Fountainhead, November 2, 1978






Circulation 10,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
Vol. No. 55 No.
&
2 November 1978
Legislature approves
SGA attorney general
WELL. ALMOST 3 more weeks till Thanksgiving
hoto by Pete Podeszwa
By ANN THARRINGTON
Staff Writer
The SGA legislature voted their approval Monday of
Kieran Shanahan for the position of attorney general.
In other business before the legislature, a new review
board was approved. Members of the review board are
Murray Bullock. Diane Gray, Alonzo Newby, Valerie
Chaffin. Liz Hamby, and Howard Newell. Alternate
members are Danny Safriet, Pete Meyers, and Edward
Walters.
The SGA also voted to participate in the Student-Alumni
Phone-A-Thon November 21. Students in the legislature
will man the phones for three hours to help raise money for
the ECU Alumni Association.
In other business. SGA President Tommy Joe Payne
vetoed a bill calling for $15,000 to be placed in an escrow
account for use by student organizations during the spring
semester of next year.
Payne said that he vetoed the bill because he felt that
$15,000 or even $10,000 was too much money to be placed
in an escrow account
"I approve of the concept but not the sum involved he
said.
Payne said that there was already a lack of funds in the
SGA to approve to clubs and programs and that placing a
large sum of money in an escrow account would give the
Appropriations Committee less money to work with
Payne also appealed to the legislators for volunteers to
accompany police on Halloween night. The volunteers
would only serve as monitors, helping police maintain order
in the downtown district.
Danny Mumford was sworn in by Attorney General
Shanartan to fill the vacant position as Jones Dorm
Legislator.
Jeff Triplett, Chairman of the Rules and Judiciary
Committee, announced the approval of the constitution of
the Students for Christ.
In other business, speaker Libby Lefler told legislators
about her correspondence to FOUNTAINHEAD.
axplaining the purpose of the SGA legislature to students
ho were unfamiliar with the association and its functions
In her letter to the editor, she explains why the SGA is
unable to fund all requests by clubs.
The SGA has already received requests for $192,000 to
be funded to campus clubs and organizations but only has
$110,000 to spend, according to Lefler.
Legislator Brett Melvin, Chairman of the Appropri-
ations Committee read his resolution to the Media Board
concerning the funds which were designated to be used for
the publishing of last year's BUCCANEER
Melvin asserted that all monies not spent of the
$49,237.50appropriated to the BUCCANEER should revert
back to the SGA General Fund.
Greenville campus police
offer 'Operation Identification'
r
What's inside.
By MIKE ROGERS
Staff Writer
The Greenville police
department is presently
employing an identification
system Operation Identi-
fication, to mark clothes
and other valuables and.
hopefully, to discourage
� � 1 program of en-
graving items of value in
homes and businesses with
an approved number sys-
said Doug Jackson,
the Community Crime Pre-
vention officer for the
Greenville police
Jackson said the pro-
gram has been in effect
since May. 1975
Jackson added . that
three years before that, the
Greenville Jaycees bought
engravers, and gave them
to the police department for
citizens to check out, take
.home, use. and return.
According to Jackson.
in those three years, only
100 people used the en-
gravers. 42 of which were
policemen
Now. however, since
the Greenville police en-
grave the clothes them-
selves, participation has
increased, Jackson said.
"In the past three and a
half years we've engrmvd
approximately 2,000 indivi-
dual's items
He added that anyone
who gets their valuables
engraved also receives a
sticker with a warning,
Notice! We have joined
Operation Identification.
All items of value on these
premises have been
marked for ready identi-
fication and have been
recorded with the Green-
ville Police Crime Pre-
vention Program
Jackson said the best
type of number to use is not
your social security num-
ber, but a driver's license
number.
"If you don not have a
driver's license number, we
will give you an approved
number said Jackson.
He added that Social
Security numbers would
not work because the Social
Security office will not
divulge information.
"We have recovered
items in Greenville by
using this system Jack-
son said.
Any student who wishes
to have his valuables
marked, should either call
Officer Jackson, or go to
the campus police depart-
ment which also engraves.
According to Jackson,
the police department uses
an electric engraver.
"For furs and other
items which can't be en-
graved, we have a pen that
uses a special fluid that
only shows up under a
black light
Jackson said the engra-
ving service is fairly pop-
ular, and most cities
throughout North Carolina
are using it.
ECU faces Appalachian State at home
Satsee p. 8
Pablo Cruise & Livingston Taylor will
appear at Minges Coliseum for preview
see p. 6
Greek forumsee p. 3
What's new on the hill
p. 5
This week's free ffick is the academy
award winning The Turning Point, tor
preview see p. 6
Media Board cancels
77-78 BUCCANEER
Model council
to meet here
By RICHY SMITH
Assistant News Editor
The Atlantic Coast Mo-
del Security Council
meeting will be held at
ECU February 23-25, ac-
cording to William Barbe,
Secretary-General of ECU
Model United Nations
(Model UN).
The Model UN club is
sponsoring four Security
Councils, The council is ex-
pecting delegations from all
over eastern United States.
The basic rules and pro-
cedures of the National
Model UN in New York
will be followed at this
ACMSC meeting.
According to Barbe,
four security councils will
be in simultaneous sessions
and fifteen countries will be
seated on each council.
The council will seat 60
delegations within the ide-
pendent Security Councils.
There are several countries
represented, commented
Barbe.
Those that are available
for selection by the differ-
ent schools are United
States, USSR, China,
France, United Kingdom,
Nigeria, Kuwait, Gabon,
Czechoslavakia and Bolivia.
Five other countries will
also be represented, ac-
cording to Barbe. They are
Africa, Asia, Eastern Eur-
ope. Latin America, and
Western Europe.
The ACMSC plans to
have a distinguished A-
merican speaker on Foreign
Affairs. Last year's speaker
was Dean Rusk, former se-
cretary of state to Pres.
John F. Kennedy.
There are many impor-
tant issues to world peace
that require action by the
United Nations, Barbe said.
The third annual Security
Council simulation will be
discussing these issues.
The advisors for the
ACMSC III are Dr. Oral
Parks, ECU Political Sci-
ence and Fulbright Re-
search Scholar, ACMSC 1
and 2, Dr. Sandra Wurth-
Hough, ECU Political Sci-
ence and Advisor to the
State Department on Mid-
dle East, ACMSC 1 and 2,
David Zuckerman, Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania, Con-
nie Zuckerman, American
University, Shelley Fowler,
Sec-Gen. ACMSC 1 and
Wiley F. Betts, SecGen
ACMSC 2.
The model security
council is funded by the
ECU Student Government
Association.
By MIKE ROGERS
Staff Writer
The Media Board voted
unanimously in a Wed-
nesday meeting to cancel
the 1977-78 BUCCANEER
Tommy Joe Payne, Mt
dia Board chairman, re-
ported that the cover sent
in last spring was not back
yet. Members of the board
discussed drawing up a
contract for future editors
to sign that would legally
force then to produce on
time.
Having cancelled the
BUCCANEER, the Media
Board was faced with the
1977-78 Buccaneer budget
of $42,794 and how to use
it.
One board member re-
marked that the ECU Play-
house needed more money
than, the SGA could afford
to give them, and sug-
gested that the board give
the money back to the SGA
Other members remarked
that the SGA gave the f
money to the Media Board
in the expectation that the
BUCCANEER would be
published.
Several board members
said the SGA might con-
sider this act a prerequisite
to further funding. They
added that the board's pri-
mary concern was with the
media.
Still other members
commented that the board
was too concerned with
school politics and should
instead concentrate on the
good of the students.
The board then recog-
nized Jim Dale ECU inter-
nal auditor Dale reported
that certain persons were
buying materials with the
university s money without
filling out the proper forms
Dale added that phone bills
were also a problem. One
member suggested that
people were either making
illegitimate phone calls
h m tv offices of th�
9UCCANCCP FOUNTAIN
HEAD ���: � ne
were immwji �� �
phone numbers �od jna-amg
the bills to noseof-ce
An observing student
remarked that in many
cases, the staff members
made legitimate phone
calls and merely forgot to
record them.
The board discussed
putting locks on the
phones, using a switch-
board system, or running
the calls through Menden-
hall Student Center The
board finally decided not to
take action until next
month.
Pi Lambda Phi
chapter reorganizes
DO YOU THINK anyone will notim me?'
Photo by Pete Podeszwa
By STEVE WILSON
Staff Writer
The ECU Chapter of Pi
Lambda Phi Fraternity is to
� undergo extensive reor-
ganization, according to
Ronnie Eaaon, former pre-
sident of Pi Lambda Phi.
' The house that was
formerly occupied by the
fraternity is now vacant,
but soon, the house will be
occupied by another ECU
fraternity, the Sigma Tau
Gamma.
Eason said that a reor-
ganization of the fraternity
was necessary. He cited
disinterest by the fraternity
members and some mis-
management of funds by
his predecessors as causes
for the reorganization.
Eason said that a suc-
cession of events made the
reorganization necessary.
"Itsanoid houee, with
old fixtures, that needed
more money than we could
afford to put into it. A lot of
the brothers lost interest
and became Inactive said
Eaaon.
He also said that poor
attendance during rush
periods caused the decision
to move out of the house.
The house will notd ap-
proximately 15-20 persons
Eaaon also said that
some of the remainingaf ve
brothers are tentatively
planning to hold informal
rush part lea soon.
He said the parties will
probably be held in mem-
bers apartments. Eaaon
added that this was the way
the fraternity started when
it was founded on the ECU
campus.
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Volleyball
Male and female stu-
dents, faculty, and staff
interested in forming a
volleyball club should meet
in room 105 of Memorial
Gym at 6:30 p m. on Tues
November 7. At that time,
it is anticipated that a
constitution and officers
will be determined and that
activities for the year will
be planned. For further
information contact Dr.
Sayetta in the Physics
Department
Macho Man
Be sure not to miss the
Sigma Tau Gamma Little
Rose's "Macho Man" con-
test on Tues November 7
a! the Elbo Room. A prize
will be awarded for the
male who best represents a
Macho Man Other
prizes will be given away
throughout the night. Tick-
ets are 25 cents presale at
Little Rose sand 50centsat
the door.
SPAN
Tri-Sigma
SHEA
There will be a SPAN
(Student Planning Associa-
tion) meeting November 6
at 4 p.m. in Brewster BD-
209. Those interested in
urban and regional plan-
ning are invited.
Dr. Simon Baker will be
the guest lecturer. The title
of his lecture is "Two New
European Towns Along
with the lecture Dr. Baker
also has an interesting slide
presentation. The new
towns which will be dis-
cussed are Tapiola, Fin-
land, and Stevenage, En-
gland.
Free Flick
Due to the home
football game this week's
free flick will be shown
Sat one time only, at 2
p m. The film will be
screened Fri. night at the
usual times of 7 and 9 p m.
Admission to the film is
by ID and Activity Card for
students and Mendenhall
Student Center Member-
ship Card for faculty and
staff. All free flicks are
shown in Hendrix Theatre.
Student National Edu-
cation Associa'ion will be
meeting Thurs November
9, 1978 It will be in room
. 44 lenhall, at 4 p.m.
James. Director of
Career Planning and Place-
service will be speak-
e ear the oppor-
S waiting for you'
Travel
Sign up now for the
Student Union Travel Com-
mittee trip toSnowshoe, W.
Va. Places going fast. En-
joy one of the east coasts'
finest ski resorts. Sign up
now at Mendenhall ticket
office.
Sigma Sigma Sigma
sorority will be having a
yard bake sale on Fri Nov.
3 beginning at 11 a.m.
The sale will take place
in front of the Sigma house,
which is located at 803 East
Fifth St.
The proceeds from the
sale will go to the Tri-Sig's
philanthropy, and the Rob-
bie Page Memorial Fund.
The money will be sent to
the children's ward at Noth
Carolina Memorial Hospit-
al.
Pi Sigma
There will be an organ-
tional meeting of Pi
Sigma Alpha on Wed
November 8 at 7 p.m. in
Brewster BC-105. All
members are asked to
attend.
Turkey shoot
Win your Thanksgiving
dinner at the Mendenhall
"Turkey Shoot" on Thurs
November 15 between the
hoursof 7 p.m. and 11 p.m.
The MSC Bowling Cen-
ter will be by the site of the
old-fashioned turkey shoot.
An entry fee of $1.50 will
give you the chance to bowl
one ball on ten consecutive
lanes. If at least eight pins
fall on each lane, you win a
turkey! Enter as many
times as you like. Limit
three wins per person.
Print Group
The Print Group will
have cards and note paper
with university scenes for
sale beginning Mon Nov-
ember 6. Contact any print
maker in Rm. 1105 Jenkins
bldg.
Leadership
Leadership training
class provides good fun and
fellowship in addition to
helping you learn about the
'Christian life. Classes are
now going on every Thurs.
night at 7 p.m. in Brewster
B-103. Come check it out.
Sponsored by Campus Cru-
