950s
but then, Washington isn't
one for compositional sur-
prises. He makes up in
song for what he lacks in
music.
Equally surprising and
equally pleasant is the good
Billy Joel number, "Just
The Way You Are Of
course, Billy Joel composes
so well that his music
doesn't want too much
innovation. It's enough in
this case that Washington
plays the melody expres-
sisimo, which he does, and
the song in his hands
realizes great musical pos-
sibilities.
Loran' s Dance is one
of the three Washington
originals on a seven-song
album. The song contains
some moderately interest-
ing passages as well as
some downright boring
ones. All too often Wash-
ington sells out, filling the
grooves with repetitious
and mundane bars of mu-
sical padding. Too bad, but
at least it'snot disco, which
would put Washington a
cut above Maynard Fer-
guson and M lies Davis if he
didn't lack theirdynamicism
in performance.
Washington and Co. get
down with some funky on
"Do Dat This song
boasts some good jazz
disco vocals which gave the
song exuberance and an
open, loose quality which is
most appealing.
Sensitivity in
composition
"Step N Thru" is
composed by a member of
the group, R.L. Streacher.
His name isn't very big in
the jazz world so far but his
talent wilt surely win him
eventual acclaim. The song
is the "jazziest" on the
album, and for that reason
one of the most delightful.
On "Step 'N' Thru"
John Bisks, Jr. on electric
violin, Tyron Brown on
acoustic bass, Leonard
Gibbs, Jr. on erectric gui-
tar, and MHiard Vinson on
drums stl deserve mention
for their superb ensemble
and solo playing.
The title cut of the
album. Reed Seed, s the
best of Washington s latest
batch of matenat It has the
most intriguing and sophi-
sticated melody of anything
on the disque Indeed
where most of the other
songs are merely craft.
"Reed Seed can be called
art in that it makes us feel
something we have never
realized that we have felt
before
"Maracus Beach has
much the same sensitivity
in composition and perfor-
mance as Reed Seed
with a little latin charm
added The song is by J
Simons who should write
more, or be recorded more
The rhythm and reeds are
sunny, sandy and very
south of the border.
Grover Washington Jr's
new si bum. Reed Seed, is
comprised of excellent ren-
ditions of songs new snd
slmost new. These songs
sre well-played snd fun but
neither amazing nor brli-
��nt. But than, fun is, sfter
sil, so fun.
f







ftftfitr
t r r f �
� t
NTAINHEAD P�n 7
ECU's Doskey gets
standing ovation
at Carnegie Hall
continued from p. 6
Ruckblick is actually an .
Intermezzo in B-flat minor
that holds a thematic re-
lationship with the second
movement.
The tender quality of
this movement readies both
performer and audience for
the sweeping finale, pos-
sibly one of Brahms' most
difficult movements.
The whirlwind perform-
ance of the coda brought
the audience to its feet, and
after continued applause
Doskey returned to the
The
Balcony
This
Wednesday
night at
8 p.m. in
the
Hcodrli
Theatre
piano to perform as an
encore "L'isle joyeuse" of
Claude Debussy.
The only unfortunate
part of the entire occasion
was the absence of pub-
lished reviews of the con-
cert as a result of the New
York newspaper strike.
It is the opinion of this
writer that the formidable
task of a New York per-
formance was well met by
Doskey, and the enthu-
siasm shown by the aud-
ience left no doubt that this
pianist is one of enormous
talent, ability, and accom-
HIANIST HENRY DOSKEY performing
in a trio last April with violinist Fairy a
plishment.
ECU can be proud to
have Henry Doskey on its
music faculty.
2$�2�&,
0ift
TOX CLLL
(L)ccu�ion�
Mellado and (cellist Daniel Mellado.
Doskey recent h. performed at Carnegie.
Tuesday
�igftnvdL, cN.C. 27834
Nigjif.
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at the
Dinners includV large baked potato,
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Fri. Sat.
Sun.
JACKS
STEM HOUSE
264 R,v-Pass
Phone: 756-5788
Printmaker Sexauer has
prints in two more states
ECU News Bureau
Intaglio prints by ECU faculty
printmaker Donald Sexauer are on
display in Marinsville, Va and
Framingham, Mass. this month.
Forty black and white and color
intaglio prints by Sexauer are on display
at Martinsville's Lynwood House Com-
munity Arts Center through Nov. 21
The show is sponsored by the
Piedmont Arts Chapter of the Virginia
Museum of Fine Arts.
