Fountainhead, October 17, 1978






Circulation 10,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina vo. no. 55 no. ?r ,� October 1978
Plays want funding
By LENA HENSLEY
Staff Writer
Under a proposed plan to cut ECU's Playhouse budget,
students will now have to pay to see a production.
The following statements were included in the
statement released by the playhouse management to
students when picking up tickets.
" Due to the current financial crisis at the ECU Student
Government Association, SGA has advised the Playhouse
that it will in all likelihood, be unable to subsidize student
admissions to the Playhouse to the extent that it has
traditionally done " Also, "In order to pay for the current
production, it has become necessary for us to institute a
charge for student admissions
Friday afternoon a meeting was held for those
concerned about the welfare of the Playhouse.
The discussion was led by Tina Padilla which
presented the current standing of the Playhouse. Without
most of the requested funds it is possible the Playhouse will
have to cancel the rest of the season according to Padilla.
She also asked for the support of those present and for them
to spread the word to get other student and faculty
involved.
When asked why SGA was cutting the budget, Padilla
had two possible reasons. 1( that SGA really doesn't have
the money and is trying to be fair to all organizations or 2)
that this is some sort of power play.
Playhouse General Manager, Preston Sisk said that
$18,000 has already been spent on the current production.
He also stated that the budget he proposed and that has
been presented to SGA of $33,000 was based on last year's
budget with the $3,000 increase just to cover the loss of
revenues from the closing of McGuinnis Auditorium after
Christmas.
Sisk also checked with the Student Fund Accounting
Office and found that last year approximately 51 of the
money alloted to SGA wnt for Media funding leaving 49
to cover all other organizations and this year with the
formation of the Media Board, the funds were split equally
between the two. So, Sisk concluded that the money is or
should be there, but added he didn't know what the
problem was.
At the meeting, Chairman of the Drama Department
and also Artistic Director of the Playhouse, Edgar R.
Loessin said he believed the Playhouse would get the
money but perhaps not all that was requested.
Loessin asked that all interested students go as a group
to the next legislature meeting and to all subsequent
meetings until the budget is voted on.
Sisk added that he feels the legislature wants to support
and fund what the student body wnats, so he wants to show
SGA that the Playhouse is supported by the students.
First non -Italian pontiff chosen
VATICAN CITY (AP) -
The cardinals of the Roman
Catholic Church Monday
elected 58-year-old Polish
Cardinal Karol Wojtyla as
pope, the first non-Italian
in 455 years to lead the
ancient. 700-million-mem-
ber church
He took the name John
Paul, the same as his pre-
decessor
Wojtyla. little-known
archbishop of Krakow, is
the 263rd successor to the
Throne of St. Peter. The
election of a prelate from a
communist nation will
doubtlessly have vast re-
percussions on relations
between Rome and the East
bloc.
White smoke, the tradi-
tional signal that a new
pontiff is chosen, billowed
into the night from the
Sistine Chapel at 6:18 p.m.
1 :18EDT. "It isofficial, the
pope is elected the Vati-
can radio said.
The 111 cardinal-
electors, meeting for the
second time in two months
to select a pontiff, made
their decision in the second
day of voting in their secret
Sistine Chapel conclave. It
came on what was appar-
ently the seventh or eighth
ballot.
The new pope, born in
Wadowice, Poland, on May
18. 1920. was elevated to
cardinal by Pope Paul VI
eleven years ago and is a
member of several Vatican
congregations � Sa-
craments and Divine Wor-
ship, Clergy and Catholic
Education.
He was born the son of a
chemical factory ' worker,
and has a good working
relationship with the com-
munist government of Po-
land.
EDGAR R. LOESSIN, chairman of the Drama department, urges students to attend SGA meetings until the budget is
voted on.
Siamese twins' parents
never gave up hope
Futrell addresses students
ByCHARLESCHANDLER
Assistant Sports Editor
Washington Daily News
Editor-Publisher Ashley
Futrell told a group of ECU
Journalism students last
Tuesday that he felt the
efforts of Watergate repor-
ters Bob Woodward and
Carl Bernstein in the famed
scandal has brought light to
many young potential jour-
nalists.
The long time newsman
told the goup that Wood-
ward and Bernstein showed
the youth of America that
journalists can have a large
influence on everyday
American life. He said that
the duo exemplified the
young reporter, brash and
daring.
Futrell spoke for some
time on his past in the
world of journalism. He
then entertained questions
from the students.
One of the students
asked Futrell if he would
protect a reporter who was
being asked to reveal a
clandestine source. Futrell
replied that he would
protect the reporter under
any and all circumstances.
He noted that once a
reporter revealed a source,
the source was often lost
forever.
Futrell also spoke on the
issue of women sports
reporters in men's locker
rooms after an athletic
event.
Futrell concluded the
discussion by inviting any
and all of the students to
the world of journalism.
But he told the students to
be successful, they must
first be totally devoted to
the search for an answer to
each and every question
that the profession pro-
vides.
DURHAM, NIC. (AP)
� David A. Bain, a 39-
year-old state worker, says
he had hope until the last
minute that at least one of
his Siamese twin daughters
would survive.
"I had hope until the
last minute, until the last
minute I had hope Bain
said Sunday. "Never, ne-
ver lose hope, as long as
you have a breath in your
body, you gotta hope
Tonya Bain died at 9:10
a.m. Sunday � less than 24
hours after the death of her
sister Sonya.
"Her weakened heart
was never able to supply
fully the needs of her body
tissues and she died from
unremitting cardiac fail-
ure Dr. Howard Filston
said in a brief statement.
The twins, born Oct. 3.
were separated Thursday
by doctors at Duke Medical
Center in a desparate a-
ttempt to save their lives.
Doctors never offered much
hope that either child would
survive.
"A lot of people have
been calling to tell me how
sorry they are, that they'll
keep praying for me
Geralding Bain, 36, mother
of the twins, said. "I'm just
trying to hold on Mrs.
Bain, who has seven other
children, said she never
saw the twins in person,
only in pictures
Bain, who lives in
Fuquay-Varina. about 15
miles south of Raleigh, is a
$123-a-week technician in a
state agricultural labora-
tory.
The girls were born by
Caesarean section at Wake
Medical Center in Raleigh
because they were posi-
tioned improperly for nor-
mal delivery. Doctors said
they were not aware the
infants were joined until
the surgery was under way.
Doctors had wantec
delay the separation sur-
gery for several months to
allow the infants time to
grow stronger but 'ey
went ahead because they
said the babies corj I
were deteriorating
A team of four senior
surgeons and five staf
physicians performed the
five-hour operation. The
said following the surgery
that the twins faced hor-
rendous" odds. The twins
were jomed from the chest
to the navel and thee
hearts and livers were
connected
Sent to Faculty Senate
Fall break resolution proposed
By MARC BARNES
Assistant News Editor
The weekly SGA Legi-
slative session was domin-
ated by one order of
business � the question of
whether or not to appro-
priate the sum of 15,000
dollars for use in an escrow
account.
The measure, submit-
ted to the full legislature by
Lynn Calder calls for the
money to be set aside for
use by student organiza-
tions in the spring of 1979.
After a spirited debate,
the measure was tabled.
In other business, the
legislature approved a re-
solution which called for a
fall break, which would last
approximately four days,
and an extended drop per-
iod.
This resolution is slated
to be sent to a meeting of
the Faculty Senate, which
is to be held today.
Brent Melvin, chairman
of the Appropriations Com-
mittee told the legislature
that his committee will
meet once a week for the
next four weeks to consider
a new budget.
According to Melvin,
the Appropriations Com-
nvttee will, at the end of
th? four week period, have
the budget ready for
Legislature's approval.
the
Melvin urged "pa-
tience" on the part of the
legislators, saying that the
task which faced them was
not easy.
A large crowd, which
some estimates placed as
high as 150, were present
at the meeting. The crowd
was made up of Drama,
Music, and Art students
and they were on hand to
protest a plan which would
drastically cut the funding
for some of their programs.
The bill concerned did '
not come before the floor
for business, however, and
the students sat or stood
around the perimeters of
the floor, and listened to
orders of business before
the legislature.
What's inside
JOYCE KENNEDY OF
Mothers Finest See p. 5
Photo by Chap Gurley)
ECU'S winning streak ends see p. 7.
ECU Soccer team defeats Pembroke
State, 4-2. see p. 7.
Brother's Johnson. Mother s F.nest
concert reviewed see p 5
Jorge Bolet pleases a capacity crowd For
reviewsee p. 5.
Brewer's installation schedule announced
see p. 3.
ECU Law Society organized;
activities include speakers, trips
W H OS GOT IT? ECU Heid hockey team is shown in action against Davidson Saturday morning.
Photo by Steve Romero
i
I
mtmr t & m m' w ��� 4�
By KAY WILLIAMS
Staff Wrltar
Are you interested in
attending law school or are
you concerned about the
changing laws? If so, then
the ECU Law Society is the
club for you.