sade for Christ.
The Student Union
Coffeehouse Committee presents
f � V
Writers
Psi-Chi
Psi-Chi will have a bake
sale WedNovember 8 from
9 a.m. until 4 p.m. in front
of the student bookstore.
All members of Psi-Chi
who were initiated in Octo-
ber may pick up their
membership certificate
from Mrs. Nelson in the
main Psychology office.
Please do this as soon as
possible.
Gamma Beta
Gamma Beta Phi will
meet Thurs November 2
in Mendenhall 244 at 7
p.m. All members are
urged to attend. Pledges
are required to attend this
meeting.
The Writers Guild will
hold its forth in a series of
meetings on Mon Nov-
ember 6 at 3 p.m. in Austin
207. All interlucent and er-
udite persons welcome.
Homecoming
Alpha Dappa Alpha
Sorority is sponsoring a
pre-game Homecoming
celebration at the Ramada
Inn, 264 By-Pass, Fri
November 10, from 10 p.m.
until 2a.m.
Tickets in advance may
be purchased from any Al-
pha Kappa Alpha member
and are $3 per couple, and
$2 per person. Tickets will
be $2.50 per person at the
door.
Buy your tickets now,
and enjoy an evening of
social elegance.
Concert
Talent
MSC
The MSC All-Campus
Table Tennis Tournament
will be held on Tues
November 7 at 7 p.m. in the
Mendenhall Multi-Purpose
Room. The winners of the
Day-Student Tournament
and Dorm-Student Tourna-
ments will be competing in
both the men's and wom-
en's divisions. The man
and woman who finish first
in their divisions will re-
present tournaments to be
held in Knoxville, Ten-
nessee on February 8,9,
and 10.
The Student Union Ma-
jor Attractions Committee
will present Pablo Cruise
with special guest Living-
ston Taylor on Thurs
November 9, 1978, at 8
p.m. in MingesColiseum.
Tickets will be $5 for
ECU students and $7 for
the public. All tickets are
available from the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center. In addi-
tion, public tickets can be
purchased from: Apple Re-
cords, East Fifth Street,
School Kid's Records,
Georgetown Shoppes; and
The M usic Shop, Greenville
Square Mall.
Only public tickets will
be sold at the door.
Fellowship
Jesus is the door to
eternal life. He offers you
this and abundant life of
righteousness, peace, joy,
health, love, and victory. If
you reject Him you will not
have eternal life nor abun-
dant life. You are invited to
come to a Full Gospel
Student Fellowship Bible
study tonight in Menden-
hall 212 7:30-9:30. John
Crowe will be teaching on
how a person becomes a
new person in Christ, what
happens when he does, and
how this is victoriously
lived out in practical every-
day living.
Arts
The Eta Psi Chapter of
the Kappa Alpha Psi Fra-
ternity here at ECU is
sponsoring an All Campus
Talent Presentation. The
event is scheduled to be
held on Tues November
14 from 6 until 10 p.m. in
the Multi-Purpose Auditor-
ium at Mendenhall Student
Center. Participants will be
reviewed by a panel of
judges on a point system
with the performance re-
ceiving the highest total
points declared the winner.
If interested, call
758-8608.
Real Estate
"Under all is the Land"
is the slogan for Rho Ep-
silon, the National Real
Estate Fraternity at ECU
Rho Epsilon is open to all
business majors who are in
real estate and majors that
are planning to concentrate
in real estate.
Rho Epsilon helps the
student by perpetuating the
real estate profession be-
yond the classroom. If you
are interested in Rho Ep-
silon, you are invited to
attend their next meeting
Thurs November 9, at 4
p.m. in Rm 221 Men-
denhall.
The speaker will be
C.B. "Pop" Beasley from
New Bern, and the
topic will be "Resort De-
velopment Current
members are also urged to
i attend
The Student Union Mi-
nority Arts Committee pre-
sents a Homecoming Dance
featuring Anglo Saxon
Brown on Mon , November
6, at 8 p.m. m Wright
Auditorium.
Anglo Saxon Brown has
toured the U S with Are-
thra Franklin and Europe
with Elvis Presley
Tickets will be S1 for
ECU students and $3 tor
the public Tickets are
available at the Centra
Ticket Office m Mendenhall
Student Center
All tickets sold at the
door will be S3
Percussion
The ECU Percussion
Ensemble will perform in
concert Thursday. Nov 2 at
I 8:15 P-m. in tne A J
Fletcher Music Center Re-
atai Hall.
The concert, tree and
open to the public, will
feature "acolorful program
that includes a wide variety
of timbres and styles
Insurance
Joe Goodson and
Flanagan Insurance Agen-
cy, insures the Greenville
Art Center He win speaK
about the types of insur-
ance available for artists
and their work on Nov-
ember 10 in Jenkins audi-
torium.
East Carolina University
Student Union Major Attractions Committee
TIT3C3U, - fli
Joe Collins
Thurs. & Fri Nov. 2&3
8:3� & 9:30
Room IS
Mendenhall
Admission
50 cents
Free
snacks
With special guest Livingston Taylor
Thurs Nov. 9� 1978 Sp.tn
Minges Coliseum ����
Students
S5.0C
02
10
19
40
74
122
175
176
201
211
299
318
405
420
444
453
482
496
500
532
537
555
573
577
578
613
T-Shirt winners must claim their
T-Shirts By 5:00 Monday, Nov. 6, 1978.
626
649
670
688
697
703
753
777
779
Classifieds
tors �
FOR SALE: 1 Pioneer
SA-8500 stereo amplifier
(100 watts per channel); 1
Super Scope AM-FM, FM
stereo tuner; 1 Panasonic
turntable-eight track com-
bination; 2 Marant' HD-77
speakers. $600 for all or will
sell each piece separately.
Call 756-8571 before 8 p.m.
or 752-9245 after 8 p.m. for
more information.
FOR SALE: 2, three
way air suspension speak-
ers. Cost $200 new, want
$100 for pair. Call Frank at
758-1186.
FOR SALE : Rotel stereo
receiver BSR McDonald
turntable and two SMG
speakers. Receiver has 12
watts RM S per channel and
all equipment is in ex-
cellent condition. $100. Call
758-6198.
FOR SALE: 66 Mus-
tang, Classic, exc. condi-
tion, new tires, new clutch,
new battery, exceptional
interior. $975. Phone
756-8242 or 799-0794 (Wil-
mington)
NEED: A responsible
roommate by Nov. 5 to
share a 2 bedroom apt.
Rent is $63 not including
utilities. Call 758-5794.
FOR SALE: Ford Pinto.
Factory air AM-FM cas-
sette deck; good condition.
Rear end has been modified
to comply with government
safety standards. Come by
162 Jones after 2:30 p.m.
and lets rap.
FOR SALE: Wooden
clarinet, excellent condition
plus accessories. Also
folding reeding lamp, per-
fect for dorm room. Also,
will sell or trade a number
of assorted magazines. If
Interested, call 752-9852.
FOR SALE: Craig Pow-
er Play; receiver with 8-
track, turntable, 2 speak-
ers. Less than a year old.
$200 or best offer. Call
Sharon at 756-8132.
FOR SALE: 1972 Honda
CB350-4 motorcycle in ex-
cellent mechanical condi-
tion. New tires, new bat-
tery, 29:000 miles, one
owner. Call LaRae at
758-3386, or Lucy at
752-8585. Leave message
or keep trying.
FOR SALE: 1977 Ford
Courier Truck, AMFM
sliding glaaees, camper
shell with carpet, 30 MPG,
Red with tan interior. Call
756-2380 after 5 p.m.
weekdays. Ask for Dexter.
FREE PUPPIES: 6
weeks old. Good pets on
hunting dogs. Call 756-7719
jpsisorici�
LOST: Gold monogram
pin with initials JSC. Re-
ward offered. Call Jane at
758-6277.
LOST: Green Parka with
plaid lining, L.L. Bean
label, in vicinity of Elm and
Tenth streets. Reward.
Please leave ins�ags at
757-6614.
WANTED: Electric gui-
tarist needed I or soft rock
band. Please contact: Twila
Wolfe at 758-2585 as soon
as possible.
FREELANCE AR-
TISTS: needed immediate-
ly. Here's a chance to do
some work that will be
published. It'll look good in
your portfolio. And, you'll
pick up some good pay.
Contact Betty Moeeley, Art
Director, Allen and Longino
Advertising, Inc. 752-1914.
TODAY
MID EASTERN DANCE:
(Authentic Belly Dancing)
taught by Sunshine - exper-
ienced teacher and perfor-
mer in Ohio, Mexico,
Atlanta, and the DC. area.
Classes are now forming.
Call 756-0736.
YOGA: Hatha yoga is now
being taught by Sunshine.
New classes forming. Relax
-ation, realization, weight
loss. For more info, call
756-0736.
torrent
ROOM FOR RENT
Males only. 402 Student
street. Call 752-4814
ROOMMATE NEED-
ED: Situation available for
female interested �n pnvafe
room in attractive house
with ail conveniences, loca-
ted 2 blocks from campus.
Owner is mature, profes-
sional gentleman interested
�n sharing expenses. For
'��rview, call 75S-3016
after 5 p.m.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom
Apt sublet in Langaton
Park. $210 a month. Avail-
able Thanksgiving. Caf,
);ig�C � " w'
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2 Nwwibw 197S FOUNTAINHEAD Pags3
Greek Forum
STUDENTS PUT AWAY
Tuesday night to celebrate Halloween.
Gurley
their books
Photo by Chap
ByRICKIGUARMIS
News Editor
The Phi Kappa Taus
held a work day Saturday
which was devoted to the
planning of Homecoming.
The Phi Taus are building a
float for the parade and
have mailed out a newslet-
ter to all alumni inviting
them to Homecoming and
to the festivities which are
being planned during the
weekend.
During the Saturday
planning session, the little
sisters treated the brothers
and pledges to lunch.
The Phi Taus would like
to congratulate John Jeter
for an excellent perfor-
mance in Pippin, and Robert
Swaim, advertising mana-
ger of FOUNTAINHEAD,
who along with two other
members of the paper
represented ECU at the
national convention in
Houston, Texas, last week.
Monday night, the Phi
Taus inducted ten new little
sisters and are looking
forward to working with the
new girls.
This weekend before
the football game, Phi Tau
will have a cocktail party
and following the game, the
fraternity will stage a
mixer
Lambda Chi Alpha Field
Day was a big success this
year.
The Beta Theta Pi's, a
Men's Residence Council
prepares for homecoming
The Men's Residence
Council met Monday night
in the basement of Scott
Dorm to select their
nominee for homecoming
queen
Each dorm had selected
their own nominee indivi-
dually prior to the meeting
Monday and the nominees
attended the general coun-
cil meeting.
Kathy Dreyer was
selected from the group to
represent the M RC in the
homecoming court as well
as the m the parade,
according to Gerry Wal-
lace. MRC President
The MRC is also
wording on their entry for
r i ade.
Some dorms are staging
contests of the best banner
or other type of decorations
depicting the homecoming
theme with cash awards as
the incentives
Other activities on the
hill include a pig-pickin'
and a bluegrass concert,
jointly sponsored by the
MRC and the Women's
Residence Council. The
pig-pickin' will be held on
Nov 8, from 4:45-7:00 p.m.
The intended site is the
field beside the tennis
courts on the hill.
Many of the men's
dorms have been sponsor-
ing socials with the womens
dorms. The latest trend was
the Kiss-A-Treat social.
This type of social has been
popular during the Hallo-
ween week-end and drew a
good response.
The MRC sponsors a
supervised study hall in the
basement of Scott dorm.
Members are encouraged
to take advantage of this
facility. It is a good place to
get away from the noise for
a little quiet contemplation.
Student Union Films
Committee presents
The Turning Point
Friday night 7 and 9 p.m
Saturday at p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
new fraternity on campus,
and the Sigma Sigma
Sigmas won top honors
during the day of competi-
tion. This marks the Beta's
first victory during the field
day the the Tri-Sigs' fourth
consecutive victory.
The Sigmas are very
pleased over their fourth
consecutive victory, during
Lambda Chi field day.
The Tri-Sigs are plan-
ning their annual pie throw
on Nov. 21. Further details
will be forthcoming next
week. This Friday, Nov. 3,
the sorority will be having a
yard-bake sale from 11 a.m.
until, in front of the Sigma
house at 803 E. Fifth St.
Proceeds will go to N.C.
Memorial Hospital for the
children's wing.
The Sigmas also took
top honors during team
tennis as all-campus cham-
pions.
The Sigma Tau Gam-
mas have come a long way
since chartering last
spring. To emphasize the
growth of the chapter here
at ECU, a dream has
become a reality. As of
Nov. 1, thj Sig Taus have
moved into their new house
at 410 Elizabeth St.
To celebrate this occa-
sion, the Sig Taus will be
having its all campus
pregame BUCK FEST at the
house this Saturday, Nov
4, from 11 am until 4 p.m.
Music will be provided by
the. Nite-Bite Band and
admission will be $2.
GREAT
MEXICAN
EATERY
513 Greenville Blvd.
Open 11:00 11:00
Mon. thru Thur.
Fri.�PSat. 11:00 12:0"
Sun. 12:00 11:00
Tuesday Night
Nickel Drink Night
( with food order )
5:00-11:00
Dr. Pepper, Beer, Pepsi,
, Mt. Dew, Tea, Coffee
we Gladly Accept Personal Checks.
Free Taco Cid Iron -on Patch
with $4.00 food order
Get your hands on a
Hot 'n Juicy Hamburger
i-
P32
P 29 ONE SINGLE HAMBURGER AND ONE ORDER OF FRI
TWO SINGLE
HAMBURGERS
for $1.26
(plus tan)
Tomato . . . 10c extra
Cheese 12 e extra
Good now thru
November 30. 1978
only at Wendy r'f at
264 Bv Pas & Ivans Street
Greenville NC
TWO SINGLE HAMBURGERS PER COUPON
MIStNt COu�ON 8�'0� CXC�Nl,
A SINGLE
HAMBURGER
and French Fries
for 99
(plus tan)
Tomato 10c extra
Cheese 12c extra
Good now thru
November 30. 1978
only a! Wendy's at
264 Bv Pass & Evans Street
Greenville. NC
RCOUPON
Our special coupon offers
make it more tempting than ever
to get your hands on a
Hot 'n Juicy Hamburger.
Just clip these coupons and
enjoy Hot 'n Juicy
Hamburgers at
special savings!
L"C�, H -f �OI �"wJ
A SINGLE
HAMBURGER
and French Fries
for 99C
� plus tax I
Tomato 10c extra
Cheese 12c extra
( i xid rww ihru
N member 30. 19 B
oniv at Wench s at
?4 B P.i-s & Evans Street
Gteenv. -lie NC
ONE SINGLE HAMBURGER AND ONE ORDER OF FRIES PER COuPON
jotsf cou�oafo�t oo
TWO SINGLE
HAMBURGERS
for $1.26
� plus fa,i
Tomato 10c extra
Cheese 12c extra
C.� d rx� ftn -
N.KemtH- � WTb
imly at vWnck - a'
64 B�. Pass & Evans Street
Greet If NC
TWO SINGLE HAMBURGERS PER COUPON
P� 2