Sexauer was invited to exhibit eight of
his color intaglio prints in an exhibit
sponsored by the Temole Beth Am
Sisterhood of Framingham, Mass.
The exhibit, which includes the works
of artists from all major geographic areas
of the nation, opens Nov. 5.
Sexauer, chairman of the ECU School
of Art's printmaking department, has had
his prints shown in museums and
galleries throughout the U.S. He is
represented in numerous public and
private permanent art collections.
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i him a1





7 ttawifrt 197� FmnjT.mur ri() ,
Navy loses first
Penn St. tops Maryland
By
HERSCHELNISSENSON
APSportsWriter
There can be no more
battles of college football
unbeatens unless No 1-
ranked Oklahoma and run-
ner-up Penn State continue
on their collision course to a
national championship
showdown in the Orange
Bowl
The last shootout be-
tween teams with perfect
records took place Saturday
when Penn State trimmed
tifth-ranked Maryland 27-3.
But there are plenty of
games on tap in the re-
maining four weeks
And two of the biggest
take place next weekend �
Oklahoma at fourth-ranked
Nebraska, with the Big
Eight crown and a berth in
�he Orange Bowl at stake
and No 10 Houston at No.
y Texas for the lead in the
Southwest conference.
Besides Maryland, one
'er unbeaten team fell by
the wayside over the week-
end when 11th-ranked
Navy had its Cinderella
saga ended by No. 15 Notre
Dame 27-7. That leaves
Oklahoma, a 28-7 winner
ober Colorado, and Penn
State sitting pretty with 9-0
records.
Oklahoma must still
face Nebraska and Okla-
homa State while Penn
State has North Carolina
State and Pittsburgh sche-
duled.
The two leaders in The
Associated Press ratings
had to share the weekend's
headlines with seven run-
ners who cracked the 200-
yard barrier, led by Theotis
Brown of UCLA, who
gained 274 yards on 26
carries, including scoring
bursts of 74 and 68 yards,
as the ninth-ranked Bruins
nipped Oregon 23-21.
Meanwhile, third-
ranked Alabama overcame
a record 429-yard passing
blitz by Dave Marler to de-
feat Mississippi State 35-14
while Nebraska set a school
record of 799 yards and
walloped Kansas 63-21 as
Tom Sorley threw three TD
passes and sub Craig John-
son scored on runs of 64
and 60 yards.
Southern California's
Charles White was one of
those 200-yard runners. He
actually rushed for 201,
including a 1-yard run for
Southern Cal's only touch-
down.
Frank Jordan added two
field goals as the sixth-
ranked Trojans turned back
Stanford 13-7.
Texas has the weekend
off while eighth-ranked
Michigan blanked Iowa
34-0 as Rick Leach threw
two touchdown passes and
Danny Davis and John
Newhouse each scored
twice to lead Houston to a
63-6 rout of Texas Chri-
stian.
In the Second Ten, No.
12 Louisiana State drubbed
Mississippi 30-8 behind
Charles Alexander's 147
rushing yards and three
touchdowns; Willie Mc-
Clendon became 13th-
ranked Georgia's single-
season rushing leader with
1,115 yards when he gained
149 in a 41-3 rout of VMI;
No. 14 Purdue kayoed
Northwestern 31-0 with
Mark Herrmann passing
for three scored and Steve
Fuller passed for two TD's
and ran for one to lead No.
16 Clem son past Wake
Forest 51-6.
Ron Calcagni passed for
three scores and tallied one
as No. 17 Arkansas ended a
two-game losing streak by
crushing Rice 37-7; Al
Middleton's three touch-
downs led No. 18 M ichigan
State over Illinois 59-19;
Mark Shubert's 29-yard
filed goal with 3:09 left
lifted No. 19 Pitt Dast
Syracuse 18-17 and No. 20
Washington defeated Ari-
zona 31-21 with Tom Porras
scoring on a 10-yard run
and catching a 29-yard TD
Patronize
Fountamhead
Advertisers
Homecoming Week at the
Tues. Sigma Tau-
Macho King Contest
Wed. Delta Zeta Dating
game plus a special
Homecoming attraction:
TENTH AVE. BAM)
in concert.
Fri. Afternoon party 3-7.
Beat Wm. & Mary pep rally
with ECU Cheerleaders.
I Sun. Ladies nite.