The Law Society will
hold an organizational
meeting Wed Oct. 18 at 7
p.m. in the multi-purpose
room at Mendenhall
Student Center. Plans for
the 1978-79 school year will
be discussed.
The only requirements
to become a member of the
Society are to have a 2.0
average and an interest in
law.
President of the ECU
Law Society is Chuck
Gouge. Dr. David Stevens
is the faculty advisor to the
group.
Meetings are held once
or twice a month on Tues-
day or Wednesday nights.
Keynote speakers, includ-
ing lawyers, district attor-
neys, and judges, are gen-
erally on the agenda for
the meetings. A panel
discussion of the Law
School Admission Test is
tentatively planned for one
of the spring meetings,
according to Treasurer
Lynn Calder.
Tr e group plans to visit
two law schools this year.
The purpose of this will be
to talk with law students
and professors.
An annual trip to
Washington, D.C is one of
the activities of the Society.
While in Washington, the
group plans to visit Senat-
ors from N.C, the Supreme
Court Building, and other
historical places. A high-
light of the Washington trip
last year was the privilege
to meet with U.S. Supreme
Court Associate Justice
William H. Rehnquist.
The Society is planning
a social with several area
attorneys in a couple of
weeks. These socials give
the students a chance to
meet informally with area
attorneys.
The purpose of the Law
Society is to increase and
enhance students exposure
to the legal profession,
according to Calder.
This years group hopes
to equal or excel the
accomplishments of last
year as last year was every
good year for them.
Two successful fund
drives were held last year
A car wash and a donation
drive held by the group
helped sponsor the trip to
Washington.
The Law Day Address
by Senator Robert Morgan
was an activity cosponsored
by the group with the Pitt
Cunty Bar Associaiton.
Calder said one of the
reasons the Society was so
successful last year was
because of the time and
efforts of the advisor, Dr.
Stevens.
Any student who would
like to join the ECU Law
Society and cannot come to
the October meeting should
sign up in Dr. Steven's
office, 214 Wright Annex.





Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 17 October 1978
Writers
There will be a meeting
of the ECU Writers' Guild
at 3 p.m. Wed Oct 25 in
room 207, Austin.
All persons welcome.
Study
ILO
The International Lang-
uage Organization is hav-
ing an Oktoberfest Fri
Oct 20 from 7:30 p.m.
until There will be a fun
night of dancing, music,
German foods, golden bev-
erages and. door prizes.
Tickets are available at the
foreign language dept BA-
431 or from any club
member
The International Lang-
uage Organization will be
meeting Wed Oct 18 at
7:30 p.m. in Mendenhall
Rm. 248 to discuss plans for
the Oktoberfest.
On the Hill, a quiet and
air-conditioned Study Area
has been set up in the Scott
Hall Basement. Anyone is
welcome to come to the
MRC meeting room on
Tuesday, Wednesday, or
Thursday Nights between
8:00 and 11 :00 p.m.
Additional hours may
be added.
Signs
Sign Language Club or-
ganizational meeting,
Wed Oct. 18 at 5 p.m. in
the Mendenhall Multi-
purpose Room.
For ECU students who
have taken sign language
classes or have some know
-ledge of sign language and
would like to meet with
deaf students to practice
these skills.
Chanelo's is now delivering in a
smaller delivery area so we can
serve you quicker.
TRY US
AND SEE
(now under new
management)
For Pizzas
or
Subs
call
758-7400
for fast free delivery
Greenpeace
North Carolina's first
chapter of Greenpeace is
about to be born here in
Greenville. The Green-
peace Foundation is a non-
profit environmental corp-
oration dedicated to the
survival of all endangered
species (particularly
whales, seals, and dolp-
hins) and their respective
environments.
This means Greenpeace
is opposed to nuclear pow-
er, both domestic and mili-
tary, and the practice of
whaling, which is depleting
the already diminished
number of surviving
whales.
If you are interested in
sharing your time and
effort for Greenpeace,
please contact Jerry Adder-
ton at 758-6259 (after 5
p.m. on weekdays). Your
help could be more impor-
tant than you'll ever know.
Phi Sigma
Phi Sigma Pi will hold
its monthly dinenr meeting
Wed Oct. 18 at Villa
Roma. The meeting starts
at 6 p.m. and all members
are urged to attend.
Rules
Any campus group
needing a constitution ap-
proved should submit a
copy in triplicate to Libby
Lefler, speaker of the legi-
slature, in room 230 Men-
denhall between 3-5 p.m.
weekdays or contact Jeff
Triplett, Rules and Judi-
ciary Committee chair-
person, at 758-7956.
Pablo
The Student Union
Major Attractions Commit-
tee will present PABLO
CRUISE on Thurs Nov. 9,
at 8 p.m. in Minges Coli-
seum.
Tickets will be $5.00 for
ECU Students and $7.00 for
the Public. All tickets are
available from the Central
Ticket Office in Mend-
enhall Student Center. In
addition, public tickets can
be purchased from: Apple
Records - East Fifth St
School Kid's Records -
Georgetown Shoppes, The
Music Shop - Greenville
Square Mall.
Only public tickets will
be sold at the door.
czipLECuxLLzLng
in Linufus
ift� and
JLscozatius
c7jaa�.��oxi&
�the. (fjlcixebo
201 �a�t $th Slxct.t tcinvilU, aV.C 27834
GRAND
RE-OPENING
Tues. Oct. 17
Under New Management
Get Blimped at Blimpies.
BEvERages:
Bucket 7S Regular 4S
SO OFF Giant Sub
with purchase of Beverage
f
Expires Nov. SO.

Classifieds
�orient �
ROOMMATE NEEDED:
To share completely furn-
ished 2 bdrm. apt. Cell
Brad 103-B East brook
Apts. 752-1547.
I
FOR RENT: Efficiency apt.
for rent across from college
Utilities included. 758-
2585.
Itorscte @
FOR SALE: "73 Honda
Civic, orange hatchback.
Manual. Call 752-7227.
FOR SALE : Stereo receiver
by Harmon Kardon 800
with 100 watts RMS. Best
offer over $225. Call 758-
7019.
FOR SALE: 1976 Corvette
White T-Top, 11,000 miles.
$9,000. Call 524-5590.
FOR SALE: 6'7" Jacobs
surfboard. Real smooth
board and is in good cond.
$50. Call Bill 758-2254.
Socio-Anth
The SocioAnthro Club
will meet Oct. 18 at 7:30
p.m. in BD302.
Dr. Robert Bunger will
present a slide presenta-
tion, "The World of the
Vikings All members and
interested persons are in-
vited.
BUCCANEER
The BUCCANEER is
sending out letters to ser-
vice and social organizat-
ions. If you have not
received one, please send
your name and address to
the BUCCANEER by Oct.
23. If we do not receive an
address by then you will not
be represented in the year-
book. Thank you!
BUC
Anyone interested in
working on the 1979 BUC-
CANEER is asked to come
to the meeting on Wed
Oct. 18 at 3 p.m. in the
BUC office, second floor.
Publications Center.
WRC
Law
WRC (Women's Resi-
dence Council) is sponsor-
ing a social tonight at the
Elbow Room. The good
times start at 8 and end at
11 with a 50 cents charge at
the door.
There will be reduced
prices on beverages, door
prizes, and contests, such
as the worm dance, shot-
gun race, and licorice eat-
ing contest Come out
tonight for the fun'
Science
Oct. 18. meeting of the
Science Club will present
Owen Kingsbury the
glass blower at ECU The
objects of glass will be
given to the students and
faculty present at the meet-
ing.
Refreshments will be
served at 330 p.m. and the
program presentation will
begin at 4 p.m. Anyone in
allowed to come and join
the club.
Travel
The Student Union
Travel Committee still has
places open on it's ski trip
to Snowshoe W Va
places are going fast
Sign up now at the
ticket office in Mendenha
The trip will be during
Christmas break (Jan 1-5)
Don't miss these days of
sknng and nights of soc 1
izing at one of the eas�
coast s most popular g
resorts
Lacrosse Hearing
The ECU Law Society
will have an organizational
meeting Wed Oct. 18 at 7
p.m. in the Multipurpose
Room in Mendenhall.
All students interested
in law andor law school,
please come or go by Dr.
David Stevens' office, room
214 Wright Annex and sign
up.
Party
Tonight at Chapter X.
Alpha Xi Delta will be
having a BEACH PARTY!
There will also be a Twist
Contest. The winning
couple gets a prize, so
anyone wishing to enter,
call 758-2381.
There will be a meeting
of anyone interested in
playing lacrosse (male or
female) Wed Oct 18 at
7:30 p.m. in room 105.
Memorial Gym.
