Fountainhead, October 26, 1978






Circulation 10,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
so
Vol. No. 55 NoW
26 October 1978
Mace completed for
Brewer installation
dv WILLIAM A. SHIRES
ECU News Bureau
For the first time in its
71 year history ECU has a
mace.
Weighing 12 pounds,
the mace is 43 inches in
length with a shaft of
sterling silver crowned with
a symbolic head holding an
unusual purple crystal of
flounte in a golden cage.
The silver shaft is of
hammered texture and div-
ided by a pierced band. A
similar design is used at
both ends and at the head
the large crystal is enclosed
by phalanges and capped
with a circular band of gold
in a touch of contemporary
symbolism
Designed and crafted by
John Satterfield of the ECU
School of Art faculty, the
mace will be ceremoniously
displayed for the first time
Oct 28 at the formal
installation of chancellor
Thomas B Brewer.
It will be borne by a
costumed ceremonial bear-
er at the head of the
academic procession.
The mace itself is a
traditional symbol of high
office and authority.
In earlier times, the
mace was used by medieval
knights as a close combat
weapon. With a flanged or
spiked battlehead which
could ripthough chain mail
and plate armor, it was
considered superior to the
sword and spear in hand to
hand fighting.
During the late Middle
Ages, royalty and city and
borough officials adopted
the mace as an emblem of
office, designing it with
emphasis upon ornate dec-
oration and embellishment
of the shaft. A knob or
jeweled orb was used in-
stead of a battlehead.
Today, the mace is a
ceremonial symbol for such
bodies as the British House
of Commons, the U.S.
House of Representatives,
and by a number of cities
and by many colleges and
universities.
Th idea for an ECU
mace was raised during
planning for the Installation
of the Chancellor following
Dr. Brewer's election early
this year. Satterfield, an
artisan and goldsmith, was
commissioned to design
and fabricate it.
Financing of the mater-
ials and workmanship was
pledged by members of the
board of trustees and form-
er trustees at the bequest of
Dr. John D. Bridgers Jr. of
High Point, a present
trustee. It will be known as
the Trustees Mace.
Satterfield spent weeks
researching the history and
symbolism of such a peice,
and in design and fabrica-
tion of the mace. In addi-
tion, he conducted a long
search for an appropriate
crystal.
Finally, the baseball-
sized flourite crystal was
found in a rock and gem
shop at Spruce Pine, N.C.
Satterfield felt immediately
that it was the right stone
and acquired it for the focal
point of the mace. The
crystal emits a soft floure-
scent glow.
The finished product,
Satterfield says, was des-
igned carefully to maintain
the visual integrity of a
traditional mace and at the
same time create a contem-
porary symbol unique to
ECU.
For example, he says
"the phalanges are symbo-
lic of a group of individuals
- faculty, administrators
and trustees - united in
achieving the university's
goal of constructive prog-
ress
The purple of the crystal
and the gold of the bands
that hold it are the ECU
colors.
A native of Clearwater,
Fla Satterfield joined the
ECU art faculty in 1967. His
work has been exhibited at
art and jewelery shows
throughouf the United
States and he has had a
chalice purchased by the
Smithsonian Institution.
Most recently he was
among 41 American gold-
smiths selected to show
works in the Society of
North American
Goldsmith's European Ex-
hibition which opens next
year in Pforzheim,
Germany.
JOHN SATTERFIELD, ECU Art faculty, and his creation,
the Trustees mace which will be used in the formal
installation of the Chancellor Oct 28 Photo by George
Threewits
McGinnis renovations
scheduled for early 1979
Cartwright to notarize
ballots for studentsclubs
By JULIE EVERETTE
News Editor
Students may get their
absentee ballots notarized
on campus according to
David Cartwright, SGA
vice-president and a notary
public.
Cartwright said stu-
dents who wish to get their
ballots notarized must not
mark their ballots and must
have some identification,
preferably a driver's li-
cense, although a student
ID card is acceptable.
Cartwright said this is
the first year this service
has been offered on cam-
pus, and it is free of charge
to students.
Cartwright added that a
student getting his ballot
notarized in the city would
normally be charged $2.
Cartwright said stu-
dents should come to the
SGA office in Mendenhall
between 3 and 5 p.m.
weekdays.
He urges students to
call before they come.
Cartwright said he also
notarizes for clubs and
organizations, however the
organizations must give
some notice before re-
questing notarization.
Cartwright added that
forms for absentee ballots
may be obtained in the SGA
office from 9 a.m. to5p.m.
The forms must be
completed and mailed no
later than Tuesday Oct. 31,
he said.
Cartwright said if any
student is unable to obtain
an application for an ab-
sentee ballot, a member of
their immediate family may
request an application from
the Board of Elections.
"Several students have
already taken advantage of
this service Cartwright
said.
"I urge all students to
use the service and their
right to vote. This is an
important election year
Cartwright added that
freshmen registers may be
picked up from 9 a.m5
p.m. in the SGA office.
Cartwright said any
student who does not re-
member if they ordered a
register, may inquire at the
SGA office.
"The response has been
good, but there are still a
lot of registers to be picked
up Cartwright said.
By MIKE ROGERS
Staff Writer
McGinnis Auditorium is
scheduled for renovation
after December and is ex-
pected to be completed in
early 1980, according to
Preston Sisk. general man-
ager of the ECU Playhouse.
"We've been instructed
not to schedule any per-
formances in McGinnis
Auditorium after Decem-
ber Sisk said.
According to Sisk, the
heating system is unsafe,
and the lighting equipment
needs replacing. Sisk said
the lobby is approximately
nine feet by 25 feet, barely
larger than a dorm room.
The playhouse has five
shops, four of which are
either converted class-
rooms or cafeterias, he
said. The last shop is one
built by the administration
for larger scenery con-
struction.
"Thisbuilding was built
in the 1920's, 30's. or even
before as an elementary
school Sisk commented.
When renovation is
completed about the first of
1980. we will have a really
fine performance space.
We're really excited about
it
Sisk said the auditorium
would be renovated in two
phases. For phase 1, the
university has received $1 9
million in renovation funds.
"We had to cut a few
things that we needed, but
we are very pleased with
the plans
Phase 1 should take
approximately one year to
complete, according to
Sisk.
Some changes will in-
clude handicapped access,
better dressing rooms,
bricked windows to prevent
unwanted light, scene-
shifting machinery, and an
orchestra pit.
Sisk added, "It will
provide reasonable produc-
tion facitlities, a somewhat
expanded lobby � a much
nicer auditorium with ideal
sight lines
Sisk explained further,
�When that phase is com-
pleted, assuming that the
state does appropriate the
balance of the request.
Phase 2 will begin
Phase 2 will include new
shop facilities for scenery
construction, renovation of
the dance studios, and a
long overdue renovation of
the classroom facilities,
which at the present time
are plagued by falling
plaster, bad acoustics, and
a need for power outlets for
visual aid materials and
tape recorders
Sisk said, "Phase 1 is
scheduled to be completed
roughly by January of 1980
He added, The stage
will be greatly enlarged,
and we wilt finally be nd of
ur antique light system,
which will be replaced by
an up-to-date minute elec-
tronic dimming system We
are so glad that the state
has finally decided to reno-
vate this dilapidated elem-
entary school auditorium '
Cliff Moore, vice chan-
cellorof Business Affairs.
remarked that Wright Au-
ditorium would be reno-
vated, "when the General
Assembly decides to reno-
vate it � not before, not
after
He cited some of the
problems with Wright Au-
ditorium: "It does not have
a raised floor. The second
and third floors don t have
any heating or air condi-
tioning He then added.
We don t have any money
and it will take $1.393.000.
Various activities offered
'New Horizons' theme
for homecoming week
DAVID CARTWRIGHT, SQA vice pre-
set dent will notarize absentee ballots for
studentsPhotoby Kirk Kingsbury
Media Board introduces
secretary, discusses BUC
By
JULIE EVERETTE
News Editor
and
RICHY SMITH
Assistant News Editor
The ECU Media Board
introduced the new publi-
cations' and board's secre-
tary, Kathryn Mercer In a
Wad. meeting. She has
been employed as a aacre-
tary for 11 yewa and haa
worked on campus before
she became the publication
secretary.
Pete Podeszwa, Head
Photographer, requested
that the photo lab be moved
behind the Fountainhead
Office. There, would be
minimum renovations re-
quired for the move and it
would be more convenient
since the lab would then be
located near the publica-
tions. The photo lab is now
located in the basement ot
Fleming Dorm. The pro-
posal will be discussed at
the next board meeting.
Podeszwa also stated
that he had given all the
slides that were requested
to last year's Buccaneer
editor, Susan Rogerson.
The Media Board set Nov
as the final deadline for the
1977-78 Buccaneer to be
sent to Hunter Publishing
Co. If the deadline is not
met by then, the book will
not be published.
To avoid confusion in
the publication offices,
payroll checks will be
picked up by the owner at
the Student Funding Office
located in Mendenhall at
the end of the month.
Other issues discussed
concerned advertising and
conduct of students. The
meeting adjourned with no
other business to discuss.
ByARAH VENABLE
Staff Writer
The Pirates' Homecom-
ing Parade will be held
Nov. 11th, at 10 a.m. Mike
Morse, Student Union
president said there will be
15 floats, the ECU Mar-
ching Band, the ECU Drill
Team, local area drill
teams, and high school
bands, plus 10 to 15 horses.
The parade's theme is
"New Horizons Morse
said the Student Union has
been working on this par-
ade since February 1978.
The Student Union is
sponsoring various activi-
ties during the week of
homecoming.
Wednesday, Nov. 8,
The Balcony, will be shown
at Mendenhall Student
Center Theatre at 8 p.m.
Pablo Cruise and Liv-
ingston Taylor will perform
Thursday, Nov. 9, at Min-
ges Coliseum at 8 p.m. The
tickets are $5 for students
and $7 for the public.
Tickets will go on sale
Monday, Oct. 30.
Friday, Nov. 10, the V.
Student Union will show
the movie, Annie Hall, at 5
p.m 7 p.m. and 9 p.m.
The Carolina Bluegrass
Band will play in the
Coffeehouse at 8.30 p.m.
The Homecoming Game
against William and Mary
will start Saturday, Nov.
11th, at 1:30 p.m in
Ficklen Stadium.
Starting at 8 p.m. will
be a carosel of bands.
"Contrast" will play in
the multi-purpose room.
They specialize in jazz and
dance music, said Ken
Hammond, program dir-
ector for Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
At 8:30 p.m Carolina
Bluegrass Band will play in
the snack bar at Men-
denhall. "The Monitors
will begin playing at 8:30
p.m. They will play disco
and soul music. There will
also be a blues singer in the
coffeehouse
Hammond said there
will be a dance either Oct
6th or 10th The date is
tentative now, but Ham-
mond said they are trying
for Nov. 10th
On Nov 12th, the Stu-
dent Union is presenting a
Jack Nicholson Film Festi-
val. The movies to be
shown are. The Last Detail,
Five Easy Pieces, and One .
Flew Over the Cuckoo s
Nest. The showings will
start at 4 p.m.
What's inside
ECU students will study to Costa
Ricasee p.3.
P-5.
Greek Forum.
GEORGE BURNS STARS
in this week's Free Flick,
"Oh, Godsee p. 6.
ECU Volleyball Tournament is Minges
this weekend see p .8.
George Burns shines in ths weeks free
flick, Oh God. For a previewseep.6.
Jeff Rollins reviews another book in the
"running" genre, the Holistic Runner
seep.6.
, m � M Mi ta� WK���V�
r . �





Bicycle
Recital
Anyone interested in an
afternoon socializing on two
wheels should participate
in the Bicycle Club's bike
ride Sun. Oct. 29.
Interested students
should meet at the fountain
in front of Wright Audit-
orium at 1 p m. The group
will leave at 1 .15 p.m. for a
10-20 mile hike.
The bicycle club inopen
to all full-time ECU stu-
dents. For more informa-
tion, call Tom at 752-9847.
Greenpeace
The first organizational
meeting for Greenpeace
will be held Halloween
night. Oct. 31. at 6 p.m. in
room 248 Mendenhall.
Everyone is welcome to
attend. For further infor-
mation, call Jerry Adderton
at 758-6259 after 5 on
weekdays.
Leadership
AH interested people
are invited to Leadership
Training Class every
Thursday night at 7 in
Brewster B-103.
The classes, designed
for growth in Christ are
now underway and should
be of particular interest to
Christian men and women
who are concerned with
witnessing to others about
their faith
On Sun Oct. 29, an
organ recital will be pre-
sented by Jarvis Memorial
United Methodist Church
organist Mickey Thomas
Terry in the sanctuary of
the church at 8 p.m.
Assisting Mr. Terry will
be pianist Lorraine Hale
Jacobs of New Bern. In-
cluded on the program will
be Bach's Prelude and
Fugue in d as well as his
chorale prelude on the tune
Savior of the Heathen
Come.
Also performed will be
three of Louis Vierne's
Pieces de Fantasie and the
Durufle Toccata. It will be
on the state's premiere
performace of the Flor
Peeters Concerto for Organ
and Piano that Jacobs will
assist at the piano.
Psi-Chi
Pablo
The Student Union Ma-
jor Attractions Committee
will present Pablo Cruise
with special guest Living-
ston Taylor on Thurs. Nov.
9, at 8 p.m. in Minges
Coliseum.
Tickets will be $5 for
ECU students and $7 for
the public. All tickets are
available from the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center. In addi-
tion, public tickets can be
purchased from Apple Re-
cords, East Fifth Street:
School Kid's Records,
Georgetown Shoppes; The
Music Shop. Greenville
Square Mall.
Psi-Chi is having a pig
pickin" Sun Oct. 29 at the
Cherry Court clubhouse.
Festivities begin at 2
p.m. and include volleyball,
your favorite golden be-
verage and all the pig and
chicken you can eat.
All psychology majors,
minors, graduate students,
faculty and interested per-
sons are invited. Tickets
may be obtained from Psi-
Chi members, psychology
library, or the main psy-
chology office.
Prices are $2.50 for Psi-
Chi members, $3.50 for
non-members and $3 for
faculty.
Lost-Found
In order to provide
better lost and found ser-
vice, all items found
should be turned in to the
University Police as quickly
as possible.
Particular attention
should be given to keys.
Individuals who have lost
their keys usually need
them the same day.
If keys are found, and it
is inconvenient to turn
them over to the Police De-
partment, please call the
University Police Dispat-
cher and the keys will be
picked up by a University
Police Officer. The Univer-
sity Police Department is
now is a position to provide
24 hour a day, seven days a
week, lost and found ser-
vice.
Racquetball
Racquetball Club mem-
bers are urged to attend the
meeting Oct. 25, at 6:30
p.m. in 104 Memorial Gym.
Mike Vision from Hod-
ges Sporting Goods will
come to speak with us
about the latest in Rac-
quetball recquets, shoes,
etc. Hodges is willing to
offer a discout for equip-
ment to the ECU Rac-
questball Club members.
Art
Talent
ine ttaHsi Chapter of
the Kappa Alpha Psi Fra-
ternity is sponsoring an All
Campus Talent Presenta-
tion.
The event is scheduled
on Tuesday, Nov. 14 from 6
until 10 p.m. in the Multi-
purpose room at Menden-
hall.
Participants will be re-
viewed by a panel of judges
on a point system with the
performance receiving the
highest total points de-
clared the winner. Prizes
ranging from first, second,
and third places will be
awarded.
A dress rehersal is
scheduled for Mon Nov.
13 at 6 p.m. in the Multi-
purpose room and, if
needed, an audition date
will be set. Unlike last
year's show all perform-
ances, will be divided ac-
cording tosimilarity.
For further information
contact either Willie Battle
at 332 Slay Dorm (758-8608)
Ricky Lowe at 160 Umstead
or Zack Smith at the Rear
Apt. Aycock Dorm (757-
6038).
There will be an exhi-
bition of student art work in
the Wellington B. Gray
Gallery until Sun Oct. 29.
The art works included
in this exhibition are part of
an exchange of prints,
paintings and drawings be-
tween students from the
ECU School of Art and
students from the Art De-
partment at UNC-Wil-
mington.
This is the first such
exchange of student work
between our school and
another in the UNC system,
and it is hopefully not the
last of its kind. Sponsors of
this first exchange of stu-
dent art work are the
members of the East Caro-
lina Print Group.
Students from UNC-
Wilmington who have sent
works are: Janet Clark,
Debra Dennis, Michael
Hali, Thomas Jones, Lee
McLemor, Christy Naval,
Bonnie Rogers, Lillian
Sneeden, and John Taylor.
Halloween
There will be a Hallow-
een Party at Blimpies on
Oct. 30 from 9 p.m. until
closing.
Prizes to be given away
are: First place costume,
$20; Second place, case of
beer .Third place, six pack
of beer.
In the pumpkin carving
contest, the winner re-
ceives a case of beer.
Sponsored by the senior
Interior Design Class.
Education
Last day to register for
physical education ski
groups, both credit and
non-credit, is Oct. 31, room
108, Memorial Gym.
Beech Mountain Group
begins class at 4 p.m. All
participants must attend to
confirm reservations.
Snowshoe Group meets
at 5 p.m. This is an
informational meeting; all
participants must attend to
confirm reservations.
Mendenhall
Mendenhall will be
closed Sat, Oct. 28, until 6
p.m. due to the activities
related to Chancellor
Brewer's installation.
Democrats
The ECU College Foun-
dation of Young Democrats
will hold a meeting on
Mon Oct. 30, at the John
Ingram campaign head-
quarters.
The headquarters is lo-
cated at the corner of 14th
and Charles streets behind
University Seafood Market.
Several items of importance
will be discussed.
All members and inter-
ested students and faculty
are urged to attend. The
meeting will begin at 7
p.m.
Minority
Health
Rush
On November 10-11, the
fall semester North Caro-
lina Black Student Coalition
conference will be held at
A&T State University in
Greensboro, North Carol-
ina.
Delegates, along with
alternates, are chosen for
one or two year terms.
Its goal is to promote
unity among Black students
on a statewide basis, to
insure progressive im-
provements and to sta-
balize those areas of inter-
est to black students and
their communities.
If interested in parti-
cipating contact Jay Purdie,
SGA Secretary of Minority
in Mendenhall Student
I Center.
The Kappa Sigma Fra-
ternity have little sister
rush Mon Oct. 30 at 8.30
p.m. All interested girls are
invited to attend.
Telethon
All groups interested in
telephoning for the
student-alumni association
telethon must contact the
Student Government Asso-
ciation by 5 p.m. Friday, or
call 757-6611.
Honor
Deborah Thomas, em-
ployee development spe-
aahst for the National
Center for Health Statist.cs
will be on campus wed
Nov 1 to interview stu-
dents for Cooperative Edu-
cation placements
To qualify. students
should be in their soph-
omore or junior year, have
at least a 2 5 GPA, have
background in math, stat-
istics andor computer sci-
ence, and be willing to work
for two alternating sem-
esters in the Hyattsv.He.
Md. area.
Sophomoreswillbepaid
at the GS-3 level and
juniors and seniors at the
GS-4 level. The agency will
also pay for the student s
tuition and books after the
first placement
Interested students
should come by the Co-op
office, Rawl 313, to make
an appointment and read
the sample job descriptions
available. Freshmen and
others who may be eligible
for placement next year
should attend a general
information meeting with
Thomas at 2 p.m. Nov. 1 in
Rawl 313. Qualified minor-
ities, women, and handi-
capped students are en-
couraged to apply
All persons initiated in-
to Psi-Chi Honor Fraternity
on Oct. 10 should pick up
their certificates as soon as
possible in the main psy-
chology office.
East Carolina University
Student Union Major Attractions Committee
presents
CRUISE
Ski
There will be a ski club
meeting, Nov. 1 in room
105 Memorial Gym at 4
p.m. Those interested in
competing should attend.
with special guest Livingston Taylor
TICKETS:
�ECU Students S5.00
Public S7.00
Only Public Tickets will
be sold at the door.
���
???��












Thurs Nov. 9, 1978
8 p.m.
Minges Coliseum
STUDENTS:
Buy a Student Ticket
Monday, Tuesday, or Wednesday
and you'll be eligible to win
a FREE Pablo Cruise T-Shirt
Winners will be announced in next Thursday's FOUNTAINHEAD.
???�?�????????!






?


��
TICKETS

ECU Students SS.ooi
Public S7.00
a
Only Public Tickets will :
be sold at the door.
i�
Tickets Go On Sale Mon Oct 30, 1978 (10 a.m.).
Classifieds
fcrscfc @
FOR SALE: 1 Pioneer SA-
8500 stereo amp. (100 watts
per channel), one Super
Scope AMFM stereo tuner
One Panasonic turntable -
eight track comb 2 Mar-
antz HD-77 speakers. $800
for all or will sell each piece
separately. Call 756-8571
before 8 p.m. or 752-9745
after 8 p.m. for more info.
FOR SALE. Aria Pro II
alec, guitar, pro. model
excellent cond. with case.
$300. Troy Moore 752-9640.
FOR SALE: '74 Vega in
good cond. but some rust
$400. Call 758-1239 before
9 p.m.
HALLOWEEN FACES:
created for a small fee.
Make-up by Michelle
Mennett. Call for appoint-
ment. 758-8724.
WANT TO STEAL? Mast-
erwork AMFM receiver,
Realistic 117V pre-amp 2
6' speakers all for only $60.
All in excellent cond. but
must sell as moving to
California. Call Greg 752-
5736 between 9 and 12
P.M.
FOR SALE: Handwoven
hammocks, beautiful colors
and natural, $30 - $35. Call
758-0495.
FOR SALE: White'68 VW.
Mechanically sound, rea-
sonably priced. Call 758-
6833 or 752-8013 ask for
Wayne.
FREE. 6 wk. old puppies.
Mixed breed. Fat, healthy
and cute 756-7719.
peraorici�
TOPLESS DANCERS:
needed immediately at
Hwy. 33 Club. Full and part
time. Very good pay. To
apply call 752-9917 for
interview.
IF CARLA GEORGE
this and calls Chaneto' s you
will receive a free gift
758-7400
for pert �
NEED ROOMMATE: to
share a 2 bdrm. apt. at
Langston Park Apts. Call
after 5 p.m. for details. Ask
for Kathy. 752-1892.
FOR RENT: 2 bdrm. house
2 blocks from Happy St roe.
$110.00 a month, available
Nov. 1. Call 758-3701 after
4 p.m.
ROOMMATE NEEDED
Situation available for fem-
ale interested in private
room in attractive house
with all conveniences, loca-
ted 2 blocks from campus.
Owner is mature, profes-
sional gentleman interested
in sharing expenses. For
interview, call 758-3016
after 5 p.m.
r
- � - r �

im'wm'w
mm
mm





26 October 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 3
Students to study in Costa Rica
THE LAST BITE is always the sweetest
Photo by Steve Romero
teams
ECU News Bureau
Seventeen ECU stud-
ents are preparing for a
semester of study in Costa
Rica early next year, under
a cooperative arrangement
with Costa Rica's Univesi-
dad Nacional and the ECU
Department of Geography
cipate
The Costa Rican camp-
us is located near Heredia,
a suburb of the capital city,
San Jose Students will live
with native Costa Rican
families and attend classes
on campus, taught by Costa
Rican and ECU professors
Among the course offer-
ings for the spring semest-
er, which begins Jan 8 and
ends April 27, are Spanish
language, tropical biology,
Central American history,
Central American geo-
gra)hy, field studies, and
social welfare systems of
Costa Rica.
Students will have op-
portunities to pursue indep-
endent research in their
main areas of interest
According to Dr Robert
Cramer of the ECU geo-
graphy faculty, director of
the Costa Rica-ECU pro-
gram, the 17 students will
meet with Jorge Arturo
Saenz. Universidad Nac-
ional administrator when
Saenz visits Greenville in
early November.
The student partici-
pants include residents of
seven North Carolina coun-
ties and six other states.
The seventeen students
attending are
Janet Bailey, Juliet Cas-
tor, Lisa Snyder, Donna
Wilkie. Howard Johnson.
Jean Vasicek David Barn-
ette, Amanda Harwell
Scott Whitlock. Cheryl
Boehm. Mike Monahan.
M ike Greco. Virginia John-
stone, Deborah Scudder
Christine Martin, Richard
Green and Beverly Jen-
nings
in annual College Bowl
. . . , . . . J'At.� I
8v ARAH VENABLE
Staff Reporter
ECU will participate in
the College Bowl competi-
tion again this year, accor-
ding to Wanda Yuhas,
assistant program director
for Mendenhall Student
Center
The college bowl was
v recently revived and it
is sponsored by the student
union ECU participated in
the college bowl when it
appeared on television.
said Yuhas TV rights
een purhcased This
rd year that ECU
irticipated
The college bowl is a
form of academic compe-
;n stated Yuhas. It is
somewhat like a sport, she
added
college bowl compe-
tition, there are two types
of questions: a toss-up and
a bonus. Each has a valued
number of points. Anyone
may answer the toss-up
question. If answered cor-
rectly, the team has the
chance to answer the
bonus. The obiect is to
answer as many questions
as possible. "It's a team
sport, but it is an individual
sport too. stated Yuhas.
"It's a matter of knowing
the correct answer she
added.
Eleven teams are parti-
cipating from ECU The
teams compete in intra-
mural, regional, and na-
tional contests The win-
ners of last year's intra-
murals were sent to the
regional competition. This
year they hope to have an
all star team taking part in
the regionals, commented
Yuhas.
Several departments
and organizations are re-
presented with teams. They
include departments of En-
glish, History. Sociology-
Anthropology, Philosophy
and Political Science. Phi
Sigma Pi, the Medical
School, the Baptist Student
Union, Newman Club,
ROTC, and the Student
Union
At the finals, a member
of a team is eligible to will
$3500
A scholarship fund for
the StudentUnioms set up if
a team wins
"We're suppose tooffer
an academic compliment
Yuhas stated, as she re-
ferred to the Student Un-
ion. The Student Union will
provide the entertainment
You don't have to be a
genius to play college
bowl said Yuhas. It takes
five people and a coach to
be a team. I'm suspicious
that there are a lot of
people that would like to
play, but just don't know
any of the other team
mebers commented Yu
has.
TICE
DRIVE IN-AYDEN HIGHWAY
Friday-Sunday
WILLIAM
HOLDEN
LEE
GRANT
Shows at
7 :30 & 9.30
LVMEN
0MENH
The first time
was only a warning.
Soon� THE DRIVER (R)
Meadowbrook
DRIVE IN-OPPOSITE AIRPORT
Friday-Sunday
IMAGINE YOUR LIFE
HANGSBY A THREAD
Shows at 7:30 & 9:30
PG
R
Next�
COMING HOME (R)
Mikes9 Bicycle
Shop

University Arcade
Complete line of tools &
accessories. Years of
experience fixing
Greenville's bikes.
Guaranteed Service.
752-5291
TOMTE AT THE
e�o Rpear
Early Bird Special 1 2 price adm.
til 9:30.10 Customer appreciation
til 10:00 Friday Afternoon Party
3-7 Sunday Ladies Nite
HAVE A'
BOTTOMLESS" CUP OF
PEPSI FREE
ENJOY A FREE
PEPSI WITH THE
PURCHASE OF
ANY PLATTER,
QUARTER
CHICKEN OR
SANDWICH.
Offer good only
with coupon.
1 Oth and Charles Streets-Greenville
factory
Outlet
Ski
160.00
50oo
6000
Tenni
MACR AME.
FT St
WEAVING
w758 YARN S
CORNER Of Ow & ClARK STREETS
IN HATTERAS HAMMOCK BUILDING
WtRE HARDTOPiMD BUT WELL W0RTM T '
Ski Packages while they last
Kestle Skis
Salomon 202 Bindings
A&T Poles
Caber Boots
Total normal price 27995
Now ONLY S16900 plus tax
Tennis Balls all brands $195 per can no limit
All Tennis Socks Vi off.
All Foot-Joy Tennis Shoes 40 off.
All Golf Balls 10" dozen.Includes Titleist , Top Flight,
Pro Staff, Hogan, Dunlop plus many more.
All Mens and Ladies Golf Shoes 20 off.
NOTE - We still have a few openings on our
two ski trips to snowshoe, West V a.
See Gordon at the Shop at Greenville Country Club.
(jt)rdon D. Fulp
Golf Professional
Greenville Country Club
�� � �
Phone 7560504
Open. 7 days a vee
NEW STUDENT FINANCING
Everybody knows that students have a hard time trying to establish
credit due to the lack of . , jobs, cash, and previously
established credit. gg Harmony House understands
"H -L would like to introduce
payments and establish- ing yourselves a sound credit
reference. At Harmony House, we believe it's worth our
time and your time to come by and talk to Jim, Dave, or Bronson
and get the HHH scoop on our in-store
financing foraiUH ECU students.
these problems. We
a new and exciting way
of buying on monthly
fT
V
E�w U
Bronson
r
QrQr
t
c

0.
c
6
,
f
rrrr
Dave
iltee:
HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH
On the Mall � Downtown Greenville � 752-3651
I