P� 32
HLE FASHIONED
Wendy's Old Fashioned Hamburgers
264 By-Pass & Evans Street
Greenville, NC
Ho�'�" '�'� 3� ��� v "�-����'�� . � �� �� �
m w " �� "�
"
- - -





The'77BUC: R.LE
The Media Board is to be applauded for
cancelling the 1977-78 edition of the ill-fated
BUCCANEER. It was a noble effort to try to
salvage the book that was unceremoniously
dumped in the board's lap, but it would be
foolish to throw good money after bad in order
to put out a slipshod book pieced together at
the last minute.
We are, needless to say, unhappy that the
long-awaited '7778 BUC will not be printed,
but we are happy that the Media Board will
have an additional $42,000 with which to fund
WECU-FM and to provide the media with the
equipment and renovations which were
neglected for so many years under the Student
Government Association (SGA).
We have expressed our feelings on
proposed grants from the Media Board to the
SGA in earlier editorials, and our position
remains unchanged. It would set a dangerous
precedent for one major organization to, in
effect, bail out another. How will any
organization handle its finances if it knows it
can get a handout from another body should
they carelessly overspend their alloted funds?
The Media Board was created to handle
the media and the media alone. The proposal
to create the board stated explicitly that no
money already appropriated by the SGA would
revert back, as was provided for in the original
SGA appropriations bill. FOUNTAINHEAD
reverted $20,000 to the Media Board when our
budget expired last June, and there was no
question as to whether or not it should go to the
Media Board or the SGA.
Similarly, the Media Board should build its
savings in order to both improve, expand, and
offer a buffer to the media. Through wise
financial management, the REBEL could
conceivably publish once a semester; FOUNT-
AINHEAD could hit the streets three times a
week or even more often. Professional
consultants could be called in to educate media
personnel in their chosen fields, further
improving the media and the university's
reputation.
It is unfortunate that the 1977-78 BUCCA-
NEER died a slow and painful death, but it can
be turned into a blessing. This windfall profit
should be used as seed money to update and
renovate all campus media. In this capacity, it
will be worth far more than $42,000.
Forum
Communique
Speaker explains SGA purpose
witchcraft
By LUKE WHISNANT
Everything seemed
preuy normal. was jusl
another Halloween: kids
throwing eggs and rolling
yards; parents siicing open
apples to check for razor
blades, thousands of
church-group haunted hou-
ses raking in the money and
thousands of high school
carnivals burning life-sized
papier-mache witches un-
der the almost full moon.
There may have been a
few hgitimate witches
standing around those
bonfires Tuesday night,
watching their symbolic
aiter-egos transmute into
ashes, but more than likely
they were busy with their
own celebrations- after all,
Halloween is the holiest
night of the year to some
people.
We're familiar with it
by now-the Black Mass
with all its darkest rituals
appears at least twice
monthly on TV, usually in
one of those made-for-tele-
vision movies like The
Devil'I Cheerleaders or
Satan's Daughter.
Some of the more exotic
and explicit sexual cere-
monies are only hinted at
during prime-time�you
have to check out the orgys
at your local paperback
bookshelf. Something
about TV exposure,
though, makes the whole
rigamarole of Satanism
seem silly and a little
pathetic, and I'm not quite
sure that's the way we
should feel about it. There
are more people seriously
into Satanism than we
realize.
One blistering August
day l was sitting around a
pond at the edge of a
cornfield with three friends
of mine. The corn had been
scorched to death weeks
ago, and even the crickets
were too heat-exhausted to
move, and when we finally
remembered that fish will
not bite in the hot part of
the day, we reeled in our
lines and began looking for
something else to do.
After a minute, Tim
propped himself up on one
elbow and asked, "Did I
ever tell ya'll about the
pyramid I found out here
one time?"
"Tell us about it said
Jeff.
"I was hunting out here
one time, and the dogs had
jumped a rabbit about a
mile down the road, so I
lust started walking around
until they could run him
back to me. AH of a sudden
cam to a clearing In the
woods and there's this
huge pyramid-purple, too.
with a plexiglass eye on
top
'You were stoned,
right?" asked David.
'Hell no He saw that
none of us believed him.
("Come on-get your stuff,
let's go. I'll take you
there
black hexagrams painted
over it. "Don't you know
what these are?" Jeff
exclaimed. "These are
witches' symbols
"Yal'll go on in if you
want to said Tim, "BUT
I'm staying out here
David and I went in.
Dead center of the dirt floor
was a well which Tim swore
hadn't been there before.
We dropped a rock down
the shaft and counted two
seconds before it hit
bottom.
We lifted our gear,
hiked out through the
cornfield, piled into David's
car. We drove a few miles
down the main highway
and then Tim took us down
a bumpy dirt road which
grew less and less navi-
gable and eventually
turned into two deep sun-
baked mud ruts.
We got out and walked.
Walked past an orange
mailbox with the word
Home painted on its side,
up a little hill into a wall of
pines which hid the
pyramid from sight.
It was purple. It stood
about 20 feet tall, and it
was big enough inside to
parallel park two Cadillacs
on the dirt floor.
We were swearing and
scratching our heads and
asking Tim to forgive us for
not believing his story.
This next part you
might have trouble visuali-
zing : the top two feet of the
pyramid consisted of a clear
plexiglass cap that rose to a
perfect point. A big yellow
�ye had been painted on all
four sides of the plexiglass.
(If you still can't picture
this, look on the back
left-hand side of a dollar
bill-it's a perfect likeness.)
There was no door on
the pyramid, just an
entranceway with large
"Let's see-32 feet per
second squared David
whistled. "Man, that
thing's more than 90 feet
deep
"How in hell do you
suppose they dug that?"
The sides were perfectly
smooth. "No way they
could have gotten well-dig-
ging equipment in here
In the corner stood a
make-shift spice rack and
an old iron kettle. The
spices were stored in baby-
food jars. At first we
thought wertadJfcuijd,�
someone's stsah, but on
closer inspection we were
unable to identify any of the
herbs.
Outside, Jeff had dis-
covered a campfire pit
made of bricks. Around the
pit were dozens of charred
bones. I was quietly
freaking out until Tim
informed us that they were
cow bones. Standing a little
way off from the firepit was
a marble sundial with these
words inscribed on the
face. "Before Light Comes
Darkness
Jeff kicked the sundial
over. "I know what this is
now he hollered. "These
people are devil-worship-
pers
Tim politely told Jeff to
shut up and stop destroying
other people's property.
I spent this past
Tuesday night in a barren
room here in Greenville,
just as I have spent the two
previous Halloweens.
Trick-or-treaters kept ban-
ging on the door and after
we'd run out of apples, I
turned off the lights and
locked up, hoping they'd
leave us alone.
Then it got very quiet.
Maybe I should have gone
downtown or hit a couple of
parties.
Instead, I sat around
and thought about what
might be happening 200
miles away at the purple
pyramid. Part of me was
glad I was here, safe and
warm and unterrified.
My dark side wanted to
be there.
ToFOUNTAiNHEAD
Most of you have heard
of SGA in one way or
another, but probably very
few of you know exactly
what SGA is or does. This is
my third consecutive year
in the Student Government
Association, having served
in the legislative and exe-
cutive branches.
� iBhorefore. I feel, as the
newtyutected Speaker, it is
no only my duty by my
obligation to keep the stu-
dents informed as the the
happenings of their student
government.
First, a little back-
ground about the SGA.
SGA's main purpose is to
safeguard and protect the
interests of the students.
The legislature is composed
of 53 full-time students
elected by their peers.
These legislators do not
represent a particular fac-
tion of the school. As a
matter of fact, very few
legislators come from a
department requesting
money from SGA. The
simple facts are that these
students are willing to
spend endless unpaid hours
working for the benefit of
their classmates.
In deciding upon bills,
the 1978-79 legislators try
to look at the overall need
of the club, how long it
has been at ECU, how it
has been funded in the past
how many students it af-
fects, and in what way it
will benefit the students.
This is by no means an
easy job. But then these 53
students didn't ask for an
eacy job when they applied
for SGA. -Howeve, -one
thing these students did not
bargain for was constant
criticism from their friends.
If you know a legislator
don't ask him why he
doesn't want to fund a
certain organization. The
Legislators would like to
give all organizations all of
their requested funds. But
facts are facts.
Thus far this year,
organizations have asked
for over $192,000 in funds.
SGA has $110,000 to spend.
So you see it's not a matter