208 l. 5th St
Downtown
Buy any album in the
store at regular price
and get the new
BILLY JOEL LP
" $and STREET" for
$3.99.
This coupon good
thru Thursdayonly!
�cACQ
GREAT
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EATERY
512 Greenville Blvd.
Open 11:00 11:00
Mon. thru Thur.
Fri-�PSat. 11:00 12:0
Sun. 12:00 11:00
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Dr. Pepper, Beer, Pepsi,
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We Gladly Accept Personal Checks.
Free Taeo Cid Iron -on Patch
with $4.00 food order
Collins streaks
HALFBACK ANTHONY COLLINS rushed seven times for
57 yards and caught two passes for 27 yards in the Pirates
33-8 victory over Appalachian State Saturday. Photo by
John H. Grogan)
Breakfast
from 7 a.m.
to 11 a.m.
specializing
In large
country ham or sausage
biscuits. Hot cakes. Scrambled
eggs with country ham or
sausage. Our 14 lb. beef
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serving ham and cheese,
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SUB SHOPS r GREENVILLE and NAGS ?tAD NORTH CAROLINA
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mmmmwHm





r! , ,
, .�
� t � �
pafle 10 FOUMTAINHEAD 7 Novembr 1976
In overtime thriller
Rogues upset Students 3-1
By JOHN EVANS
Staff Writer
The first major upset of
the intramural soccer sea-
son took place last week
when the Scott Rogues de-
feated the International
Students in overtime. The
game was stalemated at 0-0
after regulation and the
overtime period went
scoreless, so the match was
decided on penalty kicks,
with the Rogues winning
3-1.
That upset highlighted
a week of matches that was
shortened by a day of rain
on Monday and Halloween
festivities on Tuesday. The
win left the Belk Golas as
only one of two undefeated
teams left in the men's
rankings. The other team is
Pi Kappa Phi, which leads
the fraternity division of the
men's soccerleague. The Pi
Kapps are 2-0 on the
season.
In women's league play,
three teams, Sigma Sigma
Sigma, Cotten Dorm and
Fleming Dorm, are still un-
beaten with 2-0 marks.
In other intramural soc-
cer action last week, the
Belk Golas topped the
Jones Cosmos, 2-0. on two
first period goals, one by
Kris Solt and the other by
Chris O'Neill, and Alpi
dumped the Jones Blazars,
3-2, after leading by 3-0 at
halftime.
In intramural action
elsewhere, the co-rec vol-
leyball playoffs begin on
Tuesday with the top two
teams from each league
participating for the even-
tual all-campus champion-
ship. Monday was the final
week of the regular season
Top teams going into the
playoffs were Kappa Sig-
ma, the Ultimates. the P.E.
Majors and the Village
People.
Team Handball begins
November 14 and registra-
tion will be held this week
through Thursday. There
will be an officials' clinic on
Wednesday from 7:30 to
8 30 p.m and a Team
Handball exhibition im-
mediately following that
meeting at 9 p.m
Memorial Gym The lea-
captains' meeting wit! be
held in Room 205 of M
oriai Gym. Signups
Team Handball Boa g
and the Sports Trivia con-
test are being tak�
Room 205 of Me-
Gym
Majorette prepares for homecoming
R� TTE prepares for this
ig homecoming contest
id Mary. The Pirates
e Indians will be televised
starting at 4:10 p.m The game was
originally scheduled to begin at 1:30.
Photo by John H. Grogan
710 Nut rh (ireene SiI
Greenville
Phone' ' ' 7 V :
Mitchell's Hair Styling
J P.rt Plaza Shopping Lcntfi
Crccnvillc North Carolina 2
7.6-2r0
74
Special curly perms
forguy's & gal's, only $17.50
with ECU student I.D.
On Wednesday Nov. 8
and Nov. 1 5 ONLY.
NOW FEATURING
LUNCH 11 a.m. 2 p.m.
Choice of meat ,
2 vegetables,
Coffee or Tea.
$2.00
DINNER 4:30 7 p.m.
Choice of meat,
3 vegetables,
Coffee or Tea.
�$2.25-
? HOMEMADE DESSERTS AVAILABLE
Hours: Sunday Thursday open until 8:00 p.m,
Friday and Saturday open until 9:00 p.m
�We also are serving from our regular menu.
�We have a catering service for private parties.
For information call 752 2624.
GO PIRATES�STOMP
ANY
NUMBER
OF
PIECES.