Voting is painless
Voting is a privilege too many Americans
take for granted. The "my vote doesn't count"
attitude is merely an excuse for people who are
too lazy to take the time to register and vote
and too lazy too think about the issues and
make a decision. These same people, however,
are not at all hesitant to complain about the
government.
The vote is perhaps the most powerful
weapon ever entrusted to the public. With it,
officials can be elected or removed; laws can be
enacted or repealed, and taxes can be raised or
lowered. It is the foundation of the American
system of government, but without the active
participation of eligible voters, it is a useless
item buried in political science texts.
In order for government to work, there
must be a steady flow of public opinion to
elected officails. Voters must acitvely study
issues in order to make a wise decision, and
then communicate their decision either
through correspondence with elected officials
ex through the ballot.
We really don't realize how lucky we areo
have such a tool. Few nations in the world
allow their citizens to dictate who shall govern
and how they snail govern.
And yet, the vast majority of eligible
American refuse to vote. They forget to
register (something they wouldn't have to do if
they voted regularly); or they are too busy on
election day.
Sadly, college age voters are no better that
the rest. Our predecessors fought a hard uphill
battle for passage of the constitutional
amendment allowing 18 year olds to vote, and
today most people could care less. Instead, this
age group has one of the poorest voting
records
It doesn't take much for students to get an
absentee ballot, or, better yet, vote in
Greenville. Registered voters can go to the
board of elections in their home county on or
before Nov. 7 and vote in person, they can have
a parent or close relative pick up a ballot,
send it to them, have it notorized, and return it
to the home elections board, or send in a
request for an application for a ballot to their
home elections board. After the application is
received, the voter must fill it out and return it.
The ballot will then be sent to the voter, who
must then vote, notorize it, and return it.
Voting is simple and painless. It only takes
a little mental and physical effort, and it makes
the difference between a vital and a poor
government.
American Journal
- Smokers' 'rights' threatened
Communique
Mhood memories rediscovered
ByDINOHARRELL
I had a desk once. It
was a really nifty desk, and
! was proud of it.
My parents had bought
it at an auction somewhere,
second hand, when I was
still a httle boy. It was
missing some veneer on
top. but it didn't really
matter. The top wasn't
always on top, so no one
ever noticed.
You see, the desk was
designed in a really unusu-
al way It was fixed so that
atypewritercouid be bolted
to it, and when it wasn't
being used, it could be
folded away, down inside
the desk, out of sight.
When the typewriter was
folded away, the desk
looked pretty much like a
normal one.
There was a place to
pull up a chair, and a shelf
to put your feet on when
you sat in front of it. There
wasadrawer on the right, a
big one that went almost all
the way to the back of the
desk. The drawer was
fastened to the overhang-
ing top, no legs to its right.
It was made that way so
that a filing cabinet could
be kept under it. And there
was a handle on the front
edge of the top that, when
pulled up, angled the top to
a position parallel to the
back of the desk
When this happened,
another top folded out.
When the transformation
was completed, there stood
a desk, the middle part
lower than the rest, with a
typewriter sitting on it,
ready for action
Except that I didn't
have a typewriter. But
there were holes in the top
where bolts had once held
one.
I remember the holes
well. I used to forget them,
and when I was writing
something, my pencil
would mash a hole through
my paper.
I spent some of the best
hours of my life at that
kTve forgotten
many things
about the little
boy who sat at
the desk, . . .
the kind of
things he
thought
desk. I read books there,
built models of rockets and
rubberband powered air-
planes, collected stamps
and coins ? it, and a
thousand other things. I
kept secret messages in the
drawer, always at the back,
and under the piece of
panelling I had found that
just barely fit, which creat-
ed a perfect false bottom.
It was perfect for secret
messages.
When I started collect-
ing coins, and needed a
safe place to keep them, I
put a lock on the drawer. I
kept other things in it then,
a diary, scrapbook, more
secret messages, special
rocks, bolts I had found,
magnets, etc.
The list of things was
almost endless. Anything a
little boy puts into his
pockets went into the
drawer, locked safely away.
I even put firecrackers and
matches and things in it
when I got older, the kinds
of things mothers shouldn't
see.
It's been so long since
the desk was moved out of
my room that I really don't
remember why it had to go.
It must have been moved
to make room for new
furniture, or something. I
probably put up a fight, or
cried, or just felt a loss the
day it was taken away, I
really don't remember.
I've forgotten so much
since then. I've forgotten
many things about the little
boy who sat at the desk, the
kinds of things he used to
do, the kinds of things he
thought. I had even
forgotten the desk, or at
� least not thought about it
for a long time until the
other day.
I was home for Thanks-
giving, taking a little time
out from school, and having
nothing better to do, I
stepped outside and took a
walk. I didn't have any-
thing special in mind, but
the fall air was pregnant
with the smell of colored
leaves, and the weather
was the kind that is peculiar
to a beautiful autumn day.
My steps carried me
into the big pine forest that
guards our home from the
city and its noises, and lead
me into the past. I walked
around for awhile, sat
against a big pine tree,
watched some squirrels
playing high above me, and
just unwound. I came back
through the woods, off the
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over 50 years
EDITOR
Doug White
PRODUCTION MANAGER ADVER�.?S?2�E�ER
Leigh Coekley news EDITORS Robert M'
Julie Everette
TRENDS ED.TOR " G"armiS pE�"
Steve Beehner S"m H�Br?
FOUNTAINHEAD it the �uden� EfffiKLrf ECU
Carolina University sponsored by the MedleBoerd of ECU
and is distributed each Tuesday and Thursday (weekly
during the summer).
Mailing addrees: Old Sopth Building, Greenville, N.C
27834
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni $6 annually.
path, tromped through bri-
ars, crawled through thick-
ets, and got good and tired.
Just before I got home, I
crawled Wrcfh vine
choked tangle of bushes, a
stood up, putted "the half
out of my eyes and looked
toward the hous.
There in front of me,
hidden from sight to any
who stood at the house, was
the desk. I stood, thrilled,
and a hundred memories
flashed through my mind.
One of those memories
made me look at the desk
handle for a moment. I
turned and ran to the
house.
I was back in minutes,
breathless, a small screw-
driver in my hand. I bent
over the desk, my knees
knocking off veneer that
was cracked and buckled
from years of standing in
the rain.
I unscrewed the big,
hollow brass handle from
the desk and turned it over.
Nothing. I felt a twinge of
sadness.
I had remembered that I
used to write things on
small pieces of paper and
put them behind the cover
plates of light switches,
where they would wait to be
found someday. I seemed
to remember hiding a
message in the desk han-
dle, years ago.
I could see the little boy
again, carefully folding a
piece of paper with a
message on it, and sliding
it into the handle, andthen
refastening the handle to
the desk, hoping but not
really believing that some-
one would find it someday.
I tore a small twig off a
bush and sat down, leaning
against the desk. I pushed
the twig into the handle. It
went in, farther and farth-
Ier, and out the other end,
pushing in front of It a
small roll of paper.
I picked the piece of
paper from my lap, where it
had fallen. My hands
shook as I unrolled it,
turned it over and read it.
I sat still a long time
after I read it; tears welled
up in my eyes and rolled
down my cheeks, dropping
off onto the paper. They
I were tears of something
infinitely greater than
happiness or Joy.
The note, written In the
scrawl of a small boy,
holding a big fat pencil m a
hand small by comparison,
said simply, "Remember
me?"
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
Last June, California's Proposition 13 slashed property
taxesand touched off a nationwide "taxpayers revolt On
Nov. 7, the state's voters will decide the fate of Proposition
5, a broad no-smokiog initiative that, if it passes, could
galvanize anti-smoking sentiment across the country.
If it passes. The success of Prop. 5 is by no means
assured, thanks to a lavishly financed effort to snuff out the
measure that has scored impressive gains in the final weeks
of the campaign.
Opponents of Prop. 5 � mainly the tobacco industry and
its public relations advisors � are spending.up to $5 million
tlstop passageofthe initiative. That is at leasMO times the
amount available to the
Campaign for Clean Indoor .mm����
studies that suggest that "sidestream smoke" � unfiltered
smoke from the burning end of someone else's cigarette,
cigar or pipe � can be a significiant health hazard for
non-smokers. Infants and persons with heart and
respiratory diseases are especially vulnerable.
Sidestream smoka, has twice as much tar and nicotine,
three times as much benopyrene (a powerful carcinogen);
five times as much carbon monoxide, and 50 times the
concentration of nitrosamines (more carcinogens) than the
often-filtered smoke inhaled by smokers. �
Smokers, of course, are more thoroughly exposed to the
hazards of tobacco than are non-smoking bystanders they
inhale more smoke, more often. But non-smokers in
enclosed places like offices where co-workers puff away
may as well be i.oKing,
Air, the sponsor of Prop. 5.
Most of the opposition
money is going into a media
blitz deriding the proposed
law as illogical, unworkable
and an attack on individual
rights.
Prop. 5's adversaries
call themselves Caliform-
ans for Common Sense,
although little of their
financing comes from Cali-
fornia. The R.J. Reynolds
Tobacco Co. alone has
given $1,169,786 to the
no-on-5 war chest. Rey-
nolds is based in Winston-
-Salem, N.C.
All told, five tobacco
industry giants, similarly
removed from California,
have supplied over 90 per-
cent of the anti-5 funds.
As a result of this
formidable outlay of capi-
tal, Prop. 5, which led by as
much as 20 percent in
public opinion polls in early
September, was running
dead even in October.
Known officially as the
Clean Indoor Air Act, Prop.
5 would ban tobacco smok-
ing in most enclosed public
places and workplaces,
schools, and hospitals and
clinics (except for private
rooms). It would also
require non-smoking sec-
tions in restaurants, lobbies
and waiting rooms. Excep-
tions would be made for
bars, retail tobacco shops,
hotel and motel rooms,
�halls hired for private
parties and some public
gatherings, like rock con-
Restrictive smoking laws are already on the books in 33
states and the District of Columbia, as well as in hundreds
of municipalities. The proposed California law would be the
toughest in the nation. In addition to its broad range. Prop.
5 would proscribe citations and $50 fines tor violations.
In taking on the tobacco interests, pro-5 forces are going
up against one of the oldest and most prosperous industries
in America, one whose roots reach back to colonial times,
when gentleman planters comprised a landed aristocracy.
Today, tobacco is a $17 billion a year industry supplying
weed to the 53 million Americans who smoke.
The percentage of adult smokers has dropped since
smoking was linked with cancer in the early 1960s, but
because of population growth, more cigarettes are sold than
ever before some 600 billion of them last year.
Prop. 5 is not Prohibition. It would not snatch the
burning stubs from the hands of smokers in their homes,
but it would prevent therrtfrom exposing others to the
possible hazards of their habit in public. Opponents of the
measure say that government has no business regulating
the pereonal preferences of individuals.
Proponents counter that a preference that harms others
Is no longer merely personal.
Much of the argument for Prop. 5 relies on recent
too. It is these s.tuations
that Prop. 5 woulo curtail
Prop. 5's critics prefer
to sidestep medical quest-
ions, invoking instead the
dreaded image of Big Brot-
her in vaguely worded,
emotional appeals.
One popular billboard
opposing the initiative
reads simply: "They're at it
again Vote No on Prop
5 "They" are not identi-
fied, but presumably
they're the fuzzv-thmkmg
do-gooders and bureaucrats
who would order our lives
with little regard 'or what
"we" think.
Peter Hanauer. co-
author of Prop 5 and the
treasurer of the Campaign
for Clean Indoor Air. den-
ounced the no-on-5 camp-
aign in a telephone inter-
view, charging it is rooted
"in ignornaoe and fear
Hanauer compares the
non-smoking initiative to
Prop. 13 "in the sense that
it arose from popular dis-
content. Prop. 13 may not
have been the best way to
cut property taxes, but it
happened because govern-
ment wouldn't take action
We tried o get no-smoking
bills through the state
legislature, but the tobacco
lobby succeeded in getting
them killed "
Replying to critics who
say the proosed law would
be unenforceable. Hanuuer
says We think it will be
largely self-enforcing. This
has been the case in the
past year in Berkley,
where a municipal ordinance upon which Prop. 5
is based has been shown to work mostly by peer pressure.
It's an educational process as well as a law. We don't
expect or even want a lot of police action
According to Hanauer, the pro-5 forces will net
$300,000 to $500,000 some of which is being held to buy ads
in the crucial final days before the election, " whan most
people make up their minds Moat of the money has come
in small individual donations. The largest donor is the
American Cancer Society, which gave $25,000the first
time they've ever endorsed a political act ion. according to
Hanauer.
Hanauer adds that similar anti-smoking lobbies exist in
a number of states, including Florida, Arizona and
Massachusetts. "Anti-smoking feeling is particularly keen
m places where the environmental movement is strong
where there are a lot of elderly retired people There
petitions circulating In Florida for a measure almost exactly
like ours.
"CaliforeW he aays, "ia a beilweether I can't -v
exectly whtt wil, fpp�, t JST!
are groups in pretty near all parts of the country
.
I
�a�
Meat
. - - �





9 1 I
t �
26 October 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
Greek Forum
COULD THIS BE Thursday Night Fever?
Photo by Chap Our ley)
Child Development
gets training grant
ECU News Bureau
A grant of $97,824 has
been awarded the ECU
Department of Child De-
velopment and Family Re-
lations by the N.C. Dept. of
Human Resources to pro-
vide training services to
eastern N.C. day care per-
sonnel.
Involved in the program
will be employees of-feder-
ally certified day care fac-
ilities in Bertie, Edge-
combe, Pitt, Wayne, Wil-
son. Tyrrell. Nash, Lenior.
Washington, Craven,
Beaufort. Greene. Jones.
Martin. Pamlico, Hyde and
Carteret Counties.
Basic goal of the pro-
gram is to improve the
quality of day care services
to children by helping
service personnel become
more effective in their jobs.
Administrators of the
project are Drs. Charles
Snow and Nash Love of the
ECU School of Home Econ-
omics faculty. Project
trainers are child devel-
opment specialists Sandra
Houston and Patricia
McMahon.
Training activities will
include short-term work-
shops and visits to day care
facilities by the project staff
for consultation and on-
the-job assistance, and vis-
its by day care employees
to select demonstration
centers for study and ob-
servation.
Some day care teachers
receiving training will be
working toward the Child
Development Associate
credential, a nationally re-
cognized qualification
which recognizes profes-
sional worth among those
who work with young child-
ren in day care and class-
room settings.
ByRlCKIQLIARMIS
News Editor
The Lambda Chi's have
been working hard this past
month in an attempt to
make this year's field day
one of the best. Everyone Is
urged to attend Lambda
Chi Field Day and show
their support to the Lambda
Chi's.
PanheMenic's Pledges
on Parade is Friday night,
Oct. 27. A lot of planning
has gone into this activity In
hopes that they will get a
big crowd at the Greenville
Moose Lodge this weekend.
Fraternities and sorori-
ties are again reminded of
Dr. Thomas Brewer's in-
stallation which is being
held Saturday. This is a
special time for the Brewer
family and for the uni-
versity. Because Greeks are
the largest minority on the
ECU campus, they should
be well represented at the
ceremonies on Saturday.
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
The Chi Omegas spent
this week preparing cos-
tumes for their Halloween
social. They are also pre-
paring to attend Dr. Brew-
er's installation as a group
and are working hard pre-
paring for Lambda Chi
Field Day.
The Chi O's would like
to announce the election of
LisaHerrasJr. Panhellenic
president.
On Wednesday the Al-
pha Xi Delta's had a
Halloween party for their
WE ARE PAYING
CASH
FOR CLASS RINGS
(REGARDLESS OF CONDITION)
OTHER GOLD RINGS
(REGARDLESS OF CONDITION)
ANY GOLD OR SILVER OF
ANY KIND AND
TOP CASH PRICE PAID FOR
SILVER AND GOLD COINS
COIN COLLECTIONS
BRING TO "COIN MAN"
HARMONY HOUSE
SOUTH
ON THE MALL
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
Every Tuesday night is "Ladies Nite"
with reduced beverage prices for
ladies from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Featuring Chris Farren
Every Wednesday
is Blue Grass Night
ART
526 S. Cotanc
Down Town
COU!OM MMHtS-
; LIMITED TMEOffn
12 Exp. Cplor Rim
Devel-ped .and Printed
$249
� OAF
Piedmont
has discount fores
worth flying "
COUPOM EXPIRES
It I Jill'
20 Exp. Color FHm
Developed and Printed
'jEniSsS
Or just about anywhere else you d like to go For
Usance our Round Thrift-3 Fsrs saves yo 30
oundmp When you return no earher than h .third
daySwfngVur or,g.nal date of departr P�ed-
XTnt c wnnitond Excursion Fere means a o
SrSdSSunTSu leave Saturday a I return
Saturday sSX or Monday through the first ava.l-
ap!Smaomh�)fiU other d.scount fares to
hnSf rom too For complete information, call your
SlJenToXdEont Airlines Major credit cards
acPtecf All d.scount fares subject to change
without notice
COUPON
JMrTEO TE
MOVIE OR SUl
1�W.
pledgee.
On Halloween night the
Alpha Xi's will visit the
children's ward of the Pitt
Memorial Hospital and will
also visit the Greenville
Nursing Home to present
cards and songs as part of
their local philanthropy.
The Sigma Sigma Sigma
sorority is having their bake
and yard sale as planned on
November 3, in front of the
house at 803 E. Fifth St.
The Sigmas are trav-
eling to State, Nov. 2 for a
social with the Sigma Chi's.
The Atlantic Christian Col-
lege Sigmas from Wilson
will also be traveling to the
social.
Last Thursday, the Tri-
Sigs entertained Mrs.
Thomas Brewer at a tea at
the sorority house. All of
the sisters and pledges
were along with several
alumnae.
The Sigma Tau Gamma
"Lil Roses" will be having
a Macho King Contest at
ARMY-NAVY STORE
1501 S. Evans
B-15, bomber, field,
deck, flight, snorkel jackets
Back Packs
the Elbo Room Tuesday
night Nov. 7. Tickets are
being sold by the little
sisters.
The Sig Taus are also
having a Halloween Blow-
out on Monday, Oct. 30 at
the Attic. There will be
prizes and contests plus
reduced prices on your
favorite beverage.
The Sigma Nu Little
Sisters gave the brothers
and pledges a champagne
breakfast at the house this
past weekend. The new
little sisters will be inducted
on Nov. 5.
Sigma Nu is planning a
float and house decorations
for homecoming. After the
game, they are having a
private party at the Lemon
Tree Inn in Chocowi.iitv.
The Kappa Sigma Fra-
ternity traveled to Norfolk
this past weekend to the
Pirates' football aame.
Kappa Sigma is having
their Little Sister Rush on
Monday night, Oct. 30
starting at 9 p.m. All
interested young ladies are
invited to attend.
SAAD'S SHOE REPAIR
113 GRANDE AVE.
COLLEGE VIEW
CLEANERS
�TVVVV�CK
TOMLAXAFTSt
A0AYMOAOBT
THE SUNSET
net. SihSniEfT
HI
temKi:t�fri$�fo33bjfciwjjj
Thursday Family Night
ALL YOU
CAN EAT
TROUT $1.95
shrimp $3.95
OYSTERS $4.25
FLOUNDER� $3.95
Dinner meal Include Golden Crisp
French Fires, Cole Slaw, Tartar Sauce and
the world's best hushpupples.
mm
i Q A A Sun. thru Thurs. 4:30-9:00
Seafood �����"�
IT
Friday's Seafood
v 2311S. Evans St.
STUFFY'S
Good Stuff
ROAST BEEF
SPECIAL
Regular Roast Beef Sub
aud small drink
$1.50 (normally S1.85)
Offer good Oct. 26 30
Offer Good With Coupon Only
Free Delivery on Campus
6:00 p.m. -12:00 midnlte
i
768-6130
581 CoUnehe