of wanting to cut an organi-
zation's bill, it's a matter of
having to.
Basically, I ask the
students of this campus to
be patient and cooperative
with their SGA representa-
tives. Out of the 53 mem-
bers only six have ever
served before. So the in-
terest is there, it is only a
matter of time.
I do urge you to get
involved in two ways
though. First, attend an
SGA meeting to find out
exactly what is happening
SGA meets every Monday
at 5 p.m. in Mendenhall
221. Everyone is more than
welcome to attend.
Second, talk to your
legislalprHMMVjjrt" theW
how you feel. They don't
know unless you tell them
We are in the process of
trying to pian talk sessions
in the dorms and offcampus
but until then get a list of
the legislators who are
representing you and talk
to them on a one to one
who
legi-
basis.
For those of you
don't know who the
slators are, I will be more
than happy to supply you
with the information I am
in Mendenhall 230 Monday
thru Thursday from 3-5
p.m. or call me at home.
One last thing, this is
our SGA. The effectiveness
of it depends largely on the
amount of interest and
support given to the or-
ganization by the student
body. Anyone who has any
questions about anything
relating to SGA please feel
free to contact me and I will
be more than glad to help
Libby Letter
SGA Speaker
Sen. No editorial
'misses the point'
'Dr. Rice, we're
going to miss you
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Last week was sad for
many education majors due
to the news of the loss of a
professor in the Science
Education Department. Dr.
Dale Rice will not be with
the East Carolina faculty as
of May, 1979.
Dr. Rice teaches Sci-
FounJainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over 50 years
EDITOR
Doug White
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Leigh Coakiey
TRENDS EDITOR
Steve Bachner
NEWS EDITORS
Julie Everette
Hicki Gliarmis
ADVERTISING MANAGER
Robert M. Swaim
SPORTS EDITOR
Sam Rogers
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper of East
Carolina University sponsored by the Media Board of ECU
and is distributed each Tuesday and Thursday (weekly
during the summer).
Mailing address: Old Sooth Building, Greenville, N.C.
27834
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni $6 annually.
ence Methods, which is a
required course for all
education (early childhood,
special ed. and intermed-
' iate) majors. Thanks to him
I have learned more from
his class than most other
science courses. He is
a young, energetic profes-
sor that makes learning
fun.
Not only is he one of the
best professors I have had
as far as motivating his
students to learn, he also
cares about us. Dr. Rice is
always willing to listen to
our problems and seems to
have an answer.
East Carolina is about to
lose a very talented man.
He has and is contributing
much to the field of science.
He has published articles
and grants to do research.
East Carolina will miss
him but especially the
education majors will miss
such a good teacher.
I am glad I had the
chance to have him as an
n struct or before he leaves.
Thank you, Dr. Rice.
We're going to miss you.
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
The Oct. 24 editorial
entitled "Senator No Must
Go" completely misses the
point. No mention is made
of the principles either
candidate stands for.
Rather, the editorial
dwells on issues of secon-
dary importance�such as
how much money each
candidate has raised.
The critical question at
election time is to deter-
mine how each candidate
lines up with the principles
set forth in the Constitu-
tion. I believe Senator
Helms had adhered to
those principles.
In his book When Free
Men Shall Stand, Senator
Helms has written: "The
great principle that the
founders of our republic
sought to establish.is that
progress consists in re-
straining the state. In
devising the Constitution,
they made every effort to
see that political power was
divided and circumscribed
and that the rights of the
individual were exphcity
declared
In the final analysis
issues must subordinate
themselves to principles If
standing on principle is
"reactionary and objec-
tionable then so be it
Our supertaxmg, super-
spending, superbureauca-
tic federal government was
built by Senators and
Representatives who were
not "reactionary and
"objectionable enough to
say no to more and more
government
On Nov 7. am going to
vote for the candidate who
has the guts to say no and
to stand on principle-
Senator Jesse Helms.
Lyle Barlow
Forum policy
Forum letters must contain the name, address, phone
number, and signature of theauthor(s) and should be typed
or neatly printed
Lettersare subject to editing for brevity, obscenity, and
limited to three typewritten,
Michelle Edwards
libel
No more than three letters on any subject will be printed
in one issue.
Letters should be
double-spaced pages.
Letters must be received by noon on Mondays and
Wednesdays either at the FOUNTAINHEAD office, second
floor, Pulbications Center, or at the information desk in
Mendenhall.
Authors' names will be withheld only when inclusion of
the name will embarrass or subject o ridicule the author
(such as letters discussing homosexuality, drug, abuse
etc.).
"Forum" is the primary avenue of student opinion and
the moat direct way of getting a
be.
to the powers that
i0:
.
��Mnwpwmwi' wi �m� ��'�i �'�w��w





2 November 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
ECU sponsors citizens'conference
DV FOR the Appalachian
game, students pose with a Stroh's
Photo by Chap Gurley
ECU News Bureau
"Citizen Participation
in Community Planning
and Neighborhood Devel-
opment" is the theme of a
Nov. 3-4 conference for
citizens, government offi-
cials and professional plan-
ners co-sponsored by ECU
Topics of the event
include the roles of ethics,
law and politics in plan-
ning; formulation of the
�public interest" from cit-
izen values, priorities and
goals; the nature and
transitional role of the
neighborhood and housing;
and preservation of historic
structures and districts.
The conference is spon-
sored by the GreenvillePitt
County League of Women
Voters and the ECU Urban
and Regional Planning
Crafts �air scheduled
Program, in cooperation
with the ECU Division of
Continuing Education
Support for the confer-
ence is partially provided
by a grant from the N C
Humanities Committee All
interested persons are in-
vited to attend without
charge Conference ses-
sions and workshops will be
held in Mendenhall Student
Center.
The conference will
open Friday at 1 15 p.m
with a welcome by Green-
ville Mayor Percy Cx.to be
followed by two sessions
Community Planning
and Citizen Participation
An Overview. Dr David
Godscalk of the UNC-
Chapel Hill planning fac-
ulty, speaker, with respon-
ses by Grahm Pervier.
Beaufort County manager.
Tom Richter, regional dir-
ector of the Dept of Nat-
ural Resources and Com-
munity Development, and
Ruth Trevatham. former
member of the Greenville
Planning Board. and
The Laymen and N C
Planning Law Michae'
Brough, Carrboro city at-
torney, and Phil Green,
assistant director of the
UNC-Chapei Hill Institute
of Government speakers,
and respondents Dick Fen-
der. Wilmington-New
Hanover planning director
Ed Howeii of the Greenville
City-County Planning and
Zoning Commission, and
Mary Alice Yarprough of
the Greenville Board of
Adjustments
ed-
be
Pr iday,
u .lay.
3. at
in
N.C 10 -
Fi lay and
on
�tsmen,
' mging
to the
I : i the
n-
Crafts-
� and
on-
nal
ances

ihem-
md
Piedn
ince and
" .siasm
. � se ' s ex-
1978 Fail
tnoe
� crafts
. jp �� These
include pottery, weaving,
glass, wood, jewelry, en-
ameling, photographs,
prints, batik, iron work,
leather, stitchery, and quil-
ting
In addition to the
craftsmen's exhibits, there
will be live entertainment,
a sidewalk cafe, demon-
strations by master crafts-
men, and education exhi-
bits
Within walking distance
is a Holiday Inn Motel with
a restaurant, as well as
several other eating places.
Other motel and hotel ac-
the center of the city as wei'
as on the outskirts.
PRESENTS A
"THANK GOD "STEVE
IT'S FRIDAY" HARDY'S
PARTY with BEACH
Live on WRQR PARTY"
3-7 PM Friday Nov.3
Friday Night-
The
beginning
of the
and don't
forget,
Monday
Nov.6
"MISS
CHAPTER X
CONTEST"
CHAPTER X
presents
"JANICE
J f
3TACEY STUART
tKTWMUUKBtFiOAT
ACaOSSTHfMfifMEU&ANT
�mmm na-uxf stwxes'
V'
MARVEl AS H Mil UMUKamHCS
�U THE GMCf Of TOO UKXT M�
OF YESTBIYEM WfTW THE �K-ACTHt
OF TOWT'S
MAKER
PENS!
�?�
&
�?;
Liner
LP TMfPftOTBAUtlMIR:AWAO�mCIIIT
STEP BACKWARD IN WRITING as
ho ApftAftm ATwtjteooK smt
Thursday Family Night
ALL YOU
CAN EAT
trout$1.95
shrimp$3.95
OYSTERS$4.25
FLOUNDER ���������� $3.95
Dinner meal includes Golden Crisp
French Fires, Cole Slaw, Tartar Sauce and
the world's best hushpuppies.
FRIDAYS
1HQ0 Sun. thru Thurs. 4:30-0:00
Seafood ������
u-rSf: Friday's Seafood
-I 2311 S.Evans St.
J7
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
You too
tt
'&SffHF
7 could become
a collector's item
Make your YEARBOOK PORTRAIT
appointment NOW at:
APPOINTMENTS
BEING TAKEN NOW
COME BY
OR
CALL THE BUC OFFICE
AT 757 6501
PICTURES WILL BE MADE
FROM
MONDAY, NOV. 6
UNTIL
TUESDAY, NOV. 21
FROM 9 a.m. TIL 5 p.m.
THIS IS
THE ONLY TIME
PICTURES
WILL BE MADE
THIS YEAR!





Major Attractions
presents Pablo Cruise
Je � ����� nt fre
ByCHRlSFARREN
Staff Reporter
and
JEFF ROLLINS
Assistant Trends Editor
Coming to Minges Col-
iseum on Thurs . Novem-
ber 9. A & M recording
artists, Pablo Cruise, will
be performing their own
brand of island-flavored
music as a part of the
festivities for East Caro-
lina's Homecoming Week.
For years basically a
West Coast oriented group
with a small but avid fol-
lowing, .elsewhere. Pablo
Cruise came into national
prominence during the
summer of 77 with the
release of A Place In The
Sun. their vigorous, free-
flowing third album, which
enjoyed a solid gold success
and contained their smash
single 'Whatcha Gonna
Do" which had a long
summer sojourn m the Top
10.
However, while most
. VI RE
3 ARTISTS Pablo Cru.se will appear in concert in Minges Coliseum Nov 9.
in top form
DARREN BERGSTEIN
� rrends Editor
to the good old-fashioned vampire
� the horror film vehicle
Has th -1 personnage
. . jhed from movie
- .ars since an kind
� �� . rcuit Perhaps the
finally driven the
rror ftln afficionado like myself do
� tie Count Dracula and his
grimace and chor'le in
� horror or otherwise bear �-
sed the previews they show scantily on TV
.hat tace. that ot Christopher Lee as Count
uhii anothei popped up at me, that ot OraouVa's
. an Helsing. the interminable Peter
lefinitely that this flick of the
is no piece of trash . it was the seventh
-e Hammer Dracula series originally
�f Dracula
Cinema
. rid .as the title changed9 The Satanic
acula is infinitely better and pertains more to the
e it up to some mane advertiser to think up a title
Dracula and his Vampire Bride, which is a name
� � only for drive-in marquees and sleazy
mill moviehouses
jon't let the poster fool you. The quote proclaims
King of the Undead married the Queen of the
es Oh gawd' A quote like that comes straight out of
- s made on two dollar budgets. For people who
-now what this film really is. a quote like that could
the number of box office receipts,
�heless. the film is terrific. It is a welcome sight to
oe it was made well over two years ago So when I
e TV previews and recognized the film for what
�s anxious and eager to see it.
� mbs no? a disappointment Christopher Lee is in top
is the sanguiary Count. King of the Undead. Prince of
Darkness Lee is Dracula. his whole body emitting an aura
and awesomeness that is his trademark and that
e character what it is. Peter Cushing. as the living
� � � Van Helsing. Lornmer Van Helsing, is
:able enemy, the only man who knows what
and the only man who knows how to contend
- im.
sa shame that the series bowed out Christopher Lee
resigned from pursuing the part any longer because of what
�� is present film involves that of bringing Dracula to
idem day. 20th Century London
iee feit that doing that, the whole mystique and power
g Dracula was no longer present, and that
bringing him up to present day civilization reduced any
semblance of a supernatural being. When
s and computers replaced castles and crypts, Lee
The opening of the film is very confusing. An
ominous-looking house is shown and inside what appears to
be a prisoner is guarded carefully Below, the living room,
something definitely eerie is taking place, however. A
sacrifice is being prepared, as a rooster's neck is slashed
and the blood is allowed to flow onto a young, naked girl.
The satanists each dip a finger into the blood and mark and
inverted crucifix onto their foreheads. The Priestess of
Ceremonies conveys that they all are the Devil's Disciples
now. and she makes her point clear when she thrusts a
dagger intothe girl'schest.
Meanwhile, the prisoner has escaped, and is brought
into the hands of Scotland Yard, where Inspector Murrat,
portrayed heroically by Michael Coles, interrogates him,
and learns of a bizarre cult
They enlist the aid of a man who is the expert in
dealing with the occult: Lorrimer Van Helsing. Peter
Cush.ng is his own refreshing, straight-forward self as the
vampire killer, who lectures to Murray and another aide on
the aspects of vampirism.
Van Helsing talks with one of the scientists who is
suspected of being one of theS tanists at Pelham House.
The man appears hysterical, and mentally unbalanced;
Van Helsing has further proof of this when the
bacteriologist shows him a virus he has been breeding that
is a more devastating form of bubonic plague.
Van Helsing finally learns that Dracula has been
resurrected and is living under the name of a DO. Denham,
a maior industrialist. The hunter of the undead uncovers a
plan masterminded by the Count; the K ing of the Vampires
plans to annihilate every living soul on earth through the
use of the deadly strain, thus acheivmg his ultimate
revenge
It is evident why Lee chose to leave the role of Dracula
after this film Most of it takes place ms.de anticept.c,
modern labs and buildings, leaning almost more to the
science fiction side than to the supernatural. Only when
Murray and Van Hels.ng's daughter discover a lair
underneath the House where Dracula's minions lay does
the film show any evidence of the old remnants of castles
and dungeons.
Still, the film is suspenseful and offers fine special
effects, acting, and brings back the team of Lee and
Cushing, the duo of the modern horror film.
With the last ot the Dracula films, they have'jUen
brought full cycle. Generations metamorphose from the
original Van Helsing in the Transylvanian settings, to the
Van Helsing of the revolver, and the laboratory Dracula is
the only one who remains the same, his omnipresent, evil
'cloak spreading over whoever he encounters and bending
them until they're under his domination.
But isthe last film as good asthe first?
Horror of Dracula (known simply as Dracula in Great
Britain where it was made in 1958) was the first in the
Hammer odyssey. Christopher Lee. a tall and powerful
personality who has been cast just a year before, in 1957, as
the creation of Baron Frankenstein, in The Curse of
Frankenstein, was cast, and director Terence Fisher from
then on out brought out the true evil of the vampire. Lee
was superb, and the film was a box office success,
outgrossing Curse of Frankenstein
It was not until 1965 that Hammer decided to bring back
the Count, and under the skilled supervision once more of
Terence Fisher as director, Lee once again starred in in
Dracula, Prince of Darkness. Though the Count is not given
as much footage as in the preceeding film, it is still
a suspenseful venture into the Carpathian Mountains,
where the King of the Undead again runs rampant due to
the efforts of his obedient manservant K love. At the finale,
Dracula dies a novel and thrilling death; trapped on the
frozen ice of the moat that surrounds his castle, a chunk is
split by thegunshotsof his pursuersand he falls slowly into
the water, for running water is one of the enemies of the
vampire.
Lee returned in 1968 for Dracula Has Risen from the
Grave, this time directed by Freddie Francis. Here Lee is
resurrected by a priest who unwittingly falls on the block of
ice that contains the Count's frozen form � blood from a
cut on the priests' head seeps through the water and the
vampire King islet loose upon the world.
Lee moves Dracula and sets the pace for the character's
development, though again not given much footage. As in
the film before it, Peter Cushing is absent as Van Helsing.
Dracula is dispatched at the finale when he is knocked off a
cliff and impaled upon a huge cross.
Tasfe the Blood of Dracula, the next in the series, was
gauntily directed by Peter Sasdy, in 1970. Lee is again
given little to do, but his magnetism is felt when he enters
the scene and is brought forth into the world by three fools
venturing into his lair. Here he dies a chilling and confusing
death; plummeting to the ground and disintegrating into
dust when religious symbols flash amidst him
Sasdy again directed in The Scars of Dracula, made also
in 1970. Lee dies a more chilling death in this one; a metal
rod he is holding is struck by lightning and he is
incinerated.
LIVINGSTON TAYLOR WILL appear m concert Nov 9
Turning Point brint
ballet to Hendrix
The Student Union Films Committee presentsthe highly
acclaimed film The Turning Point this weekend at
Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix Theatre It will be
shown this Friday night at 7 and 9 The film will be shown at
2 p.m.Saturday due to this week's home football game
The Turning Point is one of the best films of this era.
It's that rare example of synergy in which every key
element is excellent and the ensemble is an absolute
triumph.
Anne Bancroft and Shirley MacLaine. starring as
long-time friends with unresolved problems, are magnifi-
cent; Arthur Laurents' screenplay is literate, mature, and
compelling; Herbert Ross' direction is sensational; the
production is superb.
The intricate plotting introduces Bancroft as a ballet star
just reaching that uneasy Margo Channmg age where a lot
of Eve Harringtons (male and female) are beginning to
See MACLAINE. p. 7
people think of Pablo
Cruise as a relatively new
band, they have in reality
been around for quite
sometime.
Beginning in 1974. the
band's first album was
simply entitled Pablo
Cruise, a smooth and very
creative effort that went
virtually unnoticed.
This album did include
'Ocean Breeze a ram-
bling and at times stunning
piece that was marked by
Cory Lenos' liquid piano
lines, and David Jenkins'
intense guitar playing
Even now this song re-
mains as one of their best
and is especially impressive
live.
Their second album.
Lifeline, fell into much the
same category as the first
The music was refreshing
and alive. When critics
dubbed Pablo Cruise's ro-
bust, rhythmic blend
'Sports rock" it was more
than a clever editorial de-
scription
A downhill racer on
ABC s Wide World of
Sports skied tc the accom-
paniment of "Zero to Sixty
In Five" from the Lifeline
album and many of their
other high-velocity ins"
mentals have been adopted
as trademarks for a variety
of athletic events
A Place In The Sun was
the culmination of lots o
hard work and dues for the
band, and rightfully so. The
album was somewhat of a
crossover, mixing the Pablo
Cruise freshness with a
new. more marketable
style The public approved
Still riding the crest of
critical acclaim and pop-
ularity. A Place In The Sun
is swiftly approaching plat-
inum status, and the former
opening act. whose taste-
ful, exhilerating perform-
ances have literally stolen
the show from a variety of
top-billed bands, has itself
been elevated to headlining
status.
� a ncp of freed
convey a senbc w
in motion
Pablo Cruise
appear.ng at M.nges '
,seum for one show
Thurs . November 9 at 6
pm Tickets are $5 for E
students and $7 for I
public Only public tickets
will be sold at the door
Appearing Pa-
CrulSe will be L �
Ta, � )ther of Jan
Tayloi "ho nas rece-
begun a strong con
the recordi-g ��
performing field
a-other one in a seru
of concerts brou .
campus by the Maj i
on s Co
Thurs iy night
ance promises to be
hfe and refreshing sounds
Livingston Taylor
n g s:
gom i
� I irsday
it 8
� L � ���
en ' l
N
v
���
r
Be
�'�"�'
i n d r
ii
�. - act

� n '
h C :
imes ai

I
se
L r.
few ears ac
� jethei "
Tav
-
Now with the release of
their fourth A & M album.
Worlds Away, the high
level of achievement that's
become their trademark
continues and offers def-
initive auditory evidence
that sunshine and sophi-
stication are not mutually
exclusive.
� � i �
���
a Car na - a-
a�e.
After a five
absence from th ia
scene he has ust re eased
the� a bum
Mirror which s d ; we
on tl
Taylor keeps h � I
ence . �
mind a- 1 e doesn � .
dov " He say
know a t" ai � . audu
wars and they're :
get it
Playmg livi .
make a :&ee' � : eer
playing to audiences t r th
last few(ftve) ,ea
See TAYLOc p 7
Dracula AD 1972, marked two things; one the first
attempt to bring Count Dracula into modern day London of
1972, and two, bringing back his old rival, the formidable
Van Helsing, once again in the suitable guise of Peter
Cushing.
Count Dracula and His Vampire Bride brings the series
around full circle apparently ends it permanently, but as
before (through the wonders of cinematic magic and
money), the Count could be brought back and let loose upon
an unsuspecting world However, Lee's unhappiness about
the setting of the character will have him refusing to play
the part
W hiter Dracula? Yes, in the film's eye to come. But the
movies in the past will be available to enjoy again and
again. Hammer produced, and tried in vain to maintain, a
figure that is prominent in folklore, but kept the series
toned down to the degree that it will remain a classical
set of records in the annals of horror.
And nemesis Cushing will always be there with the
Count, wooden stake in hand, ready to put an end to his
existence.
The series, as well as the character, are immortal.
THE NORTH CAROLINA Symphony Orchestra will present
a concert Monday, Nov. 6at 8p.m. at the Farmville Central
High School, sponsored by the Farmville Community Arts
Council. The Chamber Orchestra is made up of about half ot
the 73-member full Symphony, and performs a program
especially suited tor the smaller group ot musicians. James
Orgle, associate conductor tor the Symphony, will conduct
served as
M ichigan
the orchestra for the Farmville concert Oroie has
assistant conductor tor the University of
Orchestra and its Arts Chorale and recent,
conductor for the Winston-Salem SS!i I
session. Tickets are available from Z, r
Center and Apple Records. Z sTst'Tn OrZlT "
- - �� - .





Soprano Antonia Dalapas gives
voice recital Sunday at Fletcher
ECU News Bureau
Soprano Antonia Dal-
apas, a member of the ECU
School of Music voice
Acuity, will perform in
recital Sunday, Nov. 5, at
8 15 p.m. in the A.J
Fletcher Recital Hall.
The recital is free and
open to the public.
Mtss Dalapas will be
"pamed by pianist
Everett Pittman, dean of
te ECU School of Music,
and assisted by cellist
Mellado and vio-
airya Mellado.
Her program will in-
clude an ana from Buxte-
s Cantata No 1 ;
Guridi's "No Quiero Tus
ellanas" ; two songs by
Obradors. Del Cabello
MasSutil and "Chiquitita
�a Novia Kalomiris'
Two Greek Folksongs
three songs by Wolf, "Das
Verlassene Magdlein
England Conservatory of
Music. She has performed
in Oregon, New York and
Washington in addition to
Music
"Heb auf dein Blondes
Haupt" and "Mignon,
Kennst Du das Land?
two Chausson love songs;
Duparcs "Au Pays On Se
Fait la Guerre "Sere-
nade" and "Le Manoir de
Rosemonde" and several
songs from the American
musical theatre.
An assistant professor
at ECU, Antonia Dalapas
has degrees from the New
TAYLOR
Continued from p 6
� way they can be
ioited is with quality
and good taste "
There's no 'New and
. roved Livingston Tay-
ve always been good.
And. above all else, I'm an
�tamer
Livingston is also a fine
g-writer, as any of his
s would be sure to insist,
feel a record should be a
' xjraph-a slice of
time "3-Way Mirror, Liv-
ingston's first album for
Epic Records, is a concise
ten-song collection of
Taylor's wit, emotion and
imagination.
3-Way Mirror oreserves
the artist's penchant for
intimacy while presenting
him in a rousing, rocking,
pop setting.
Tickets for the Living-
ston Taylor-Pable Cruise
concert may be obtained
from the Central Ticket
Office in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center Admission is
$5.00 for students and
$7.00 for the public.
M ACLAINE
Continued from p 6
Tiove p M acLaine, her best friend, long ago abandoned a
iimilar career to marry Tom Skerritt and now their teenage
daughter Lesshe Browne, shows real promise as a dancer
This is the incident which triggers an explosion of new
and old conflicts, all handled in first-rate writing, acting,
and direction
he background setting could have been the business
rid, the campus, anything. As is, the choice of an All
�ut Eve environs transposed and refocussed m many
stantial ways is a brilliant writing strategy.
Admission to the film is by ID and Activity Card for ECU
;sand Mendenhall Student Center membership card
faculty and staff. All Free Flicks are shown in
Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix Theatre.
FREE
BURGER
AND
FRIES!
the New England area, and
was featured with the ECU
Symphony in performances
of Strauss's "Four Last
Songs" and the Beethoven
Ninth Symphony.
ECU Symphony
The ECU Symphony
Orchestra will perform at
Washington High School,
Norfolk. Wednesday, Nov.
8 at 8 p.m.
The concert will be
broadcast live on WGH-FM .
Works to be featured
are the Overture to "The
Merry Wives of Windsor
by Otto Nicolai, the J.S.
Bach Concerto for Two
Violins and Orchestra, and
Dvorak's Symphony No. 8
in G Major, Opus 88.
Haus conducts
The orchestra is con-
ducted by Robert Haus of
the ECU School of Music
faculty and its membership
primarily consists of ad-
vanced student instrumen-
talists, including many
from the Tidewater area.
One of the soloists in
the Bach Double Concerto
is a Norfolk resident, Glenn
Davis.
A past member of the
Norfolk Symphony and
former concertmaster of the
Tidewater Youth Symphony
Davis is a senior at ECU.
He is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Eugene Davis of 1346
Bolton St. and a graduate of
Washington High School.
PRESENT THIS COUPON
FOR 12 PRICE ADMISSION
ON FRIDAY NOV. 3
NOVEMBER
1978
1 WED
2 THURS
FRI
SAT
SUN
MON
TUES
8 WED
9 THURS
10 FRI
11 SAT
12 SUN
13 MON
14 TUES
15 WED
16 THURS
17 FRI
18 SAT
19 SUN
20 MON
21 TUES B
22 WED
23 THURS
24 FRI
25 SAT
26 SUN
27 MON
30 THURS
NOVEMBER
1978
John Moore "Amtncnn Dream"
Customer App Party Mm Chapter X
Steve Hardy i Beach Party
Fr� & Soro Ntjjht
Chapter X present! JANICE Ladies Night
John Moore "Americian Dream"
Quarter Fmials Miss Chapter X Steve Hardy
Homecomming Victory with Tommy Gardner
KA Beat The Clock
AZD Pledge Party
John Moore "Americian Dream"
Semi Fimals Miss Chapter X
Steve Hardy's Beach Party
Frat ft Soro Night
Lacrosse Club 2nd. annual Ugly Contest
eta of ECU Cust App Party,Pi Sig Pie Throw
Thankijiving IS.aht Party with John Moor
Sup�r Cult Aop fmrty TO IF Party
Steve Hardy's Beach Party
Ka Beat The Clock
Ladies Night
John Moore "Americian Dream"
COMING DEC 2 Fimals of Mm Chapter X contest
Open for Party or Social call David Waters or Don
Cailtcutt
FREE
GIFTS!
Thursday
Night is
Kids7
Night
We thought it was time kids had their
special night. And that's why we've made
Thursday night Kids' Night.
We'll give each child (12 or under) a free
burger and fries for every meal an adult
buys.
Jack the Clown will be there to entertain.
And he'll have a Treasure Chest "grab
y bag" so the kids get a little surprise, too.
Thursday Night. Kids' Night at Jack's.
What could be nicer than good food and
good fun?
JACK'S
STEAK HOUSE
Phones 766 5788
264 By Pa
2 November 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
jfeG&nioixjeeR
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20 WATTS PER CHANNEL
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399
�TECHNICS SA 300 RECEIVER WITH 35
WATTS PER CHANNEL
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SYSTEM
�TECHNICS SL 220 BELT DRIVE SEMI
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�EMPIRE CARTRIDGE INCLUDED
Technics
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CHANNEL AND BUILT IN EQUILIZER
�JVC JLF-30 BELT DRIVE FULLY AUTOMATlC
TURNTABLE
�JVC SK 700-THREE WAY SPEAKER SYSTEM
�EMPIRE CARTRIDGE INCLUDED
CRAIG T609
� AM FMSTEREO
�CASSETTE PLAYER
�IN DASH
REG. 129.95
INSTALLATION AVAILABLE
JVC KD10
CASSETTE
DECK
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REDUCTION
JVC
199
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Imperial
byJSUPERSCOPE
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CHANGER&SPEAKER
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BUILT IN STROBE AND VARIABLE SPEED.
REG. 199.95
Technics
by Panasonic
r






