Fountainhead, November 9, 1978






Circulation 10,000
Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
Vol. 55 No.
Voters re-elect Helms to Senate
Mins by 'comfortable' marg
� NA TOR JESSE HELMS The sweet taste of victory
s smile as he returns to the U.S. Senate
� 7J.
By ROBERTSWAIM
Advertising Manager
and
The Associated Press
RALEIGH - Republican Senator Jesse Helms easily
defeated Democratic challenger John Ingram in Tuesday s
HeTms received 54 percent of the vote. Ingram polled
423.037 votes to Helms' 496,497.
Early in the evening there was some speculation that
Ingram might upset Helms due to the higher voter turnout
which ,s usually an uplift for democratic candidates.
W hen the early returns began to trickle in it was evident
that Helms would be vicotrious and would win by a
comfortable margin. rart at the
Thousands of Helms supporters gathered at the
Sheraton Hotel to await the returns and the cheer their
ThTaowds at the Sheraton went wild with cheers when
moved

all three television networks decalred Helms the winner
shortly before 10 p.m.
It was about 10 p.m. when Helms came down from his
suite to deliver his victory speech to an overflow crowd that
had assembled in the ballroom of the hotel
Nickname
Helms began his address by saying "I'm Senator No
and I'm glad to be here
Helms explained his nickname to the thousands of
who were watching on national television.
"Perhaps I should mention the label, Senator No,
bestowed upo me by an ultra-liberal newspaper editor
(referring to Claude Sitton, editor of the News and
Observer), in Raleigh, N.C. who intended it as a critical
eDithet " said Helms. ,
"What this editor failed to understand, in his frenzy of
criticism, is that the people of N.C. indeed, f
America want senators who will vote no to excessive
federal spending, excessive federal controls and continued
inflation " said Helms. .
HeTms said that in voting no' to the excess o.
government he had been voting 'yes' to the wishes of the
oeople of the state.
in dosing, Helms said that he held no ill leelmflsajnj
his opponent, John Ingram who had viciously attacked him
during the final days of the campaign.
��I wish him and his family well said Helms.
Helms to enter the 1980 Republican presidential primanes
although Helms said he has no presidential ambitions at the
moment.
-�I think the senator is going to be an extraordinarily
influential factor in the national Republican Party, sa.d
state GOP chairman Jack Lee, who added he expects Helms
at least to be a favorite son candidate
Ingram won 38 counties to Helms' 62 but IngranVs
were mainly small, rural areas, some w.th heavy black
votes. He solidly took the northeastern corner,o he
Sandhiilsand scattered counties in the fa��"� f
Orange County, alway Democratic, but lost usually
Democratic Durham.
�This is not a personal victory. This is a victory of the
conservative, free enterprise system in America. Helms
declared after winning. . �
�I, is a clear signal that the American people are far
ahead of the big spending Congress In realizing thaI fede a
deficits and an overwhelming federal bureaucracy are after
all the principle causes of inflation he said.
Nicknamed "Senator No" for n�oonstwt opp�t.on to
social legislation. Helms turned the tag to his advantage
during the campa.gn, say.ng he was proud of vot.ng no
to federal regulations and waste
County votes
N i � Bureau
Homecom-
I, will begin at
a revised
� events for
Dav ECU
.nave announced.
the Home-
�vas made
. a change in
ECU-William
otball game at
Fickien Stadium which will
be televised by ABC (4
p.m. EST) Before the
television arrangements.
the game had been sche-
duled for a 1:30 p.m.
kickoff
The Homecoming par-
ade, always a highlight of
old gradsday at ECU. will
form on Elm Street and
move down Fifth Street
pass the mam campus and
the Chancellor's home pro-
ceeding to the downtown
area.
The parade will include
at least five bands and 17
gaily decorated floats.
The theme of the week-
long Homecoming ob-
servance in "New Horizons
al ECU and this is ex-
pected to be portrayed in
design of the floats being
readied for the parade.
Art exhibits, class re-
unions, socials and concerts
are scheduled throughout