Page6 FOUNTAINHEAD 26 October 1978
Vannelli is 'macho'
ByCHRlSFARREN
Staff Writer
GmoVannelliis an innovator. His singing, appearance,
and style are totally unparalleled by any other musician to
date For years his thunderous voice and orchestra like
sounding keyboards have intrigued listeners.
For years his hairy chest, wavy hair, and overall macho
image has simutaneously excited and disgusted females.
For years his tru ly sensitive and at times profound lyrics
have boggled critics with their apparent contradiction to his
outward image.
The sound of his music has always been intense and
ex � full sounding, and until now most people either
k � hated his music - there really was no neutral
positioi
Over the past five vears his music has constantly been
changing in its style, but has remained fairly consistent in
its approach (i.e. big vocals, heavy keyboards).
. rful People. Vannelli's first album to really gain
any critical attention, was basically filled with silky smooth
banads and worked well at introducing his style to the
without scaring off too many would-be fans
ess.
Storm At Sunup, his next album, was a step towards a
much more jazz influenced sound. Some of the songs were
very long with extended sax, guitar and piano solos running
throughout.
The lyrics stopped talking about people and concen-
trated more on ideas. The music was jazz (for lack of a
better word) but it was a different kind of jazz than anyone
at that time had ever experienced.
Almost predictably. Gist of Gemini was a step in yet
another direction. While the sound continued to be
"The sound of his music has
always been intense and full
sounding . . . (itI has a
sureness and stability
� � Eves of Laura of Laura Mars'
Dunaway stars
in Laura Mars
By DARREN BERGSTEIN
Assistant Trends Editor
Eyes of Laura Mars happens to be a very interesting
� s a psychological thriller that achieves what it is
� � -hat is. to titillate, and frighten.
�ye Dunaway handles herself skillfully, portraying the
e of a photographer Her specialty is fashion
er of the kinky kind, her models sometimes
ng in unusual and quite strange ways.
ss Mars becomes alarmed when she learns that a
- is loose and that she can see through his eyes. And
this is the mam flaw of the film ; this psychic phenomena is
never fully explained The audience must assume that it is a
. Mars arbitrarily has.
Tommy Lee Jonec comes into view when t show is staged
that displays Miss Mars' various works. In this film Jones
a much more fitting role for himself than the role he
H,
recognizable as that of Gino Vannelli. the music was almost
in a synthesized rock vein.
This semi-concept album was a disappointment to many
who thought Gino was trying too hard to find his prescribed
place in the scheme of contemporary music.
Pauper In Paradise marked a return to the innocence
and calmness of Powerful People in some respects, however
the album was recorded live in the studio with a full
orchestra accompaniment. On many of the tunes this was
extremely effective, but on an equal amount of other songs
it was overdone.
With all of this behind him (and me) Gino Vanneli's
latest release is called Brofner to Brother, and is a solid
culmination of all his previous efforts. Vannelli seems to
have found himself in this release, for the music has
a sureness and stability that his other albums sometimes
lacked.
Thisalbum still contains a variety of different songs, but
each one is treated separately and setting it apart from the
rest.
Unlike previousalbums, Gino has learned how to use his
voice mixing the quiet intensity of "I Just Wanna Stop"
with the raw power needed in "The Evil Eye
The production too is more appropriate. Where before
the synthesized keyboards and fullness were added with
abandon to nearly every tune, in Brother to Brother is is
used more sparingly and more effectively.
Gmo Vannelli wrote all but two of the songs on the
album, all of which are consistently solid both musically and
lyrically The lyrics on this album follow no real pattern but
have something to say about a lot of things with a special
openness and awareness.
GINO VANNELLI HE writes all but two of the songs on his ne
The other two cuts on the album were written by brother
Ross Vannelh.one of which is the already popular "I Just
Wanna Stop Keeping it in the family, the album is
produced and arranged by Gino, Joe, and Ross Vannelli
The Vannelli sound in Brother to Brother has shed some
of over intensity problems of previous albums, and as a
result the album is more enjoyable to listen to.
rW
The
w album Brother to Brother
The trendy, danceable and smooth production of
River Must Run" is especially notible in thisrespe
Thisalbum once again marks a change 'or Gino Va �
but hopefully it isachanaehat will stay Brother to Brother
is a truely good record and succeeds in weeding out the
flaws and combining the atributes of previous albums Dy
this totally unique performer.
Free Flick is Oh, God!
The Betsy - that of an over sexed race car driver
, a New York police detective assigned to Miss
xilar case.
'�- riot intensifies when the killer begins to murder
v ;yees and business associates. Jones appears to
� "le help and she retreats even farther into the
te � .� shell he has built - retreating into her
itograpf .
i. is shocking and has a surprising twist.
One may asl if this is the role for Dunaway. Looking
the average hapless heroine of fifties' horror films,
-aggled. and scared witless, she tries to grab the
audience's pity with well-placed screams and fits of fright.
This week's Free Flick is the Carl Reiner comedy Oh,
God1 The film will be shown this Friday and Saturday night
at 7 and 9 p.m. in Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix
Theatre.
Oh, God1 is a celebration of the marvelous things that
could happen to the Everyman (embodied by singer turned
actor John Denver in his first movie role) were God to
return to Earth in human form.
In the film, God returns in work clothes to prove He is
alive and well, and to promote His original values through
the reluctant auspices of a young supermarket employee
(John Denver).
Book covers Zen and Yoga techniques
Oh, God' is George Burns' first film since he won an
Academy Award for his performance in his 80th year in The
Sunshine Boys in 1975. and it is John Denver's first film
ever
It was produced by Jerry Weintraub. is a Warner Bros,
release, and was directed by Carl Reiner, the soft-spoken
wit of the 70s
Films are open to ECU students, faculty and staff and
their guests. Admission is by ID and Activity Card or
Mendenhall Student Center Membership Card. All films
are shown in the Mendenhall Student Center Theatre.
i
GEORGE BURNS AS he appears in Oh God
unning
Cinema
4
She does look frightened, but Dunaway appears to be a
steadfast actress, apt to pursuing parts containing more
strength and longevity In this film, she isn't asked to do
much but scream like a seventies Faye Wray
Nevertheless. Dunaway also seems to be the ideal
fashion photographer. She handles the camera quite well,
while taking hints on the side by Rene Auberjonois. When
Rene is murdered before her very "eyes" . she is almost on
the verge of collapse and despair, thinking she could be
next victim.
Tommy Lee Jones, though looking understandably
better off from The Betsy could have pursued his part with a
bit more zest .
He appears to be, at first, skeptical of both Dunaway s
sanity and her story, then begins taking a supreme liking to
Dunaway s character. This is after he openly pans her
work as garbage at the show where they originally met
(though Jones at the time did not know Dunaway was
responsible for the "garbage")
The film moves along at a steady pace, especially the
scenes where Dunaway is aware of the killer's intentions
and makes vain attempts to halt the ghastly events that
follow.
The film also uses fine music, the most prominent
example is the theme, titled "Prisoner" and sung mightily
by Barbara Striesand. The song sets the mood for the film
and is heard against a background of Dunaway's haunting
eyes.
So, Eyes of Laura Mars proves itself to be one of tne
most suspenseful films of the year. Chock full of shock
sequences, it may also earn the title of sleeper of the year.
By JEFF ROLLINS
Assistant Trends Editor
Holistic Running, by
Joel Henning, discusses
running as a spiritual and
physical discipline which
can lead one to a trans-
cendant awareness of his
place in the universe.
This new runner's man-
ual has the added charm of
being written by a very
literate fitness expert who
quotes as easiiy from the
Bahadvaged Gita as from
John Fowles Daniel Martin.
With the increasing
popularity of jogging there
has developed what might
be termed the "fitness
genre" in trade literature.
These books are generally
written by respected old
MD's or by jocular college
PE instructors wr "�
discovered that they can
make money by telling the
sedentary bourgeoisie how
to be happier by being
fitter.
Joel Henning, though,
is a literate intellectual who
applies Zen and Yoga tech-
niques to running long
distances. His book, Hol-
istic Running, is not written
to the 'round the block
jogging neophyte but to the
serious runner who puts in
thirty to forty miles a week
and up.
The object is to achieve
a profound feeling of or-
ganic unity with the uni-
verse by emphasizing the
mind's connection to the
body. The holistic runner
(from the Greek "holos"
meaning "whole" or "one-
ness") uses Zen and Yoga
techniques in order to know
his body well and develop it
to its maximum potential.
Henning says, "The
final stages of long-
distance running, when it
becomes holistic, may
bring levels of insight and
selfawareness that seem to
be attained by only a small
portion of the human spe-
cies � those who are
willing to pay the price, like
serious students of Zen adn
Yoga, as well as long-
distance runners
Prana: spirit
In running as in, med-
itation the breath is the
thing. The yoga term
"prana" refers to the life
spirit, air, which enters us
with each breath. The long
distance runner's body
might demand as much as
sixty percent more oxygen
during a hard workout,
therefore he needs to utilize
such breath enhancing
techniques as diaphrag-
matic breathing and re-
laxing the jaw muscles by
imagining the point right at
the front of the jaw and
keeping it loosely moving
up and down.
Henning quotes the
master in Zen in the Art of
Archery, concentrate
entirely on your breathing,
as if you had nothing else to
do. Through this breathing,
you will not only discover
the source of all spiritual
strength, but will also
cause this source to flow
more abundantly, and to
pour more easily through
your limbs Obviously,
pulled by a rope atteched to
your belly. This will allow
your body, neck and head
to stay erect. Remember to
stay relaxed.
Your breathing will be
much easier if you maintain
this posture, and your leg
muscles will be able to
carry you much further,
advises Henning.
Henning describes the
beginnings of an increased
awareness achieved by
Books
the benefits to be had from
holistic running are not
oniy physical.
It is of course important
to run as efficiently as
possible. One should land
on his heels and take off
from his toes, rolling heel-
toe, heel-toe.
Imagine a line drawn
down the center of the foot
from the heel to the toe. Try
to strike the ground levelly.
Henning says to try to
keep your head relaxed but
erect. It helps to focus on a
point off in the distance
directly In front of you.
Pretend that the top of
your head is attached to a
skyhook directly above you
and that you are being
running long distances.
�You have passed the
ten mile mark. You sense
that the things around you
were not just created by
God but continue to contain
God, and that you are
connected to them.
"You feel the center of
energy in yourself; you are
identified with the energy
of which external nature is
the image. You are not an
island alone, but an embyo
supported by all of nature
around you
"You have begun, as
�merson put it, to 'Unlock
your human doors and
achieve a communion with
transcendant forces
Henning reviews a
passage from Plotinus. The
philosopher maintains,
"You can only apprehend
the infinite by a faculty
supenoe to reason by en-
tering into a state in which
you are your finite self no
longerThis is ecstasy It
is the liberation of your
mind from the finite con-
sciousnesswhen you thus
cease to be finite, you
become one with the in-
finite '
The Zen master. Su-
zuki, in his Introduction to
Zen in the Art of Archery,
describes Plotinus' "ec-
stasy" in his own Oriental
terms. He emphasizes the
importance of leacing the
self, forgetting it.
"When the self-forget-
fulness is attained, man
thinks yet he does not
think. He thinks like the
showers coming down from
the sky, he thinks like the
waves rolling on the ocean,
he thinks like the stars illu-
minating the nightly hea-
vens; he thinks like the
green foliage shooting forth
in the relaxing spring
breeze. Indeed, he is the
showers, the ocean, the
stars, the foliage
Western yogas
Sophisticated Western
biofsedback techniques
have begun to prove that
Westerners can do what
only studious yogas has
dons bsfors. That is to
control by will involuntary
muscles like the eart and
the endoctmai svsten- the
responsiveness the in! te
relation of mmd to b
must always be apprecia'
for itscomple I
By taking regular, ex-
tensive runs one will be-
come more in tune with the
relation of his mmd to h s
body, and hence to the
universe When one eats
and breathes he is taking
part in the eternal ex-
change of energy The
runner will slowly has an
increasing conception of his
rightful place in the organic
universe, asserts Henning
The author that Holi-
stic runners' will begin to
sound like EM Forster s
Harold as he literally rows
his heart out agmst the tide
in the short story. "The
Point of It "
"He made himself all
will and muscle He began
not to know where he was
The thrill of the stretcher
against hts feet, and of the
tide up his arms, merged
with his friend's voice
towards one nameless sen-
sation ; he was approaching
the mystic state that was
the athlete's true though
unacknowledged goal; he
was beginning to be
(Review copy of Holistic
Hunnmg provided by cour-
ts Central News)