If you cannot attend.
but wish to participate in
either fall or spring sem-
ester, call Mike at
752-9583. Any student,
faculty, or staff member
can play
Nurse
HAVE A "BOTTOMLESS" CUP OF
PEPSI FREE
ENJOY A FREE
PEPSI WITH THE
PURCHASE OF
ANY PLATTER,
QUARTER
CHICKEN OR
SANDWICH.
Offer good only
with coupon.
10th and Charles Streets-Greenville
TICE
DRIVE IN-AYDEN HIGHWAY
Wednesday - Thursday
Shows at 7:30 and 9:15
You remember
R
Starts Friday:
DEVIL TIMES FIVE
Meadowbrook
DRIVE IN-OPPOSITE AIRPORT
Wednesday - Thursday
Shows at 7:30 and 9 15
An experience
in terror
ond suspense
Starts Friday:
MAGIC OF LASSIE
There will be a student
nurse sassocaition meeting
on Thurs Oct 19 at 6:30
p.m. in room 202 of the
nursing building. Guest
speaker will be Mrs Sue
Pennington who will speak
on Death and Dying All
SNA members and nursing
majors are invited to
attend
Coffeehouse
The Student Union
Coffeehouse Committee
ytfiff meet on Wed Oct 18.
at 3 p.m. in the Coffee-
house. Committee mem-
bers are required to attend,
as an act will audition.
On Thursday and Friday
nights at 8:30 and 9:30 in
room 15 Mendenhall. the
Coffeehouse will present
Deborah Holloway and
Charlene Carter m separate
performances
Holloway sings songs in
the Jom Mitchell vein
Court and Spark period
Carter's music is more
blues oriented. Performing
on the electric piano, her
music is light improvisa-
tional and delightfully mel-
low.
As always the Coffee-
house offers a wide array of
snacks and hors d'ouevres.
all for the paltry sum of 50
cents.
This Week At The
T
Tues.
WRC FUND RAISING PARTY
Wed.
"TENTH AVENUE B
Thurs. "BILL DEAL
AND THE RHONDELLS'
1st Appearance this year.
Fri. AFTERNOON PARTY 3-7
Sun. LADIES MTE
FOR SALE : "Aria" double-
neck 6-12 string electric
guitar. Sounds and looks
like rare G id son model.
$250. Call Bill 758-2254.
WANT TO BUY: Waterbed
and or heater. See Bob or
Jim 338 Slay.
personal (J)
LOST: Tan, cocker spaniel
puppy male � 2 months old.
Call 758-8996 or return to
102-B Meade St. Offering
REWARD
HELP WANTED: We need
a lead vocalist (Male or
female) to work on original
material for a recording in
Atlanta. Not preparing a
road band Semi-progres-
750. Fw aua�(on MH
ECUandthe Prograr
Hearing-Impaired Stude
will sponsor a Sign Lai
uage Club for studenl
members of the Greenville
community who wou
to meet and practice " �
communication skills Th�
organizational meeting a
be held Wed Oct 18 a1
p.m. in the Mendea
M ulti-Purpose Room on I
ECU campus
The club is open �
anyone who has taken Sign
Language classes or has
some knowledge of s
langauge Meetings will be
open to deaf students a
deaf adults from the Green-
ville area This is a
opportunity for those mter-
ested in sign language to
� eet with deaf people and
th sign langauge stud-
's m order to practice
their manual communicat-
ion skills.
Gospel
The Student Union
M morty Arts Committee
will present Jor
Johnson and the ECU Gos-
pel Ensemble in conce"
Sun . Oct 22. at 7 p.m The
concert which will be held
m theHendnx Theatre a
feature traditional as we
as contemporary gospel se-
lections There will be no
admission charge and the
public is invited to atte-v
MRC
On Wed Nov 8.
M RC (Men s Reside
Council) and WRC
-en's Residence Counc
are presenting a pig : ;�
and concert on the hill r.
the tennis courts
The meal will be se- �
at 4 45 p m . and the
evening will last until 7 A
people interested m com
must present
MRC WRC card and ra.
purchase tickets for $3 from
their dorm officers
Buses will be avanab i
to and from the wome- -
dorms
Anthro
On Wed . Oct 18. Lam-
bda Alpha, the Anthropol-
ogy Honor Society, will
sponsor an informal coffee
and conversation hour in
Brewster. B302 (the Soci-
ology Anthropology Stu-
dent Lounge)
All those interested in
Anthropology. including
majors, minors, and non-
majors, are urged to attend
between 11 am and 1 p.m.
Refreshments will pe
served.
GREG MOLL: i.
portraits from photos or
att'nga. Watercolor
sketches 18x24 in size. $25
Finished oil painting $100
?� � Nov- 5. C,
between 6 and 9 p m
752-5736. P
momm





Health careers
scheduled
ECU News Bureau
Re-
s' itatives from hospit-
s and other health
� will visit East
!na University Nov 1
ECU s annual Health
� s Da
h? event, sponsored
I eer Plan-
et Service
with the
' Nursing
h and
s is de-
.dents
ted in
fields
neet with
tor
and
ai ECU. said
veil as
seniors are
ate in
� to dis-
nploy-
-
i � sopho-
ng a nur-
major
attend
!ne represen-
nore about
� para-
ireas I em-
sented
� sical and
� � � -ed-
sociai and
ces. med-
iae, diete-
:e and aud-
. � -ommunity
- lopment
it ons. reha-
envi-
psych-
I special
be
U s Men-
Center
�: p.m.
. sh-
are
not required to make prior
reservation
Evelyn Perry, dean of
the ECU Schol of Nursing,
commented that the event
is "a fine opportunity for
students to talk with a large
variety of potential em-
ployers and make early
choices of their employ-
ment locations
Dr Ronald Thiele, dean
of the School of Allied
Health and Social Profes-
sions noted that each year
many employers of health
professionals come to the
ECU campus actively
seeking students as po-
tential employees.
"Job opportunities in
the health-related fields are
ample, and we encourage
any student preparing for
work in the the health-re-
lated professions to attend
Health Careers Day and
sample the job market
Thiele said.
Agencies and employ-
ers to be represented in-
clude hospitals and clinics.
nursing homes, social ser-
vice agencies. mental
health centers, rehabilita-
tion institutions and food
service departments
CORRECTION
In the Oct 12 edition of
FOUNTAINHEAD the
next meeting of the ECU
Science Club at which a
glass bower will demon-
strate his art was incor-
rectly reported as Nov.1.
The meeting and de-
monstration are scheduled
for Wed Oct 18. in
Flanagan building FOUN-
TAINHEAD regrets the
error.
Breakfast
from 7 a.m.
to 1 1 a.m.
specializing
in large
country hamorsansage
biscuit. Hot cakes. Scrambled
eggs with country ham or
sausage. Our 14 lb. beef
burgers are ground from fresh
Hestern Chuck. We have pure
soft served ice cream. Also
serving ham and cheese,
chicken fillets, hot dogs, chill
and beans, f rench fries, apple
turnovers, and a variety of soft
drinks. located on the corner
off 5th and Reade St. and on
II y. 264 in Washington.
GREAT
MEXICAN
EATERY
512 Greenville Blvd.
Open 11:00 11:00
Mon. thru Thur.
Fri.�PSat. 11:00 12:0
Sun. 12:00 11:00
Tuesday Night
Nickel Drink Night
( with food order )
5:00 11:00
Dr. Pepper, Beer, Pepai,
ML Dew, Tea, Coffee
wa Gladly Accept Personal Checka.
Free Taeo CId Iron -on Patch
w ith $4.00 food order
Installation schedule planned
17 October 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 3
ECU News Bureau
Dramatic productions,
open house receptions, art
exhibits and concerts have
been scheduled at ECU
Oct. 26-28, to coincide with
the Sat Oct. 28 installation
of ECU's seventh chief
administrator, Chancellor
Thomas Bowman Brewer
The installation cere-
mony will begin at 10.15
a.m. in the campus' North
Lawn, with an academic
procession Luncheon will
be served afetrwards in
ECU'S Mendenhall Studnet
Center to invited guests,
and the day's acitvities will
conclude with an open
house in the Chancellors
Residence from 2 to 4 p.m
Admission to the instal-
lation ceremony is free to
any ticketholder, as well as
by special invitation. Ticket
orders may be placed by
telephone at 757-6537 The
Chancellor's Open House is
free and open to the public.
Two special art exhibits,
Friends of the Faculty
and "Nature Abstractions"
will be on view at the Gray
Gallery in the Leo Jenkins
Fine Arts Center from 9
a.m. to 4 p,m. Oct. 26 and
27, and from noon to 4 p.m
Oct. 28. The gallery is open
to the public.
A dinner theatre prod-
uction, God Says There
Is No Peter Ott . will run
on each of the three even-
ings at 6:30 p.m. in Mend-
enhall Student Center Tic-
kets are available at the
Central Ticket Office
An ECU Playhouse pro-
duction of the Broadway hit
musical PIPPIN is schedul-
ed for 8:15 p.m Thursday
and Friday evening in
McGinnis Auditorium. Tic-
kets are on sale at the
Playhouse Box Office
ECU'S recently-
expanded Joyner Library
will host the public at an
open house from 3 to5 p.m.
Fri Oct. 27. On view will
be several major acquisit-
ions in the library facilities,
including electronic book
detection and door security
systems, a commercial bib-
liographic searching sys-
tem and an automatic cat-
aloging system.
m&m
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Thia offer � not open to employee, of A4.P ,t i .ub.tdiane. manufacturer o�-
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69
�6�6





"
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 17 October 1978
Longer drop needed
The Student Governemnt Association Countless students find themselves trap-
(SGA) passed a resolution for a four day fall
semester break between Labor Day and
Thanksgiving. This resolution must now be
passed by the Faculty Senate before becoming
an official holiday. ECU has long needed a
break during that long stretch between
holidays for students to rest up, catch up, and
take stock of their academic progress.
Many students fall behind during the two
and a half months between holidays and find
themselves swamped under with seemingly
impossible assignments, usually all due at the
same time. A break around mid-term would
give students and faculty both a chance to get
caught up, prepare for mid-term exams or
recover from them. The four days
could be easily made up by tacking on an extra
two days at the beginning and end of the school
year
If the drop period were extended past this
holiday or at least past mid-terms, students
could either use the holiday to evaluate their
progress or determine how well they are doing
in a course by the score on the mid-term.
ped with impossible schedules after the drop
period and can either suffer through the
semester and risk a series of failures or try to
cajole an incomplete out of a sympathetic
professor.
Often professors haven't even tested their
classes before the drop period, so students
have no idea how well they are doing in class
until it is too late. Many professors give tests
prior to the drop deadline, but fail to return the
results to the students until after that deadline
has passed.
It is unfair both to the students and the
university to lock students in courses from
which there is no escape, without any
knowledge as to their standing in class. A
college education is hard enough as it is. The
university should not make it any more difficult
by imposing drop deadlines with little or no
regard for students. The deadline should either
be extended (the plan we favor) or professors
should be required to test students and return
the results at least a week in advance of the
deadline.
DORn LIFE ON THE HILL
Commentary
Forum
Footbinding a barbarous custom
Student proposes student-run cafeteria
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
I guess this is the
first Forum letter I've writ-
ten which deals with neit-
her politics nor with gripes.
Surprise!
I've come up with an
idea which could be of
three-fold benefit to stud-
ents and could possibly
save ECU some money.
The big problem is that I
don't really know where to
present this idea. So here I
am
This year, even after the
redecoration of Jones Cafe-
teria and the revamping of
its food service, there is
little if any increase in
students who frequent our
campus cafeteria. I still
hear occassional (although
far fewer) complaints about
food and service from those
who do eat at Jones. And. I
notice that many students
would rather spend $2.75 at
the Crow's Nest or at
Jason's than at Serv-O-
M at ion.
In other words, it seems
that students generally dis-
likea cafeteria atmosphere.
At the last ECU Board
of Trustees meeting there
was mentioned the possibi-
lity of opening a new
cafeteria on campus. Why?
There is a lovely and
much-forgotten building,
behind our new Art Build-
ing, which is being used for
storage. (In places.) Much
of its floor space is not used
at all. i'm talking about the
East Cafeteria Building,
which is now the campus
catch-all and holds a few
Archaeology classes in one
section.
Turn this building into a
student-decorated, student
-operated, and student-
staffed resturant. I mean a
real resturant with menus
and waiters and waitresses,
the whole bit.
I mentioned three bene-
fits. One: Students would
have an on-campus place to
dine on food other than
sandwiches. Two: Students
would have a place to meet.
Maybe we could even take
McDonald's idea and hang
student and faculty art
there.
Save the campus
money, I said? Of course!
There'd be no need to
build!
Maybe someone out
there could give me some
feedback, some reasons
this would or would not
word. Or maybe someone
could tell me who could
help launch an idea like
this.
Thanks for all this
space, FOUNTAINHEAD.
Ellen Fishburne
Police lambasted
4Call me if that ti
goes flat again'
ToFOUNTAINHEAD
In reply to the letter
"Chivalry is dead at ECU"
by Michele Parish and
Kathy George. Asan "ECU
male" I feel that these two
women are generalizing the
way all males are by the
actions of a few.
The guys that drove by
without offering to assist
these girls to change a tire
either were in a hurry,
didn't notice, or were just
shy Even if they were
ignorant, not everyone on
campus is this way.
Apparently these wo-
men are either freshmen or
new on campus, otherwise
they may have called a
male friend to help. It
would have even been
acceptable to ask a male
passerby for help.
I drove by these two
while they were changing
the tire and turned around
to offer my assistance, buyt
by the time I got back to
their car they had finished.
I would have been on the
scene earlier, but I was
helping another stranger
get his girlfriend's car
started in the Mendenhall
parking lot!
So give the guys a
break, and call me if that
tire goes flat again.
ToFOUNTAINHEAD:
This is in response
to the three young men (?)
who had a letter in
FOUNTAINHEAD, Oct. 12
concerning chivalry.
I am all for equal rights,
but, like anyone else, I'm
only human.
I don't know what has
gotten into some people
since ERA and equal rights
has become so widespread.
People have been using
these for excuses of laz-
iness and inconsideration
too long. I refer to both men
and women alike.
It is a pity that even the
campus cop wouldn't at
least offer the girls chan-
ging the tire some ass-
istant
Last Sunday I got back
to the dorm late. I was
driving a different car with
no sticker on it. Being used
ChrisWidener to my own car, I hadn't
Fburtainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over 50 years
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Leigh Coakley
EDITOR
Doug White
TRENDS EDITOR
Steve Bachner
NEWS EDITORS
Julie Everette
fticki Gliarmis
ADVERTISING MANAGER
Robert M. Swaim
SPORTS EDITOR
Sam Rogers
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper off East
Carolina University sponsored by the Media Board of ECU
and is distributed each Tuesday and Thursday (weekly
during the summer).
"ailing address: Old South Building, Greenville. N.C.
27834
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni $6 annually.
even thought about the new
car not having a sticker on
it and parked in dorm
parking.
When I went to the
campus police to find out
where my car was Monday
morning, I discovered that
the time my car was towed
was not even 15 minutes
after I'd left it. That wasn't
even enough time for me to
get to my room.
I find that absolutely
amazing considering the
fact that it took me nearly
30 minutes to get my car
squeezed between a
crookedly parked car and a
tree. To this day I still can't
figure out how they got my
car out.
I don't know about
anyone else but I'm getting
sick and tired of hearing
excuses for the campus
cops. I honestly don't feel
they're doing the job they
are paid to do.
They aren't paid to act
put out when they have to
let one of us girls in the
dorm, they're just sup-
posed to do it � it's their
job.
The way I look at it, the
campus police are more
than willing to do some-
thing if money is involved.
I'm not talking about bri-
bery. I'm talking avout how
quickly they manage to
write tickets and tow cars.
I'm not the only student
who feels this way and I'd
like to know how others
feel. Maybe some changes
can be made.
There are too many
things involved here that
the students don't know
about and I'd like to see
them out in the open for a
change.
Cheryl Boehm
By HESTER PETTY
Uppity Women of Greenville
Much of the history of women (herstory) has been
unrecorded (by histroians who considered women's
achievements unimportant and who saw the oooression of
women as insignificant) or destroyed (by the Ch. stians who
burned the written documents of the Goddess-worshippers
and who later burned the women who kept herstory alive
through oral communications).
That herstory which has survived into the 20th century
has been largely ignored. It is a story that includes tales of
9lJPIaj?'V .tenure, degradation and gynocide Chinese
footbinding is part of that story.
I thought that it had occurred hundreds of years ago and
that it was probably like wearing tight socks (every woman
a size five). I was horrified when I read about its herstory.
The story begins sometimes between the ninth and
eleventh centuries A.D. when (according to one Chinese
myth) the Emperor Li Yu ordered Lovely Maiden, one of his
favorite dancers, to bind her feet so that they looked like
crescent moons.
This individual innovation soon became the unanimous
custom among the Chinese aristocracy. And before long
foot-binding was accepted practice among all social classes.
The first binding of the foot took place when a girl was
very young. It usually took about two years of training to get
the toes to curl under the foot in the proper position.
After that, the bindings had to remain in place for the
rest of the girl's life in order to insure the proper shape. The
following is a description of the footbinding procedure:
"The success or failure of footbinding depended on
skillful application of a bandage around each foot. The
bandage, about two inches wide and 10 feet long, was
wrapped in the following way. One end was placed on the
inside of the instep, and from there it was carried over the
small toes so as to force the toes in and towards the sole.
The large toe was left unbound.
The bandage was then wrapped around the heel so
forcefully that the heel and toes were drawn closer
together. The process was then repeated from the
beginning until the entire bandage had been applied.
"The foot of the young child was subjected to a coercive
and unremitting pressure, for the object was not merely to
confine the foot but to make the toes bend under and into
the sole and bring the heel and sole as close together as
physically possible
The proper length for a woman's foot was three to four
inches. Longer feet were considered ugly. Among the
aristocracy and upper classes, the the threeto four inch foot
was customary.
Of course, these women seldom left the house and when
they did go out walking they needed support from a cane or
servant. Lower class women seldom had feet under four
inches because they had to work and it is difficult to work
(especially in the fields) if one is constantly falling down.
The barbarism of footbinding is seen clearly in the
following story which was told in the 1930s by an elderly
Chinese woman who remembers her own experience as a
little girl in the late 1800s:
"I was inflicted with the pain of footbinding when I was
seven years old. I was an active child who liked to jump
about, but from then on my free and optimistic nature
vanishedShe (mother) washed and placed alum on my
feet and cut my toenails.
"She then bent my toes toward the plantar with a
binding cloth 10 feet long and two inches wide, doing the
rightfoot first and then the left. She finished binding and
ordered me to walk, but when I did the pain proved
unbearable.
"That night mother wouldn't let me remove my shoes
My feet felt on fire and I couldn't sleep; Mother struck me
for cyring. On the following days, I tried to hide but was
forced to walk on my feet
"Beating and curses were my lot for covertly loosening
the wrappings. The feet were washed and rebound after
three ot four days, with alum added. After several months
all toes but the big one were pressed against the inner
surface.
"Whenever I ate fish or freshly killed meat, my feet
would swell and the pus would drip. Mother criticized me
for placing pressure on my heel in walking, saying that my
feet would never assume a pretty shape. Mother would
remove the bindings and wipe the blood and pus which
dripped from my feet.
"She told me that only with the removal of the flesh
could me feet become sJender If ! mistakenly punct�
sore, the blood gushed like a stream. My somewhat flesri.
big toes were bound with small pieces of cloth and for
upwards, to assume a new moon shape
"Every two weeks, I changes to new shoes Each ne
pair was one - to two-tenths of an inch smaller th
previous oneAfter changing more than 10 pairs of shoes
my feet were reduced to a little over four inches
'I had been in binding for a month when my younger
sister started; when no one was around, we would weer
together. In summer, my feet smeiied offensive becaus
blood and pus; in winter, my feet felt cold because of lao
circulationFour of the toes were curled in like so ma
dead caterpillars; no outsider would ever have believed I
they belonged to a human being
'It took two years to achieve the three-inch model M .
toenails pressed against the flesh like thin paper
heavily-creased plantar couldn't be scratched wne- I
itched or soothed when it ached My shanks were tri
feet became humped, ugly, and odifenous: how I em �
natural-footed
To understand why millions of footbound mother
the feet of millions of daughters we must look at
'whys' of footbinding: why did this pract.ce ga.r
popularity Why did it continue for so long? Why
millions of women subfected to the pain and mutilal
footbinding?
According to the myth. Lovely Maiden's feet we-e I
for some aesthetic purposes and the crescent moon st
was probably of some religios significance Her bouna N
became the aesthet.c standard among the Emperor's a
and consequently the standard for those moving Up I
social ladder.
Footbound brides were soon ,n demand by the ma e
social-cl.mbersconformers and since mamage was the
mlyhWayKa.W�man Survived (other than P'ost.tu'
mothers had no cho.ce but to make the.r daughters
marriageable. y
It wasn't long before the bound foot became an absolute
necessity for marr.age. I, waseven sa.d that a woman's feet
were the first thing examined by the groom and h.s family
China became a country with a foot fetish A woman's
sexual attractiveness was dependent on the shape and size
of her feet. Her shoes were her most important form of
fashion adornment. M.lhons of men were turned on at the
sight of a woman's bound foot.
What can I say about a soc.ety that defined a woman's
worth by the mutilated shape of her feet? What 71
about the men who sexual response was in part derm nc
iez:zebound feet- d"� Set s
severely restricted a woman's freedom of movement eet
that were in pain when in use, feet that bled and .Taked ots
because of poor circu.at.on and unc.ean.ness? "
and shsTt;aesnthely T " " the �"9
-nu snoes. it was the bound foot they were so fond m
The practice of footbindmg lasted for i ifTwi ?
created and allowed to cont.nue " "� r.TtZ1 " "
because women were not valued mem� T
pa.n and suffering did not ma , y The,r
considered them worthless and Tnfenor ,h�
wascr:e?peofn rrry � F�
breast fetish in America th,?'09' but ,s the
allowed hundreds oen to rl"�7 '�' ,hat
that later resulted IZVllnTT' '
breasts of many of them? d d,9ease of tne
rzTi n?hre rdards � - �
different from pa mZJH Chmese ��
same �nQL7sZZ?�TT the
must change our appearance "Jtl bt,�B t(d that "e
attractive. We are still being toion 0rd6r to
Pretty enough, never quite staged 1 T" QUe
skinny enough, never quite right enouQh � ' � QU'te
The result of this criticism is insect �
polish, cover up and take away dieTiJ " Paint and
ts never enough, we're still L?tt !? noae �
insecure. n qu,te n0ht and we're still
it is time to stop all this craziness it i. ?
��king ourselves for what we arJ, T T t,me t0 ��"
right enough. Don let anyone lf v " J5 "
Sources: Woman HatinTLl diff�
- y E.P. Outton in 11� P"W
Custom by Howard S Levy w o�ry 0uriOtn "
PP25-26. LeVy' W ���, New York, 1!
Ibid . PP. 26-28.
I





17 October 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
Mother's marvelous,
Broth
ers lacking
i race, you leave exhausted, but
M thei l acti � the title track
Ji iy e Kennedy electrified
repertoire of shrieks and
I by her singing partner Glen
'��' the pair resembles a heavy metal
Sirn; Mur dock's strong tenor, a
�'rfectly complemented by
avily influenced by Chaka
noods from funky to sexy,
lies on one emotion:
M has but one purpose for
- - �ut the jams, raise
nent in its most
erl e ;uliar form of musical
into submiss-
ling ' the band Not a single
it the ba e unorphous unit.
f dest � in this case, of
ements from Rufus.
metal and art rock
into a unique
i' Guitarist Gary "Mo"
a night listening and
Hi : t all jms, just as bassist Jerry The
�THE BROTHERS JOHNSON definitely did not give us the
thunder of the gods what they gave us was more of a belch.
Wizard - . has spent hours listening to Led Zeppelin.
The" � � tually unparalleled Kennedy
and Murdock are in perpetual motion, dancing, leaping,
swinging n - stands, and m general driving the audience
into an singly intense frenzy. Every musician is a
showmai esp � " ennedy. M urdock. Seay. and Moore.
Each s choreographed without looking
�reas the Brothers Johnson offered
a chorus � ,s Finest gave us modern dance
their perl � nance was calculated to
entertain, b � . of the act is that it all seemed so
natural Every mov every costume, every ornament.
came ac . isand original Gary Moore looks
' " � st a eave Haight-Ashbury: The
v- - ��� ��' -�� ' � welry imoresothan the
' ' � ' ind ai a ional turban, drummer
ke every Ei ; sh drummer you' ve ever
while keyl I V - � - � a conservative version
of Th . �� equined beret
Mot he
deser
Sad I y ich wa
Johns- �n
� ��� �: in outstanding and we!
�ice screaming for more
a � a � the iackluster Brothers
' Then the angel filled the censer with fire from the altar
and threw it down upon 'he earth and thunder crashed and
rumbled flashed ind there was a terrible
earthci. � � ' � � n. S 5

ai inpleas
�� . did not give us the
.�. - they gave us was more of a belch.
i a Jerful meal.

ched round the walls of Jericho
� .
jl � -nan band, they failed to
either ��� �� � � tertam the au 4. nce. many of whom
left befon th et wa hall �� They would never have
; ��� ailed back I e ore if their
announcer I kepi screan Brothers Johnson'
Brothers Johnson vet the PA system
The only music u ind I use the term loosely in
an unpleasant conclusion to
Chap Gurley
reference to the other �
Johnson Never mmd that
Graham and quotes Star
measure, he is still a-
mastered his instrumei I ii
does not know that he is unar
on his instrument
Aside from the outstd
Johnson, the r- n undi
eight performers on stag-
to do " i - inee arour
Ro
horn �-��
smging ba -
Johnson ��� � ther hall ft
By the way d'C .
that of the rhytf
m. or they were s
suspect th
For a the si . ei I �.
the audiencei d' 1 every
Marie Show the Br
audience the M tf �-
and virtually � � efl
question of ta ent . s sf a
Brothers Jot
- ��� a mildly
Funk Out Ma Face th t
drone of der .�:�.� � . - . ��
tempo for
tobe rorrid I contem;
boring
W ith a comp- �� nt ba
Johnson, especu .
powerful force in modi
term you like music �" "
they will do nothing but n �
1939's Reefer Madness highlights double fe
4
nng of
lOrama of
i hot. M i
per
I
elative
ommentary by
ioger Pryow.
� �
Mattacl
. I md the
"ers
Pi' ' " -xessfully
Aeaves the various ele-
cts of Dynamite Chicken
nto a tight cohesive while
lly overwhelms
the unsuspecting audience
th its uniqueness and
humor
Reefer Madness, a film
n ide in 1939. is the second
" e double feature
"� ' ig, and it stars Dave
O'Brien. Dorothy Short,
and Carleton Young
In the 30's. one of the
favorite subjects of poverty
row' exploitation films was
the evils of "the devil's
weed marijuana
Pure campy melodrama
all the way. completely
hilarious by standards
today, such a film as Reefer
Madness was considered
tight drama under the guise
of warning the audience of
how marijuana was destroy
mg the lives of young
people m that time.
The plot of Reefer
Madness is no different.
with a young man's life
soon becoming a night-
mare, pure high camp'
that must be seen to be
believed
Films are open to ECU
students, Faculty, and Staff
and their guests Admis-
sion is by ID and Activ ii.
Cards or Mendenhail Stu-
dent Center Membership
Card. All fiimsare shown in
the Mendenhail Student
Center Theatre
This special film presen
tation is sponsored by the
Student Union Films Cv
mittee
The next Wednesday
special film, Lost Weekend.
a
Jorge Bolet: 'worked a master's magic on
the piano'for music lovers last Wednesday
the
;en-
irns
-
- ��"
tuos tic piai
Boiet's sty'e is perfe I .
su,tedpieces played
on Wednesday night
He brings a full, rich
sound out of the piano His
stye is aggressive, bold.
.scuime. and he opts for
strongiy stated rather
in the preciously lyrical
sp.an.st technique
The first set by Bolet
jch as m
s intentions w�
' � andante Intei
in A minor was
a dreamy, legato piece that
ed to illustrate Boiet's
odic gifts
ceo m G minor
egro passionatoi was
the most technically dem-
anding composition Bolet
played by Brahms It is a
stirring. German- ��- - -
evocative of Brahm's pre-
decessor Beethoven
Bolet included the fa-
mous Wanderer Fantasy
by Schubert as his second
set From the commanding
first chords, which stri-
dently introduce the Fan-
tasy to the fugue-hke al-
legro which ervOs the piece,
Bolet captured the audi-
th his mterpreta-
he Presto gave Bolet
"unity to exhibit
awesome virtuosity at
� n ind
After the intermission
Bolet returned to play
Godowsky's "Studies on
Chopin's Etudes These
des on the etudes are
less interesting thema-
ally than they are tech-
ally Of course. Chopin
Arote his brilliant etudes
the advanced student of
the piano to practice certain
ects of playing But
what makes the etudes
great is that not only are
they arcane studies in
piamstic technique but are
stirring, moving pieces of
music as well
The composer Godow-
sky. though, was interested
in only the formal aspects
'he Etudes His Studies
on the Etudes accordingly
were remarkable for their
showcasing of dazzling vir-
tuosity Two of them (Bolet
played six m all) were for
the left hand alone
Those familiar with the
Etudes would recognize
that Godowsky's version of
Chopin' No 12 exceeded
even the Pole's in its
demands upon the player
Also, the Chopmist would
have recognized the ex-
tremely lyrical No. 13,
which Godowsky trans-
cribes for the left hand
only
Bolet ended the pro-
grammed part of his per-
formance with a selection
from Liszt's "Annees de
Pelennage Book II. Liszt
wrote his "Travel Jour-
nals while gadding about
Europe stealing wives as
well as waves of acclam-
ation for his great compo-
sitional and performing
gifts
The Liszt, as might be
expected, was astounding
Lisztomamacs can imagine
the ability required to
master his compositions
Throughout .Bolet was al-
ways in control never losing
a drop of pure musicahty im
all the very difficult pass-
ages
As a delightful contre-
tempts to the rousing Ro-
mantic program, Bolet
treated the audience who
gave him a standing ova-
tion to a delicate, lovely
piece as encore Confirm-
ing what all music lovers
know, that no matter what
pianicstic pyrotechniques
are involved, the tune's the
thing.
Bolet works a master's
magic on the piano, and it
is a magical experience to
hear him
PIANIST JORGE BOLET "The musta-
chioed gentleman with gray sideburns
proceeded to treat the audience to a
program of virtuoso Rom
Boiet's style was perfect ,
pieces played on Wednesday ��
Photi
t
!





Knight left audience 'disappointed'
PLAYBOY FILM CRITIC Arthur Knight
Photo by John H. Grogan
By STEVE BACHNER
Trends Editor
Film is the great popul-
ar medium, with an aud-
ience of incredible size, a
commercial vigor which,
though somewhat dimin-
ished from the pre-televls-
ion days, is still staggering.
Film has an artistic potent-
iality that realizes Itself
with some frequency in
works of undeniable excel-
lence.
There are more good
movies in any given year
than there are good plays or
novels. Reviewing films
then, or criticizing films, Is
like reviewing or criticizing
a blizzard or a war.
The critic is laughably
impotent, has no influence
either with the film-makers
or with the film audiences,
has no suitable or adequate
vocabulary with which to
discuss the films for his
reader. The critic has no
position on which to stand,
from which to formulate a
general theory of what he is
trying to do or wants to say,
and no way of rationalizing
his intellectual career.
Still, the critic, and in
this instance it's critic-cum-
hlstorian, writes about film;
teaches film literature, and
makes an occasional buck
on the side by lecturing
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about film. He does all of
this, makes his livelihood
doing it, because he is
driven be an unquenchable
thirst for film; his love for
the art sends him to the
moviehouse, to the library,
back to the moviehouse and
eventually to the typewriter
or classroom or lecture hall.
All of this brings us
back to square one to
Arthur Knight, a noted film
critic and movie historian
who strings for Playboy
magazine and the Saturday
Review. Knight lectured on
the topic of Sex in the
Cinema last Tuesday, to a
group of students the maj-
ority of whom hoped to at
least catch a clip from the
granddaddy of porno films,
Deep Throat. If this was
their only motivation for
attending the lecture, they
left a disappointed bunch.
Mr. Knight's audio visual
aid concluded with a simp-
er, not a bang.
As for the lot that
dropped in for an invigorat-
ing, informative lecture,
they too left a disappointed
bunch.
Knight seems content to
prostitute his knowledge as
well as the artform by
lecturing on what will prob-
ably always be a "hot"
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ecu VETERANS
Become an Air Force Officer
Your previous active duty service, combined
with enrolling in Air Force ROTC, may lead to
your becoming an Air Force officer.
Contact:
Lt Col Carl E. Tadlock
ECU Wright Annex - Room 206
or call 757-6597
3 71
ROTC
Gotewoy to o great way of life.
&
THE STROH MEWERY COMPANY, DETROIT, MICHIGAN Wi
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topic
After spending some
eight hours with Knight, I
came away with only one
revelation (a minor one at
that). Probably the most
erotic clip in Knight's rep-
ertoire was one that showed
very little skin and con-
cerned itself mostly with
reaction shots of Heddy
Lamarr and her male coun-
terpart during their love-
making
ROCK-DORIS
For whatever reason. I
couldn't help but run those
old Rock Hudson-Doris
Day movies through my
head Watching a Huds-
Day movie, one feels hurl
and ashamed that ie is
seeing something he should
not, that he has been forced
to look into the bathroorr I
the American imagination.
But in the skin flicks the,
have real bathrooms into
which the camera litwa
peepsand. watching, one is
not embarrased. but wise
He feels that Rock and
Dons have adequately pre-
pared him Here is the
bathroom all right,
there are no prescription
or patent medicines, no
asprin. no toilet paper
toilet), no used razor
blades, no hot water bot-
tles, no frazzled tooth
brushes
On the other side of the
com, there is much soap
there is a naked girl
The clips inspired
another minor insight In
one sense, the single most
salient element of si- ri
flicks is poverty of the
imagination In a great
many skin fheks there is
absolutely no way to U
what image will be throve
on the screen next. One
emerges from the theatre
exhausted and exasperat-
ed, not because of the
pictures of simple bodies
but because of uncontrolled
tension. Knight's lecture
provided a curious paradox
Apart from pulling film
history out of context, amid
frequent factual errors anc
an illustrative reel that
appeared to have been
spliced together with Silly
Putty. Knight managed
inadvetantly. to raise num-
erous questions about the
viability of film criticism
discussed with much diffi-
culty earlier in this review
As a youngster. Knight
was probably a bright and
intellectual prodigy all hot
to write great film criticism
But the movie men have
learned that, given a little
time, such a bright young
man is more than likely to
corrupt himself

f v
!
v





17 October 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
ECU
ivin streak ends
Pirates bow to Golden Eagles 17-16
BVCHARLESCHANDLER
Assistant Sports Editor
HATTlESBURG. Miss - Southern m
eJasownrtn . southern Mississippi sur-
� d second quarter ra y bv thp cm d .