Pirates face explosive
Appalachian State squad
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
ECU head coach Pat Dye has talked all season long
about the potential explosiveness of his Pirate offense. Yet,
with just three games remaining on the schedule Dye, as
well as the rest of the Pirate fans, are still patiently awaiting
that complete game
"I still haven't given up on this team one bit said Dye
Wednesday at his weekly press luncheon. "We have the
potential to be explosive offensively.
"But. warned Dye about ECU'S upcoming contest
against Appalachian State thisSaturday, "Thiscould be the
week
The Pirates were idle last week, and a short layoff was
just what the Buc's, now 5-3 overall, needed, according to
Dye "I think all of our players have enjoyed the time off
said Dye. "Having to get up mentally and physically each
week gets tinng. I've been real pleased with our attitude on
the practice field this week. I'll know more about how ready
we are when we get on the field Saturday
Jim Brakefield's Appalachian State Mountaineers also
brjng a 5-3 record into the game and have put 260 points on
the scoreboard in its eight contests this season.
The Mountaineers are nationally ranked in four
offensive categories and have four individual standouts who
are also ranked in national statistics. The Apps are ranked
fifth in the nation in total offense and quarterback Steve
Brown ranks 11th in the country in total yards a game with
an impressive 200.9 average.
Appalachian State presents more problems offensively
than any team we've faced all season noted Dye. "They
run the option extremely well and do a good job of throwing
the ball They've got a great quarterback in Steve Brown.
Appalachian has always executed against us and I'm sure
they' H be ready for us this week
Even though the Mountaineers have ranked among the
nations leaders offensively every week, the defense is
LaVonda Duncan
Pirates end fall
golf schedule
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
The ECU golf team
concludes its fall schedule
this weekend when the
Pirates travel to Greens-
boro to compete in the
Guilford College invita-
tional Tournament.
The 54-hol event
begins Friday on the
Cardinal Country Club with
15 teams competing the
tournament. Other teams
entered in the three-day
event are Richmond, UNC-
Wilmington, host Guilford
who will have two teams,
Shorter College, Campbell,
and Atlantic Christian.
North Carolina's no-
tionally ranked squad along
with Virginia Tech, High
Point, UNC-Charlotte,
Davidson, Duke and Gard-
ner-Webb will also be
playing.
Although the Pirate
golfers haven't finished
higher than seventh in a
tournament this fall, head
coach Bob Helmick has
spent most of the season
experimenting with several
different lineups.
"We really haven't
established a set lineup
yet said Helmick who
replaced M ac M cLendon as
the head coach in Septem-
ber. "We've tried to play
everyone on the squad in at
least two tournaments and
evaluate their performance
in tournament competition.
"We really haven't
played that well in our
tournaments because we
haven't used the same
players in any one event.
We've been doing a lot of
experimenting
ECU took seventh place
in the 25 team Methodist
College Invitational and
placed eighth in the
Campbell College-Atlantic
Christian Invitational.
Sophomore Steve Jones
and David Brogan were the
Pirates low individuals in
the Methodist tournament
with identical 74-75-149
totals.
Senior Kenny Powell
captured individual honors
for the Bucs' in the
Campbell College-ACC
event with rounds of 76-77-
153.
No one has really been
playing well this fall and no
one is real happy with their
game noted Helmick.
"By the time our spring
season rolls around I hope
we will have a set lineup
and I think all of our players
will be playing much
better
Sophomores Carl Baa-
man, Joey Hines and Stan
Stewart along with Powell,
junior Bobby White and
freshman Sidney Davis will
be in the Pirates lineup this
weekend in the Guilford
Cg Invitational.
giving up just as many points.
Consider a few of Appalachian's losses. Furman 52,
Appalachian 34, UT-Chatanooga 72, Appalachian 14, East
Tennessee State 35, Appalachian 34.
"They've given up alot of points, but there's never been
a time when they've quit on the field explined Dye.
"They work hard on the field all the time and they're the
kind of team that can gain momentum at the end and beat
you
"Another problem with their defense is that they've
settled with very few starters in their lineup. They don't
have much team speed and they've rotated a lot of people in
their secondary
Brown, a 6-0, 178 ib. sophomore from Goldsboro was
injured on the next to the last play of the game against East
Tennessee State and is still a questionable starter Saturday.
Brown has completed 92-164 passes for 1315 yards and
eight touchdowns and has rushed 97 times for 291 yards
and six touchdowns. He will pitch to speedy halfback Scott
McConnell who ranks 11th in the nation in scoring and will
throw to split end Rick Beasley who ranks third nationally in
receptions with six a game.
"I know all our players are looking forward to playing
our last three games at home said Dye. "It could be a
wild game
NOTESAppalachian State has given up 28 turnovers in
eight games this seasonthe Apps have lost 23 fumbles
coupled with five pass interceptionsECU has lost 24
fumbles this season along with 10 interceptions for a total of
34 turnovers Gerald Hall is ranked eighth nationally inpunt
returns with a 12.9 yard averagethe Pirates are fifth in
the country In total defense allowing only 224.4 yards and
are allowing only 92 yards per game passing which ranks
sixth in the nationAppalachian State has given up 3340
total yards in eight games and opponents have scored 241
points against the Apps.
Bugs' Duncan
adds new spark
to ECUattaek
By JIMMY DuPREE
Staff Writer
ECU'S girl's volleyball program has enjoyed a
successful season thus far with a record of 26-10. One of the
most pleasant surprises of this season has been the
emergence of a new team leader, junior LaVonda Duncan.
Duncan's interest in volleyball goes back to her high
school days when she was named Raleigh Sanderson's
MVP and also All-State when her team captured the state
championship.
Duncan began her college career at Louisburg Junior
College, where her interest in volleyball was intensified.
"In high school, I learned the most basic fundamentals of
the game. My coach at Louisburg the first year really built
my interest in volleyball. He decided I could do my best as a
setter. College coaches are able to provide a more tacticle
approach to offense said Duncan.
While at Louisburg, Duncan led the team to the state
junior college title and fifth in the national tournament.
"We had a new coach my sophomore year and it just wasn't
as much fun to play as it was the first year remembered
Duncan.
Since transferring to ECU, Duncan has made many
significant contributions to the squad. "We've used
LaVonda as our offensive coordinator this year explained
head coach Anita Dillon. "Everyone on the team is not
allowed to argue with the referee during a match. We chose
LaVonda as our floor captain which means she must
confront the referee over disagreements
"LaVonda has proved to be a good spokesman for the
team praised assistant coach Debbie Tyson, "I would say
she is also our best all-around player
The former high school homecoming queen was
impressed with the program at ECU from the outset. "I like
playing here said Duncan. "I have an important role
since the offensive allignment we use only calls for one
setter. I know I have a lot of room for improvement
Duncan expressed concern over her conditioning in the
off-season. "I've always had trouble staying in shape after
the season is over. We're planning to have a USVBA team
(United States Volleyball Association) here during spring
semester which should remedy that problem. I also plan to
work hard on my ball handling during the summer
Duncan was chosen by her teammates prior to the
season to serve as a co-captain. "We've come a long way
since the first of the season. We improve all the time.
We've learned to understand one another's individual
problems and help each other. We don't have any
personality conflicts on the team
With preparation for the upcoming state tournament
nearing a close, Duncan is optimistic about the Pirates
chances of taking first place. "We have the talent to win it.
I really think we can win it, if I didn't I wouldn't be of much
value to the team. We have our ups and downs, but all
teams have to cooe with that
Duncan knows ECU will be hard-pressed with such
tough competition. "We lost to State three times during the
season, but we have the talent to beat them. I really think
Carolina will be our toughest competition. We beat them
once during the season, but they recruit a lot of talent and
they will be looking for revenge
' LaVonda Duncan's moat recent honor waa selection to
the All-Tournament team in last weekend's Invitational.
W 1th the determination and talent she has shown thus far in
her brief career with ECU, her coaches both agree that ahe
would be one of the most difficult players to have to replace.
Slip slidin' away in Boone
THE PIRATES ARE shown here in last season's 45-14 astro-turf surface. Appalachian and ECU will square oft
victory over Appalachian State in Boone, N.C. It rained Saturday night in Ficklen Stadium The game will start at
throughout most of the day and most of the players spent all 7:00 p.m.
afternoon slipping and sliding around on the Mountaineers
l-i

�?
c
1

? f -
i
i
: rf iic.il '
Appalachian State QB
returns to haunt Pirates?
By CHA RLES CHA NDLER
Assistant Sports Editor
Often in the world of
sports, old acquaintances
seem to find ways to come
back from adverse situa-
tions to haunt each other.
Such an incident will
occur this Saturday night
when ECU hosts the
Mountaineers from Appa-
lachian State in Ficklen
Stadium.
Mountaineer quarter-
back, Steve Brown, and
Pirate head coach Pat Dye
had a series of discussions
a few years ago, when
Brown was a senior at
Goldsboro High School.
Brown wanted to attend
ECU, but wasn't highly
recruited by the Pirates.
Dye and the ECU staff
doubted Brown's running
ability, especially in the
Pirate wishbone attack.
So Brown was off to Ap-
palachian State. The 6-0
sophomore currently ranks
11th in the nation in total
offense with 200.9 yards
per game. The Mountain-
eers are averaging 451.6
yards per game.
All these statistics
haunt Pat Dye. "We realty
made a mistake not re-
cruiting him any harder
said Dye. "You know, he's
ranked high nationally in
totally offense. I'm sure
he'd like to come to Ficklen
and really show us what
kind of mistake we made. I
just hope he doesn't burn
us
Yet, Brown says he isn't
going out Saturday night
with such intentions. "I'm
anxious to get back to the
east said Brown. "But
that doesn't mean that I
have any animosity against
Coach Dye and East Caro-
lina
"I know Coach Dye
didn't think I could play
college ball. But proving it
on the field to him in
particular is not a big thing
tome
Brown says the main
reason he was not offered a
scholarship from the Pirate
staff was because he ran
very little in high school.
"He (Dye) told me that I
never ran the ball. I told
him that I could. Other
people told him so also. But
maybe he just needed to be
more sure
But Dye is definitely
sure of Brown's ability
now. "Brown is a good
quarterback and is a better
player because of all the
talent around him. Their
offense has all the tools
The Mountaineers na-
tional rankings certainly
verify this assertion. The
"tools" Dye is speaking of
include split end Rick
Beasley. Only a sopho-
more, Beasley has been
Brown's favorite target,
averaging six catches per
game, which ranks third
nationally.
Halfback Scott McCon-
v
Mountaineer coach Jim Brakefield
nell has also been a big
weapon for the Mountain-
eers. He is the nation's
11th leading scorer.
Though the Appala-
chian offensive figured are
impressive, their defense
performances have left a lot
to be desired. Big plays
have hindered the defense
all season long.
The fact that his Moun-
taineers are giving up over
30 points a game ia not very
pleasing to Appalachian
head coach Jim Brakefield
"We just haven't bean
consistent enough he
��W. "I've been very die-
appointed In our defense "
However, Brakefield ia
proud of Brown and the
offense. "Steve has played
real well this year. He's
been an excellent leader
Is it possible that Brown
will lead the Mountaineers
to victory Saturday, and
therefore prove once and
for all to Dye that he has
excellent ability?
"He doesn't have to
prove anything to me "
�ya Dye. "I already know
that i was wrong. Believe
"�� I know
After Saturday night
�hher Dye or Brown will
�ome out on top in a ctasaic
confrontation between two
�d acquaintance, Each
would love to win.
I
�.fc,�i�





r f
f f r �
t t r
1 t r f r
r t f r f '
FOUNTAINHEAD's Fearless Forecast
APPALACHIANS AT ECU
MARYLAND AT PENN STATE
UNC AT RICHMOND
SOUTH CAROLINA AT N.C. STATE
CLEMSON AT WAKE FOREST
DUKE AT TENNESSEE
OKLAHOMA AT COLORADO
MISSOURI AT OKLAHOMA ST.
NAVY AT NOTRE DAME
SOUTHERN CAL AT STANFORD
MISSISSIPPI AT LSU
CALIFORNIA AT ARIZONA ST.
CHARLESCHANDLERTERRYHERNDON
(75-30-1)(73-32-1)
ECU 30-17ECU 35-12
Penn StateMaryland
UNCUNC
N.C. StateN.C. State
ClensonClemson
TennesseeDuke
OklahomaOklahoma
MissouriMissouri
Notre DameNotre Dame
Southern CalSouthern Cal
LSULSU
Arizona St.Arizona St.
SAM ROGERS
(70-35-1)
ECU 27-14
Maryland
UNC
N.C. State
Clemson
Tennessee
Oklahoma
Missouri
Navy
Southern Cal
Mississippi
Arizona St.
DAVID MAREADY
(42-18)
ECU 36-6
Penn State
UNC
N.C. State
Clemson
Tennessee
Oklahoma
Missouri
Notre Dame
Southern Cal
LSU
Arizona St.
LARRY GILLMAN
ECU Head Basketball
Coach
ECU 28-14
Penn State
UNC
N.C. State
Clemson
Tennessee
Oklahoma
Missouri
Notre Dame
Southern Cal
LSU
Arizona St.
Struggling Raiders big question mark
Gillman
joins
forecasters
Larry Gillman, East
Carolina's controversial
basketball coach, is this
week's guest forecaster
Gillman served as an
assistant coach at San
Francisco, Minnesota, and
Houston before taking the
head coaching )Ob at ECU.
The top game this week
is definitely the Maryland
at Penn State clasn This
matchup includes two of
the four remaining un-
beaten teams in the
country Penn State,
ranked second in both wire
service polls, has not lost to
Maryland since 1961
By CHARLESCHANDLER
Assistant Sports Editor
ahead
What's wrong with the
Oakland Raiders9 Someone
somewhere should find out.
Everyone concerned with
the National Football
League sure wants to know.
The Raiders have not
performed up to the stan-
dards they have set for the
last decade or so The
Super Bowl Champs in 1976
after a 13-1 regular season
record. Oakland went 11-3
last year and just missed
another shot at the Super
Bowl when they lost to the
Denver Broncos in the AFC
Championship Game.
Coming into this sea-
son, many prognosticators
foresaw a Dallas-Oakland
matchup m this season's
Super Bowl. But a funny
thing has happened on the
way to this big shootout.
The Raiders record now
stands at a shocking 5-4.
The losses have come to
Denver. New England. Se-
attle, and San Diego. Only
the Patriots have played
-e championship material
from among that group
e Raiders only big
victories have come over
Green Bay and Houston.
The once-vaulted Rai-
der offensive line has al-
lowed quarterback Ken
Stabler to be sacked 21
times m the nine games.
The total reached only 16
last year for the entire
season
Also representative of
the lack of line support are
Stabler s 20 interceptions.
by far the most in the NFL
this season But the often-
s.ve line cannot take full
blame from the Snake's
lask of accuracy. Stabler.
Hke another Alabama grad-
uate named Namath exper-
,enced a few years ago.
may be on the downswing
of his career
But one should not
count the Raiders out just
yet even if the defense has
g,ven up 27 points in each
of the last two games.
Veteran running back Pete
Banaszak has vowed that
his team will be at the top
at the end of the season. If
so Oakland must get to-
gether an act that has
caned for much less than an
encore thus far. Coach John
Madden has his hands full.
He has never been in this
situation before He'd like
tor it to end as soon as
possible.
The only way to rid of
the situation is to win
Raider teams from the past
always did this. They
should again this season.
But, isn't that what every-
one said at the beginning of
the season?
Here's a look at the
games in the NFL this
week.
OAKLAND 24,
KANSAS16
The Raiders should win
this week, if not impres-
sively The Chiefs win
simply need a near perfect
game to win. That is, if the
Raiders come back like they
should. Many questions
will be answered as a result
of this game. The season is
on the line for Oakland.
SANDiEG0 21
CINCINNAT117
The Bengals erupted
last week with a big win
over the Oilers. The
Chargers gained a big win
.lac defeating Oaklano.
SS for Dan Foots and
py to come out
HOUSTON 20
CLEVELAND 17
These two teams are
involved in an intense
battle for a possible wild
card spot in the playoffs.
The Oilers played as bad as
they can last week against
the lowly Bengals. Pasto-
nni. Campbell, and the
gang prevent an oil slick
with this victory.
DALLAS 27
MIAMI 21
This is the game to
watch this week. When the
play their best, these two
clubs may be the best in
their respective divisions.
The Cowboy defense is
much stronger than the
Dolphins There,nhes the
difference in this game.
MINNESOTA 17
DETROIT 16
The Lions have played
extremely well the last two
weeks. Its a shame they
must play the Vikings this
week But don't look for a
runaway The Vikes will
win. but not without
listening to some roars
from those pesky Lions
GREEN BAY 14
PHILADELPHIA 10
The Pack is back, right?
Well, no one is quite sure
yet. The Green Bay
'schedule has not exactly
included world beaters thus
far this season. The Eagles
should provide them with a
very tough test this week.
Upset could be the word
here, but something in the
skies believes the Pack is
really back.
NEW ENGLAND 31
BUFFAL07
The Patriot express rolls
into Buffalo this week. The
Pats are playing as well as
anyone in the League at
this point. Coach Chuck
Fairbanks is not about to let
the Bills stop his machine.
Neither are his players.
PITTSBURGH24
NEW ORLEANS10
Finally the Saints have a
respectable team. After
years of losers, Coach Dick
Nolan has brought a
contender to New Orleans.
The Saints now stand 5-4,
but the Steelers should
even things out a little.
DENVER 21
NEW YORK JETS13
The Jets were humili-
ated 55-21 by the Patriots
last week. New England
put 41 points on the board
in the first half alone. But,
this is not last week, and
the Broncos are not the
Patriots. But the Jets are
the Jets. And that spells
out one thing against the
�Orange Crush a loss.
ATLANTA 14
SAN FRANCISCO 13
The 49ers played a
horrible game against the
Redskins last week. The
Falcon defense causes a
repeat performance.
ST. LOUIS21
N.Y.GIANTS20
The Cards got their first
win of the season last week
upon the return of quarter-
back Jim Hart. Coach Bud
Wilkinson would like to see
his team make it two in a
row. With a little luck, his
wish will be fulfilled.
SEATTLE 24
CHICAGO 21
The Seahawks are for
real. They are one of the
respectable teams in the
NFL. They may be a few
steps from the playoffs yet,
but they should hand the
disappointing Bears their
seventh straight loss.
LOS ANGELES 21
TAMPA BAY 13
The Rams have lost two
in a row. The Bucs would
love to extend the streak.
But look for Pat Haden and
the Ram offense to get
things going again.
WASHINGTON 24
BALTIMORE 14
Redskin quarterback
Billy Kilmer rejuvinated his
team last week. The offense
looked better than it had in
several games.
itchell's Hair Styling
P.tt Plaza Shopping Ccrec
XCrccnvillc North Carolina
756-2950
37M4
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Special curly perms
for guy's & gal's, only $17.50
with ECU student I.D.
On Wednesday Nov. 8
�nA Nov. 15 ONLY.
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Large homemade biscuits with
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NHD TO RELAX AFTW
AOAYINOASSB?
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SPECIAL
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FRI. & SAT.
11:15 P.M.
ARMY-NAVY STORE
1501 S. Evans
B-15, bomber, field,
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Back Packs
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Bring Your Rice
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Oh Yes
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It Might Rain!
FOR PIZZAS AND
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Runners World Magazine as being one of I Q(E CALL OR COMt
We now have ETON1C-KM
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We also have a large selection of
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Phone 754-0S0
Open 7 days a week until danv
BY CHANELO'S
758-7400
�THE FIRST 50 ECU STUDENTS AND
THE FIRST 50 APPALACHIAN STUDENTS WILL
RECEIVE A FREE DRAFT AFTER THEGAME






Pagt 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 2 Novmber1978
Valentine, Brewington,
Hall head Pirate defense
tOMAS BREWER. ECU Chancellor, presents
aptains of the divisional flag football
teams Lett to right are: Debby Newby.
Steve Staley. Sada Hara Ohs. Dr. Brewer. Dan
McCombs. Scott Dorm: Sarah
and Bill Bugbee. Phi Kappa
photo
Warm
Adidas, Jelenk, Wilson,
White Stag, Court Casual.
� Ski Jackets
Socks, Goggles, Pants, and
Coordinated Outfits.
� Don't Forget
Homecoming is just a few
days off. Get your ECU
jackets, rugby sweaters,
and official Pat's hat. Also
we have fraternity, sorority,
and dorm T-shirts
and sweatshirts.
H.L.HODGES
Floyd, Sigma Sigma Sigma:
Tau. ECU News Bureau
Patronize
ECU Sports Information
Offensive wizardry can
often be accomplished with
sleight of hand, but as
three East Carolina de-
fenders have proven this
fall, the only way to have
the nation's fifth-ranked
defense is with hard-nosed
football.
For Zack Valentine,
linebacker Mike Brewing-
ton and safety Gerald Hall,
along with their Pirate
teammates, limiting the
opposition to only 228.4
yards per game has not
come easy, and the task
appears toughest this
Saturday.
Appalachian State, now
5-3, brings its wishbone to
Fickten Stadium ranked
fifth in the nation in total
offense, averaging 451.6
yards per outing, to battle
East Carolina, also a 5-3
squad, but accustomed to
yielding only half that total.
Kickoff is set for 7 p.m.
FOl NTAINHEAD
advertisers
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The trio, all solid
candidates for the-Southem
Independent team, has
consistently been among
the teams top performers
and helped continue the
tradition of tough Pirate
defenses. Their accom-
plishments this fall have
come with plenty of ability
and a fierce desire to
improve each week.
The late Vince Lom-
bard! had a football
philosophy which included
the idea that defense was
the instinctive side of
football.
�If a man is running
down the street with
everything you own the
great coach once said.
"You don't let him get
away That's tackling.
Defense is more instinctive
than offense
The instincts that this
terrific threesome has
employed have helped
Valentine be one of the top
ends in the South, Brew-
ington lead the team in
tackles, and Hall came
away with three pass
interceptions and rank
eighth in the nation in punt
returns.
"I wouldn't trade this
group for any three at
another school said
Pirate coach Pat Dye.
"What they mean to usas a
defense and as a team
couldn't be replaced
"Zack has given us both
steady and great play for
four years as has Gerald.
We have always had a
standout at linebacker and
this year it's Mike. Sure,
we gear the defense for the
linebackers to make the
tackles, but he does have to
make the hits to be great
While Brewington, a
Greenviil native, leads the
Pirates in tackles with 117
through the first eight
games, Valentine tops the
club with seven sacks
among his 41 tackles, and
Hall is the top put returner
witha 12.9 average as well
as the top tackier among
defensive backs with 50
stops.
Valentine and Hall,
seniors from Edenton, were
chose to the pre-season
all-Southern Independent
team and are demonstra-
ting why tne 14 coaches of
the group chose them for
the honor, while Brewing-
ton, just a junior, is
pushing hard to join the
group
MAC
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�� �





Title
Fountainhead, November 2, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 02, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.522
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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