the week.
Tickets should be ob-
tained in advance for the
Alumni Dance and Musical
Extravaganza which will
begin at 8:30 p.m. at the
Moose Lodge. This is a
couples only affair and
tickets are $20 per couple
advance sale, the alumni
office said.
Alumni registration for
Homecoming will be held
from 10 a.m. until 12:30
p.m.
Carries east
Sen Jesse H lems carried the Piedmont and most of the
east, losing in the rural hinterlands, as he easjfy
aside Democrat John Ingram to win a second term Tuesday
Helms whose liberal campaign spending contrasted
with his conservative, anti-big government ideology, won
54 percent of the vote by running up insurmountable
margins in the major cities and smaller, textile counties of
the oooulous Piedmont.
lE margin, was as comfortable as when Helms became
the state's first GOP senator since reconstruction in 1972
And the victory was certain to fuel encouragement for
Helms won by 10.000 votes in Mecklenburg, the largest
county and by 5,000 each in Forsyth and Gu.lford. He took
Buncombe in the mountains by 1.000 and New Hanover on
the coast by 3.000.
Helms won his home county of Wake by more than
12.000 and took Ingrams home of Randolph county by
nearly 5.000. . Birtll
Ingram made no statement beyond his Tuesday mght
councession, and said he planned to return to work as State
insurance commissioner. Qa0,nh
Helms remained secluded at h,s home in Ralegh
Wednesday, and did not hold the traditional morning-after
news conference.
Media board keeps '78 BUCCANEER funds
� RC BARNES
Assistant News Editor
The question of what
should be done with the
funds originally intended
for use for the publication
of the now defunct 77-78
BUCCANEER, and discus-
sion of the right of FOUN-
TAINHEAD management
to use legal services with-
out notifying their gov-
erning body highlighted
Wednesday's Media Board
meeting.
The money totally ap-
proximately $42,000 has
been the subject of a heated
controversy in recent weeks
between the Student Gov-
ernment Association (SGA)
and the various campus
medias
The SGA, through the
statements of several legi-
slators, wanted the funds
reverted to the SGA Gen-
eral Fund. Several mem-
bers of the Media Board
echoed their sentiments,
saying that the money
should be returned to the
SGA.
Several members of the
campus media appeared
before the Board to list
specific funds that their
respective publications and
services should receive.
Doug White. FOUNTAIN-
HEAD editor, said that
What's inside
I
WOODY ALLEN
ECU-William and Mary to be televised on
ABC see p. 8.
State volleyball tournament at Minges
this weekendsee p. 9.
Greek Forumsee p. 5.
Student Union Films Committee hasa full
slate of free films for homecoming week.
A nnie Hall leads the pack .for previews,
see p. 6.
The Gregg Smith Singers will perform at
Hendrix Theatre this Wed. eveningsee
p. 6.
Interior design dept. seeks
ByMARTHA OAKLEY
Staff Writer
The Interior Design De-
partment in ECU'S School
of Art is currently being re-
viewed for accreditation by
The Foundation for Interior
Design Education Re-
search.
The Foundation, known
at FIDER, is a national
organization that studied
interior design education as
ijght throughout the
country in various schools
of art.
At the request of indi-
vidual departments, FIDER
will visit and make an eval-
uation for possible accred-
itation or simply offer sug-
gestions.
The Department of In-
terior Design has received
interest from the state
chapter of the American
Society of Interior Design
concerning its accredit-
ation.
The only pressure the
FIDER
department is undergoing
to become accredited is
self-made, according to
Mel Stanforth, Chairman of
the Interior Design Depart-
ment.
According to Stanforth,
the evaluation is now in the
paperwork stages.
"We wont't know the
outcome for quite a while
he said. "But if the depart
ment becomes accredited it
will be the only one In the
state which is
FOUNTAINHEAD needed
a new typesetting machine,
new furniture.file cabinets,
light tables and industrial
carpet.
White commented on
the amount of noise in the
office, adding that the
carpet would be an efficient
sound deadener.
Robert Swaim, FOUN-
TAINHEAD advertising
manager said the printing
budget would run out the
last week in February, if
printing costs continued at
the present rate.
"We will require an
additional appropriation of
$15,000 to print the paper
until the end of school
Swaim said.
Pete Podeszwa, head
photographer of the Photo
Lab, said his department
needed funds to cover
purchases of new equip-
ment, and to cover the cost
of moving the Photo Lab
into the Publications Build-
ing.
According to Podeszwa,
the Photo Lab needs a film
dryer, a darkcoom revol-
ving door, a print pro-
cessor, and a dry mount
press.
Podeszwa added that a
new en larger was also
needed.
Craig Sahli, BUCCAN-
EER editor, seid the yeer-
book needed new lighting,
alterations to the exterior
walls to extend them to the
ceiling, and two file cab-
inets. Sahli also said that
the yearbook staff needed
one more typewriter and
three desk lemps. .
He said a desk calcu-
lator for the business man-
ager to aid in bookkeeping
was needed.
LukeWhlsnant, REBEL
editor, asked for a new
typewriter, a door to be cut
leading from the magazines
editorial department to Hs
art depertment, and the
wall to be extended to the
ceiling.
Discussion on the Issue
began when one member ot
the Media Board asserted
that the money should be
sent to the SGA, although
she approved of the expen-
ditures for the Photo Lab;
the wall extensions to the
ceiling mentioned by BUC-
CANEER and REBEL, and
purchase of light .Jxtures
mentioned by alt three
publications.
Gerry Wallacf, presi-
dent of the Men's Resi-
dence Council said that the
Media Board constitution
stated that the Media
Board had to keep the
money.
Wallace added that the
media needed the funds,
and that it was a "bad
precedent to set to give the
money away He also said
that the organizations on
campus should keep sav-
ings accounts so that they
wouldn't run out of funds.
Wallace made his re-
marks in the form of a
motion, vhich was sec-
onded.
Dean Alexander said
that he was against using
the money for the campus
media. "Thisboard doesn't I
have the right to spend the
money that was allocated to
the BUCCANEER Alex-
ander said.
He added, "We have an
obligation to see that it
goes back to the SGA
Dr. Thomas Eamon said
that he was "strongly op-
posed" to keeping tha
money. He added that the
board might have the legal
right to the money, but not
the "moral" right.
Ann Thompson, of the
Panhellenic Council said
that the Board had the
"moral" obligation to give
the money to the SGA.
Dean Alexander said
that the Constitution prohi-
bited the Medie Boerd from
giving the money to the
9GA In the future, but It
wesn't In effect in this case.
Dr. James Tucker of
Student Affeirs seid thet he
could see both eMes of tit
controversy.
Wallace said that the
issue could not be decided
by morals, it must be
decided by laws. He added
that the students would still
benefit from the money. He
said "It is a question of
legality
One of the members of
the board asked Ann
Thompson, who was op-
posed to keeping the
money, what the SGA
would do with it. Thompson
mentioned that the ECU
Playhouse needed funding,
as well as other financially
strapped activities and or-
ganizations.
The vote was close,
3-2 in favor of the Media
Board keeping the funds.
In other business, the
board heard from the
FOUNTAINHEAD Editor
Doug White, and Adver-
tising Manager, Robert
Swaim, on an expenditure
for legal advice during the
last few months.
Swaim said that the
newspaper had received an
inquiry from the State
Board of Elections con-
i cerning an advertisement
placed in FOUNTAIN-
HEAD for Sen. Jesse
Helms. Swaim said that the
reputation of both himself,
and the reputation of the
newspaper was at stake.
He added that he
sought legal advice, and he
drew his authority to do this
from the FOUNTAINHEAD
contract which was sanc-
tioned and approved by the
M edia Board on M arch 29.
Assistant Professor of
journalism said 'Swaim
and White should be com-
mended for what they did,
because it could have saved
the university � and the
Media Board - a lot of
em harassment
Warren quoted several
court cases which show that
college newspaper publi-
shers (a governing body
lik6 the Media Board on
this campus) were respon-
sible for what was pub-
lished in the school news-
papers.
Dean Alexander said
that the Media Board did
not have the Operations
Manual for FOUNTAIN-
HEAD, a booklet listing job
descriptions, layout rules,
and office procedure.
Professor Ira Baker,
Head of the Journalism
program, said that The
power of the press is to be
responsible Baker quoted
a source at the University of
Missouri that stated that
oneof the biggest problems
of collegiate journalism was
me fact that there was no
responsible person to be
legally liable in case of a
lawsuit 'This ownership
is not made clear. Baker
added
Baker commented fur-
ther that a statement of
policy should be a high pri-
ority with FOUNTAIN-
HEAD, and that the staff
should not be blamed if no
guidelines are provided "I
would simply urge that the
Media Board compose the
guidelines as soon as pos-
sible. Baker noted, and he
left a manual from another
school to use as a guideline
for the operations manual
The Media Board set a
deadline of Jan. 1, for all
campus media to make
their operations manuals
available.
On the legal question
the board approved a plan
whereby the Editor and
Advertising Manager of
FOUNTAINHEAD would
be able to get legal services
by informing only the
chairman and advisor of the
Media Board.
EVERYONE LIKES A chtffng
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FLAS
Pag 2 FOUNTAINHEAD � Nov�mb�r 1978
Bowling
Writers
The campus level re-
creational qualifying tour-
naments to determine the
top men and women in the
events of bowling, billiards,
backgammon, chess, and
table tennis, are now un-
derway The tournaments,
sponsored by Mendenhall
Student Center, are some
fo several hundred being
held at colleges and uni-
versities around the nation i
in the qualifying round for
the intercollegiate cham-
pionships conducted by the
Association of College Un-
ions � International.
The campus winners in
each event will participate
in the regional 5 tour-
nament with the champions
from approximately thirty
other schools from the
states of Kentucky. Vir-
ginia. North Carolina, Ten-
nessee, and South Caro-
a The ACU-I regional
face-to-face tournaments
will be held Feb. 8, 9. and
10. at the University of
Tennessee in Knoxville,
Tennessee. The trip to the
regional competition for the
ECU representatives will
be sponsored by Menden-
hall Student Center.
Qualifying tournaments
were conducted in each
dorm to determine dorm
winners who will parti-
cipate in the All-Campus
tournaments. Day-student
representatives were sel-
ected through tournaments
held in September and
October which were con-
ducted by MSC.
The Writer's Guild will
meet Monday at 7:30 In
Austin-207. Discussion will
include formation of a prose
forum. All persons inter-
ested in writing welcome.
Tournament
The All-Campus Bowl-
ing Tournament will be
held Thurs, Nov. 30, with
the women's competition
beginning at 6 p.m. and the
men's competition getting
underway at 8 p.m. at
Mendenhall. The top five
winners in each division
. will represent ECU in
! Knoxville.
Fellowship
Chemistry Sierra
Billiards
MSC
The MSC All-Campus
Bowling Tournament sche-
duled for Thurs Nov. 9
has been re-scheduled for
Thurs Nov. 30. The wom-
en s competition will begin
at 6 p.m. and the men's
competition will begin at 8
p.m. at the Mendenhall
Bowling Center.
Come watch the compe-
tition as the MSC All-
Campus Billiards Tourna-
ment gets underway on
Mon Nov. 13 at 6 p.m. in
the Mendenhall Billiards
Center. The semi-finals and
final match will be held
Tues. evening, Nov. 14 at
the dorm and day-student
tournaments will meet in
this double elimination
competition to determine
the champion and second
place finisher who will
represent ECU in the ACUI
regional tournament in
Knoxville, Tennessee.
Backgammon
Scheduled for Mon
Nov. 20 is the All-Campus
Backgammon Tournament
to be held in the Multi-
purpose Room at Men-
denhall at 7 p.m. Intro-
duced at the regional tour-
nament fro the first time
last year it met with such
success that the event will
be continued. The first
place finisher will partici-
pate in the regional face-
to-face tournament.
Are you a user being
used? Would you like to be
free but are cscared that no
one will accept you? If so,
you are a person who needs
to hear Myles Cartrette tell
how Jesus Christ accepted
him as a user and a loser
and had given him a life of
real freedom. We invite you
to come tonight, Nov. 9 in
Mendenhall 212 7:30-9:30
p.m. Also after the meeting
we are going to the movie,
"Born Again Full Gospel
Student Fellowship will ac-
cept you.
Turkey shoot
Win your Thanksgiving
dinner at the Mendenhall
"Turkey Shoot Thurs
Nov. 16 between the hours
of 7 p.m. and 11 p.m the
MSC Bowling Center will
be the site of an old-fa-
shioned turkey shoot with a
slight difference. An entry
fee of $1.25 will give you
the chance to bowl one ball
on ten consecutive lanes. If
at least eight pins fall on
each lane, you win a
turkey! Enter as many
times as you like. Limit
three wins perperson.
Interested in Chem-
istry? The ECU Chapter of
the American Chemical So-
ciety is reactivation. You
need not be a chemistry
major to join. If interested,
come to the meeting in
Flanagan, 202, Mon
Nov. 13at 7 p.m.
Military
Pablo
Trivia
The Student Union Ma-
jor Attractions Committee
will present Pablo Cruise
with special guest Lving-
ston Taylor on Thurs, Nov.
9, at 8 p.m. in Minges
Coliseum.
Tickets will be $5 for
ECU students and $7 for
the public. All tickets are
available from the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center. In addi-
tion, public tickets can be
purchased from Apple Re-
cords, School Kid's Re-
cords, and The M usic Shop.
Only public tickets will be
sold at the door.
Republican
ECU College Republi-
cans have their next meet-
ing on Thurs Nov. 16 at 7
p.m. The meeting will be
held in Brewster C-103. All
interested persons are in-
vited to attend. Refresh-
ments will be served.
The Intramural Depart-
ment in its never ending
search to provide various
types of competition for the
college student again offers
a unique opportunity,
baseball trivia. This com-
petition requires no physi-
cal strength or stamina,
just intelligence of the
history of professional
baseball. Registration be-
gins Nov. 13-16 in the
Intramural Office, Rm. 204
Memorial Gym. Play be-
gins Mon Nov. 20, SIGN-
UP The intramural pro-
gram is only as good as the
people who participate.
The Sierra Club will
meet Mon Nov. 13, at 8
p.m. to explore North Car-
olina's plan for improving
and maintaining water
quality in the state. Anyone
interested in fishing,
swimming, boating, crab-
bing, or any other activities
on North Carolina's rivers
arrl streams is encouraged
to attend. The club meets in
the basement of the First
Presbyterian Church, 14th
and Elm streets, Green-
ville.
Leadership
Leadership Training
Classes (LTC) are designed
to teach you about the
Christian way of life and to
show you about growing in
a personal relationship with
Jesus Christ.
You'll have fun, meet
new friends and learn a lot.
LTC meets every Thursday
night at 7 p.m. in Brewster
B-103. Everyone is invited.
LTC is sponsored by the
Campus Crusade for
Christ.
Cap-Sown
Graduate
History
The Lambda-Eta Chap-
ter of the Phi Alpha Theta,
History Honor Society, will
hold its fall semester ini-
tiation ceremony on Tues
Nov. 14 at 7:30 p.m. in
Brewster C-103. Dr.
Thomas Brewer will be the
guest speaker. Faculty
members who have been of
service to the organization
will also be honored. All
history majors, minors, and
faculty members are invi-
ted to attend. There will be
a reception hald after the
meeting.
Attention all first sem-
ester graduates. Delivery
dates for your caps and
gowns will be Nov. 28-30 at
the Student Supply Store.
These Keepsake gowns
are yours to keep providing
the $10 graduation fee has
been paid. For those re-
ceiving the Masters Degree
the $10 fee pays for your
cap and gown, but there is
an extra fee of $7.95 for
your hood. Any questions
pertaining to caps and
gowns should be referred to
the Student Supply Store,
Wright Building.
First, take a young per-
son in military service,
probably away from home
during the Christmas sea-
son for the first time; mix
with some mail. Then add
an idea conceived by con-
cerned Americans, and you
have a continuing cam-
paign called "Military
Overseas Mail" (or
M.O.M as sometimes
known) � to serve our
military personnel not only
overseas, but Stateside as
well.
In the previous Christ-
mas programs, thousands
of pieces of mail, primarily
Christmas cards with notes
and letters of support and
encouragement written in-
side, have been collected
from the public. This mail
in turn has been distributed
all accross the U.S. and
around the world, to let our
young military people know
that we as individual Am-
ericans do care about them.
(If you have a friend or
relative in military service,
who would appreciate some
extra mail at Christmas,
sen d in the name and
address, and MOM. will
see that some mail is sent
to them.)
This is an ideal Christ-
mas project for students
and their families, either as
individuals or as members
of organized clubs or other
groups. For information on
how you or your group may
participate in this very
worthwhile event, please
send a stamped, self-
addressed envelope to:
MILITARY OVERSEAS
MAIL
Box 1787
Baltimore, Md. 21203
Also, please mention how
you learned of M .O.M .
P.S. This recipe is sure-
fire and never fails. It's
topped with the warm
feeling that you've made a
young American service-
men and women, many
places in the States and
around the world, a little
happier at Christmas.
The Graduate Record
Examination will be offered
at ECU on Sat Dec. 9,
1978. Application blanks
are to be completed and
mailed to: Educational
Testing Service, Box 966-R,
Princeton, NJ 08540.
Late registration dead-
line is Nov. 15, 1978.
Applications may be ob-
tained from the ECU Test-
ing Center, Rm. 105,
Speight Building.
ACT
Printing
The ACT will be offered
at ECU on Sat Dec. 9,
1978. Application balnks
are to be completed and
mailed to: ACT Registra-
tion, P.O. Box 414, Iowa
City, Iowa 52240 to arrive
no later than Nov. 10, 1978.
Applications may be ob-
tained from the ECU Test-
ing Center, Rm. 105,
Speight Building.
Law
The Print Group will
have cards and note paper
with university scenes for
sale beginning Mon Nov-
ember 6. Contact any print
maker in Rm. 1105 Jenkins
bldg.
Economics
The student section of
the American Home
Economics Association will
meet Mon November 13
at 7 p.m. in the Van-
Landingham room of the
Home Economics Building.
An interesting program
on today's fashions will be
presented. All home econ-
omics majors and any other
interested persons are
urged to attend.
Comics
The ECU Comic Book
Club is holding a Comic
book convention at the
Roxy Theatre. Sun Nov.
12. The convention will last
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and
admission is free to the
public. Anyone interested
in comics, fantasy, science
fiction or nostalgia in gen-
eral is encouraged to at-
tend. Dealer space is avail-
able. For more information
call 758-6909 before 7p.m.
The Law School Ad-
mission Test will be offered
at ECU on Sat Dec 2,
1978. Application blanks
are to be completed and
mailed to: Educational
Testing Service, Box 966-R.
Princeton, NJ 08540
Late registration dead-
line is Nov. 13, 1978
Applications may be ob-
tained from the ECU Test-
ing Center. Speight Build-
ing, Rm. 105
College Life
Another 'College Life"
is taking place this week-
end! If you want to take a
� � study break just getting
in from the weekend and
want to relax, or need a
break from your roommate,
come over to Garrett Dorm
Lobby, Sunday night at 9
p.m. This weekend "Col-
lege Life" is bringing Tom
Lowder, a speaker from
UNC. and guitarist Richard
Fullilove. There will be the
usual fun, refreshments,
and a door prize. If you are
even mildly interested in
finding out how Jesus
Christ relates to you, the
college student, "College
Life" is for you! So come on
down to Garrett Dorm
Lobby. Sunday night at 9
p.m. for "College Life
The Student Union Coffeehouse Committee presents . . .
Carolina Bluegrass
along with
Frank Hunter
Fri. & Sat. Nov. 10 & 11
at 8:30 & 9:30 p.m.
Rm. 15 Mendenhall
On Sat. night, Frank Hunter will perform in the
CoHeehowe while Carolina Bluegrau perform in the Snack Bar.
Admission:
FREE
f Jl� � WJWIJJJEJE
wax
ALLEN
DANE
KEATON
"ANNIE
HALL'
Friday night only 5, 7 and 9
�ECOND EIC ATTRACTION
cMctxilLn MonOE UcmMe J&aiuxE
cHouj to cMaviy a cWutionaixz 8:30 fx.m.
Plus a JsA Nicholson Festival Sunday at 4 p.m.
Classifieds
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Circulation 10,000
Carolina University
Grtenvifis, North Carolina ���
Voters re-elect Helms to Senate
wins by 'comfortable' margin
U S SENA TOR JESSE HELMS The sweet taste of victory
s reflected in Helms' smile as he returns to the U.S. Senate
for a second term.
By ROBERT SWAIM
Advertising Manager
and
The Associated Press
RALEIGH � Republican Senator Jesse Helms easily
defeated Democratic challenger John Ingram in Tuesday's
election.
Helms received 54 percent of the vote. Ingram polled
423,037 votes to Helms' 496,497.
Early in the evening there was some speculation that
Ingram might upset Helms due to the higher voter turnout
which is usually an uplift for democratic candidates.
W hen the early returns began to trickle in it was evident
that Helms would be vicotrious and would win by a
comfortable margin.
Thousands of Helms supporters gathered at the
Sheraton Hotel to await the returns and the cheer their
candidate.
The crowds at the Sheraton went wild with cheers when
Homecoming parade moved
to Saturday afternoon
ECU News Bureau
Saturday's Homecom-
ing 8 parade will begin at
under a revised
able of events for
ecommg Day. ECU
�� als have announced.
'he shift m the Home-
ng schedule was made
necessary by a change in
the ECU-William
and Mary football game at
en Stadium which will
be televised by ABC (4
p.m. EST). Before the
television arrangements,
the game had been sche-
duled for a 1 :30 p.m.
kickoff.
The Homecoming par-
ade, always a highlight of
old grads day at ECU, will
form on Elm Street and
move down Fifth Street
pass the main campus and
the Chancellor's home pro-
ceeding to the downtown
area.
The parade will include
at least five bands and 17
gaily decorated floats.
The theme of the week-
long Homecoming ob-
servance in "New Horizons
al ECU and this is ex-
pected to be portrayed in
design of the floats being
readied for the parade.
Art exhibits, class re-
unions, socials and concerts
are scheduled throughout
the week.
Tickets should be ob-
tained in advance for the
Alumni Dance and Musical
Extravaganza which will
begin at 8:30 p.m. at the
Moose Lodge. This is a
couples only affair and
tickets are $20 per couple
advance sale, the alumni
office said.
Alumni registration for
Homecoming will be held
from 10 a.m. until 12:30
p.m.
all three television networks decalred Helms the winner
shortly before 10 p.m.
It was about 10 p.m. when Helms came down from his
suite to deliver his victory speech to an overflow crowd that
had assembled in the ballroom of the hotel.
Nickname
Helms began his address by saying "I'm Senator No
and I'm glad to be here
Helms explained his nickname to the thousands of
who were watching on national television.
"Perhaps I should mention the label, Senator No
bestowed upon me by an ultra-liberal newspaper editor,
(referring to Claude Sitton, editor of the News and
Observer), in Raleigh, N.C. who intended it as a critical
epithet said Helms.
"What this editor failed to understand, in his frenzy of
criticism, isthat the people of N.C. indeed, citizens all over
America want senators who will vote no' to excessive
federal spending, excessive federal controls and continued
inflation said Helms.
Helms said that in voting 'no' to the excess of
government he had been voting 'yes' to the wishes of the
people of the state.
Inclosing, Helms said that he held no ill feelings against
his opponent, John Ingram who had viciously attacked him
during the final days of the campaign.
"I wish him and his family well said Helms.
Carries east
Sen. Jesse Hlems carried the Piedmont and most of the
east, losing in the rural hinterlands, as he easily brushed
aside Democrat John Ingram to win a second term Tuesday.
Helms, whose liberal campaign spending contrasted
with his conservative, anti-big government ideology, won
54 percent of the vote by running up insurmountable
margins in the major cities and smaller, textile counties of
the populous Piedmont.
The margin, was as comfortable as when Helms bacame
the state's first GOP senator since reconstruction in 1972
And the victory was certain to fuel encouragement for
Helms to enter the 1980 Republican presidential primaries,
although Helms said he has no presidential ambitions at the
moment.
"I think the senator is going to be an extraordinarily
influential factor in the national Republican Party said
state GOP chairman Jack Lee, who added he expects Helms
at least to be a favorite son candidate.
Ingram won 38 counties to Helms' 62, but Ingram's
were mainly small, rural areas, some with heavy black
votes. He solidly took the northeastern corner, much of the
Sandhillsand scattered counties in the far west. He carried
Orange County, alway Democratic, but lost usually
Democratic Durham.
"This is not a personal victory. This is a victory of the
conservative, free enterprise system in America Helms
declared after winning.
"It is a clear signal that the American people are far
ahead of the big spending Congress in realizing that federal
deficits and an overwhelming federal bureaucracy are after
all the principle causes of inflation he said.
Nicknamed "Senator No" for his constant opposition to
social legislation. Helms turned the tag to his advantage
during the campaign, saying he was proud of voting "no
to federal regulations and waste.
County votes
Helms won by 10,000 votes in Mecklenburg, the largest
county, and by 5,000 each in Forsyth and Guilford. He took
Buncombe in the mountains by 1,000 and New Hanover on
the coast by 3,000
Helms won his home county of Wake by more than
12.000 and took Ingram's home of Randolph county by
nearly 5.000.
Ingram made no statement beyond his Tuesday night
councession, and said he planned to return to work as state
insurance commissioner.
Helms remained secluded at his home in Raleigh
Wednesday, and did not hold the traditional morning-after
news conference.
Media board keeps '78 BUCCANEER funds
MARC BARNES
Assistant News Editor
The question of what
should be done with the
originally intended
ise for the publication
ow defunct 77-78
BUCCANEER, and discus-
nght of FOUN-
TAINHEAD management
to use legal services with-
out notifying their gov-
erning body highlighted
Wednesday's Media Board
meeting.
The money totally ap-
proximately $42,000 has
been the subject of a heated
controversy in recent weeks
between the Student Gov-
ernment Association (SGA)
and the various campus
medias
The SGA, through the
statements of several legi-
slators, wanted the funds
reverted to the SGA Gen-
eral Fund. Several mem-
bers of the Media Board
echoed their sentiments,
saying that the money
should be returned to the
SGA.
Several members of the
campus media appeared
before the Board to list
specific funds that their
respective publications and
services should receive.
Doug White, FOUNTAIN-
HEAD editor, said that