�andy BovettP th,rn n ! � U P,ra,es and rode
r Doyette s third quarter field aoal to a 17 1c �
here Saturday n.ght 6 v,ctory
lheAG2LaC�2nfl M unanswered PO'nts m the first period
e uolden Eagles watched ECU explode for 1� J
quarter pomts expiode for 16 second
e second half the Eagles vaunted defense.
as the Nasty Bunch held the Pirates in check
Bovene s t,pt , T aS aW6S�me all�n3 �nlV
joa. The field goal dnve however, wa
vards penalty against the Bucs
" Eagles took their first possession 65 yards in 16
- a t Dwn USM
P"atesat w�i Halfback T.co Bea. gamed just over half
tagles yards on the drive, rushing for 33 yards
uartPTn"38 by an Opt,on pitch ,rom Junior
�rterback Dane McDamel to Chuck Cook, who ran S,x
-�s untouched into the end zone.
e second Eagle score came after a fumble by Pirate
� Leander Green At the time, the Pirates were
Pirates ponder
possibilities
after USM loss
HA -LESCHANDLER
Sports Editor
ESBURG. Miss
-ad coach Bobbv
�d his Southern
ssippi Golden Eagles
' 'V- deserved .
the Plates their
3ss to the Eagles can
� by 'he
rea � the team after
� . hat mig
robably
it should have been.
ate p'acekicker Bill
probably should
have been successful on his
extra pomt attempt after
the Pirates' first touch-
dow
Cornerback Willie Hol-
jbably should have
�ercepted the pass from
Eagle quarterback Jeff
Hammond that he dropped
efore the Eagles
kicked the game's winning
Dye probably should
. e called for a two-point
conversion attempt rather
the one point kick that
gave the Pirates a 16-14
: a'ter the Pirates' sec-
ond touchdown
Dye himself felt that he
was m error on this parti-
cuiar occasion Obviously
I just made a poor decision
to kick the second extra
point But there's no way to
if we would have
made the two points
� er
Yet through all the
second guessing and mis-
givings. Dye did find a few
optimistic aspects of the
loss. "I'm proud of the
way our football team came
bac- said Dye We
made a football game out of
Dye was referring to
the Pirates 16 pomt ex-
plosion in the second quar-
ter after the Eagles had
taken a 14-0 lead in the first
oenod
Dye also noted that he
felt his team .� rough
their roughest game of the
season against the Eagles.
It certa � was a hard
,ht game on both
sides said Dye "I think it
was the most physical game
we have played all year "
The fifth year Pirate
coach praised the Eagle
defense Southern Miss-
issippi has a fine defensive
football team, noted Dye
They're as good as we've
taced in somo time. We
moved on the' a in the
second quart it they
came out and ot
harder in the se; . half
Southern Miss head
coach Bobby Collins ap-
peared worn and exhausted
after the tight contest He
had only a slight word of
respect to say about the
Pirates But actions speak
louder than words in this
case Collins shook his head
in awe. saying. "We beat
one good football team
tonight; one real good
football team
Yet m the ECU locker
room, all Dye and his
troops could say was. "We
could have, and probably
should have beaten one
good football team to-
night
Crafty Karpovich
,cce KARPOVICH slips past a PeybroKe State
eCUsJE - J1 Pirates 4-2 victory over the Braves
Photo by Chap Qurley
on the move at the Eagle 35 yard line. But as would be the
case again later in the game, the Golden Eagles took full
advantage of an ECU turnover
It took USM only four plays to score their second
touchdown of the night. But, in the process, McDaniel
suffered a shoulder separation, and was lost to the Eagles
for the evening. McDaniel's replacement, Jeff Hammond
threw a 51 yard scoring pass to tight end Marving Harvey
on the very next play from scrimmage. Boyette's extra point
gave the Eagles a 14-0 edge at the end of the first period
The two touchdown deficit did not phase the Pirates,
though, as they scored on their first possession of the
second quarter. The 44 yard drive was capped by a 10 yard
touchdown from Leander Green to Eddie Hicks. Bill
Lamm's extra point attempt, which was wide left, would
later prove fatal to the Pirates.
Steve Greer's 37 yard run and a 40 yard pass from Green
to Billy Ray Washington set up the next Pirate score. Lamm
capped a stalled Pirate drive with a 37 yard field goal
Pirate cornerback Willie Holley intercepted a Hammond
pass with 1 :52 left in the half to give Green and the offense
the ball once again.
Three big plays gave the Pirates the halftime lead.
Green hit split end Terry Gallaher on a 42 yard pass play.
Fullback Theodore Sutton then ran around right end for 24
more yards. Halfback Sam Harrell capped the drive with an
18 yard touchdown run. Lamm's extra point gave the
Pirates a 16-14 lead at halftime
The second half was an entirely different story for the
Pirate offense. The "Nasty Bunch" held ECU to only four
first downs and 71 total yards after intermission.
Meanwhile, the Pirate defense thwarted the USM attack,
holding the Eagles to less than 100 total yards.
Except for Lamm's missed extra point, the cruicial play
of the game came with 6:45 left in the third quarter. The
Eagles were driving for the first and only time of the second
half.a third down pass from Hammond to split end John
Cannon was nearly intercepted by Holley
Seeing an open field and six points in front of him,
Holley did as so many defensive backs and receivers do,
drop the ball. On the very next play, Boyette kicked what
was eventually the winning field goal, giving the Eagles a
17-16 lead.
ECU head coach Pat Dye said that he felt both sides
played well enough to win "It was certainly hard fought on
both sides noted Dye "It was the most physical game we
have played in all year
Mack heads returnees

0
Sam Harrell
THE ECU TAILBACK scored the Pirates last touchdown on
an 18 yard aunt in the second quarter of Saturday's game
at Southern Mississippi.
Pirates open practice
A distressed Dye
ECU HEAD COACH Pat Dye ponders a troublesome
situation The fifth year Pirate mento met head-on with
such a situation after the Pirates 17-16 loss to Southern
Miss last Saturday Photo by John H. Grogan
ECU-USM Stats
ECU 0 16 0 0- 16
USM 14 0 3 0-17
S M iss � Cook 6 run
(Boyette kick)
S Miss � Harvey 51
pass from Hammond (Boy-
ette kick)
ECU � Hicks 10 run
(kick failed)
ECU � FG Lamm 37
ECU � Harrell 18 run
(Lamm kick)
S Miss � FG Boyette
35
Rushing: ECU � Sutton
12-86, Greer 4-44. Green
10-22. Harrell 2-22, Collins
5-17. Hicks 6-15. Hawkins
1-4. Gallaher 1-1. USM �
Beal 24-70. Winder 14-38.
McDaniel 5-36. Floyd 1-10.
Passing: ECU � Green
7-20-2. 87 yds. USM �
McDaniel 1-1-0, 79 yds.
Hammond 3-81. 79 yds
Receiving ECU �
Hicks 3-22, Gallaher 2-25,
Washington 1-40, Collins
1-10. USM � Cannon 2-17,
Harvey 1-51. Brown 1-19.
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
With its season opener against UNC-Asheville just over
a month away, the ECU basketball team began practice
Sunday with a lengthy three hour workout.
The Pirates, who finished with a disappointing 9-17
record last year under new head coach Larry Gillman.
return all five starters this season including the nation's
leading scorer Oliver Mack
6-11 center Al Tyson, from nearby D H Conley High
School, heads a talented list of newcomers which includes
two junior college transfers who should provide immediate
help
"With all our starters returning from last year I'd like to
think we' II be a much improved unit from last season, said
GiMman last Thursday at the team's annual media day
"We won five of our last eight games at the end of last year
and we seemed to be playing with a lot more maturity
during that period.
"Considering everything the team went through on and
off the fioor during the end of last season, that streak was
really amazing noted Gillman, "But that's all behind us
and I'm really encouraged with some of our new players
Despite endless rumors and speculation Gillman would
be fired after last season, the former San Francisco
assistant returns for his second year at the helm of the
Pirate program.
The NCAA investigation of the ECU porgream has also
subsided and Gillman feels it's simply a matter of blending
the old with the new for a successful season.
"We has a lot of adverse publicity last year explained
Gillman "But even through most of the controversy our
team played fairly well. We've got a lot of returning
veterans and a lot of newcomers. It will be just a matter of
how soon they can play as a cohesive unit
All-Amencan candidate Oliver M ack returns for his final
year and it certainly promises to be another bright one. The
6-3 guard from Queens. NY finished fourth in the nation
last year in scoring with a lofty 28.0 average and is
undoubtedly the finest player to ever wear a Pirate uniform.