Installation Concert, brass and opera featured
26 Octob 1978 FOUNT AIMHCADPagjT
School of Music schedules full slate
By SUSAN CHESTON
Staff Reporter
The ECU Symphony
Orchestra will perform a
special Installation Concert
on Saturday, October 28, at
8:15 p.m. in Wright Aud-
itorium. The concert will be
the final event of the series
of activities celebrating the
installation of Dr. Thomas
Brewer as the new Chan-
cellor.
Robert Hause will con-
duct the orchestra and two
student soloists, Linda
Hanson and Glenn Davis,
will be featured.
The program will open
with Otto Nicolai's Over-
ture to "The Merry Wives
of Windsor The "Con-
to for Two Violins and
Orchestra' of J.S. Bach
will follow. The three-
movement work is a con-
certo grosso of Bach's
ethen period in which
two violins form the con-
certino in contrast with the
f-pteno L.med by the
mg orchestra.
Seniors Hanson and
Davis will solo as violinists
for the Bach. Both are stu-
dents of Dr. Paul Topper of
the ECU School of Music
faculty.
Hanson has perform-
ance experience as a mem-
ber of the Fairfax Sym-
phony and the American
outh Performs orchestra.
American Youth Performs
is an honor group for ex-
ptional high school musl-
ins Hanson, a native of
rfax. Va . is a Music
vlucation major.
Davis, of Norfolk, Va
s pei formed as a member
� the Norfolk Symphony
�d as concertmaster of the
Tidewater Youth Symph-
v He is a recipient of the
A J. Fletcher Scholarship.
Davis is also a major in
M usic Education.
The orchestra's final
selection will be the "Sym-
t hony No. 8 in G Major,
Opus 88" of Antonin Dvor-
ak. The four-movement
work is known as one of
Dvorak's most light-
hearted, rhapsodic and
folk- inspired works. The
use of rich cello timbres to
introduce several themes
has identified this major
symphony as the "Cello
Symphony
Following the October
28 performance, the ECU
Symphony Orchestra will
present the same program
on tour in Bayboro (Nov-
ember 6) and in Norfolk
(November 8).
A unique feature of the
Installation Concert will be
the cover design of the
program. Specially de-
signed to honor the Chan-
cellor's Installation, the
cover will feature a repro-
ductio of the silver mace
created by John Satterfield
for the ceremonies. Zane
Leake, and ECU ARt major,
created the program cover.
The Saturday night per-
formance is free and the
public is invited to attend.
Opera Theatre
Scenes from operas by
Humperdinck, Beethoven,
Verdi, Mascagni, Meyer-
beer, Rossini, Bizet, Pro-
kofief and Donizetti will be
performed by the ECU
Opera Theatre Oct. 27-28.
Each performance is
scheduled for 8 p.m. in the
A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
Tickets, which are $1.50
each, may be purchased at
the door or reserved in
advance, by telephoning
757-6331.
The "scenes" produc-
tion is directed by Dr.
Clyde Hiss of the ECU
School of M usic faculty and
includes the following:
Hansel und Gretel
(Scene from Act I): Gretel,
Alysa Smith of Wendell and
Hansel, Valerie Seagraves
of Jacksonville.
Fidelio (Scene from Act
I): Jacquino, Ira Jacobs of
Wilmington; Marzelline,
Margaret Brooks of Wil-
mington; Rocco, H. Elliot
Stone of Martinsville, Va
and Leonora, Sheila Brooks
of Wilmington.
Trovatore (Scene from
Act II): Manrico, Steve
Walence of Marshal I berg
and Azucena, Dianne Har-
ris Picket of Charlotte.
Cavalier ia Rusticana:
Santuzza, Teresa Leggett of
Greenville and Alfio, Don-
ald Greene Jr. of Hamlet.
Les Huguenots (Scene
from Act II): Marguerite de
Valois, Belinda Bryant of
Dalton, Ga Valentine,
Tree Guion of Virginia
Beach, Va Urbain, Emily
Bennett of Whiteville; and
Stephanie, Carolyn Greene
of MoreheadCity.
La Cenerentola (Scene
from Act II): Dandini, Ger-
ald Murphy Jr. of China
Grove; Don Magnifico,
Donald Greene Jr. of Ham-
let ; Prince Ramiro, Douglas
Newell of Roxboro; Clor-
inda, Margeret Brooks of
Wilmington; Tisbe, Eliza-
beth Auman of Fayette-
ville; and Cinderella, Anne
Gunn of Durham.
Carmen (Scene from
Act III): Frasquita, Julia
Moore of Canton; Merce-
des, Teresa Leggett of
Greenville; and Carmen,
Carolyn Greene of More-
head City.
Voina I Mir (Scene from
Act I): Natasha Rostova,
Belinda Bryant of Dalton,
Ga Prince Andrei Bol-
konsky, Gerald Murphy Jr.
of China Grove; and Sonia,
Shelia Brooks of Wilming-
ton.
L'Elisir D'A more
(Scene from Act II): Gian-
netta, Venessa Malloy of
Wilmington; Nemorino,
Steve Walence of Marshal-
Iberg) Adina, Julia Moore
of Canton; and Dr. Dul-
camara, H. Elliott Stone of
Martinsville, Va.
-M
J�Q
KJ.SJK.
24Houisaday
Large homemade biscuits with
Ham-Sausage-Steak
Chicken-Cheese-Butto:
AtoCcmbmalia
-Dinners-
FriedQucken Tube and Buckets
also Drive thru window
For take out call 500N.GreeneSt
758-7607
Jk Pxtleubx PCucs
Private Gay Club
Memberships Now Being Accepted
Brown Bagging
and
Your Favorite Beer
Open WedSun.
9:00- until
Disco and All
New Light Show
Costumes for the pro-
duction were designed by
Patricia Hiss. Piano accom-
panists are Susan Bell of
Blacksburg, Va. and Teresa
Watkinsof Kannapolis.
Installation
Brass fanfares and
suites from four centuries
of music will herald ECU'S
installation as its seventh
chief administrator, Chan-
cellor Thomas Bowman
Brewer, Oct. 28.
Taped renditions of
rousing brass music by
Lassus, Susato, des Pres,
Kugelmann, Gabrieli,
Lully, Purcell, Corrette and
Beethoven will be played
through the loudspeakers
of ECU'S electronic carillon
system during the hour
before the North Lawn
ceremony formally begins
at 1015 a.m.
The fanfares, selected
and recorded by James
Rees, director of radio
services at ECU, include
musical compositions used
in various celebrations and
ceremonies during the
Renaissance, baroque and
classical eras.
The ECU Symphony
Orchestra, conducted by
Robert Hause, will accom-
pany the procession of
ceremony participants onto
the lawn with three selec-
tions: the "Cortege" from
Rimsky-Korsakov's
"Mlada the Elgar
"Pomp and Circumstance"
March No. 4 and "Orb and
Sceptre composed by
William Walton for the
1953 coronation of Queen
Elizabeth II.
SOLOIST JAMES FORGER: Classical and contemporary
works will appear on the program when the ECU
Symphonic Wind Ensemble presents its fall concert Sunday
Oct. 29, at 8:15 p.m. in Wright Auditorium The concert is
free and open to the public. The ensemble will perform the
Charles Simon Catel Overture in C, Percy Grainger :
'Spoon River the Ingolf Dahl Concerto for Alto Sax and
Wind Orchestra, and H Owen Reeds La Fiesta
Mexicana Featured soloist in the Dahl concerto is James
Forger
CHANELO'S PIZZA
IS NOW UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT AND IS
DELIVERING IN A SMALLER DELIVERY AREA
SO WE CAN SERVE YOU QUICKER.
TRY US AND SEE
(THE NEW DELIVERY AREA IS SOUTH OF THE
RIVER AND EAST OF EVANS STREET)
DIAL 758-7400 FOR FASTER FREE DELIVERY
PIZZA SUBS LASAGNE SPAGHETTI
WE MIX OUR OWN CRUST AND
BAKE BREAD EVERY DAY.
TASTE THE DIFFERENCE!
WFOR THE WEEK
OF OCT.26-NOV.2
DORM RESIDENTS ON THE
HILL WILL RECEIVE 10 OFF
FREE
BURGER
AND
FRIES!
THE
PADDOCK
CLUB
1008B Dickinson Ave.
Thursday
Night is
Kids'
Night
We thought it was time kids had their
special night. And that's why we've made
Thursday night Kids' Night.
We'll give each child 12 or under) a free
burger and fries for every meal an adult
buys.
Jack the Clown will be there to entertain.
And he'll have a Treasure Chest "grab
bag" so the kids get a little surprise, too.
Thursday Night. Kids' Night at Jack's.
What could be nicer than good food and
good fun?
JACK'S
STEAK HOUSE
Phones 756 5788
264 By Pass