WILLIAM AND MARY
TAIEGATE
BEFORE THE
GAME�LET
ROY DO THE
COOKIN'
B.Y.O.B
TENTH STREET
CALL NOW! RESERVE TKj
NUMBER OF PIECES, TIME YOU'EE PICK IT EP, & NAME
DRINKS ARE ON ROT WITH
PIRATE VICTORY�AFTER GAME.
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Hicks paces Pirates past Appalachian 33-8
f
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
Saturday'scontest between ECU and Appalachian State
was bmedV as an offensive show with Mountaineer
quarterback Steve Brown at center stage.
w"h BIU on the Cannes ,he � �M
w�h a bady bruised Knee. the Pira.es had � Z
the Apps.coast.ng to an easy 33-8 v.ctory be.o-e a wet
Ficklen Stadium crowd of 19.726
Mte; building a comfortable 17-8 lead at the half, the
Bucs struck for two quick scores in the third period and
opened up a 27-8 advantage which all but ended the game
?P6The victory over Appalachian State was ECUsecond
straight and .mproved the Pirates overall record to 6-3 for
the year wh,ie the Mountaineers fell to 5-4 overall.
Not having Steve Brown out there at quarterback
really hurt them offensively said ECU head coach Pat
Dye I thought we did a pretty good job of controlling the
line of scrimmage, but were still not a polished football
team like we really should be.
We weren't as ragged offensively as we have been
during some of our games this season. But other than a few
m.nor breakdowns. I was mighty proud - � -Hnri
tonight " . -
Dye was also mighty proud of
Eddie Hicks The senior from Henderson rushed 16 times
for 114 yards and scored three touchdowns including a nifty
25yardrunforECU'sfirstTD.nthegame.
Edd.e Hicks. Anthony Collins and all of our backs ran
e�l tonight. ' praised Dye. 'The key to our runn.ng game
was the offensively. They came off the ball real well.
, also have tog.ve a lot of credit to Leander Green. He
really makes us go. We really did a good job of mixing our
sand Leander executed well
A week's rest certainly d,dn t hurt the P.rates either.
V. th Hicks. Collins and Sutton running at will around the
ends the Pirates rolled up a whopping 373 yards on the
ground Sutton added 68 yards on eight attempts while
Comns ran seven times 1 . 57 ,ards and also caught two
nasses lor another 21 yards.
N doubt aoout it, the layoff really helped us.
sa.d Dye We had an excellent game plan and we also had a
�me t0 !o ms and prepare for Appalachian
Aere also com.ng off a real disappointing loss to East
Tennessee State last week '
he Pirate get on the scoreboard quickly in the first
quarter After a shanked punt by Appalachian's David
Abernathy which traveled only 19 yards.
of our effort
halfback
ECU moved to the Apps 19 yard line before the drive
stalled and Bill Lamm came in to kick the first of two field
qoals, this one from 36 yards.
Late in the first period. Gerald Hall fielded a line drive
punt and scampered 22 yards to the ASU to give the Pirates
excellent field position at the Mountaineer 26.
Green found Collins open for 16 yards, but two penalties
pushed the ball back to the 25. However that was no
problem for Hicks. He took a pitch from Green around he
left side and tip-toed down the sidelines 25 yards for ECU 8
first touchdown. Lamm"sconversion was wide and ECU led
9-0 with 10:56 in the first quarter.
Midway through the second period, Appalach.an faked
a punt and up man Larry Lawson ran for a first down on the
ECU 26. Even from there, it took the sluggish
M ountaineers eight plays to score.
On fourth down from the one. quarterback Paul
Hamilton faked twice into the line and went around the
riqht side for the touchdown. And on the conversion M .chad
fumbled the snap but threw to Andy Kilday for the two
point conversion and the Apps only trailed 9-8 with
6 42 remaining in the half.
ECU came right back on its next series moving 55 yards
in 10 plays for the touchdown. Collins returned the k.ckoff
38 yards to the Appalachian 45 and on first down Green ran
15 yards totheApps 40.
Hicks scored his second touchdown of the evening on a
one yard plunge and with Lamm's conversion the Pirate led
17-8 at the half
Lamm added his second field goal early in the third
period on a 43 yard boot with 10.49 which gave ECU a 20-8
lead . .
And the Pirates came back with another scoring drive
in the third quarter moving 64 yards in 12 plays to move
out front 27-8. Hicks went over from the four yard for the
touchdown line and Lamm's conversion was good.
ECU'S final score came after linebacker Tommy
Summer intercepted a Hamilton pass and returned it 12
yards to the Appalachian 30.
Collins capped the 30 yard drive with a 10 yard
touchdown run which concluded the scoring. Lamms final
conversion was wide.
�Defensively, we got a lot more people around the ball
in the second half said Dye. -They had a fine offensive
scheme, but they never really stopped us in the entire
game. We stopped ourselves with several mistakes. We II
have to play a much more disciplined game against W illiam
and Mary next week.
Hicks moves outside
ECU HALFBACK EDDIE H.cks skirts around the left s,de running oacks rushed for 37:
for a bg gain. H-cks rushed 16 times for 114 yards and
three touchdowns m the Pirates 33-8 victory over
Appalachian State Saturday night in Ficklen Stadium ECU
carries. The Pirates are now 6-3 overall with William am
Mary next on the schedule
Apps win 7-0
ECU backs steamroll Apps
ASU stops ECU hooters
.�� �nn�n n!o, arc c
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
ECU s around attack looked mgre like the explosive
rushing game head coach Pat Dye has promised l season
long in the Pirates 33-8 victory over Appalachiar State
Saturday n gl n fickien Stadium.
Quarterback Leander Green and the Bucs fleet of
runn.ng backs ran over and around the hapless Appalachian
State defense all even.ng The Pirates totalled 373 yards
rusnmg on just 60 carries.
We just executed a lot better tonight said halfback
Eddie Hicks who rushed for 114 yards and scored three
touchdowns "We've been fumbling the ball so much this
year )t s really been hard to get the offense going
�But heck, with 'heir defensive ends we were running
the sweeps real effectively. They were just slow which �
allowed us to get outside and really get some running
room
Hicks took a pitch from Green and sped 25 yards down
the sidelines for ECU'S first touchdown. The swift
Henderson native also scored on one and four yards runs
later in the game and was given the R.W. Moore
Scholarship award after the game for his efforts.
�The way our offensive line was blocking there was no
reason m the world we shouldn't have had a good game.
They were knocking down people on the corners and they
were also opening up gome big holes in the middle
Indeed When Hicks and Collins weren't rambling
around the ends. Theodore Sutton found plenty of running
room over the middle The husky fullback.rushed for 68
yards on just eight carries including a big 22 yard gallop in
the Pirates first third quarter scoring drive.
Allot our backs ran well paised Dye. "The offensive
line came off the ball well. Leander did a good job of getting
the ball to the backs on the option.
"I think we should have gotten more out of our passing
game continued Dye. "We were trying to go deep too
much and if we had just looked more for our backs we could
have completed more passes
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
With the season quickly
winding to a halt and an
all-important NCAA tour-
nament bid close at hand, it
wasn't hard to understand
why Appalachian State
soccer coach Hank Stein-
brecher was concerned a-
bout Saturday's contest a-
gamst East Carolina
� I almost had to yell at
those guys on the trip up
here. explained Stein-
brecher 'All they've got
on their minds is the NCAA
tournament bid. We
weren't concentrating on
East Carolina and I hon-
estly didn't think we were
mentally ready for this
one
But by halftime. any
remote possibility of a
Pirate upset was elimin-
ated. The talented Apps
scored three goals in the
first half, tacked on four
more in the second period
and coasted to an easy 7-0
victory.
The Mountaineers im-
proved their overall record
to 9-0-2 this season and still
remain in contention for
one of four NCAA berths in
the southeast regionals.
The loss dropped ECU to
3-10-2 overall with one
game remaining this Wed-
nesday at home against
North Carolina.
�Obviously, they were a
far superior team Pirate
head coach Brad Smith
after the game. "We
played very poorly defen-
sively. Our players were
just not picking up their
men and consequently they
were getting loose for some
easy shots. We did a very
poor job of containing
them
The Mountaineers were
in control from the outset
and allowed ECU only ten
shots on goal in the game
while Appalachian State
had a whopping 35 at-
tempts.
Sophomore Thompson
Usiyan, Appalachian's
leading scorer opened the
Moutnaineer sooting bar-
rage with an unassisted
goal only 4:1 into the game.
Soon after, halfback
Mike Somnazu pushed the
Apps ahead 2-0 on an assist
from Keith Layne with
12:31 gone in the half.
Somnazu added his second
goal of the contest just
before the half on another
assist rom Layne and the
M ountaineers led 3-0.