Mack received the MVP award in last year's First Union
Invitational Tournament and also broke a school scoring
record with 47 points against USC-Aiken.
"Inch for inch, pound for pound, you're going to find a
better basketball player in the college game today said
Gillman. "He just loves basketball. It's no chore for him, he
just likes to play. But last season we didn't win and that's
what he wanted more than anything
Mack will have an experienced supporting cast this
season which will ease the scoring burden and allow him to
concentrate more on defense.
Forwards Herb Gray and Herb Krusen and K e Powers
all return along with center Greg Cornelius arc; gd-
Walter Moseley
Gray was the team's second leading scorer behind
with a 14 2 average and was also the second leading
rebounderon the squad with 7 9 grabs a
finished the season with a 13.5 average .
Cornelius was the leading rebounder at 8 1
Tyson, a highly recruited prep star from nterv
could start at center while freshman Clarence M es I
Burimgton will probably see a lot of playing time " . -
and M iiesboth played m the N C East-West Alt-Star game
this summer
Other newcomers include transfer David UnOe
who will become eligible after ECU s first seve
Mark McLaurm. a 6-6 forward, from Springfield Ma
and junior college transfers Frank Hobson and Ge
Maynor
Hobson is a 6-8 forward from Cadiz. Ky whiie Ma.
is a 6-2 guard who came to ECU from Louisburg Junior
College
"To have a successful season we re going to havi
improve our rebounding and defensive play. " said G man
"We have just as difficult a schedule on the road and a
much tougher schedule at home
1971-79PirateRoster
fGreg CorneliusC-F6-9New Albanv
ttHerbGrayF-G6-8Sea? Pieasa "�' I
Frank HobsonF6-8Cad
TtHerb KrusenF-G6-5Si .e' Srr
tOhver MackG6-3QLjee N -
George MaynorG6-2Rai
M ark M cLaunnF6-6Scr ' ass
Clarence M ilesG6-4
tWaiter MoseleyG6-2Quee" �
tKyle PowersG-F6-5�
Alton TysonC6-11 nterv
David UnderwoodF6-6Queens N �
TLetters won�2l
1It
Pirates dump Pembroke
defender �
Saturday afternoon
By DAVID MAREADY
Staff Writer
Several ECU freshmen
turned in solid perform-
ances as the Pirate Soccer
Team defeated a weak
Pembroke State University
squad 4-2, Saturday, on
Minges Field.
A fired up ECU club
took the field at the be-
ginning of the first half and
clearly dominated the a-
ction. However, the Braves
of Pembroke drew first
blood with only 6:10 gone in
the first half on a goal
scored by fullback, Mike
McPhail.
Twenty minutes elapsed
before Eric Tucker coun-
tered for the Pirates with
26:15 expired in the first
half to even the score at one
apiece. David Radford was
credited with the assist.
The remaining twenty
minutes of the first half
went scoreless and the half
ended with the score dead-
locked at 1-1.
Although the score
r
showed the teams even at
halftime, the statistics re-
flected the true dominance
by the Pirates. The Braves
could only manage four
attempts at the ECU goal
while the Pirates had at-
tempted a whoppmgsixteen
at the Pembroke goal.
The first twenty min-
utes of the second half were
a nightmare for Coach Dan
Kenney's Braves. They
simply fell apart during a
five minute stretch as the
Pirates scored three conse-
cutive goals.
The first of the three
goals was scored by fresh-
man, Brad Winchell off
David Radford's second
assist of the day with
eleven minutes gone in the
second half.
Lightning struck one
minute later in the form of
Jeff Karpovich. Karpovich
slammed a Dennis Elwell
assist into the Brave's goal
to make the score 3-1; but
the scoring wasn't over.
Three minutes after Kar-
povich's goal, freshman
Shawn Berry connected on
an unassisted goal to boost
the Pirates into a com-
manding 4-1 lead.
ECU then encountered
a long dry spell in scoring
mainly because of offensive
miscues and numerous
penalties.
With 35:25 gone in the
half, Braves' halfback
Chuck Perry scored the
final goal of the day to
reduce the Pirate lead to
4-2. The Braves attempted
a gallant comeback in the
final stages of the contest,
however, it was smothered
by sound defensive play led
by ECU'S Jeff Kluger and
goalies, Kevin Tyus and
Kerry Lovitt. The game
ended with ECU on top 4-2.
Brad Smith cited sev-
eral freshmen for their out-
standing play including,
Andy Roman, Shawn Ber-
ry, Brad Winchell, and Eric
Tucker
"Eric's goal was very
important said Smith,
"because it gave us a tie
game going into the half
and it kept us from having
to play catch-up ball in the
second half
Statistically, the Pirates
scalped the Braves on shots
at goal with thirty, while
the Braves could manage
only a mere eight shots at
the well defended Pirate
goal.
"Although we did not
play very glamorous ob-
served Smith, "we did,
control most of the action
throughout the game
The Pirates, who are
one goal away from a school
record in goals scored in a
single season, upped their
record to 3-6-1, while the
Braves fell to a dismal 1-12
on the season.
ECU soccer action re-
sumes Tueday, at home
when the Pirates' battle a
strong UNC-Wilmington,
The Seahawks are currently
ranked 10th in the South.
Fancy foottvork
DUANE BAILEY MANUEVERS past a Pembroke Sate
defender Saturday afternoon in soccer action on the Minges
Field
Photoby Chap Gurley)
t






Page 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 17 October 1978
Time Outs win, reach campus playoffs
By JOHN EVANS
Staff Writer
The intramural flag
football divisional champ-
ionships were decided
Tuesday afternoon and the
all-camous finals will be
played Wednesday at 7
p.m next to Ficklen Sta-
dium
Most of the intramural
football titles were decided
by less than a touchdown,
except in the dormitory
division where the Scott
Time Outs rolled to a 42-22
win over Aycock's Top of
the Roost
The Time Outs never
trailed in rolling to their
20th straight win and
reached the all-campus
playoffs for the third con-
secutive season. In three
seasons as dormitory
champions the Time Outs
have won 31 of 32 games,
losing only in the all-campus
final in 1976
The Time Outs opened
up a 14-0 lead early in the
game on their way to a
22-14 halftime lead The
Time Outs defense held the
Roost without a gain on the
first possessions and then
scored touchdowns on each
drive following their de-
fensive stands. The first
score came on a three-yard
pass froi.i Bill 5ass to
Keven Thomas and Thomas
added the points after for
an 8-0 lead. After holding
Top of the Roost for the
second series, the Time
Outs drove down the field
again and scored on a
fourth down. 50-yard swing
pass from Bass to Dan
M cCombs.
Nathan Muliam got the
Roost on the scoreboard on
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their next possession when
he took a pitch from
quarterback Eddie Owens
and lofted a 35-yard touch-
down pass to Tom Cody,
making it 14-6.
Each team got another
score before the half as
Bass hit Terry Campbell on
an 18-yard scoring pass and
McCombs for the conver-
sion to make it 22-6 Then
the Roost followed with an
18-yard score on a run by
Owens, and a conversion by
Muliem, to make it 22-1
just before the half.
The second half became
a physical display of force
between the two teams with
a total of four players being
ejected from the game for
unsportsmanlike conduct
and dangerous play.
The Time Outs scored
two quick touchdowns for a
34-14 lead that just about
clinched it. After that
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there was more fighting
than scoring as the tempers
began to flare on both
sides. One of the Time Outs
second half scores came on
an interception-lateral re-
turn when Jimmy Wilkins
intercepted a pass, ran 20
yards, and then latereled
the ball to Chris Seagraves
to complete the 60-yard
score, which made it 34-14
and clinched the Time
Outs' third straight dormi-
tory championship.
In other men's playoff
games, the Sadaharu Ohs
pulled the only upset in the
five championship games
with a 16-12 win over the
the SociologyAnthropolo-
gy club. In the fraternity
playoff. Phi Kappa Tau
defeated Lambda Chi al-
pha
In the sorority cham-
pionship. Sigma Sigma
Siama took a narrow win
over Alpha Xi Delta. 8-6
and they will meet the
dormitory champions from
Tyler. The Tyler team, the
Tearjerkers, made an early
score by Minnie McPhatter
stand up for an 8-0 win
In Tuesday's semifinals
of the men's all-campus
championships. Sadaharu
Oh meets Aycock Top ofthe
Roost and Ph. Kappa Tau
takes on the Time Outs
Both games will be played
at 4 p m
On Wedne;
the Tyier Tearje-
theSigmas win n �
ali-campus Sf
ion ship
Rose Bowl dream game
spoiled by dual upset
By
HERSCHEL NISSENSON
AP Sports Writer
A funny thing happened
over the weekend to that
dream Rose Bowl game
between Southern Califor-
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Of course, the happen-
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fifth-ranked Michigan or
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Michigan State � and
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chuckle just a little
On a weekend that vir-
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Title
Fountainhead, October 17, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 17, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.518
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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