What's inside
WOODY ALLEN
ECU-William and Mary to be televised on
ABCsee p. 8.
State volleyball tournament at Minges
this weekendsee p. 9.
Greek Forumsee p. 5.
Student Union Films Committee hasa full
slate of free films for homecoming week.
Annie Hall leads the packfor previews,
see p. 6.
The Gregg Smith Singers will perform at
Hendrix Theatre this Wed. eveningsee
P. 6.
Interior design dept. seeks
accreditation from FIDER
By MARTHA OAKLEY
Staff Writer
The Interior Design De-
partment in ECU'S School
of Art is currently being re-
viewed for accreditation by
The Foundation for Interior
Design Education Re-
search.
The Foundation, known
at FIDER, is a national
organization that studied
interior design education as
ught throughout the
country in various schools
of art.
At the request of indi-
vidual departments, FIDER
will visit and make an eval-
uation for possible accred-
itation or simply offer sug-
gestions.
The Department of In-
terior Design has received
interest from the state
chapter of the American
Society of Interior Design
concerning its accredit-
ation.
The only pressure the
department is undergoing
to become accredited is
self-made, according to
Mel Stanforth, Chairman of
the Interior Design Depart-
ment.
According to Stanforth,
the evaluation is now in the
paperwork stages.
"We wont't know the
outcome for quite a while
he said. "But if the depart-
ment becomes accredited it
will be the only one in the
state which is
FOUNTAINHEAD needed
a new typesetting machine,
new furniture,file cabinets,
light tables and industrial
carpet.
White commented on
the amount of noise in the
office, adding that the
carpet would be an efficient
sound deadener.
Robert Swaim, FOUN-
TAINHEAD advertising
manager said the printing
budget would run out the
last week in February, if
printing costs continued at
the present rate.
"We will require an
additional appropriation of
$15,000 to print the paper
until the end of school
Swaim said.
Pete Podeszwa, head
photographer of the Photo
Lab, said his department
needed funds to cover
purchases of new equip-
ment, and to cover the cost
of moving the Photo Lab
into the Publications Build-
ing.
According to Podeszwa,
the Photo Lab needs a film
dryer, a darkroom revol-
ving door, a print pro-
cessor, and a dry mount
press.
Podeszwa added that a
new en larger was also
needed.
Craig Sahli, BUCCAN-
EER editor, said the year-
book needed new lighting,
alterations to the exterior
walls to extend them to the
ceiling, and two file cab-
inets. Sahli also said that
the yearbook staff needed
one more typewriter and
three desk lamps. ,
He said a desk calcu-
lator for the business man-
ager to aid in bookkeeping
was needed.
LukeWhisnant, REBEL
editor, asked for a new
typewriter, a door to be out
leading from the magazines
editorial department to Ha
art department, and the
wall to be extended to the
ceiling.
Discussion on the Issue
began when one member of
the Media Board asserted
that the money should be
sent to the SGA, although
she approved of the expen-
ditures for the Photo Lab;
the wall extensions to the
ceiling mentioned by BUC-
CANEER and REBEL, and
purchase of light .jjxtures
mentioned by all three
publications.
Gerry Wallace, presi-
dent of the Men's Resi-
dence Council said that the
Media Board constitution
stated that the Media
Board had to keep the
money.
Wallace added that the
media needed the funds,
and that it was a "bad
precedent to set to give the
money away He also said
that the organizations on
campus should keep sav-
ings accounts so that they
wouldn't run out of funds.
Wallace made his re-
marks in the form of a
motion, which was sec-
onded.
Dean Alexander said
that he was against using
the money for the campus
media. "This board doesn't
have the right to spend the
money that was allocated to
the BUCCANEER Alex-
ander said.
He added, "We have an
obligation to see that it
goes back to the SGA
Dr. Thomas Eamon said
that he was "strongly op-
posed" to keeping the
money. He added that the
board might have the legal
right to the money, but not
the "moral" right.
Ann Thompson, of the
Panhellenic Council said
that the Board had the
"moral" obligation to give
the money to the SGA.
Dean Alexander said
that the Constitution prohi-
bited the M edia Board from
giving the money to the
SGA in the future, but It
wasn't In effect in this case.
Dr. James Tucker of
Student Affaire aatd that he
could see both tides of th
controversy.
Wallace said that the
issue could not be decided
by morals, it must be
decided by laws. He added
that the students would still
benefit from the money. He
said "It is a question of
legality
One of the members of
the board asked Ann
Thompson, who was op-
posed to keeping the
money, what the SGA
would do with it. Thompson
mentioned that the ECU
Playhouse needed funding,
as well as other financially
strapped activities and or-
ganizations.
The vote was close,
3-2 in favor of the Media
Board keeping the funds.
In other business, the
board heard from the
FOUNTAINHEAD Editor
Doug White, and Adver-
tising Manager, Robert
Swaim, on an expenditure
for legal advice during the
last few months.
Swaim said that the
newspaper had received an
inquiry from the State
Board of Elections con-
cerning an advertisement
placed in FOUNTAIN-
HEAD for Sen. Jesse
Helms. Swaim said that the
reputation of both himself,
and the reputation of the
newspaper was at stake.
He added that he
sought legal advice, and he
drew his authority to do this
from the FOUNTAINHEAD
contract which was sanc-
tioned and approved by the
Media Board on March 29.
Assistant Professor of
Journalism said "Swaim
and White should be com-
mended for what they did,
because it could have saved
the university � and the
Media Board � a lot of
embarassment
Warren quoted several
court cases which show that
college newspaper publi-
shers (a governing body
like the Media Board on
this campus) were respon-
sible for what was pub-
lished in the school news-
papers.
Dean Alexander said
that the Media Board did
not have the Operations
Manual for FOUNTAIN-
HEAD, a booklet listing job
descriptions, layout rules,
and office procedure.
Professor Ira Baker.
Head of the Journalism
program, said that "The
power of the press is to be
responsible Baker quoted
a source at the University of
Missouri that stated that
one of the biggest problems
of collegiate journalism was
the fact that there was no
responsible person to be
legally liable in case of a
lawsuit. "This ownership
is not made clear Baker
added
Baker commented fur-
ther that a statement of
policy should be a high pri-
ority with FOUNTAIN-
HEAD, and that the staff
should not be blamed if no
guidelines are provided l
would simply urge that the
Media Board compose the
guidelines as soon as pos-
sible. Baker noted, and he
left a manual from another
school to use as a guideline
for the operations manual
The Media Board set a
deadline of Jan. 1, for all
campus media to make
their operations manuals
available.
On the legal question.
the board approved a plan
whereby the Editor and
Advertising Manager of
FOUNTAINHEAD would
be able to get legal services
by informing only the
chairman and advisor of the
Media Board.
EVERYONE LIKES A
t

i





Bowling
The campus level re-
creational qualifying tour-
naments to determine the
top men and women in the
events of bowling, billiards,
backgammon, chess, and
table tennis, are now un-
derway. The tournaments,
sponsored by Mendenhall
Student Center, are some
fo several hundred being
held at colleges and uni-
versities around the nation i
in the qualifying round for
the intercollegiate cham-
pionships conducted by the
Association of College Un-
ions � International.
The campus winners in
each event will participate
m the regional 5 tour-
nament with the champions
from approximately thirty
other schools from the
states of Kentucky, Vir-
ginia. North Carolina, Ten-
nessee, and South Caro-
lina The ACU-I regional
face-to-face tournaments
will be held Feb. 8, 9, and
10. at the University of
Tennessee in Knoxville,
Tennessee. The trip to the
regional competition for the
ECU representatives will
be sponsored by Menden-
hall Student Center.
Qualifying tournaments
were conducted in each
dorm to determine dorm
winners who will parti-
cipate in the All-Campus
tournaments. Day-student
representatives were sel-
ected through tournaments
held in September and
October which were con-
ducted by MSC
Writers
MSC
The MSC All-Campus
Bowling Tournament sche-
duled for Thurs Nov. 9
has been re-scheduled for
Thurs Nov. 30. The wom-
en s competition will begin
at 6 p.m. and the men's
competition will begin at 8
p.m. at the Mendenhall
Bowling Center.
The Writer's Guild will
meet Monday at 7:30 in
Austin-207. Discussion will
include formation of a prose
forum. All persons inter-
ested in writing welcome.
Tournament
The All-Campus Bowl-
ing Tournament will be
held Thurs, Nov. 30, with
the women's competition
beginning at 6 p.m. and the
men's competition getting
underway at 8 p.m. at
Mendenhall. The top five
winners in each division
will represent ECU in
Knoxville.
Billiards
Come watch the compe-
tition as the MSC All-
Campus Billiards Tourna-
ment gets underway on
Mon Nov. 13 at 6 p.m. in
the Mendenhall Billiards
Center. The semi finals and
final match will be held
Tues. evening, Nov. 14 at
the dorm and day-student
tournaments will meet in
this double elimination
competition to determine
the champion and second
place finisher who will
represent ECU in the ACUI
regional tournament in
Knoxville, Tennessee.
Backgammon
Scheduled for Mon
Nov. 20 is the All-Campus
Backgammon Tournament
to be held in the Multi-
purpose Room at Men-
denhall at 7 p.m. Intro-
duced at the regional tour-
nament fro the first time
last year it met with such
success that the event will
be continued. The first
place finisher will partici-
pate in the regional face-
to-face tournament.
Fellowship
Are you a user being
used? Would you like to be
free but are cscared that no
one will accept you? If so,
you are a person who needs
to hear Myies Cartrette tell
how Jesus Christ accepted
him as a user and a loser
and had given him a life of
real freedom. We invite you
to come tonight, Nov. 9 in
Mendenhall 212 7:30-9:30
p.m. Also after the meeting
we are going to the movie,
"Born Again Full Gospel
Student Fellowship will ac-
cept you.
Turkey shoot
Win your Thanksgiving
dinner at the Mendenhall
"Turkey Shoot Thurs
Nov. 16 between the hours
of 7 p.m. and 11 p.m the
MSC Bowling Center will
be the site of an old-fa-
shioned turkey shoot with a
slight difference. An entry
fee of $1.25 will give you
the chance to bowl one ball
on ten consecutive lanes. If
at least eight pins fall on
each lane, you win a
turkey! Enter as many
times as you like. Limit
three wins perperson.
Trivia
The Intramural Depart-
ment in its never ending
search to provide various
types of competition for the
college student again offers
a unique opportunity,
baseball trivia. This com-
petition requires no physi-
cal strength or stamina,
just intelligence of the
history of professional
baseball. Registration be-
gins Nov. 13-16 in the
Intramural Office, Rm. 204
Memorial Gym. Play be-
gins Mon Nov. 20, SIGN-
UP The intramural pro-
gram is only as good as the
people who participate.
Chemistry
Interested in Chem-
istry? The ECU Chapter of
the American Chemical So-
ciety is reactivation. You
need not be a chemistry
major to join. If interested,
come to the meeting in
Flanagan, 202, Mon
Nov. 13 at 7 p.m.
Pablo
The Student Union Ma-
jor Attractions Committee
will present Pablo Cruise
with special guest Lving-
ston Taylor on Thurs, Nov.
9, at 8 p.m. in Minges
Coliseum.
Tickets will be $5 for
ECU students and $7 for
the public. All tickets are
available from the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center. In addi-
tion, public tickets can be
purchased from Apple Re-
cords, School Kid's Re-
cords, and The M usic Shop.
Only public tickets will be
sold at the door.
Republican
ECU College Republi-
cans have their next meet-
ing on Thurs Nov. 16 at 7
p.m. The meeting will be
held in Brewster C-103. All
interested persons are in-
vited to attend. Refresh-
ments will be served.
History
The Lambda-Eta Chap-
ter of the Phi Alpha Theta,
History Honor Society, will
hold its fall semester ini-
tiation ceremony on Tues
Nov. 14 at 7:30 p.m. in
Brewster C-103. Dr.
Thomas Brewer will be the
guest speaker. -Faculty
members who have been of
service to the organization
will also be honored. All
history majors, minors, and
faculty members are invi-
ted to attend. There will be
a reception hald after the
meeting. �
Sierra
The Sierra Club will
meet Mon Nov. 13, at 8
p.m. to explore North Car-
olina's plan for improving
and maintaining water
quality in the state. Anyone
interested in fishing,
swimming, boating, crab-
bing, or any other activities
on North Carolina's rivers
and streams is encouraged
to attend. The club meets in
the basement of the First
Presbyterian Church, 14th
and Elm streets, Green-
ville.
Leadership
Leadership Training
Classes (LTC) are designed
to teach you about the
Christian way of life and to
show you about growing in
a personal relationship with
Jesus Christ.
You'll have fun, meet
new friends and learn a lot.
LTC meets every Thursday
night at 7 p.m. in Brewster
B-103. Everyone is invited.
LTC is sponsored by the
Campus Crusade for
Christ.
Military
Cap-Gown
Attention all first sem-
ester graduates. Delivery
dates for your caps and
gowns will be Nov. 28-30 at
the Student Supply Store.
These Keepsake gowns
are yours to keep providing
the $10 graduation fee has
been paid. For those re-
ceiving the Masters Degree
the $10 fee pays for your
cap and gown, but there is
an extra fee of $7.95 for
your hood. Any questions
pertaining to caps and
gowns should be referred to
the Student Supply Store,
Wright Building.
First, take a young per-
son in military service,
probably away from home
during the Christmas sea-
son for the first time; mix
with some mail. Then add
an idea conceived by con-
cerned Americans, and you
have a continuing cam-
paign called "Military
Overseas Mail" (or
M.O.M as sometimes
known) � to serve our
military personnel not only
overseas, but Stateside as
well.
In the previous Christ-
mas programs, thousands
of pieces of mail, primarily
Christmas cards with notes
and letters of support and
encouragement written in-
side, have been collected
from the public. This mail
in turn has been distributed
all accross the U.S. and
around the world, to let our
young military people know
that we as individual Am-
ericans do care about them.
(If you have a friend or
relative in military service,
who would appreciate some
extra mail at Christmas,
sen d in the name and
address, and MOM. will
see that some mail is sent
to them.)
This is an ideal Christ-
mas project for students
and their families, either as
individuals or as members
of organized clubs or other
groups. For information on
how you or your group may
participate in this very
worthwhile event, please
send a stamped, self-
addressed envelope to:
MILITARY OVERSEAS
MAIL
Box 1787
Baltimore, Md. 21203
Also, please mention how
you learned of M O.M.
P.S. This recipe is sure-
fire and never fails. It's
topped with the warm
feeling that you've made a
young American service-
men and women, many
places in the States and
around the world, a little
happier at Christmas.
Graduate
The Graduate Record
Examination will be offered
at ECU on Sat Dec. 9,
1978. Application blanks
are to be completed and
mailed to: Educational
Testing Service, Box 966-R,
Princeton, NJ 08540.
Late registration dead-
line is Nov. 15, 1978.
Applications may be ob-
tained from the ECU Test-
ing Center, Rm. 105,
Speight Building.
Printing
The Print Group will
have cards and note paper
with university scenes for
sale beginning Mon Nov-
ember 6. Contact any print
maker in Rm. 1105 Jenkins
bldg.
Economics
The student section of
the American Home
Economics Association will
meet Mon November 13
at 7 p.m. m the Van-
Landingham room of the
Home Economics Building.
An interesting program
on today's fashions will be
presented. All home econ-
omics majors and any other
interested persons are
urged to attend.
ACT
The ACT will be offered
at ECU on Sat Dec 9.
1978 Application balnks
are to be completed and
mailed to: ACT Registra-
tion. P.O. Box 414, Iowa
City, Iowa 52240 to arrive
no later than Nov. 10. 1978
Applications may be ob-
tained from the ECU Test-
ing Center, Rm 105,
Speight Building.
Law
Comics
The ECU Comic Book
Club is holding a Comic
book convention at the
Roxy Theatre, Sun Nov
12. The convention will last
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and
admission is free to the
public. Anyone interested
in comics, fantasy, science
fiction or nostalgia in gen-
eral is encouraged to at-
tend. Dealer space is avail-
able. For more information
call 758-6909 before 7 p.m.
The Law School Ad
mission Test will be offered
at ECU on Sat , Dec 2.
1978 Application blanks
are to be completed and
mailed to: Educational
Testing Service. Box 966-R
Princeton, NJ 08540
Late registration dead-
line is Nov. 13. 1978
Applications may be ob-
tained from the ECU Test-
ing Center. Speight Build-
ing. Rm 105
College Life
Another 'College Life'
is taking place this week-
end! If you want to take a
'study break . just getting
in from the weekend and
want to relax, or need a
break from your roommate,
come over to Garrett Do-t
Lobby. Sunday night at 9
p.m. This weekend Col-
lege Life is bringing Tom
Lowder. a speaker from
UNC. and guitarist Richard
Fullilove. There will be the
usual fun, refreshments,
and a door prize If you are
even mildly interested in
finding out how Jesus
Christ relates to you. the
college student. "College
Life' is for you! So come on
down to Garrett Dorm
Lobby. Sunday night at 9
p.m. for "College Life1
The Student Union Coffeehouse Committee presents . . .
Carolina Bluegrass
along with
Frank Hunter
Fri. & Sat. Nov. 10 & 11
at 8:30 & 9:30 p.m.
Rm. 15 Mendenhall
p,xouahf fxxmnti
WOOD
ALLEN
DIANE
KEATON
"ANNIE
HALL'
On Sat. night, Frank Hunter will perform in the
Coffeehouse while Carolina Bluegrass performs in the Snack Bar.
Admi
ssion:
FREE
Friday night only 5, 7 and 9
SECOND BIC il II U IK S
Marilyn eMonxoE JcxJjIe Dtoiwu
oafataao
ctjcuj bo cA(axxif a cduoncuXE 8:30 fi.m.
cfH dlijouk �jz IO.15 fx.m.
Plus a Jack Nicholson Festival Sunday at 4 p.m.
a
Classifieds
ust see to appreciate only
$35. 758-7676.
FOR SALE: Refrigerator
great for use in an apt. or
home. Is in good condition.
NEED IMMEDIATELY: A
responsJbiefemaleroorn
mate to share a two bed-
room apt. Rent $63. Call
758-5794.
FEMALE ROOMMATE:
wanted to share apt. close
to campus with two other
giris. Her share of the rent
would be $70 plus Vt
utilities. Call 752-2024.
MID EASTERN DANCE:
(Authentic Belly Dancing)
taught by Sunshine - exper-
ienced teacher and perfor-
mer in Ohio, Mexico,
Atlanta, and the D.C. area.
Classes are now forming.
Call 756-0736.
YOGA: Hatha yoga is now
being taught by Sunshine.
New classes forming. Relax
-ation, realization, weight
loss. For more info, call
756-0736.
NEEDED: Used light-
weight bicycle with 23"
frame. Will negotiate on
price. Call Dan at 758-8074.
HELP WANTED: Sales-
Person in Golf, Tennis and
Ski Specialty Shop with ex-
perience in bookkeeping,
typing and other secretarial
duties. Part-time position-
hours negotiable. Applica-
tions now being
Call 752-1525.
t
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wZtT" ��" Sun,n,er Schoo,
- an tour offered to students.
. Piedmont
has discount fares
worth flying home
about
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Weekend Excursion Fare
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UNO-Innsbruck, Austria
9 Novtmbf 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Pag 3
International program open to students
By RICHY SMITH
Assistant News Editor
An International Sum-
mer School is held each
summer in Innsbruck, Au-
stria and is open to stu-
dents all over the United
States.
The program is part of
the International Study
Programs and is sponsored
by the University of New
Orleans.
The sixth annual pro-
gram will expand in 1979
from 200 to 250 students,
according to program dir-
ector. Dr. Gordon Mueller.
"UNO's popular alpine
summer school attracted
students from 39 different
universities and five for-
eign countries this past
summer said Mueller,
"and as a result UNO-
Innsbruck has now become
the largest overseas sum-
mer school offered by any
American university
Mueller said students
are already making their
applications for next sum-
mer.
Courses are focused on
the cultural, historic, social
and economic traditions of
Europe. Geology, business,
and education classes are
also taught. All credits are
transferable and all in-
struction of courses are by
faculties from American
universities. All courses are
taught in English.
There are approximate-
ly 60 courses in 19 different
subject areas. Nine sem-
ester credits may be a-
quired during the summer
school session, according to
M ueller.
fcf
TX
JJ�
U.S.A.
24 Hours a day
Large homemade biscuits with
Ham-Sausage-Steak
Chicken-Qieese-Butter
Also Combinations
-Dinners-
FriedChicken Tubs and Buckets
also Drive thru window
For take out call 500N.GreeneSt
758-7607
"Job opportunities are
available for students at
other schools who wish to
work for the program as
official campus representa-
tives in 197879 stated
Mueller
Mueller said those stu-
dents interested in working
should notify the University
of New Orleans.
The six week summer
program also offers special
courses and a workshop
featuring American poet
Robert Duncan. There will
also be a Symposium on
War and Peace under the
supervision of Professor
Stephen E. Ambrose, the
official biographer of Pres-
ident Eisenhower and in-
ternationally known mili-
tary historian.
Students are housed in
the student dormitory at
the University of Innsbruck
while attending the pro-
gram.
According to Mueller,
time isalloted for travelling
and touring Europe.
The UNO-Innsbruck
summer program begins
July 1 and ends August 10.
Students may partici-
pate in an optional three-
week tour of northern Eur-
ope or the Greek Islands
HOLLOWELL'S
SNACK BAR
Orangeade and Lemonade
25 and 35
made from fresh oranges and lemons,
no imitation flavoring added.
Hot Dogs 45
Ice Cream, all flavors 15 dip
Banana Splits 86
Hot Fudge Sundae 70
Quality � Cofflptfiffvt Pricms � Sfvlcm
8a.m730p.m. 8a.m-l0p.rn.
prior to the school.
According to Mueller,
the total package cost is
$1,539. It includes the
charter flight, tuition, and
room There is a reduced
price set for students ar-
ranging their own trans-
portation
Information may be ob-
tained from the University
of New Orleans. New Or-
leans. Louisiana.
WE ARE PAYING
CASH
FOR CLASS RINGS
(REGARDLESS OF CONDITION)
OTHER GOLD RINGS
(REGARDLESS OF CONDITION)
ANY GOLD OR SILVER OF
ANY KIND AND
TOP CASH PRICE PAID FOR
SILVER AND GOLD COINS
COIN COLLECTIONS
BRING TO "COIN MAN"
HARMONY HOUSE
SOUTH
ON THE MALL
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
BOOKS
axu
butterflies
rlington Blvd.
reenville, A.C.
27834
BROAD SELECTION OF
PAPERBACKS, BARD-
BACRS,MAGAZLES A.YD
TEACHING AIDS.
We deal in special orders
of any size.
OPEN Mon. thro Sal.
10:OOam� 9:00pm
You too

h
i could become
a collector's item
Make your YEARBOOK PORTRAIT
ppointment NOW
APPOINTMENTS
BEING TAKEN NOW
COME BY
OR
CALL THE BUC OFFICE
AT 757 6501
PICTURES WILL BE MADE
FROM
MONDAY, NOV. 6
UNTIL
TUESDAY, NOV. 31
FROM 9 a.m. TIL 5 p.m.
THIS IS
THE ONLY TIME
PICTURES
WILL BE MADE
THIS YEAR!
t


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t
1
Impoverished media
The Photo Lab
from Its present
dorm.
The FOUNT A
cafeteria, and has
tile floor. These
throughout the office when calls are received.
needs to move its operations
dungeon beneath Fleming
NHEAD office was once a
a cavernous ceiling and hard
factors, plus the numerous
The Media Board acted wisely yesterday in
deciding to keep the $42,000 originally
allocated for the 197778 BUCCANEER. They
now have the capital to make the desperately
needed improvements in the media offices,
and it is our hope that the board will not be
tight-fisted with this windfall profit.
All media housed in the Old South Building
(REBEL, BUCCANEER, FOUNTAINHEAD,
and the EBONY HERALD) need new light
fixtures. Only FOUNTAINHEAD has any
hanging light fixtures, and only a few at that.
The other three have only desk lamps and very
dim lights embedded in the ceiling 15 feet
above the floor.
FOUNTAINHEAD needs another typesett-
er, since the present one is old and
untrustworthy. Should this machine break
down, it would shut down the entire operation
of the paperThe BUCCANEER, REBEL, and
EBONY HERALD have virtually no typewrit-
ers This list does ijiot even begin to scratch the
The media need a new, centralized phone surface. WECU has not even been mentioned,
system, and FOUNTAINHEAD, since its office At last, however,
space is quite large and is divided into small resources to make up for the"years of neglect
cubicles, needs an intercom system to keep our we suffered und�r the Student Governmc
beleaguered secretary from having to scream Association.
partitions within the office wreak havoc with
noises, bouncing them back and forth, etc.
One can imagine the din in the office on layout
days when, at any given moment, there are
usually a half dozen typewriters in use, a very
noisy AP wire machine, all three phone lines
ringing constantly, a headliner and typesetter
(both of which emit myriad nerve-racking
electronic "beeping" sounds) in use, people
are shouting to relay phone calls, someone is
swearing at a maqhine that just ate 15 minutes
worth of work, wNile all the time these sounds
are ricocheting throughout the office. The
need for some sort
deaden the noise
American
of inudstrial grade carpet to
s obvious.
Elections for sale
Can an election be bought?
In North Carolina's case, yes. Jesse Helms
won the Senate race not because of his
jingoism so much as because of his unprece-
dented financial resources. He holds the
campaign was characterized by chaos and
disorder, in stark contrast to the efficient
political machine of the Helms campaign.
Consequently, roughly a third of the voting
population decided the outcome of the election.
Wealthy American still rule
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
The waiters in white gloves were serving the
chyssoise and chilled white wine when the party got
roue1- Unlike"cither parties, the trouble didn't start among
quests, but among those who weren't invited.
But then this was no ordinary bash. It was an exclusive
dinner party held by a prominent socialite in San
Francisco s Union Square, where dinner is usually served in
brown paper bags.
By the time 'he guests got to their long-stemmed
.vbernes the party was out of control. Apple cores and
curses flew at the diners and the police were called.
An unemployed crasher was arrested as the silverware
jvas rushed inside. The hostess was livid.
She had a nght to have a party in a public place, she
said The lady throws a lot of parties. Earlier this year, she
had one for dogs.
This bald juxtaposition of wealth and poverty was
unique m only one respect: its visibility. Such extremes are
with us every day but usually they are discreetly hidden.
America, after all. is supposed to a land of dizzying
social mobility, the place where Karl Marx's vision of a
classless society has largely been realized. Other
unfortunate lands have working classes, lords and ladies.
America has only a huge, amorphous middle class.
Indeed, most Americans wouia probably describe
'hemseives as middle class: the $75,000 a year attorney
grudgingly, because he hasn't yet amassed enough capital
to live on the $10,000 a year clerk-typist proudly, because
she doesn't rave to live on welfare.
Thtne are. as Thomas Massey points out in a recent
article m the Washington Monthly, worlds of difference
between the expectations, contacts and real-life prospects
of the lawyer and the clerk-typist. Yet both consider
themselves, and are considered by many, to be "middle
class
possibly' (64) under the control of an indefiable family or
group of associates
If the old line clans that control much of America's
wealth and by extension its social and political life - have
not withered away, nei her have workers.
According to Zeitlii, the proportion of male manual
workers in the workforce (47 percent to 1970) has remained
nearly constant since J920. Among the additional seven
percent officially classified as "service workers" are
janitors, porters, laundy workers and dishwashers.
Most of the overall rise in service worker has come from
the increasing number of working women, Women may not
blue pollars and do manual labor, but
beauticians are clearly working
class when judged by irjeome and their lack of control over
their jobs.
dubious distinction of being the top fund raiser One can hardly say that Helms represents
m the nation in last Tuesday's election. majority of North Carolina's citizens.
Ingram put up a valiant, although Nationally, the voter turnout was the smallest
hopelessly uphill struggle to oust North
Carolina's most embarassing citizen. The poor
man never had a chance. In most any modern
election, publicity, especially television and
radio publicity, is usually a crucial factor in the
outcome, and this election was no exception
since World War II. Just how representative is
a government when so few voters cast their
ballots?
Meager resources, a disorganized cam-
paign, and a low voter turnout combined to
sentence North Carolina to another six years of
ngram's paltry $200,000 or so was no match a hawkish reactionary. We can only hope that
'or the six million largely out-of-state dollars voters will not repeat the mistake they made
Helms had at his disposal. Tuesday in 1984
As if this wasn't bad enough, Ingram's Sour grapes.
wear traditional
many- typists.cashiers,
Wealthy Americans, un
Europe, not only reign, they rule.
Forum
And unlike male industrial workers, female service
workers are largely unorganized.
The impact of these statistics in human terms
profound, becoming clejarly visible only in moments of bad
timing and bad taste, lit e the dinner party in Union Square
ike the doddering crowned heads of
Greenpeace fights to save ecology
Together, they form
immense economic, pol
to the same clubs, spi
a self-contained network with
tical and social power. They belong
their drinks on the same manicured
lawns, send their child en to the same schools.
Five of the lesser
medical school ahead of Allan Bakke were white students,
heavy donors to the school and
A classless society?
If nearly ail of us are middle class, it follows that there is
no worn ng class, or at least not much pf one, no ruling class
and none of the class conflict that plagues other societies.
Even liberal pundits like John Kenneth Galbraith agree
ours j becoming a white collar "service economy" where
mar igement and labor work as a team to reach common
goals America, according to this view, has made its
omiette without breaking eggs.
It s a comforting view, but does it hold up? Much
research suggests it does not. An extensive survey by
UCLA professor M durice Zeitlin in The Progressive cites
the following figures
In 1810, the top one percent of the American
people owned 21 percent of the nation's wealth.
In 1915, the top two percent of the people owned 35
percent of the wealth.
Today, the top one percent still owns 25 percent of all
personal and financial assets.
Comments Zeitlin: "Through all the tumultuous
changes the Civil War and the emancipation of the slaves,
the Populist and Progressive movements, the Great
Depression, the New Deal, progressive taxation, the mass
organization of industrial workers and World Wars I and II
- this class has held on to everything it had. They owned
America then and they own it now
Many of America's owners belong to the great captialist
families of the 19th century, the "captains of industry" that
supposedly disappeared with the Model T.
The Mellon family controls at least four firms In the top
non-financials, including Gulf Oil and Alcoa.
Laurance Rockefeller ownes a controlling five percent
interest in Eastern Airlines in secret accounts so
well-hidden that when the federal government and Eastern
itself wanted to know where they were, they had to ask
Rockefeller to tell them.
A study by Phillip Burch Jr. based on information in the
business press concluded that "at least 60 percent of the
top 500 industrial corporations are 'probably (236) or
Health, Education anc
"nobody seems to noti
their quotas
For working people
Reading Lillian Rubin's
who use the expression
their lives
qualified applicants who entered
the fortunate sons of
politicians with clout
While the middle dlass and the minorities are fighting
I out over who should be admitted to med school a
Welfare Dept. official remarked,
x that the rich are still assured of
the cost of powerlessness is high,
book on working class lives, Worlds
of Pain, one is struck by the number of workers in their 20s
when I was young as though
are already over.
The movie Blue Collar presented an equally disturbing
picture of frantic mach smo and self-destructive violence.
That's a touch of clas no one likes to think about much.
system is the skeleton in America's
out.
But it's there. The class
closet, waiting to come
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
A word about Green-
peace.
We are ecologists, ac-
tively working to protect
our fragile world. We have
fought French atmospheric
nuclear testing in Polyn-
esia, and won.
We have helped to
expose the brutality of the
baby harp seal slaughter in
Newfoundland. We have
driven the Russian whaling
industry out of North A-
merican waters.
In 1975, we launched
our first anti-whaling cam-
paign in the Pacific. Mem-
bers of the campaign
placed themselves between
the harpoon cannons and
the whales, with the Rus-
sians narrowly missing our
people with their explosive
harpoons.
In 1976, we mobilized a
high-speed ocean going
pursuit ship, the Green-
Rxrntainhead
Serving tha East Carolina community for ovor 50 yoara
EDITOR
DougWMto
PRODUCTION MANAGER ADVERTISING MANAGER
Laigh Coaklav N EDT0RS Robort M. S�aim
Mia Evaratta
tycki Gliarmia
TRENDS EDITOR
StavaBachnar
Carolina Unkaraity sponsors
and la diattibulad a
during tha Summar),
SPORTS EDITOR
SamRogars
of East
FOUNTAINHEAD la tha studant nawapapar
baraitv sponsor by tha Madia Boaru
toutad aaoh Tuaaday and Thursday (waakly
StSSF9 Hlr 0ld th BMlw,fl9. G'�"wllla, N.C.
Editorial oficas: 757-6366, 767-6967, 767-6306.
Subscriptions: 610 annually, alumni 66 annually.
peace II, a 150 foot con-
verted minesweeper, to try
again to save the lives of
the last remaining whales
in the world. For the first
time since World War II the
Russians would come no
closer than 700 miles of the
U.S. coast.
Our high-speed con-
frontations led to the saving
of an estimated 1,400
whales. Greenpeace is ask-
ing for a 10 year mora-
torium on all commercial
whaling.
Throughout the au-
tumn-winter, Greenpeace
will conduct a worldwide
series of whale campaigns.
No longer simply summer
sailors, we are now in a
position to confront the an-
cient horror of whaling
whenever and wherever is
occurs.
Since the first boat
sailed for the atomic test
site on Amchitka Island
seven years ago, the family
has grown around the
world. In the last few years
Greenpeace members have
confronted environmental
problems in many coun-
tries. We are dedicated to a
green and peaceful planet
Earth for ourselves, our
children, and generations
yet unborn.
We are working to save
the whales, and the seals,
to stop the spread of nu-
clear weapons, radioactive
contamination, toxic herbi-
cides, and other dangerous
poisons. We are trying to
communicate a sense of
love for our planet home
and all of its creatures.
Our work coats money,
and we rely on you for help.
We are not supported by
any government, business,
or other organization.
When you join Greenpeace, i
its for life!
Below you will see how
we have spent our money
so far, and where it has
come from. If you want
your money to go toward a
certain project, please let
us know; we'll make sure
that it does.
Money In: 46 percent
Donations and member-
ships, 19.5 percent loans,
15.3 percent, lotteries, 13.5
percent T-shirts, buttons,
etc 5.7 percent benefits.
Money Out: 44.3 per-
cent, whale campaigns,
19.9 percent, fundraising.
13.2 percent, seals, nu-
clear, misc campaigns. 13
percent office. 9.6 percent
newsletters.
We welcome your help
Please get in touch with
Jerry Adderton at 758-6259
after 5 p.m. weekdays or
any other Greenpeace
member.
We have no frills to
offer, no fancy offices to
visit or periodical maiiouts
to send you. The whales
and seals need your help
Thank you
Jerry Adderton
Rice termination
appears 'unjustified'
To FOUNTAINHEAD
I am not a Science Ed-
ucation major, but I have
several friends who are,
and it oonoerns me that no
one has sought to in-
vestigate the abrupt ter-
mination of Dr. Dale Rice's
contract.
I could understand it if
he was a poor instructor,
but it appears that he
maintained some impact on
his students or they would
not have written to
FOUNTAINHEAD com-
plementing his teaching
techniques.
I have never met Dr.
Rice, but it appears that his
termination was unjustified
if there are so many irate
and disappointed students
in the department.
This is not a high school
where out favorite teachers
were thoee who gave easy
tests and let us go to the
bathroom to have a cig-
arette. The people who are
deeply concerned about
this matter are juniors and
seniors in college: those
who were so influenced by
Rice's teachings that they
wish for future education
majors to have the same
stimulating opportunity
they had.
Surely there is some-
thing wrong. Was Dr
Rice's termination really
justified or was it just
another bureaucratic mal-
function?
I. as well as others
would like to know the real
story behind this matter, if
no one can produce con-
crete evidence on the mat-
ter, then it is up to those in
the Science Ed department
to rebu e these bureaucrats
and see that justice is
served.
it is hard to believe that
� contracted teacher may
be terminated solely on the
grounds of a faculty de-
cisionIt is apparent that
no students were consulted
in the final decision.
Anita Lancaster
aalvssv







9 November 1978 FOUNTAIWHEAD Psgs 7
Greek Forum
9 November 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
By RICK I GLIARMis:
News Editor
After much work and a
ot of well spent hours
Homecoming'78 has finally
arrived. Each fraternity and
sorority has worked hard
this month preparing for
the D�9 day. Some of the
houses will be building
louse decorations, some
will have floats represent-
ing them in the parade, and
others will be planning
oarties. brunches, and
aiumm weekends.
Because of the ABC
-egional telecast of the
ECU � William and Mary
game, the kick-off time has
been changed from 1 :30
p.m. to 4:10 p.m. The
homecoming parade has
also been changed from 10
a.m. to1 p.m.
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
The Phi Kappa Tays are
putting the final touches on
their Homecoming float in
anticipation of bringing
home first prize again this
year.
On Nov. 8, the Phi Taus
had a "different" sort of
social with the Alpha Delta
Pi's. The theme of the party
was a square dance. The
Phi Taus picked up the girls
at their house and had a
hay ride prior to the social.
Homecoming festivities
at the Phi Tau house will
begin on Friday night with
a "Welcome Home" party
for all returning alumni.
Immediately following
the football game, the Phi
Taus will eat supper to-
gether at the house fol-
lowed by a dance. Five
Degrees South will provide
dancing music for the
guests.
The Phi Taus together
with the Alpha Delta Pi's
are selling dollar coupons
for Weiner King. The pro-
ceeds will go to the Heart
Fund.
The Phi Taus would like
to congratulate their
sweetheart, Suzanne Lamb
on being selected I.F.C. re-
presentative for the Home-
coming court.
The Kappa Sigmas will
be having alumni weekend
during homecoming this
year rather than during
their formal. They will
attend the game together
and there will be a party at
the house following the
game.
Sunday morning the
Kappa Sigs will hold their
annual alumni breakfaast.
The Kappa Sigs also urge
everyone to vote for Home-
coming Pirate. The polls
close on Thursday at 4 p.m.
The Sigma Sigma Sigma
sorority is holding its an-
nual alumni and parent
weekend this weekend dur-
ing homecoming. There
will be coffee and donuts
served at the house before
the parade at 11 a.m. At 12
noon, the Sigmas will en-
tertain their guests at a
brunch at the house. The
parade will follow at 1 p.m.
after which the sorority,
parents, and alumni will
attend the football game.
The Tri-Sigs won all-
campus team tennis this
year.participants from the
sorority were Elizabeth
Wallace. Sarah Casey,
Jackie Cauthen, and Nancy
Britt.
The Sigmas are pre-
paring for a busy week
while they work as mar-
shals at the tobacco show
on Nov. 14,15, and 16.
The Sigmas are also
busy planning their annual
pie throw. This year the Pie
Throw will be held at the
Chapter X on Nov. 21, from
4 p.m. until 7 p.m.
The Alpha Phi's are
building their homecoming
float for the parade with the
Lambda Chi Alphas. The
Alpha Phi'sare planning an
alumni cocktail party Fri-
day night.
The Alpha Phi's now
have 21 members in the fall
pledge class after recently
inducting the last members
of the class.
The Chi Omegas have
been getting ready for
Homecoming weekend by
working on their front yard
decorations. The Chi O's
are also planning their
annual alumni brunch.
The Alpha Xi Deltas had
a tea in honor of their
alumni. It was a great
success
GREAT
MEXICAN
EATERY
512 Greenville Blvd.
Open 11:00 11:00
Mon. thru Thur.
Fri.Sat. 11:00 12:0
Sun. 12:00 11:00
WEEKDAY
LUNCHEON SPECIAL
S1.59
MON. thru FRI. 11-2 & 5-8
Dr. Pepper, Beer, Pepsi,
Mt. Dew, Tea, Coffee
kVe Gladly Accept Personal Checks.
Free Taco Cid Iron -on Patch
with $4.UO food order
WESTERN &1ZZUN
STEAK HOUSE
FEATURING
HOMECOMING SPECIAL
Saturday 1111
Xo.5 11 oz. Sirloin Steak with
King Baked Potato or French
Fries and Texas Toast
AIX FOR $3.99
Also featuring all new Sals
Open:
SunThur. 11-10 p.m.
Fri.&Sat. 11-11
Thursday Family Night
ALL YOU
CAN EAT
TROUT$I-9$
SHRIMP$3-95
OYSTERS $4.25
FLOUNDER ���������� $3.95
Dinner meal Includes Golden Crisp
French Fires, Cole Slaw, Tartar Sance and
the world's best hushpupples.
FRIDAY'S
IfiQA Sun. thru Thurs. 430-9:00
�f fifltAfi Frl-& Sat 430-10:00
Friday's Seafood
2311 S.Evans St.
It's Homecoming
Dress in style for the occasion
with fashions from
STEVE MARTIN
A Wild And Crazy Guy
William E. McEuen IVcsents
STEVE MARTIN
A Wild And (.Vary Guv
(formerly DAKS)
Featuring:
4 piece co-ordinates
Includes lnc Hit King Tut
Also Includes Cat Handcuffs
I'hilosopln Religion College Language
c�'

W
sweaters
skirts
jeans
Steve MartinA Wild And
Crazy Guy. The most eagei ,
awaited comedy albut'
is this follow-up to Martin s
smash hit debut IP.
Small The gold single King
Tut' (performed live here) is
included plus 'Cat handcuff
AnExpose and the title track
Sale runs
Nov. 9-15
On Warner Bros. Records and Tapes
t
Mix and Match
for the greatest look on campus!
DA Kelly'� Evan Street Mall Greenville Ph. 752-8965
NICHOLS
Hwy. 264 By-Pass
(iUAHAVTKKJI
IftYKST WU
.
mkwm0mi0mmmmm





Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 9 November 1978
Voice, organ recitals
highlight the week
By HELEN OBROMOWITCZ
Staff Writer
Dr. Charles Bath, pian-
ist, chairperson of the ECU
School of Music Keyboard
ulty, will appear in a
with his vio-
linist wife Joanne. Satur-
- Nov 11 at 8:15 p.m.
The program. sche-
led for the A.J. Fletcher
cital Hall is free and
n to the public.
The Baths will perform
'hree sonatas for violin and
piano The Mozart Sonata
C. K 296: the Brahms
Sonata No. 1 in G , Opus 78
and the Beethoven Sonata
D, Opus 12. No 1
As a duo and with their
musician children. the
Baths have appeared at the
petter Bntt Music Festival
Jacksonville. Oregon.
and m several North Caro-
;ma cities
Joanne Bath received
the Bachelor of Music de-
with honors from
n University. the
Master of Music degree
from the University of
M higan and a per-
s certificate from
Conservatoire Amer-
m Fontamebleau.
e She teacl ilin
� Greenville.
s Bath holds un-
graduate and doctoral
the Univer-
� gan and the
let ' Music degree
m the Eastman School of
sic.
"he Baths recently pre-
� ; a sonata recital for
N C Music Teachers'
oice recital
this Monday
Karen Weinberger of
� folk, Va. and Ft. Laud-
lale Fia. and Jerry Dea-
ton of SilverSpnng, Md
senior voice students in the
ECU School of Music, will
perform in a joint recital
program Monday, Nov. 13,
at 7:30 p.m. in the A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall.
The program is free and
open to the public.
Ms. Weinberger will
perform songs and arias
from the classical vocal
literature in six languages:
English, German, French,
Provincial (Medieval)
French, Yiddish and He-
brew.
Her program will in-
clude selections from
Haydn. Persichetti, Faure,
Ravel and Wolf. Her per-
formance of Ravel's He-
brew prayer will be ac-
companied by a student
harpist, and other selec-
tions will be accompanied
by pianist Jackie Riley.
Aquarius Court;
Spring, Md.
Silver
Mezzo-soprano
Mezzo-soprano Jenni
Harrison of Newport News,
Va senior voice student in
the ECU School of Music,
will perform in recital Fri-
day, Nov. 10, at 8:15 p.m.
in the A.J. Fletcher Music
Center Recital Hall.
The program, a joint
recital with soprano Cheryl
Burkhart of Blackwood, NJ,
is free and open to the
public.
Ms. Harrison will sing
M ozarf s Voi Che Sapete
and "Oiseaux si Tous les
Ans Weckerlin's "Mam-
an Dites-moi Schubert's
Music
A student of Gladys
White of the ECU voice
faculty, Karen Weinberger
is a candidate for the
Bachelor of Arts degree,
with a major concentration
in music and a minor in
history.
Jerry Deaton, a student
of Dr. Clyde Hiss of the
ECU voice faculty, will per-
form Handel's "Alma
Mia and "Call Forth Thy
Powers, My Soul three
songs by Wolf, Faure's
"L" hives a Cesee" and "La
Lune Blanche Luit dans les
Bois Virgil Thomson's
The Tiger Paul Bowies'
Heavenly Grass" and
Tom Lehrer's "Hunting
Song
He will be accompanied
by pianist Diane Kolwyck.
Deaton, a candidate for
the Bachelor of Music
degree in music therapy is
the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Donald Hamburger of 4
"Fruhlingslaube Schu-
mann's "Die Soldaten-
braut" and two songs by
Samuel Barber.
With Cheryl Burkhart,
she will be featured in two
duets, "What Can We Poor
Females Do?" by Purcell.
arranged by Benjamin
Britten, and Hawthorne's
"Hope
Pianist Ron Roberts will
be her accompanist.
A candidate for Bach-
elor of Music degrees in
music therapy and music
education, Ms. Harrison is
a student of Gladys White
of the ECU voice faculty.
Her parents are Mr. and
Mrs. PS. Harrison of 802
Roberto Drive, Newport
News, Va.
Duo recital at
Christ Episcopal
Church
12
On Sunday, November
a duo recital will be
presented by Mickey Terry
(organ) and Lorraine Ja-
cobs (voice) at Christ Ep-
iscopal Church in New Bern
at 5 p.m. in the sancuary of
the church.
The first half of the
program will consist of
organ works performed by
Mr. Terry including Pre-
lude and Fugue in A Minor
by Buxtehude, Prelude and
Fugue in D Major and the
Chorale Prelude on Savior
of the Heathen, Come by
Bach as well as Pachabel's
Ricercare in C Minor and
Telemann's Grave from the
D. Major Sonata.
Handel arias
The second half of the
program will be dedicated
to arias by G.F. Handel
from various oratoios on
which Ms. Jacobs (Contal-
to) will sing and Mr. Terry
will accompany.
Mr. Terry, a 1977 ECU
graduate, is now pursuing
graduate studies there and
is Organist of Jarvis Mem-
orial United Methodist
Church.
A former student of
Mrs. Selina Forbes and
Doctors E. Robert Irwin
and David L. Foster, he has
just recently presented a
recital in Greenville in
which Ms. Jacobs, a piano
graduate of the Peabody
(Conservatory) Institute of
John Hopkins. University
and former piano soloist
with the Ba'itmore Sym-
phony, was featured as
pianist.
Ms. Jacobs is also an
ECU grad in History and
English and is currently
pursuing her M.A. degree
in English there.
The program is a part of
an Artists Series there at
the church where Ms. Jac-
obs is serving as Organist-
Choirmaster. The admis-
sion is free and the public is
cordially invited to attend.
THE GREGG SMITH Singers will appear
under the direction of, Gregg Smith this Wed Nov. 75 at 8
p.m. in the Hendrix Theatre. Gregg Smith and his singers
have achieved an international reputation for their superb
choral mastery. The concert itself is a dramatic experience.
The singers move from balcony to main floor, with each
piece performed in a different arrangement. The effect is
live stereo music' MysicAppreciation students who attend
the performance will receive double credit towards their
recital requirement in addition to hearing the breathtaking,
multi-dimensional sounds of the group The recital is
sponsored by the Student Union Artists Series Committee
New exhibits: 'stunning
By DAVID vV. TREVINO
and
MARK WILKINSON
Staff Writers
"Images: Women on
Paper and "Ten Centuries
of East Asian Art" opened
at the Wellington B. Gray
Gallery in the Jenkins Fine
Arts Center with a cep-
tion Sunday afterno&n.
In addition to the art
contained in these exhibi-
tions, the attending crowd
was treated to Renaissance
music performed on the
lute by Walter Wilder,
artist-in-residence at Pitt
Co. Technical Institute.
"Images: Women on
Paper" is a loan exhibition
from the Weatherspoon
Gallery of the University of
North Carolina at Greens-
boro. In a selection of
paintings, drawings and
prints drawn from the
Weatherspoon's perma-
nent collection, gallery di-
rector James Tucker pre-
sented a wide view of
women. "Women on Pa-
per" is being exhibited for
the first time anywhere in
the Wellington B. Gray
Gallery. It will be shown
been exposed. Although
many of the pieces in the
show were originally made
for export to the West and
reflect some outside influ-
ences in taste, they are
none the less distinctly
Oriental.
Because of the geo-
Art
next at the Weatherspoon
Gallery in February.
"Ten Centuries of East
Asian Art" isa show drawn
from the private collection
of a member of the Medical
School faculty. The scrolls,
ceramics and furniture on
display provide a fascinat-
ing view of art to which
most Occidentals have not
r
Allen, Nicholson, Monroe films slated
DIANE K EA TON A NQ Woody A Hen in a scene from one of
this week's Free Flicks, "Annie Hall The film will be
shown Friday only at 5, 7 and 9 p.m.
By STEVE BACHNER
Trends Editor
The Student Union
Films Committee has six
films scheduled for the
homecoming weekend, in-
cluding two Best Picture
winners, Woody Allen's
Annie Hall and Milos
Foreman's One Flew Over
the Cuckoo's Nest starring
Jack Nicholson.
Annie Hall will be
shown this Friday night at
5. 7, and 9 in Mendenhall's
Hendrix Theatre.
The film, in addition to
its Best Picture embellish-
ment, netted Best Director
and Best Screenplay a-
wards for Allen as well as a
Best Actress award for
co-star Diane Keaton.
Annie Hall is described
by Allen as "a romantic
comedy about a contempo-
rary urban neurotic It
reunites him with Diane
Keaton and Tony Roberts.
The trio previously per-
formed together on the
Broadway stage in Allen's
hit comedy Play It Again,
Sam and later re-created
their roles in the equally
successful motion picture
version.
Others in the cast are
Carol Kane, Paul Simon,
Janet Margolin, Shelley
Duval, Christopher Walken
and Colleen Dewhurst.
Acclaimed ail over the
world as today's foremost
comic genius, Woody Allen
has once again written,
(with Marshall Brickman),
directed and starred in a
film.
Allen was born in Brook-
lyn and began his career
while still in high school by
sending gags to newspaper
to columnists. After gradu-
ation, he became a writer
very brave people let me
direct it
On Saturday, the Films
Committee has scheduled a
special double feature to be
screened at 7 and 9 p.m. in
the Hendrix Theatre.
Films to be shown are
How to Marry a
Millionaire, at 8:30 p.m
and All About Eve, 10:30
p.m.
Cinema
for Sid Caesar and other
television comedians.
In 1961, Allen's manag-
er persuaded their reticent
client to take his jokes
directly to the public, so he
began as a stand-up comic
in obscure New York night
spots and audiences and
critics became aware of the
fact that there was a
brilliant new talent on the
entertainment scene.
Allen was then asked to
write the script for the
movie What's New Pussy-
cat? as well as play a
featured role in the film.
The film was a commercial
success and in 1968, Alien
wrote the screenplay for
7ae the Money and Run,
in which he was to star.
Then, as he says, "some
How to Marry a Million-
aire stars Marilyn Monroe,
Betty Grable, Lauren
Bacall, William Powell and
Rory Calhoun and sports
excellent performances by
the ensemble. The film is a
superb comedy of the fifties
about three man-hunting
females who pool their
resources to trap eligible
bachelors.
All About Eve stars
Marilyn Monroe and Bette
Davis along with an all star
cast in a cynical view of
theatre life, filled with
epigrammatic gems. Davis
glows as an aging star,
Gary Merrill plays her
young beau, Anne Baxter is
a grasping actress, George
Sanders a poison pen critic,
Hugh Marlowe a play-
wright and Celeste Holm
Marlowe's sugary wife.
The film is a fifties classic.
On Sunday, there will
be a Jack Nicholson Festiv-
al at 4 p.m. featuring Five
Easy Pieces, The Last
Detail, and One Flew Over
the Cuckoo's Nest.
Five Easy Pieces, is a
subtle masterpiece of act-
ing and direction.
Bobby Dupea speaks to
a whole generation, and
Jack Nicholson's perform-
ance is a complex welding
of emotions - fear, pride,
independence, self-pity,
humor, and sadness.
The Last Detail is a
wildly raucous and poetical-
ly complex portrait of an
arrogant but sensitive sail-
or played by Jack
Nicholson. It is the com-
passionate story of two
veteran sailors who escort a
young recruit to the brig.
Their no-holds-barred last
fling builds in salty humor
and makes one of the
richest character studies in
years.
One Flew Over the
Cuckoo's Nest is Milos
Foreman's brilliant adapta-
tion of the Ken Kesey novel
of the same name. The film
won Best Picture of the
ear in 1976 and swept the
rest of the major awards,
including Best Actor, Jack
Nicholson, Best Actress,
Louise Fletcher, Best Di-
rector, Milos Foreman, and
Best Screenplay.
graphic barriers that sepa-
rated the cultures of the
East from those of the West
for so long, Oriental art
developed relatively inde-
pendent of movements and
symbols with which we are
most familiar. Man is
hardly the measure of all
things in "Ten Centuries of
East Asian Art
In the delicate watercol-
or and ink paintings, man
appears as a less imposing
part of the landscape. He
appears in harmony, if not
dominance. Rather than
the measure of existence,
man seems like a rather
small part. Mountains and
trees loom immensely over
the fragile human figures.
The gentle, expressive
strokes found in the paint-
ings are identical to those
found in the calligraphy
which accompanies them.
Both are painted with the
same brush and in the
demanding style and medi-
um that makes covering an
error virtually impossible.
Although many of the
paintings on the horizontal
story scrolls are realistic
and line oriented, much of
the paintinig is almost
romantic in nature, ex-
pressing images in only a
few sweeps of the brush.
The bamboo piece is a
wonderful example of just
such a rendering of a
standard Oriental subject
The horizontal scroll of the
monkey is another beautiful
work in which the monkey
is only barely suggested
by the sensitive brushwork
The dragons on the
Korean porcelin pottery
1 emotionally evocative
and reminiscent of some
works of American folk art
In all the ceramic pieces the
artists used gentle, natural
shapes and displayed brilli-
ant skill in the brushwork
decorations. A pair of
Japanese Satusuma earth-
en ware vases of the early
19th century exhibit the
characteristic mastery of
the cracking effect found in
so much Oriental ceramic
work.
Although much of the
furniture on display is
ornately decorated in a
rather Baroque style, there
� � �'� R 1 p
1
HOWEVER DISTASTEFUL l�c
YPs. "Girl on fltn � ' 0room'9
�"�9es: Women p V P
November 22 in the wUf . noW �� "�
�of �2r QrMy Qn"y "T"
i �hoto by John H. Grog an
t
P I rj��&r I . -fl





9 November 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Pag 7
Picasso, Matisse, Warhol and Ramos are featured
continued from p. 6
are P,eces that exhibit
simplicity of form and
graceful lines. Perhaps the
most pleasing furn.ture
Pieces are the Ch.nese
luang hua-li cabinets from
he 19tn century Both the
��nd sides are discreet-
tapered so that the
nets seem comfortably
"ng rather than bulky
' imposing.
Ten Centuries of East
A" isararechance
"Pie the art of cultures
alue harmonious co-
gence with nature rath-
m its alteration to
spiritual needs of
ie who brc
on by viewing
exciting show will
ate the generosity of
ilty member who
these pieces with
, iblic
�ges: Women on
is a collection of 60
all but five of which
by male artists, in
mage of woman
It contains
. artists the quality
1 'arely been
eastern North
Picasso's 1923
The
reflects the
'�avor of his figure
' the same peri-
� th a minimum of
picasso evokes a
N
this study of a
. and her serv-
'�' �ker a co-
tph, offers an
view a char-
�� rk of the cele-
ralist, Jean
' Amidst the sub-
�rs and gentle
' jures of this
id-headed
s practically the
� Chariot's
a McNeill
- represented
' ng Fum-
th brilliantly
"es Whistler is
1 capture the delicate
ace collar or
, strands of
i mmate a
ng
� ey portrait.
fact fi the past. It
have never been
O jr urban
� ands new images
th the unique
an experience an in-
ass society
ites
People in the city sur-
der a great deal of their
It's a necessary
10 survive On a
� V � New York that
�ore people than
classes at ECU it
;mes imperative to view
thers on the sidewalk
bstacles to be dealt with
niessly as possible
than thousands of
�� temples of the noble
� spirit
v iny of your senses
to be deadened to
� being over-
ed by the torrent of
�hat one is bom-
�. th m urban oent-
It's just a fact of life
-�mething has to be
icular to stirr ulate the
sened sensitivity of the
�riporary city dweller.
es a bright flash to
est someone who
ires mto the burning sun
reality in Chicago every
ng.
Shipboard Girl an
set lithograph by Roy
UchtensU .n, "Tobacco
Rose, a silkscreen by Mel
Ramos. Tom Wesselman's
silkscreen, Nude and
Andy Warhol's silkscreen
portrait Elizabeth Taylor"
reflect the elimination of
anything but essential,
startling images. Women
ted in cold, stark
images that convey none of
the tenderness found in
Whistler's etchings.
Ramos piece depicts in
brutally realistic figures a
nude woman with two
packs of cigarettes that
hints broadly at the insensi-
tive view of woman as an
object "Tobacco Rose" is
also a textbook example of
the California Pop style
embraced by Ramos in his
work.
"Shipboard Girl" is just
as characteristic of Roy
Lichtenstein's easily recog-
nizable style. And the
sharp lines and carefully
regimented coloring are
just as recognizably repre-
sentative of the urban
world most Americans now
exist in
Tom Wesselman's in-
volvement with erotic
themes is evident in the
realistic sexual imagery of
his silkscreen "Nude
The form of woman is
portrayed in the most basic
imagery. The face is
conveyed by a mouth. The
breasts are simple shapes
crowned with color.
The most horrific vision
of woman in the show is
that of Red Grooms. In the
stunningly evocative cray-
pas "Girl on Beach
Groom uses painfully seg-
mented shapes of garish
colors to capture an unfor-
tunately recognizable view
of woman. Groom's girl
appears as a violently color-
ed object displayed on a
blanket as crassly as any
other commercial product
designed for mass con-
sumption. However dis-
tasteful her smile may be,
"Girl on Beach" is an
exciting piece.
The vision of earlier
artists is appealing in its
enchanting simplicity. But
it is a testimony to contem-
porary artists that amidst
the dehumanizing ugliness
of urban life they are able
to find distinctly human
beauty. Anyone can look at
Eden and be charmed, but
it takes some kind of genius
to gaze at the chemical
plants of Houston and see
the splendor of the spirit of
man But the man who
labors in that tangle of
pipes demands beauty and
the artist who shows it to
him is priceless
MACRAME,
Outlet
0
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IN HATTERAS HAMMOCK BUILDING
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P � w





REVENGE
ECU, Indians tangle in homecoming contest
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
ECU had just blasted Appalachian State 45-14 after a
g 9-7 loss to Southwestern Louisiana and the Pirates
were apparently back on course heading into the Oyster
Bowl classic against William and Mary
a the Pirates needed was a victory over the Indians
a Peach Bowl invitation would be extended soon after.
fact, the Pirates were regarded as heavy favorites
entering the contest with William and Mary
sitting on a lowly 4-5 record
the craftiest Indian of them all. quarterback Tom
directed William and Mary to classic 21-17 come
from behind victory which sent the Pirates home empty
led. The senior from Fairview. Pa completed 10 out of
5 passes for 137 yards and two touchdowns and got the
; TD himself from 12 yards out late in the third
just took them as another easy game
bered ECU cornerback Willie Holley. "Maybe we
bit too excited about our bowl possibilities and
1 didn't concentrate
tantz did a good job keeping them in the game
me we got ahead and they got a lot of lucky breaks
� ready every time we got ahead and they got a
' � ��: eaks But we'll be ready thistime
� Ih a regional television audience watching and a bowl
- -emote possibility, it's not likely the Pirates
will be looking past the Indians this time around in their
homecoming game.
William and Mary boasts a fine 5-3-1 record this year
with Rozantz still directing the offense and defensive end
Melvin Martin heading a much improved defense which has
allowed just over 13 pointsa game.
"I know our players are looking forward to this one
understated ECU head coach Pat Dye. "Tom Rozantz is a
very intelligent runner and passed and reads defenses very
well. Next to N.C. State, I would have to say they're about
the toughest defensive team we've faced this season.
"They've beaten us physically the last two years
although they didn't win in 1976. We've developed a pretty
tough rivalry against them and it should oertainly be a good
TV. game
The ECU-William and Mary game will be one of four
regional telecasts Saturday afternoon following the
Nebraska- Oklahoma contest. The game will begin at 4:10
instead of the previous scheduled 1:30kickoff.
William and Mary dropped a narrow 20-19 decision in
1976 and intensified the rivalry with its 21-17 upset last
season
They kept us out of the bowl game and no one on the
team this year has forgotten about that said free safety
Gerald Hall, the nation's seventh ranked punt returner.
That game went through my mind the whole summer.
They sure talked a lot of junk out there on the field
too continued Hall. "I remember when the game was
over one of them told me 'You guys ain't gonna see no
Peaches this year
"Yea, all we saw was tears said defensive tackles
Fred Chavis. "Heck, that's the worst I've ever felt after a
loss
The loss cancelled the Pirates Peach Bowl bid, even
though the Buc's were later mentioned as a possible
candidate in the Independence Bowl in Shreveport, La. And
with a 6-3 record this year, many observers have already
written off the Pirates bowl hopes.
"I still think we can get to a bowl game said Hall. "If
we play smart and don't make any mistakes this week and
win and beat Marshall we could still go somewhere
NOTES Vern Lundquist and former Notre Dame
quarterback Terry Hanratty will handle the broadcast
chores Saturday. Lundquist will do the play-by-play while
Hanratty will be the color commentator Appalachian State
was averaging more than 450 yards a game coming into last
week's contest against ECU. The Pirates limited the
Mountaineers to just 168 yards total offenseECU ranks
second nationally in pass defense at 87.7 yards per game
while the Bucs are 24th in rushing defense allowing only
134 yards and 21st in scoring with just 13.3 points per
gameGerald Hall ranks seventh in punt returns with a
13.4 average while halfback Anthony Collins is 14th in
kickoff returns with a 24.8 averageBill Lamm connected
on two more long field goals against Appalachian State but
also missed two extra pointsLamm has booted 10 of 16
field goals this seasonECU leads the overall series
against William and Mary 6-3-1.
Gerald Hall
North Carolina
ends ECU season
with 7-0 setback

ECU's Mallory honored
with Hall of Fame selection
A RE A I
St; ter
lay set the
� � ednesday as the
Soccer team closed
' 978-79 season on a
so �� jsing to the
" ��" -els 7-0
occer Field
tarting Pirate
��� n gs 3rad W inchell and
Mar'm sa! out the
because of
pensions � W inchell
�s ejected in last Satur-
against Appai-
was benched
Martin who
:iscipiinary action
head coach
e suspen-
� �� the Pirates with
'emely weak offense
:nesday s contest.
The Tarheels, however,
ed on by hopes of
CAA playoff
ber - early, scoring
Steve Scott's goal with
. 3:17 gone in the
ng half Halfback Roy
Bar �� Aas credited with
or field conditions
ed both teamsdunng
� match as time
j again well placpc! balls
breeching halt in
of mud Never-
ess the Tarheels didn't
let a httie mud stop them
nr scoring their second
goal of the half off the head
of Rick Marvin with 10:33
gone in the first half John
Fernandez was credited
with the assist
Several minutes later,
David Blum assisted Steve
Scott for Scott's second
goal of the day with 14:22
elapsed in the half
The Tarheels blitzed the
Pirate defense with 42 48
gone in the half when John
Mansfield booted a goal
assisted by Adam Abron-
ski The goal pushed the
Tarheelsahead 4-0.
However, the Tarheels
we- atisfied with the
commanding lead as Sean
Naber connected on a goal
with but six seconds left to
play in the half. The first
finally ended with the Tar-
heels on top of a comfor-
table 5-0 lead.
The second half of ac-
tion could well have been
called the John Mansfield
show as the Tarheel wing
booted two consecutive
goals.
Mansfield's first goal of
the half came late in the
game when he slammed a
Butch Bernard assist into
the goal with 31 46 gone in
the second half.
Seven minutes elapsed
before Mansfield connected
again with 38:09 gone on an
assist by teammate Sean
Naber
Despite a weak overall
defensive showing, Pirate
goalie Kevin Tyus played a
commendable game as time
and again he prevented
Tarheels from scoring with
excellent saves
The comedy finally
ended for the Pirates with
the Tarheels on top of 7-0
blowout score
Andrew Roman
ECU SOCCER COACH Brad Smith praised Roman for his
play against North Carolina despite the Pirates 7-0 loss.
ECU finished the season with a disappointing 3-11-2 record.
Photo by John H. Grogan
Statistically, it was a
sad day for the Pirates as
they could only manage one
shot at the Carolina goal for
the entire match. On the
other hand, the Tarheel
squad fired 21 total shots at
the Pirate goal.
Wednesday's loss left
ECU with a 3-11-2 overall
record. North Crolina
upped their record to 11-3-4
for the season.
Coach Brad Smith,
though displeased with his
team's performance, did
credit Andy Roman with
good offensive play. After
today's loss, the Buc's will
be looking forward to next
year's season when the
Pirates hope to be a much
more experienced squad
capable of a winning sea-
son.
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Assistant Sports Editor
When the news of the
new inductees to the ECU
Sports Hall of Fame was
announced, many students
were befuddled. One of the
names in the group was
James B. Mallory, the ECU
Dean of Men.
Few students today
realize it. but Mallory was
once the head coach of the
Pirate baseball team. And a
good one at that. In fact, he
led the Pirates to the NAIA
national championship in
1961, sending not only
Greenville, but the entire
state of North Carolina into
a frenzy.
Mai lory's success was
not limited to just one
season either. He coached
the Pirates from 1954 until
1962, then came back as
interim coach in 1973. His
figures read 161 wins and
only 60 losses for .729 per-
centage. Not bad for an
administrator. ,
Mallory was also an
assistant football coach
during his early years at
East Carolin College. He
taught physical education
for eleven years.
The ECU Dean also has
a background in major
league baseball. At one
time he played with the
Washington Senators, the
New York Giants, and the
St. Louis Cardinals. He
played with such greats at
Mel Ott, Ernie Lombardi,
Sal Magli, and Red Scho-
endist during his two year
big league career.
Later, he moved to Elon
College as head baseball
coach. His teams posted 72
wins and 16 losses. His six
years there included four
conference championships
and two second place fin-
ishes.
It seems that Mallory
won everywhere he went.
"I always tried to get my
players fundamentally
sound said Mallory. "If
they do the basics right,
then they'll make one less
mistake than their oppo-
nent. That mistake is the
difference in winning and
losing
The 1961 championship
team did those basics just
right, claims Mallory.
"That team had real guts
said the former Pirate
coach. "The Yankees'
comeback this year reminds
me of them. They always
seemed to pull out games
that it seemed they would
lose. That's the mark of a
great team
Mallory said that the
1961 team won the national
championship under quite
adverse conditions. "Since
the tournament was played
after school was out, we
lost some players because
they had summer jobs.
Also, our leading hitter,
Gary Pierce couldn't make
the trip
Later, the Pirates lost a
starter due to an injury
which trimmed the roster
down to 12 players. Yet
Mallory brought his team
r
Jim Mallory
through.
Former ECU Chancellor
Leo Jenkins thinks he
knows why Mallory pulled
his team through that year,
and why he was always a
winner.
"Jim is a very enthu-
siastic coach said Jen-
kins. "He seemed to in-
spire all the young who
played under him He had
that little knack of being
able to inspire others and
instill confidence in then
that so many coaches lack
He's the type of coach that
I'd want my boy to play
under
ECU athletic director
Bill 'Cain says that Mallory
was a candidate that the
Hall of Fame selection
committee could not over-
look "We are very pleased
to have him in the Hall
noted Cam "The Univer-
sity should be proud of his
record not only as a coach
but asa person.
"I played under him
when I played football
here continued Cain.
The thing that impressed
me about him. in foot!
and baseball was 'ha-
always gave everyone
chance Also he h i
unique ability to daw the
best from everybody
played for him
Mallory seemed
honored with his selection
to the Hall o? Fame "It's
quite a thrill said Ma
lory it feels good t - .�.
that people recogmrt-
this way
People have always re-
cogmzed Maiiory's e
lence In 1961. he Aas
named winner of the V.
Wynn award The award s
given annually by the Ral-
eigh Hotstove League I
the person m North Caro-
lina who contributes most
to baseball
More recent winners
include New York Yankee
pitcher Catfish Hunter and
San Diego pitcher, and
1978 NL Cy Young Award
winner. Gaylord Perry
That s not bad company
Just ask Catfish and
Gaylord
Revils, Northrup head returnees
Pirate wrestlers open in Monarch tournament
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
It's called the Monarch Invitational, but over the last
few years the two-day tournament has been an annual
display of some brilliant individual performances by ECU
wrestlers.
Take last year's tournament for an example.
A relatively unknown freshman by the name of Butch
Revils from Norfolk, Va. upset four top seeded opponents to
capture the 177 pound weight class. Revils was also named
the tournament's outstanding wrestler and went on to have
a spectacular freshman season.
And again this year, Pirate head coach Bill Hill will take
virtually his entire team to the tournament with great
expectations another freshman will emerge from his
recruiting crop.
"The Monarch tournament is quickly becoming one of
the biggest and most prestigious tournaments In this area
said Hill. "I always enjoy this tournament because it gives
me a good opportunity to see how all our wrestlers look and
see what area they need Improvement in.
Since we have a lot of freshmen on the squad It also
gives me a good look at them as well
M ore than 350 wrestlers will be oompeteing In the event
with almost 35 teams entered. Awards will be given to'the
first and second place teams while individual wrestlers will
place first, second or third.
"At this stage of the season I'm not real concerned with
how we finish asa team explained Hill. "We just want to
fmd out who can help us early in the season and give some
of our younger wrestlers experience
The Pirates return eight lettermen from last year's
squad including Revils and sophomore Vic Northrup who
were both named to the National M at New' AB-raahmwn
team Northrup finished the season with a fine f64 record
and was a member of ECU NCAA tournament team.
Revils logged an impressive 18-5-1 record and was also
named the Outstanding Freshman in the Witkes Open.
Other top returnees include Bob Passino at 118, Frank
Schaede at 150, Steve Goode at 158, and Jay Dever at 190.
Passino finished the season with a 13-9 record although
he was injured most of the season while Shaede had a
14-12-1 mark and Goode posted a 21-8 record. Dever
finished with a 17-6 record.
Heavyweight D.T. Joyner is expected to join the team
after the football season and will be regarded as one of the
top heavyweight prospects in the nation. Joyner finished
20-2 last year, and competed in the NCAA tournament
championships along with Northrup.
"Once again we'll be strong in the upper weight
classes noted Hill, who begins his second season at ECU.
"Last year we had a lot of problems in the lower weights
and we tried to recruit some people who will hetp us thta
year The Monarch Tournament will help me determine
wh.ch ones we'll be able to use in our 0,her ear�y
tournaments and dual matches. y
,hJ(;UiireShmen pr0spects who will be competing ,n
the r f.rst oolleg.ate tournament this weekend arfsteven
Milanese at 118, Mark Twigg, Troy Spencer at 34 and
Danny Keene at 126 a �
Twigg and Spencer will battle for th� 1 x �
vacated by phi Osman, a SSL �ElE2 on
number, whogr.clu.ted last ynr. en, team
Milanese will badc-up Passino at 11a while k �
lunlor Ctarll. MoGimse, w,n bat ,Vte ,�" an
position. ,ne 126 pound
Other wrestlers expected to mak� th� ?
Monarch tournament arVjames RoT Rona, 12 '� S
?Dcrmid Foster all at 142, Jamas Ellison, i� pllj�
177 and Brian Marrtam at 190 ' M Spear at





9 Novambf 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Pap 9
FOUNTAINHEAD's Fearless Forecast
WAKE FOREST AT DUKE
UNC AT CLEMSON
WARYLANDatvRGna
0KClASIEATpENN STATE
SUAT?81 ATOWAST.
LSU AT ALABAMA
SBGnTON AT SOUTHERN CAL
STANF0RD AT ARIZONA ST
ARKANSAS AT BAYLOR
HOUSTON AT TEXAS
CHARLESCHANDLER
(85-32-1)
ECU 31-7
Duke
Clemson
Maryland
Penn State
Oklahoma
Iowa St.
Alabama
Southern Cal
Arizona St.
Arkansas
Texas
TERRY HERNDON
(81-36-1)
ECU 45-19
Wake Forest
Clemson
Maryland
Penn State
Nebraska
Oklahoma St.
Alabama
Southern Cal
Arizona St.
Arkansas
Houston
SAM ROGERSDAVID MA READY
(77-40-1)(52-20)
ECU 20-17ECU 24-7
Wake ForestDuke
ClemsonClemson
MarylandMaryland
Penn StatePenn State
OklahomaNebraska
Oklahoma St.Iowa St.
AlabamaAlabama
Southern CalWashington
StanfordArizona St.
ArkansasArkansas
TexasTexas
JAMESB. MALLORY
ECU Dean of Men
ECU 27-13
Ouke
Clemson
Maryland
Penn State
Oklahoma
Oklahoma St.
Alabama
Southern Cal
Arizona
Arkansas
Texas
Volleyball tourney is set
Bv.IlM M v noocc-
By JIMMY DuPREE
Staff Writer
ECU is honored this
year with the responsibility
of hosting the NCAIAW
Volleyball Championship.
The tournament will be
held this Friday, and
Saturday at Minges Coli-
seum.
The 15 teams in this
weekend's tournament are
divided into two divisions.
ECU will be competing with
Division I schools from
across the state. The
Pirates are tied in the
seedmgs with Duke for
third. There will be a coin
flip to decide which school
will acquire the third place
seeding
If ECU wins the toss,
the Pirates will face UNC-G
in the first round of the
tourney In the event that
they lose, the Bucs will
meet with the Mountain-
eers of Appalachian State
Coach Ahta Dillon
expressed scepticism over
�tie Pirates' previous play
against those two teams
We beat Appalachian
easily earlier in the
season, but they never have
against us.
NC-G gave us one of the
;hest wins we had all
season They were ready
N C State comes into
the Tournament seeded
first with North Carolina
seeded second.
State has to be the
favorite m the Tourna-
ment said Dillon. "They
haven't lost many matches
(10-2) They were upset at
the beginning of the second
half of the season by
UNC-G Its probably a
toss-up among the top four
teams. It's the tightest race
that we've had in quite a
while
The seedmgs are decid-
ed by the school's won-loss
record with other schools in
their division North Caro-
lina returns to defend the
title they took home last
season Wake Forest, a
Division II team last
season, will round out the
seven team Division I
standings.
In Division II, High
Point, Western Carolina,
and Guilford College have
captured the top three
positions. High Point is
considered the favorite in
the field of eight teams.
The Pirates take an
impressive 28-11 mark into
the tournament. "We're
seeded the same as we
were last year said
Dillon. "Last year we kink
of fell apart in the first
round and never got going;
I think we will do better
than we did then, how-
ever
ECU vs. William and Mary-
ABC Regional TV
kickoff 4:10 p.m.
Mallory
assists
forecasters
ECU Dean of Men and
former head baseball coach
James Mallory is this
week's guest picker in the
Fearless Forecast. Last
week's guest, basketball
coach Larry Gillman posted
a very respectable 10-2
record. Several games this
week are between Top 10
teams, and in several
cases, are for conference
championships. Top-
ranked Oklahoma travels to
Nebraska to face the
fourth-ranked Cornhusk-
ers Sixth-ranked Texas
plays eighth-ranked Hou-
ston in a key Southwest
Conference encounter.
Among area teams,
fJ C State faces the
' uahst test, as thev 'ravel
tosecond-rankedPenn State
MENDENHALL SNACK BAR
PRESENTS
" Homecoming Special "
PIRATES TRESURE BOX
with Golden Fried Chicken
Pearl Potato Salad
Emerald Cole Slaw
Ruby Apple
Sapphire Roll
ready to go to the game!
SERVOMATION CORPORATION
A�T-�F� � m,
STOCK REDUCTION SALE
(Now In Progress)
On IZOD Lacosta Shirts and Sweaters
Men's and Women's.
We have an excellent selection of SKI EQUIPMENT now in stock.
SKI PACKAGES (Skis, Boots, Bindings and Poles):
$169.00
(For a limited time)
Good Selection of Used Ski Equipment.
Gordon D. Fulp
Golf Professional
Greenville Country Club
Of I of Mejfiai 0'
Phone 750504
Open 7 days a week unr: la�
1 U North Greti'U;
Gieenvillt- M C 7.S34
Phone 919 7s '( .1
Sm "1mmm
NOW FEATURING
LUNCH 11 a.m2 p.m.
Choice of meat ,
2 vegetables.
Coffee or Tea.
$2.00
DINNER 4:30 7 p.m
Choice of meat,
3 vegetables,
Coffee or Tea.
$2.25 �
HOMEMADE DESSERTS AVAILABLE
Hours: Sunday Thursday open until 8:00 p.m.
Fridav and Saturday open until 9x00 p.m
? We also are serving from our regular menu.
We have a catering service for private parties.
For information call 752 2624.
i PiwfcKii
IMflMBftO S
jsp
FOR PIZZAS AND
SUBS AFTER THE
CONCERT
NESDTORHAXAFTSt
A DAY IN CLASSES?
TH�SUNSET
n9E.3thST!�T
CALL OR
COME BY CHANELO'S
758-7400
507 E. 14th St.
. Riggan Shoe
Repair Shop
Downtown Greenville
111 W. 4th Street
SAAD'S SHOE REPAIR
113 GRANDE AVE.
at
COLLEGE VIEW
CLEANERS
ARMY-NAVY STORE
1501 S. Evans
B-15, bomber, field,
deck, flight, snorkel jackets
Back Packs
THIS WEEK AT
(EhapterX
THURSDAY� JOHN MOORE
FRIDAYTGIF PARTY
AFTERNOON
QUARTER
FRIDAY NIGHTfinals of
MISS CHAPTER
X CONTEST
WITH
STEVE HARDY
HOMECOMING
VICTORY PARTY
SATURDAYWITH
TOMMY GARDNER

-rinnn The ECU e�� s
Student Union
Presents !

















on sale at MSC Central Ticket
TV



� only 2,000 available, only 5
Nantucket
Sunday Nov. 19th
8:00 pm Wright Aud.
Tickets:
Students $1.50
Public $3.00
� Office

� mail order ticket requests are urged to
be prompt
Presented by SU
Special Attractions Commitee











�&
� "Epic" are trademarks of CBS Inc S 1978 CBS Inc
Live,
1 get Liv.
Treat yourself. to lyrics that
flutter the heart. To a voice that
triggers sighs and smiles.
Livingston Taylor's new album.
"3-Way Mirror" generates the
kind of spirited, lifegiving quali
ties you would expect from an
original.
Livingston's first album on
Epic (and his first release in 5
years I contains nine Taylor made
tunes, and one he's chosen to
interpret. Backed up by Maria
Muldaur on "No Thank You
Skycap Liv proves once again
that the love song is alive and
well and waiting to be heard.
Livingston Taylor. Identifiable
his own man.
.w
"3-Wiy Mirror:
Livingston Taylor'is
new album featuring
"L. A. Serenade" and
"Going Round
One More Time?
On Epic Records and Tapes.
Mruictour �prs courtesy o� Warner Bros Records Producedby N.ck DeCaro'or TheEitena nmem
Company. Cwcut.ve Producer Charles Koppe�man Represent .on ICM Management Don La Boston .
Appearing Nov. 9 at ECU
t
"� � -� m
' � � � t
�'

������"��� "����"
������nWt�liJiHj
t
�-
1





"��� �
Papa 10 FOUNAINHEAD 9 Nggghjt 10�
Cowboy problems are big
mystery to Landry, NFL
ByCHARLESCHANDLER
Assistant Sports Editor
The present NFL season
seems to be full of question
marks. One of them mujst
certainly be the defending
World Champion Dallas
Cowboys The season
began with great expec-
tations by the Cowboys
Now saddled with a 6-4
record, the NFL champs
Tiust struggle to even win
'her own division.
What's the problem
Well, the Cowboys are not
lying with the enthusi-
asm that it takes to win
tfadays in the NFL Each
week their opponents note
this lack of 'fight" within
the champs
Another big problem for
Torn Landry's club has
been turnovers Dallas is
giving up more turnovers
it is receiving. Such
'sties ust do not belong
hampionship teams.
' another theory on
siow start by the
��boys is that such
almost always happens to a
rom Landry coached ttam.
The Cowboys have lad
such mid-season was he
�ear that the Cowbcs
; big game without
irst going through a mid-
season slump So maybe
' all is lost for Dallas
Yet. Landry should not
for granted that his
�Ml! come on strong as
ai He must work them
harder than ever m an
tempt to attain champ-
' P caf-ber again
ers feel that
will, indeed.
� ind reach the
" "gain But. who
'� ng else has
��xpected in the
�eason.
-� ok at the
1 ' ' '� - week:
DALLAS17GREEN BAY 7
Both these clubs are out
ve their worth this
� Botl osl last week.
Cowboys must
� realize that the
� � � �'� not bow at their
"ust demand
Packers don't
but should be
" here.
BUFFALO 10
s showed
�ne last week how
can be when Bob
is at the helm.
- Knox and the
� matched that
��� ill see more of
'his game.
ST LOUIS27
SAN FRANCISCO 13
Bud Wilkinson finally
has most of Cardinals back
from early season injuries.
Most preveiant among the
returnees is quarterback
Jim hart. The 13 year
veteran has the offense
rolling again The 49ers lost
:heir mam weapon, O.J.
Simpson, to injury last
'hese factors add
�'� ' number three for
St Louis
PITTSBURGH 24
LOSANGELES21
This isthe biggest game
of the week it could be a
preview of the Super Bowl.
Both teams appear to be
good candidates for that
game. The feeling here is
that the Steelers are simply
the better team. The
Steelers to win the Super
BowP Who knows9 First
they must pull this one out.
NEW ORLEANS13
ATLANTA 10
These two teams are
battling it out for a possible
wild card spot in the NFC.
The Saints have their best
team ever. The Falcons are
probably the superior of the
two clubs. But, in the upset
special of the week, the
Saints take another big step
toward true respectability.
SEATTLE 21
BALTIMORE 20
With Bert Jones, the
Colts can play with any-
body. The Seahawks are on
the verge of becoming a
very good team. In a "real
donnybrook look for Jim
Zorn to lead the Seattle clan
to victory.
MINNESTOA20
CHICAGO10
The Bears have just
about blown it. They were
picked by many to win the
NFC Central this year. But
after winning their first
three games, they have lost
seven straight. Make that
eight after this encounter
with the surging Vikings.
DENVER17
CLEVELAND 13
This is a matchup of
playoff hopefuls. Both
could end up there when
the season ends. Yet both
have their problems. Den-
ver's appear less sever,
so
NEW ENGLAND 20
HOUSTON 14
CBS-TV commentator
Pat Summerall said Sunday
that the Patriots may well
be the best team in the NFL
this season. That is a very
distinct possibility. The
Oilers will put up a good
fight, but will find them-
selves in agreement with
Summerall after this game.
TAMPA BAY 17
DETROIT 14
The Buccaneers sport
one of the NFL's brightest
young defenses. The Lions
have played well in recent
.weeks, and should continue
to do so this week. But
something in the stars says
the expansion Bucs will
win.
WASHINGTON 28
NEW YORK GIANTS21
The Redskins have lost
three of their last four, yet
still lead the NFC East by
one game. They're not
about to let the Giants ruin
their dream of a division
championship as they
bounce back from a loss to
Baltimore last Monday
PHILADELPHIA 17
NEW YORK JETS14
OAKLAND24
CINCINNATI 14
SANDIEG017
KANSASCITY7
The Chargers are a
good young team. Yet they
have had problems this
season. This game with the
Chiefs is not one of them.
NEW
ECU CANVAS
ROCKING CHAIR
FOLDS UP FOR STORAGE
ECU COACHING
JACKETS
PAT'S HAT
and
STADIUM SEATS
PURPLE and GOLD
RUGBY SWEATERS
' i
��.
H.L.HODGES
AND COMPANY, INC.
210 E. 5th St. Phone 752-4156
BONANZA
FOR PIRATES ONLY
Bonanza is proud to present
the return of our fabulous
PIRATE SPECIAL!
Which includes a ooz. Sirloin Steak,
Baked Potato , Texas Toast, Salad
from our FREE, all you can eat Salad Bar
and your choice of Beverage
( except milk, and Dessert.
All for $2.89
STITFFY'S
S,
4 �


re
$
i i
'Jff
i �� .j
I
Good Stuff
Homecoming
Special
,STUFFY'S
Js
,
y
25 cents off
with the purchase
of any sub
offer good through Nov. loth, with coupon
Don't forget your
date with a sub.
Take one to the game
. " " '����'���.
3 Z 'r
iK
STUFFY'S SANDWICHES
No. 1 Spiced Ham - Cooked Salam. - Cheese VYo" ?TT
No. 2 Cheese - Provolone - Swiss - Amencan ,
No. 3 Nam-Swiss 25 245
No. 4 Nsm - Salami - Swiss 55 ???
No 5 TunaSalad V25 245
No. 6 Roast Beef r5� 2 95
No. 7 Turkay r55 3 05
No 8 Club -Ham -Turkey -Cheese "1 ! !?
� 9 Stuffy Fsmou. - Ham-Cappacola - Salami-Cheese so 2 �
Stuffy Star - Ham - Cappacola - Proscuitn,
Salami - Cheese � ec ,
Bologna-Cooked Salam, Cheese f??
Pastrami 1W
Corned Beef �� 2
�( 55 3qc
All Stuffys Garnished at no extra cost with Tomatoes.
lettuce, onions, oil. vinegar. oreg3no and salt
BEVERAGES
Coca Cola - Sprite - Tab - Orange Ju.ce - Mr POb - Draft Beer - Coffee
Iced Tea - Lemonade - M.Ik - Hawaiian Punch - Hot Chocolate
No. 11
No. 12
No. 13
J
Offer good all day, eyery day
with presentation of ECU I.D. card.

Remember Great Things Happei
at Bonanza and ECU
7526130
Georgetowne Shoppes
t
r

l





Title
Fountainhead, November 9, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 09, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.524
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
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