�That 3-0 lead m the
first half eased a lot of
pressure said Stem-
brecher. "It was really hard
to get them motivated in
the second half, but I
thought we played real well
during several stretches
Usiyan. one of four Ap-
palachian players from Ni-
geria, scored all four
Mountaineer goals in the
second half. Somnazu and
James Wilde were credited
with assists on two of
Usiyan's second half
scores. Usiyan's five goals
now gives the speedy half-
back 27 goals this season.
The five goals also tied an
Appalachian record for
most number of goals in a
single game.
"Appalachian is cer-
tainly the class of the
state acknowledged
Smith. "They're bigger.
stronger and quicker than
we are, but then again,
their program is much
farther along than ours
"They've got some
great offensive players.
pecially Usiyan The � h I
some really nice
although their las-
goals came whe
really got sloppy
The Moun�a'neers
ranked 18th nationally 8
fifth m the sout have
game remaining ana St
brecher was optimistic a-
bout the Apps
hopes
They said we a
have to go undefeateo a tf"
the type schedule we
played and we ve jusl at
accomplished that a
though we do have
ties noted Stembreche-
Right now I would I
say out chances are
about 50-50
ECU'S opponent W
nesday North Carolina
also shooting for a .
berth and once again the
Bucs will be decided
underdogs
"It would certainly be a
Dig boost for us ?o enc
vear with a ictoi
North Carola a I
Smith "But we ve go I
start playing more r,
sistentlv on both enc-
the field '
Leander Green
Green found halfback Anthony Collins open twice for 27
yards and the Penn Yan, NY. native also picked up another
57 yards on seven attempts.
"We knew they were slow around the ends and we were
confident we could run the ball outside explained Collins.
"But the offensive line had by far its most consistent
performance. You couldn't have asked for anything more.
They were really coming off the ball well
Although the Mountaineers were ranked fifth nationally
In total offense, the Apps defense was allowing almost as
many yards, as well as points. And with quarterback Steve
Brown sidelined with a knee bruise, Appalachian never
moved the ball consistently all evening. In fact, the Apps
had just 168 yards, far below their season's average of 450.
"They got away with some things in the first half, but in
the second half we were really gang tackling and getting
people around the ball noted defensive end Zack
Valentine. "The week's layoff helped and the coaches
games plan was excellent
Linebacker Tommy Summer intercepted a Paul
Hamilton pass which set up the Pirates final touchdown in
the fourth period. Summer was also credited with three solo
tackles and one assist.
"The way Appalachim has been moving the ball this
year we knew they had alot of strong tendencies said
Summer. "Without Brown in there they were not the same
team offensively, but we had a few problems with
containment In the first half, but we straightened
everything out in the second half
Bucs earn tourney honors
� iiUiivnoocc mnsistRri of both colleae were tapped for member- With 18 teams trymq to ae'
Anthony Collins
By JIMMY DuPREE
Staff Writer
The field hockey team
concluded its season this
weekend with action in the
Deep South Tournament in
Greenville, SC. The Deep
South is not a tournament
where teams compete for
trophies. All players in the
tournament are in quest of
membership on the all-star
teams which are chosen at
the end of the tournament.
There were four all-star
teams chosen. The Deep
South All-Star Team was
comprised of club team
members only. Club teams
consist of former collegiate
field hockey players who
wish to continue to compete
beyond their college days.
The Deep South All-Star
Team included only active
collegiate players. ECU had
no members elected to
Team I. Teams II and III
consisted of both college
and club team members.
Sophomore goalie Leigh
Sumner qualified for Team
II status, which was the
highest berth given to a
Pirate.
Senior halfback Sally
Birch, junior right inner
Kathy Zwigard, and sopho-
more left inner Sue Jones
were tapped for
ship on Team III.
"I thought our girls who
were on the III team should
have been higher said
coach Laurie Arrants. "I
hated to see Drew Kennedy
not get on an All-Star
team. She's played so
consistently for us lately.
W ith 18 teams trying to get
people on teams, there just
isn't room for everyone you
think should be there
The Pirates had the best
team record, as they tied
UNC-G. 0-0, beat the
UNC-CH Jayvees 2-1 and
Furman University 2-1
over North Carolina
ECUvs
William & Mary
ABC Regional Television-Saturday
m
Mi4fM





Title
Fountainhead, November 7, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 07, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.523
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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