Pag 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 26 October 1978
Lady Pirates must rely
on quickness, strength
ByCHARLESCHANDLER
Assistant Sports Editor
Speed and strength are the name of the game. So says
ECU women's basketball coach Cathy Andruzzi as she
begins her first season as the new Lady Pirate head coach.
�We have a very short team said Andruzzi. we M
have to make up for this by outrunning and out-muscling
our opponents
The Queen's College graduate said she is pleased the
Pirates have worked hard before practice began in
creparat.on for the upcoming season, which presents
probably the toughest schedule in the school's history.
The girls have worked very hard on their weight
training " said Andruzzi. "They realized that we have a
challenging schedule coming up and saw the opportunity to
make a real commitment. I'm very pleased with the efforts
that they have put forth .D Andruzzi said she plans to
reward each girl for the effort put forth in pre-season
pract.ee. "Weplanon using 12 people as often as possible.
I will definitely use eight extensively
Among the top eight players is last season's leading
scorer Rosie Thompson. Thompson, a junior from Blounts
Simply Sports
Sam Rogers
ECU's O still the show
Before Oliver Mack had even set foot on the ECU
campus Pirate head coach Larry Gillman was comparing
the high scoring guard with Ail-Americans Butch Lee of
Marquette and North Carolina's Phil Ford.
The loquacious Gillman also confidently predicted his
Pirates would win 20 games and appear in a post-season
tournament. . .
Unfortunately, Gillman's brash pre-season quickly fell
by the ways.de and the end of the year the Bucs were
saddled with a disappointing 9-17 record.
Last year nobody knew about the basketball program
here " sa.d Gillman at the Pirates annual media day two
weeks ago. "I had to go out and tell them about it
But ' winked Gillman as he watched Mack sink a nifty
25 foot jump shot. "At least I was right about one thing
Mack the articulate 6-3 native of New York City, was
everything Gillman promised and maybe even a little more.
W ithout the talented scorer last year, if s a safe bet M mges
Coliseum would have been all but empty by the end of the
season
Ol.ver was certainly the show last year, but Gillman says
P,rate fans will see a more complete player this season
when the Bucs open at homeNov25againstUNC-Ashev.ne.
I would be surprised to see Oliver score 28 points a
game th.s year noted Gillman. "I'd still like to see him
shoot as much, but Oliver has worked more on his ball
handling and his defensive play during the off-season.
� But what's more important to Oliver than anything is
winning " continued Gillman.
He wants to have a successful season just like the rest
of the team and fans
M ack' s individual plaudits are endless. Since he arrived
from San Jacinto Junior College, he has quickly become the
most h.ghly publicized basketball player in ECU history.
Mak broke the single game scoring record with 47
points against USC-Aiken and set another school record
with his lofty 28.0 season scoring average. He was also
named the most valuable player in the First Union
Invitational Tournament last season and returns this year as
the nation's second leading scorer behind Indiana State's
Larry Bird.
Teams attitude improved
� � Sure I scored a lot of points last year and the individual
honors are real nice, but we didn't win said Mack. "This
year I'm going out there with the attitude we're going to
win and we're going to do it as a team
� All we've discussed before the season is doing things
as a team If one person didn't show up for a scrimmage
game we didn't play. If one person didn't show up for a
meeting we didn't have it. Whatever we do this year we're
going to do it together. Last year, that togetherness just
wasn't there. Th.s year I've already been able to see that
With the pre-season build-up last year, Mack was under
incredible pressure to produce from the outset of the
season But with a talented recruiting classon hand, and all
five starters returning, Mack admits most of the pressure
has subsided.
�' really think that most of the pressure was on me last
year " admitted Mack who led the team in scoring 21 times
and set six other school records. "With the team depending
a lot on my scoring, I really wasn't able to concentrate on
my defense and ball handling. But I want to become a more
complete player and I've worked a lot harder on
And despite the widespread criticism directed at
Gillman both during and after the season, Mack isconf.dent
the Pirates will be an improved team this year
�I like the attitude on the team this year smiled Mack.
�The new players like Frank Hobson, George Maynor and
Al Tyson should all contribute a lot to the team and l
certainly think we'II be a much better team
Deep South event opens
Creek led the Lady Pirates with a 20.8 scoring average. She
was also the top rebounder with 9.9 grabs a game.
-Rosie is definitely our leader noted Andruzzi.
"She's a great scorer. I'm very happy to have her on our
team. She is invaluable to us
Andruzzi also mentioned several other Pirates whom
she feels will make valuable contributions to the teamGall
Kerbaugh, April Ross, and Lynn Emerson are all very hard
workers They are improving each day. We're expecting
really great things from them
"Marcia Girven returns from last year as out top
center" saidn Andruzzi. "She can be a force in the
middle Girven led the Pirates with 100 blocked shots last
season as a freshman.
Andruzzi also mentioned that the ball-handling ability of
sophomore guard Lydia Roundtree would be a big asset to
the Pirates. Andruzzi noted that Roundtree s dribbling
expertise would be a great help to the Pirate trans.t,on
Sherry Sealey, a 5'6" transfer guard from Peace
College, should also add speed and experience to the
backcourt said Andruzzi. ftin
Andruzzi noted that the Pirate schedule this season
included such powers as N.C. State, Ohio State Od
Dominion, Montclair State. East Tennessee, and North
Carolina. � ,�
��Our schedule has improved considerable over the last
several seasons said Andruzzi. "It hasreally helped us to
prepare for this season emotionally. Hoepfully the students
and the residents of Greenville will support us since we
offer such an attractive schedule
The Lady Pirates, 20-11 last season, begin play on Nov.
28 at Campbell College. Two days later they must take on
nationally ranked N.C State in Raleigh.
Andruzzi sa.d the test would tell much about the 1978
version of the ECU squad. "Wed rather play a team like
State a little later on. But we'll do the best we can. I think
they play two games before that game. This could prove to
anceECU has only two players on the team taller than
5-10" the Pirates must be aggressive. "This is where the
pre-season weight training will come in handy explained
Andruzzi. "We should be a strong ball club. Our speed w.l
be a plus also. I just hope we can overcome the height
disadvantage
Lydia Rountree R�8e 1fh��Pntfl, P.rates ,n
THE UTTLE SPARKPLUG trom nearhy Elm City finished THE JON.OB �� 172 �. a J910 S
l.tl Assists an. a. CO steals from her �w� -�� ��.��'�J� ItouTdTrhTmpson 3 ��" �'
last season- Roundtree finished with 256 points last year points per me ana 9.SeD� Emerson or
!Z me third highest point tota, on the team- Only a one forward IteZel, season No, 28
sophomore, Roundtree rans aa one o, the guides, guards J� CJ
in the state . -g
ECU Invitational opens
�" -Troohies will be f.
.a w nnorr �, i vajq h�H hru-��ri to Farrrwille v.rainia ana
Lady Pirate Roster
1
NAME
Rosie Thompson
Lynne Emerson
Sherry Sealey
Gale Kerbaugh
Laury Young
Marcia Girven
Lydia Rountree
Lillion Barnes
Patty Howell
April Ross
Robin Insley
Kim Versprille
CLASS
Jr.
So.
Sr.
Sr.
Fr.
So.
So.
Fr.
Jr.
Sr.
Fr.
So.
HOMETOWN
Blounts Creek
Newtown Square, Pa.
Smithfield
Raleigh
Raleigh
Woodbridge, Va.
Elm City
Wilson
Lynnbrook, N.Y.
Bath
Poquoson, Va.
Norfolk, Va.
ECU is likely to be the
seventh-seeded team
heading into this week-
end' s North Carolina Al AW
field hockey tournament at
Appalachian State.
The Pirates, now 1-8.
will participate in round
robin play which opens
Friday and concludes Sat-
urday. The top two teams
from each of two pools of
four will advance to tour-
nament play later on Satur
day. The title game Is set
for Sunday.
Top players for the
Pirates elude left inner
Sue Jones, a aophomore
from Virginia Beach, Va
and right halfback Debbie
Harrison, a sophomore
from Hatteraa. Both have
demonstrated consistently
fine play throughout the
By JIMMY DuPREE
Staff Writer
Minges Coliseum will
be location of the first
annual ECU Invitational
Volleyball Tournament.
The first of the three
sessions begins at 4 p.m.
Friday afternoon, followed
by matches at 6 and 8 p.m.
The first two sessions of
the tournament will consist
of round robin play to dec-
ide the seedings for the
single elimination champ-
ionship playoff. The four
teams with the best record
in the round-robin action
will advance to the semi-
finals which will begin at
2:00 p.m. on Saturday.
The losers in the semi-
finals will meet to decide
third place at 5:00 Satur-
day. The championship will
begin at aproximately
6.30.
Pirate coach Alita Dillon
sees ECU and Virginia
Tech as the favorites in the
tournament. "We should
win it said Dillon. "This
isour first invitational and I
think we're well prepared
for it. We had hoped to
have a twelve team tour-
ney, but because of other
commitments some of the
teams we invited were
unable to attend. It takes a
few years to establish a
tournament
The Pirates enter the
Tournament with a 17-10
overall record, including
victories over two of the
other teams in the field.
Earlier in the season, ECU
defeated Louisburg College
in Minges. Dillon noted
Louisburg has played very
well. They made it to the
semifinals in the Appa-
lachian State Tournament
last weekend, which was
further than we got
The other victim of the
Pirates that will be here
this weekend is Concord
College from Athens, West
Virginia. ECU beat Con-
cord in the Appalachian
State Tournament in what
would have to be con-
sidered a hard fought vic-
tory ;15-11,15-9.
Rounding out the field
of the six team festival is
Longwood College from
Farmville. Virginia and
Peace College in Raleigh.
Dillon mentioned that
Peace has had a lot of
injuries to key players
which has limited severely
their ability tooompete
'Trophies will be pre-
sented to the first, secon
and third piace teams
There will also be a six
member All-Tournament
team selected by the otl
coaches.
ECU volleyball action
Pirates
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
ECU has seen very little
of its newly expanded Fick-
len Stadium this season.
With six of its first eight
games on the road, it's not
hard to understand why
head coach Pat Dye wel-
comes an open date this
week before the Bucs
conclude their seasonwith
three home games.
"Its good to have a
week off admitted Dye.
"It gives our coaches a
chance to get on the road
and do some recruiting. It
also gives our players a
chance to get away from
football for a weekend. I
just wish we had an open
date earlier in the season
After dropping a close
17-16 decision to Southern
Mississippi two weeks ago,
the Pirates bounced back to
take a 21-14 victory over a
determined Richmond team
last week in the annual
Oyster Bowl classic in
Norfolk.
ECU quarterback Lean-
der Green directed the
Bucs on all three scoring
ECU DEFENSIVE TACKLE Noah Clark grabs Richmond dfjve8 m6 W8d the win-
auartarback Qrag Qragory from bahind and toroaa a fumbla nmg loucMwn himself
Tat. in tha fourth quartar. with lust 1 a��1
the final quarter. The JeoX-
Chavis forces fumble
sonville native carried the
ball 23 times for 102 yards
and hit split end Billy Ray
Wahington with a key 39
yard pass which set up
ECU'S Green's final touch-
down.
"Leander had his finest
game of the season
praised Dye. "He hasn't
been challenging people
running the ball like he did
against Richmond. And
only in the last few games
has he been healthy
Even though the offense
moved the ball consistently
in the final quarter, the
Pirates spent most of the
first three periods in their
own territory and fumbling
the ball in cruicial situ-
ations.
Sam Harrell lost a pitch
in the first quarter which
Richmond safety Jeff Nixon
recovered on the ECU 2.
Two plays later the Spiders
scored on Demltri Korn-
egay' s one yard run.
And on the next series,
Steve Greer fumbled a snap
from center on fourth down
which ended another Pirate
scoring drive. By the end of
the game, ECU had fum-
bled 11 times and lost four.
"In our offense we
expect to tumble anywhere
from four to five times and
lose two or three a game
said Dye. "But 11 times is
just too many. Most of our
fumbles Saturday were on
exchanges from the center
There's not much we can do
but keep playing and hope
you can correct that part of
the game
Both Leander
and Steve Greer had prob-
lems against Richmond"
Dye praised the entire
offensive unit for their play
against Richmond and sin-
gled out split ends Billy Ray
Washington and Terry Gal-
laher for their clutch pass
catching.
Gallaher grabbed a key
15 yard pass on the third
down on the Pirate first
score in the fourth quarter
and Washington's 39 yard
reception setup ECU's win-
ning touchdown.
"Our offense seemed to
make some progress
against Richmond said
Dye. "There's no question
we played our best game
offensively. However, I still
don't think we've played
the way we're capable of
playing yet
The Pirates will face old
Southern Conference rival
Appalachian State next
Saturday before meeting
William and Mary the
following weak in the
homecoming game
ECU will conclude its
regular season the follow-
ing week against Marshal.
another member of the
Southern Conference
NOTES Three former
ECU athletes and a orn-e-
coach will bC'ductec in the
school's HaH of Fame du
ing halttime ceremonies o
the William and Ma-
game. Jim MaMory, Jim
Johnson. Tom Michel, and
Richard Narron are tour
inductees the four mem-
bers now bring the total to
23 who have been en-
shrined since the Hall of
Fame was begun in
1974. Jim Johnson was the
same fan who came off the
sidelines last year against
William and Mary and
tackled quarterback Tom
Rozantz as he went into the
end zone for the winning
touchdown Richmond
safety Jeff Nixon had an-
other outstanding game
against the Pirates last
week and is a cinch to grab
Ail-American honors again
this yearNixon intercep-
ted two paaees and re-
covered a tumble on ECU's
two yard tine which set up
the Spiders first touch-
downNixon now has 21
interceptions
� �
, - �






FOUNTAINHEAD's Fearless Forecast
CLEMSON AT N.C. STATE
MARYLAND AT DUKE
UNC AT SOUTH CAROLINA
WAKE FOREST AT AUBURN
FLORIDA AT GEORGIA TECH
ARKANSAS AT HOUSTON
GEORGIA AT KENTUCKY
OKLAHOMA ST AT NEBRASKA
MISSISSIPPI ST AT TENNESSEE
PITTSBURGATNAVY
CALIFORNIA AT SOUTHERN CAL.
ARIZONA ST. AT WASHINGTON
CHARLES CHANDLER
(68-25-1)
Clemson
Maryland
South Carolina
Auburn
Georgia Tech
Arkansas
Georgia
Nebraska
Tennessee
Pittsburgh
Southern Cal.
Arizona St.
TERRV HERNDON
(65-28-1)
N.C State
Maryland
South Carolina
auburn
Georgia Tech
Arkansas
Georgia
Nebraska
Mississippi St.
Pittsburgh
Southern Cal.
Washington
SAM ROGERS
(62-31-1)
N.C. State
Maryland
South Carolina
Auburn
Georgia Tech
Arkansas
Georgia
Nebraska
Tennessee
Navy
Southern Cal.
Washington
DAVID MAREADY
(35-13)
N.C. State
Maryland
South Carolina
Auburn
GoergiaTech
Arkansas
Georgia
Nebraska
Tennessee
Pittsburgh
Southern Cal.
Washington
DICK JONES
Sports Director, WITN-TV
Clemson
Maryland
South Carolina
Wake Forest
Georgia Tech
Arkansas
Georgia
Oklahoma St.
Mississippi St.
Navy
Southern Cal.
Arizona St.
26 October 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page �
Jones joins
forecasters
WITN Sports Director
Dick Jones is this week's
guest picker in FOUN-
TAINHEAD's Fearless
Forecast
Jones along with former
ECU football player Kenny
Strayhorn, had served as
the play-by-play commen-
tator on the ECU Football
Highlights this season
which are seen every Sun-
day on WITN.
Last weeks guest
picker Jim Woods, the
Voice of the Pirate Sports
Network, finished with an
impressive 9-3 record
Upsets highlight NFL's 'Week of the lightning Bolt
-�- V- MEW ENGLAND 34 ATI ANT
ByCHARLESCHANDLER
Assistant Sports Editor
When the dust settles
on the 1978 football season
and a world champion is
crowned, fans will look
back to the "Week of the
Lightning Bolt
They will recall the
games of this past week-
end For there may. have
been aprecedent set just
last week.
Upsets appeared on
television screens as Sun-
day afternoon wore on more
frequently than do Ken
Stabler interceptions to op-
posing defensive backs. No
less than nine upsets ap-
peared in Monday morning
newspapers. One cannot be
sure if this is a record, but
one thing is for sure, the
1978 National Football
League season was en-
hanced by upsets
The biggest of the sur-
prises occured at the King-
dome m Seattle. It was
there that the expansion
Seahawks defeated the
mighty Oakland Raiders
27-7 Other stadiums a-
round the League housed
similar shockers. The
hopeless' Detroit Lions
scored 31 first half points,
nearly half of their TOTAL
for the previous seven
games, and dumped San
Diego 34-14 Kansas City
surprised the Cleveland
Browns. Minnessotta
"froze" Green Bay's march
toward the NFC Central
Division title. Baltimore,
without Bert Jones, de-
feated the defending AFC
champion Denver Broncos
7-6 The New York Giants
handed Washington Red-
skins their second consec-
utive loss. Tampa Bay
shocked Walter Payton and
the Chicago Bears, holding
the league's premier run-
ner to under 40 yards
rushing en route to a
victory.
The story on and on.
And, by the way, there
are no longer any unbeaten
teams in the NFL, thanks to
the "Week of the Lightning
Bolt New Orleans
marched out of the LA
Coliseum with a victory
over the previously un-
beaten Rams. On Monday
night, Dan Pastorini and
Earl Campbell carried
Houston to a 24-17 victory
over Pittsburgh, handing
the Steelers their first loss
of the season.
Well, there they are,
the games that shook the
NEL. Also shook were
forecasters all around the
country. Jimmy the Greek
and others were left
speechless after seeing
their percentages for the
season drop drastically.
This forecaster is included.
But, it's not so bad. The
�Week of the Lightning
Bolt" may be in a history
book some day.
With fingers crossed,
here's a look at this weeks
games.
DALLAS 24
MINNESOTA 17
The Vikings has to win
over Green Bay last week
for a number of reasons.
One was this sure loss to
the World Champions. Yet,
the Vikes should make
things interesting
national television
ienoe.
CHICAGO 16
DETROIT 13
MIAMI 21
BALTIMORE 14
The Colts have had it
rough this season. It's too
bad the Dolphins don't
have any pity on them.
CLEVELAND 17
BUFFALO 14
The
in
The Bills defeated Cin-
cinnati 5-0 last week. But
everyone knows that a
pitcher can throw only
every fourth game.
Browns are a "hit
Cleveland again.
DENVER 21
SEATTLE 20
If the Seahawks win this
once, the NFL had better
beware. After last week's
win over Oakland this one
seems out of reach. But
never count out Jack Pat-
era's club. This game will
be most exciting.
HOUSTON 21
CINCINNATI 13
Many pre-season fore-
casts picked the Bengals to
win the AFC Central Div-
ision this season. But with
an 0-8 record, this seems
impossible. So does their
chances in this contest.
PITTSBURGH 28
KANSASCITY14
WASHINGTON 24
SANFRANCISCO.10
The Redskin defense
meets OJ. Simpson in an
attempt to rebound from
two consecutive losses. The
Juice is not what he used to
be.
NEW ORLEANS13
NEW YORKGIANTS10
The Giants are just
playing too well. They are
due for a thrashing. Even
though this score does not
qualify as a beating, the
Saints should sneak up on
their opponent again this
week.
GREEN BAY 20
TAMPA BAY 17
The Packers need a win
this week. A loss would
badly damage the con-
fidence of Bart Starr's
young club. The Pack
should prevail over the
vastly improved Buccan-
eers.
PHILADELPHIA 17
ST. LOUIS 16
The Cards have a better
chance to win this game
than any they have played
all year. Yet the home field
advantage gives the edge to
the Eagles. This could be
Bud Wilkinson's last game
as a coach if the Cards lose.
NEW ENGLAND 34
NEW YORK JETS24
In a battle for the AFC
East lead, the Pats claim
supremeacy.
LOSANGELES26
ATLANTA 10
It seems that this is the
week of revenge and come-
back. The mighty Rams get
in on the ad also
V
URal� aft R
1ZX
b
'
SMOOTHIES
The powerful Steelers
rebound from their first loss
in fine style with thiswin.
OAKLAND 27
SAN DIEGO 17
J
HOT ENTREE
iSI 4NNU4L
All C4MPU�
$3.33 4Jnllcr t tte Jcci- Bietci$e fi�
At tte I1 KW PM &��� cr lue. Cct. 11
(S33 IHccfeei K4.)
fl
-gyre1
ruttisi
Both teams have per-
formed inconsistently all
season. Ken Stable has had
a big problem with inter-
ceptions. He's due to have
a good game.
Ill rn'
J5CAUZJM
KW1URAL Kfc CUU�p�
Costume Ccrtet
lot Iile $133.33
2r J Pi! f 53.33
JiJ ?fle $25.33
mi
Sim F4KC
ttxiltt risk
JIscc iccfcfcicll
II-30-3
A 30 EVANS riALL
l)ttASEM�NT-MtN6ES
BI IURI Si33 III l�3J
-
-rt4-r�-
M ft.
6
THE
PRO SHOP
OF GREENVILLE. INC.
I 1 1 Eostbrook Drive
Next To King & Queen Rest
O

Two top
Sirlon dinners
for $3.99. Dinner
includes choice of potato
Texas Toast and salad from
our FREE all-you-can eat
Salad Bar.
:) SALE -Appare.
$ StiH �n Progress)
� �,
All Top Quality
�Equipment
il
l� �
aud-
Child's Plate FREE
Includes Hamburger,
French Fries and Lollipop
with FREE drink
With great savings on golf, Service
tennis, & ski equipment
and apparel.
Sale ends Oct. 28th.
Beautiful Apparel and Equipment For
Every Need-Men, Ladies, Juniors and-
Yes even Toddlers! A Complete and Con-
venient Rental Program With Full Service
Work Shop Staffed With Certified Skiing
Technicians For Your Complete Con-
At LNSt 7 Comprehensive
Package Ski Tripe Planned In-
cluding Van. Colorado. Kjh
tool on, Vermont, Canada and
Wlnt
'H -
vwt
for Information
792-1929
itorgroon, Va.
The Bears have dropped
� straight. Yet playoff
fever is still alive in the Fire
City. A win this week
essential, though.
Lions get caged.
s
the
520 North Greenville Blvd
(264 By Pass) Greenville
New Hours
SunThurs. 11 a.m9 p.m.
Fri. & Sat. 11 a.m10 p.m.
Wt.
. � � f m m w
� r 0 � W 0
�� 0 0 T � ' V






,e 10 FQUNTAINHEAD 26 October 1978

:
Z?
t ?�� rt a '
'
UJ
� �' 5
p-
ias
r�
VI
;t,
u
i
y .t
M
"S
r.fci
5.�
��-
l4
,
iV
'5'
.33
-j
3fc

?�Sn
U
i:
&
��
kSv
S&
v
i&jrf
E&.
- -
?&�
Vi
&
li
SJ9S
?
:
fe

-?"K�
-v�
Make your YEARBOOK PORTRAIT
appointment NOW
APPOINTMENTS BEING TAKEN NOW
COME BY OR CALE THE BUC OFFICE
AT 757 6501
PICTURES WILL BE MADE FROM
MONDAY, NOV. 6
UNTIL TUESDAY, NOV. 21,
FROM 9:00 AM TILL 5:00 PM
THIS IS THE ONLY TIME
PICTURES WILL BE MADE THIS YEAR!





Title
Fountainhead, October 26, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 26, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.521
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy