Fountainhead, October 10, 1978






Circulation 10,000
Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
Vol. 55 No. JfjW October 1978
Parking takeover?
By MARC BARNES
Assistant News Editor
A proposal to separate faculty and staff parking has
caused quite a bit of stir in the university community this
past week. According to several anonymous sources, a plan
is afoot to separate faculty and staff parking and to give
perferred parking to the faculty.
Thisisfalse however,according to Dr. Carl Adler, who
submitted a proposal to the Faculty Senate recently. Dr.
Adler said in an interview that he is not in favor of giving
staff members less desirable parking.
"I can't speak for the senate for what it had in mind
when it adoped it, all I can tell you is what I had in mind
when I submitted it Adler said.
Adler went on to say. "In point of fact, I would have the
parking divide equally on a pro-rata basis � that means
that if staff had sixty percent of the registered cars they
should get sixty percent of the parking. Furthermore, " he
went on. "in my view they should get sixty percent of the
desirable parking
Adler went on to point out an example of his parking
proposal m the Memorial Gym area. He said "Cars trying
to get to and from the parking lot west of Austin create
congestion " He went on to point out that if that parking lot
was given entirely to the staff, who are here for practically
the entire day. there would be almost no congestion. "No
faculty would be driving in there looking for a parking space
because there wouldn't beany for them Adler said.
He added that the interior spaces should be staff and
exterior spaces should be faculty. He said, "That way, you
not have a lot of traffic congestion that we have
now
Adler remarked that there was no reason that the
ty should look for parking places where staff are
ked, because staff cars aren't leaving the campus area.
er commented further that "I think it's much more
intelligent to separate the two parking spaces In fact,
Adler noted, the staff would probably get the better parking
ices, because they will be nearer to the buildings on the
interior of the campus.
Adler said he didfi't know how the rumor got started,
but he said that it was probably just suspicion
Aciier commented on the fact that several letters, all of
i anonymous, have surfaced which have accused him of
to take parking.away from staff and give it to the
faculty Adler said that "It is not fair that there are
anonymous letters, if people are going to say this, they
should say what it is, because I don't know how to answer
He added that it was not his intention to take
parking away from staff.
Ader said that he hears faculty members complain that
,hPV couldn't find a parking space. He went on to say that
3 was readily available at 8 in the morning, but
that there are faculty members that teach labs until at night
until 11 and it is unfair to expect them to be back at 8
the next morning to compete for parking spaces with people
that work from 8 to 5.
He went on to say that faculty members are highly
mobile, sometimes having to commute to Allied Health or
elsewhere and back during the day, and staff don't have to
do this.
Adler said that he would like to talk to anyone that wants
to talk about the matter. "I haven't talked to anybody, but I
am aware that there are these things going around
Adler stressed that he was not speaking for the Faculty
Senate, and he went on to say that "All I did was submit
that proposal. I've been on faculty parking committees off
and on since 1965. This proposal has come up many times,
and three years ago it was adopted by the parking
committee and it just disappeared
He went on to say that the Facilities and Planning
Committee has decided not to look at the problem this year,
so Adler took it to the Faculty Senate. He said "I normally
would have taken it directly to (Facilities and Planning) but
it was my impression that they didn't want anything about
parking coming up this year, so I decided to go to the
Senate.
He added that "It's my feeling that this will help
rationalize, somewhat, the parking on this campus He
went on to say, "It's not done for an ego trip or anything
else
Adler explained that if the faculty has to go look for
parkmn places, they should look in a lot where there will be
a lot ot turnover.
In a faculty lot, according to Adler, a lot of cars will be
coming and going all day long. In a staff lot, most of the
cars will be stationary. According to Adler's proposal, the
faculty, which are mobile, would compete for parking
spaces with other faculty members, and the staff would
compete with other sjaff members.
He went on to say ihat "I was certainly astonished about
the amount of feelings about it He added that the staff
members who are objecting to this should take their
objections to the campus Facility and Planning Committee.
The Chairman of that committee is Wes Hankins in
Geography, and I'm sure the committee would be very
receptive and would be glad to hear their complaints, and if
they thought they were justified, I'm certain they would
bring it back to the Senate, and say this shouldn't be
done
He went on to say that, "It is ce mly more intelligent
(to contact the Facilities and Planning committee) than
passing anonymous letters around that can't be answered
Adler aiso said that whatever is decided about faculty
staff parking should be fair to everyone involved.
Efforts to track down the source of the anonymous
letters failed.
SGA meets; Payne discusses
summer budget appropriations
flu RClRF fiT kJI CWVWM ���: . .
By ROBERT M. SWAIM
� ertising Manager
"? the Monday night
meeting of the SGA legis-
jre. committee appoint-
ments were announced,
SGA President Tommy Joe
Payne delivered his first
address to the new legisla-
ture, and several appropri-
ations bills were intro-
duced.
The following people
were appointed committee
chairmen: Brett Melvin -
appropriations, Jeff
Tnpiett - Rules and Judi-
ciary, Student Welfare -
ChnsCheatham. and Sylvia
Honeycutt - Screenings and
appointments.
In his address to the
legislature, President
Payne reported on the SGA
business that had been
transacted during the
summer.
"We only spent where
we felt it was necessary and
tried to keep as much
money as possible free for
the fall legislature to
appropriate said Payne.
But just because it was
Summer didn't mean that
everything stopped
President Payne said
that most of the Summer
appropriations were to the
transit system.
According to Payne, the
amount appropriated to the
transit system was to keep
the buses operating from
August through October.
Payne also said that
$800 was appropriated to
SOULS the first time ever
that SGA has funded that
organization.
Other Summer appro-
priations were: $264toRho
Epsilon and $3,500 to the
Homecoming Steering
Committee.
President Payne com-
mended SGA Vice-Pres-
ident David Cartwright for
"an excellent job working
on three projects this
summer
One of the projects
Payne spoke of was the
ECU student directory
which has a section listing
day students for the first
time.
"We tried to get more
day student names In the
book said Payne. "It
doesn't look like a lot of
work but it was and we're
proud of it
Payne stressed to the
legislature the need to
spend carefully and warned
that the veto power would
be invoked if necessary.
"I do have the veto
power and I'm positive that
you will see me use it more
than once said Payne.
"But when I do veto, it will
not be out of spite or
vengeanoe.lm above that
Payne emphasized the
hope that the legislature
will be cooperative with the
executive branch this
coming year.
"This is a political
organization, so I will say
just a few words about
politics. I have been
through a lot in this
organization, most of it
good and some of it bad.
But I don't live in the past.
When I was installed last
year, I asked the legislature
to help me remove some
obstacles that stood in the
path of progress and I told
them I was willing to work
with everyone in order to
get the job done. I still hold
this feeling and I am willing
to see it through. It is a lot
easier to do work for
students when you don't
have to fight all the time,
but I haven't forgotten how
and if the need arises, I can
do it again said Payne.
NEW YORK MIME Keith Berger answered substained applause with silence.last Wednesday night
See story, p 6
Photo by John H. Grogan
NTE offered on Nov. 11
By KAY WILLIAMS
Staff Writer
The National Teachers
Examinations (NTE) will be
given at ECU on Nov 11 in
Speight Building.
The deadline to register
for the NTE is Oct. 19.
Registration forms should
be mailed in time to reach
the Educational Testing
Service in Princeton, N.J.
by Oct. 19. A registrat-
ion fee of $5 must accom-
pany all registration forms
received by ETS after Oct.
19 and before Oct. 25. No
on-the-spot registration is
allowed.
All registrants take the
common examinations and
most of the registrants take
one of the 26 area examina-
tions offered, according to
Wanda D. Wiseman, sec-
retary to the director of the
ECU Testing Center.
Registrants taking the
common examinations
should report to the Testing
Center in Speight at 8:30
a.m. That test should be
over about 12:30 p.m. Area
examinations are scheduled
to begin at 1:30 p.m. and
end at about 4:15 p.m.
Registration forms and
instructions are available in
the ECU Testing Center,
Speight building, room 105
or directly from the Nation-
al Teacher Examinations,
ETS, Box 911, Princeton,
N.J. 08541.
In order to be certified
to teach in North Caroffna,
all prospective teachers
must take the NTE. In
1968, the N.C. State Board
of Education, selected the
cutoff score of 950 for North
Carolina teachers.
Contrary to rumors, the
ECU Testing Center has
received no official com-
munication that the cutoff
score will be raise by the
N.C Legislature, according
to Mrs. Wiseman.
The NTE is given
nationwide three times a
year. It is given in Febrary.
July, and November.
Wiseman urgesall stud-
ents who plan to take the
exam to give themselves
plenty of time, it takes
approximately four to six
weeks for the test scores to
come back
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SBK
SSS
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What's inside
3S8
Pirates win third straight game, top VMI.
19-6see p. 9
V
v.
ECU wants to continue
with UNC.see p. 9
football series
Liqi
Keith Berger performed to a capacity
audience last Wednesday night. For
review and interview see p. 6
World-wide bike rider comes to
Greenvillesee p. 3
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uor supporters and opponents
confident of referendum victory
Rvnnnn auitc w
DAVID CARTWRIGHT SGA vice-president
TOMMY JOE PA YNE SGA president
Photos byPodeszwa
By DOUG WHITE
Editor
Last summer, the N.C. General Assembly approved a
bill to aiiow local option liquor by the drink, and several
counties and communities have already approved the sale
of mixed drinks. Although Pitt Cc. has not called for a
referendum,both sides of the issue are confident they will
win should one ever be called.
According to Rev. Van Dale Hudson, Trinity Free Will
Baptist, there is a strong conservative element in the
county which would defeat a mixed drink proposal.
"I've only been here a year and a half, but I understand
that in the statewide referendum on the issue a few years
ago the vote was about two to one against in this county,
because of the strong conservative element he said.
"We're one of the strongest denominations in the area,
and I think we could influence the vote in our favor. We
certainly would do our part to defeat it should it ever come
to a vote
Hudson is "convinced" that the liquor and beer
industries have a great influence on politicians and that it
will be harder to defeat liquor by the drink in Pitt Co. th�n it
was 10 years ago.
"I'm opposed to liquor by the drink mainly becau- I'm
opposed to alcohol. According to a survey by the N; onal
Institute on Alcohol Abuse, the public spends $10 f iting
the damage done by liquor for every $1 it earns fror quor
taxes.
Liquor is the basic cause of most problem most
major crimes, such as rape, murder, and burlary involve
drinking; social drinking is a contributing factor to
alcoholism. We've lost more people on the highway
because of drinking drivers thatn in all U.S. wars combined
Our nation has surpassed France as the moat drunken
nation in the world Hudson said.
Tony Vigorito, part owner and manager of "The Tree
House sees liquor by the drink as a boon to local
businesses.
"I like liquor by the drink both personally and
professionally. I was raised on Long Island in a mixed drink
environment, so naturally I favor it. I'm looking forward to
it. It'll help Greenville get a lot of stuff that it's missing
he said.
"There's a lot of energy and creativity here and people
want to get out and do things, and liquor by the drink will
enable the businessmen to offer these things he added
One of the advantages will be increased tips and wages
for bartenders and waitresses, according to Vigorito.
"I think the moral issue is no longer a valid argument,
it's just a matter of control. If theothe side will just listen to
common sense, liquor by the drink will provide tighter
control. When I first moved here, I couldn't believe the
rolling bars people had, people riding around with a
bottle Vigorito.
Vigorito is confifdent voters would pass liquor by the
drink in Pitt Co but feels it would take a good voter
turnout.
"I warn people who are for it not to sit back and let it
happen. You've got to show that this is what you want The
determining factor will be the 21-35 age population and
older people with enough common sense who'll see that it
won't hurt the community he added
Tom Haines, part owner and manager of "The Attic
feels liquor by the drink will have little effect on the college
community.
"The Tree House will probably be the only resturant
downtown with liquor by the drink, and one club is
considering becommg-a private club in order to serve mixed
drinks, but I doubt that will come about. College towns are
traditionally beer towns, partly because of the 21 year old
age restriction on liquor, and partly because beer is more
economical Haines said.
According to Haines, liquor by the drink usually results
in a more adult, sophisticated handling of alcohol.
"People have a tendency to finish off a bottle they
brown bag. That won't happen with mixed drinks because
they will be more expensive. It won't create a 'lets go get
smashed' attitude; you've got to be rich to get smashed
from cocktails he said.
"Nobody knows how it'll be, because it's all new said
Sanny Dilda, State Alcohol Enforcement agent, "it'll be trial
and error. People are predicting all these things, goodand
bad, will happen or won't happen, but nobody knows for
sure, it'll all be speculation
"Hopefully, the regulations will provide the necessary
control. We'll just have to wait and see. The regulations
were drafted with the philosophy that they be easy to
enforce said Ann Fulton, chief hearing officer, N.C.
Board of Alcoholic Control.
v
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Pag 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 10 October 197B
Jobs
NASTAR
CAPSON, the nation-
wide central co-op recruit-
ment organization for the
Navy, is sending recruiter
Bill Jackson to talk with
eligible ECU students
To be eligible, students
should file the federal
employment form (avail
-able in the Co-op office)
and the co-op application,
and must have completed
between 30 and 90 semest-
er hours by Jan. 1, 1979.
Eligible students should
have at least a 2.0 overall
average, have a transcript,
be recommended by a co-op
coordinator, be a citizen of
the U.S and be mobile for
the Spring semester, since
the jobs are located outside
the Greenville area.
School of Business stud-
ents are not eligible. Quali-
fied minorities, women and
handicapped students are
encouraged to apply.
Co-op has other career-
related job placmement
available for spring semes-
ter Interested students
should come to the Co-op
Office. 313 Rawl, for more
information. Applications
must be completed by Oct.
13. to receive priority for
spring placements.
Services
Conregation Bayt
Shalom is pleased to invite
you to attend High Holy
Days services.
They will be held at the
First Presbyterian Church,
Elm and 14th St Green-
ville. The schedule of ser-
vices is:
YOM KIPPUR
Kol Nidrei - Tues Oct. 10
6:30p.m. Wed Oct. 11, 10
a.m. Minchah. Wed Oct.
11.4 p.m.
A breaking of the fast
will be held at the home of
Dr. and Mrs. Ed Lieberman
311 King George Rd. All in
attendance of services are
cordially invited.
There will be an organ-
izational meeting for ser-
ious skiers that will race
NASTAR this winter.
The meeting Is Wed
Oct. 11, at 4 p.m. in room
105 Memorial Gym.
CCFC
Chi Beta
Chi Beta Phi scientific
fraternity meeting is being
help at 7:30 p.m Thurs
Oct. 12 in the Biology
Reading Room (2nd. floor).
Activities will be plan-
ned for this school year. All
members are urged to
attend or contact president
Ken Russell at 758-6747
Come by the Leadership
Training Class for fun,
fellowship, and some prac-
tical insights into the excit-
ing Christian life. Every
Thursday night from 7-9
p.m. Sponsored by the
Campus Crusades for
Christ.
Phi Eta
Pi Kappa
Pi Kappa Phi's are
having little sister rush
tonight at 9 p.m. The house
is located at 803 Hooker Rd.
All sororities and G.D.I's
are urged to come out to
find out what a good time
really is.
Lecture
What is the uncondit-
ional love of God? How doe
sit affect the Christian's
self-image?
Mr. Richard Morri-
son from Nashville, N.C.
will be speaking about how
Paul's letter to the Roman's
chapter 5, verse 8, affects
his and our lives.
Come to Mendenhall,
room 221, at 7 p.m. Wed-
nesday night and check it
out.
Wed Oct. 11 at 7 p.m.
is the next meeting for all
Phi Eta Sigma members.
The meeting will take
place in Mendenhall 244.
Nominations for Who's
Who and a report on the
donut sale will be discus-
sed. Come and get involved
Gamma Beta
All Gamma Beta Phi
Pledges must attend either
the meeting on Tues Oct.
10 at 7 p.m. in Mendenhall
221 or the meeting Thurs
Oct. 12 at 7 p.m. in
Mendenhall 244. Essays
and dues must be turned in
by Oct. 24 in Mendenhall
243.
Poetry
F6SF
There will be a Poetry
Forum next Thursday
night, Oct. 19, at 8 in, room
248 of the Mendenhall
Student Center. All poets
attending should bring at
least six copies of their
poetry.
The forum will feature
poetry by Tar River Poet
Editor Peter Makuck Jeff
Rollins and REBEL Editor
Luke W hisnant to name but
a few.
Issues of the Tar River
Poet can be purchased at
the campus Student Supply
Store, Greenville's Central
News and Card Shop, The
Book Barn, and The Mush-
room.
Have you ever hit one of
those spots where you
thought you were the only
true Christian around, and
you fear that all the people
you really care about are
lost?
Of course you have.
There are few Christians
around that can boast a full
repertoire of saved loved
ones.
This Thursday night at
7:30 in room 221 in the
Mendenhall Student
Center the Full Gospel
Student Fellowship will
look into "prayer for lost
loved ones
We'll also try to answer
the age-old question of,
"How can I be happy in
heaven with lost loved ones
on Earth?"
Handball
The new Intramural sport
sensation is ooming soon.
Anyone interested in learn-
ing more about Team
Handball and the special
opportunities available
within the Sport Club, come
to 105 Memorial Gym at 3
p.m. Wed Oct. 11 for an
informational, or ientational,
and organizational
meeting. Club members
especially are urged to
attend.
Law Society
The ECU Law Society
will be having an organizat-
ional meeting Oct. 18.
The meeting will take
place in Mendenhall at 7
.p.m. in the Multi-p.ur.pose.
room.
AH those interested in
law andor law school,
please come to the meeting
or go by Dr. David Stevens
office in 214 Wright Annex
and sign up.
Legislature
There will be a N.C.
Student Legislature meet-
ing on Oct. 10 at 8:30 p.m.
in room 248 Mendenhall.
This is an important
meeting. Matters to be
discussed are? Bill Topics,
Resolutions and the Interim
-Council at UNC-Wilming-
ton.
All members are urged
to attend. All interested
students, Freshman
through Senior classes are
invited to attend.
For further information
call Joe Tanahey 758-7968
or Marc Adler 758-9523.
Don't miss it, this is where
the action is
Bicyclists
All full-time students
interested in a bicycle club.
This year an interested
student, in association with
the intramurals depart-
ment, is trying to form a
bicycle club. All interested
bicyclist are encouraged to
attend the first meeting so
an appropriate analyses can
be made on the future of
such a club. The first
meeting will be Tues Oct.
10 at 8 p.m. in Memorial
Gym room 105.
Phi Beta
All students interested
in joining Phi Beta Lambda
must fill out the application
posted outside of Richard
Dupree's office in Rawl
209.
Interested students
should bring thier dues at
the next meetirfg, Oct. 11 at
4:30 in Rm. 130.
Theta Alpha
The Theta Alpha
Chapter of Alpha Kappa
Alpha Service Sorority will
sponsor a bake sale, Wed,
Oct. 11 from 10-4 p.m. in
the lobby of the student
bookstore.
All proceeds benefit the
NAACP.
Theta Alpha will also
sponsor a post-game
Homecoming Celebration,
Saturday, Nov. 11 from
10-2 a.m. at the Ramada
Inn.
Tickets will be on sale
during mid-October.
The affair is semi-
formal.
Scholars
There will be a dinner
meeting of the League of
Scholars, Wed Oct. 11 at 6
p.m. at Jasons.
All members are urged
to attend.
CCF
There is a new organiza
tion on campus called the
Campus Christian Fellow-
ship.
It meets every Monday
night in the Mendenhall
Student Union. The time is
6:30, and the room is 238.
Everyone is invited to come
by for Bible study and
singing songs.
Ski trips
Registration for the
Physical Education snow-
skiing trips will be held
Oct. 12 at 7.30 p.m in
Minges Coliseum, .Room
142-143. This is a mandat-
ory meeting for ail partia-
pants.
INBT
All the hotdogs you can
eat That's right The
INDT Club is having a
cookout at 5 p.m. Oct. 5 at
the Gazebo on campus.
We want members so
everyone is invited.
Tickets are on sale for
$1.50 in the INDT Dept.
office (Basement of Flan-
agan Bldg.). Hotdogs,
chips, and things, all you
can eat
Concert
Lecture
There will be a meeting
of Omicron Delta Epsilon,
the honor society for
Economics, on Wedn Oct.
11, 1978, in Rawl 103.
Old members are en-
couraged to attend.
TTJosf Hlfdentsay join
who have a 3-5. overall
G.P.A who have a 3.0
G.P.A. in Economics, and
whohave had at least 10
semester hours of Eco-
nomics.
Brewer
The trustees, faculty,
staff, and students of ECU
request the honor of your
presence at the installation
of Thomas Brewer as
Chancellor of the Univer-
sity on Sat, Oct. 28 at 1030
a.m. on the North Lawn of
ECU.
If you wish to attend,
please call 757-6537 to
request tickets.
The ECU Student Union
Lecture Committee will
present on Tues Oct. 10 at
8 p.m. in the Mendenhall
Student Theatre, Playboy
columnist, Arthur Knight,
who will present a lecture
and 50 minute film pres-
entation on the history of
Sex in the Cinema. ECU
students are admitted free
with ID and Activity Card.
Car wash
The little sisters of the
Kappa Sigma fraternity are
hav ing a car wash Sat Oct.
14, from 10 until.
It win be in the Darryi's
parking lot beside the
Kappa Sigma house on 10th
St.
Come support the little
sisters and get a clean car!
The Student Uoion
Major Attractions Commit-
tee will present Brothers
Johnson with special guest
Mother's Finest on Sat .
Oct. 14, at 8 p.m. in Minges
Coliseum.
Tickets will be $4 for
ECU students and $6 for
the public. All tickets are
available from the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall
In addition, public tickets
can be purchased from
Apple Records - E. 5th St
Greenville, School Kid's
Records - Georgetown
Shoppes, Greenville. The
Music Shop - Greenville
Square Mall, Greenville.
Only public tickets will
be available at the door.
Raquetball
There will be a Raquet-
ball Club meeting, Wed .
Oct. 11 at 6:30 p.m. at 105
Memorial Gym.
Nurses

There will be a Student
Nurse's Association meet-
ing tonight at 6:30 p.m. in
room 202 of the Nursing
Bldg. Topic for discussion
will be self-awareness con-
cerning nursing as a pro-
fession. All nursing majors
are invited to attend. Re-
freshments will be served.
A
The Fourth Annual Rebel Art Show
Registration deadline:
Wed. Oct. 11,4 PM.
Prizes to be awarded include the Annual Attic
Lward (Best-In-Show$100 and a plaque, an
ight $60 prizes for first place in each category,
(Prizes provided by the Rebel, the Attic , and Jefferie's Beer and Wine.)
Classifieds
Iforsote @
FOR SALE: By owner. '74
Ford Van, looks and runs
tike new. V8-302 engine.
Automatic transmission,
power steering, and brakes
air conditioning, radio, car-
peted, under coated, and
equipped for towing travel
trailer :hitch and electric
brakes); New tires. $3,595
cali 756-0166.
FOR SALE: Small white
Whirlpool refrig. with 14
inch separate freezer com-
partment. $150. Call 752-
6597 after 7 p.m.
LAB COATS: for sale at
JA's Uniform Shop located
at 710Weat6Th St.
FOR SALE: Peevey PA 400
plush amp. Fa more info.
call 753-4025.
FOR SALE: '76 deluxe
Motorbecane MOPED
$276. Runs well and Is in
good shape. Call 752-5236
and ask for Mike.
FOR SALE 76 Ford Cdbra
II. 4 cylinder, 4 speed,
great gae mileage, AM FM
8-track. Asking $2,600 (owe
$2,500). Contact Don Bohn
at 749-3791 (Fountain) after
5 p.m.
FOR SALE: 5 cu. ft. refrig.
with freezer compartment.
Perfect for dorms. Call
752-1699.
FOR SALE: 77 Celica
Toyota GT liftback. AC,
AMFM stereo, 5 speed
overdrive, ESP system.
Excellent oond. Like brand
s
new) Chocolate color with
white pinstrip. Reason for
selling: Need the Jack
$5,150 Call Kim. 756-8948
or come by 819 Greene.
FOR SALE: Refrig. in good
oond. for $40. Call 73B-
8158.
FOR SALE: JVC KD-15
cassette tape deck. Full
warranty. Three months
old. Call Jim 758-2811.
tor rent � persona!�
FdMALE DESIRES: room-
mate for 2 bdrrn. apt. at
Eaetbrook. Call 758-4251 or
756-5942.
LEAD GUITARIST: seek-
ing position with establish-
ed band. Call days753-5182
nights 753-4025. ALSO
HORSEBACK- RIDING: at
Jarman Stables located on
Hwy. 43 West. Call 752-
5237.
TYPING SERVICE: Cheap
rates, professional and ef-
ficient service. Call 756-
3815 after 5 p.m.
HELP WANTED: Veteran-
student commuting from
Washington, N.C. to work
in office position 15-20
hcure per week. Must be
fUHttme student. Ceil Ron
�rown at 758-3215 Wthich-
ard 206, Mon. or Frl.

,�
g v: �r





10 October 1978 FQUNTAINHEAD Page 3
World-wide biker in Greenville
THIS MAY BE one way to keep security from giving someone a ticket
Photo by Richard Green
ByED WILLIAMS
Staff Writer
Masami "Sammy"
Kawano, rode into Green-
ville on his Japanese-made
Panasonic bicycle two
weeks ago while on his
world-wide journey which
he hopes will end in
Bombay, India sometime in
1980.
Sammy, 28, was born in
Oita, Japan and is a
Physical Education Instruc-
tor.
While he was in Japan
he decided that he wanted
to do something that would
leave him with "many good
memories of my youth
He came up with the idea
that he would like to travel
around the world on a
bicycle. He purchased a
one-thousand dollar Pan-
asonic bike and began
training himself for his long
journey by riding up "big,
rough, stone roads" in the
mountainsof Osaka, Japan.
In 1976, he loaded up
his bike with a hammock,
tent. cooking utensils,
clothes, sleeping bag, cam-
era, and a diary, from
CRAZY TUESDAY Foosball
tournament, chugging contest
svith lots more prizes and
specials
Thursday "THE TAMS"
Friday- Afternoon Party 3-7
Sunday- Ladies Nite
STAN
TEAGUE
YOUR ON-CAMPUS Grjtog REPRESENTATIVE
STAN TEAGUE IOX-C SCOTT DORM
Photo by John H. Grogan
STAN RECENTLY ATTENDED
A STROH'S COLLEGE
REPRESENTATIVE SEMINAR
IN DETROIT, AND HE INVITES
YOU TO SEE HIM FOR YOUR
MUGS, T-SHIRTS, AND OTHER
PARAPHENALIA.
which he hopes to publish a
book of his travels some-
day, and set out from Japan
to Australia.
His journey has led him
from there to America, and
consequently to Greenville
where he is staying with the
Dillinder family at 102
North Sylvan Street.
Sammy generally rides
80 to 100 miles a day and
spends his nights in police
or fire stations, which wel-
come him openly. If neither
of these options are avail-
able to him, he sets up a
tent in which to stay.
He tries to keep to the
back roads and side streets
rather than taking the main
highways while riding.
He also plans on which
time of the year to travel
in which country. He tries
to ride only in fair weather
and therefore plans his
schedule accordingly. For
example, he stayed away
from America when it was
winter here and traveled
instead in other countries
when it was summer Then
he came to America when
the weather began to turn
warmer. Of course, his
plans don't always work
out. He once slept outside
in 20 degree below zero
weather in Georgia.
He has had other un-
usual experiences also.
Another incident that oc-
cured in Georgia was the
time "a man tried to run
over Sammy (with his
car) stated Mrs. Yoshiko
Dillinder.
Sammy said that he has
also had encounters with
bears in Canada and with
wolves while in Australia.
Sammy has traveled
through 27 states in
America so far.
He plans on going to
New York next where he
will stay with friends, even
though he stated, "I don't
like big towns. Too noisy
Sammy said that he
likes the size of Greenville
but he doesn't have any
time limit on how long he
will stay
He stops in some towns
and cities long enough to
get a part-time job so as to
have enough money to fix
his bike (although he has
only had three flat tires so
far), and buy food and other
necessities.
Sammy says that he
would like to publish a book
someday about his journey.
He said he would have it
printed in English because
"most people use English
as the international lang-
uage
Before he started his
world-wide bicycle ride.
Sammythoughtthat the trip
would take four years Once
he got a good start into his
journey, he switched his
goal to travel around the
world in five years Now he
says he says it may take six
years
If you're ever riding
down the road and see
a man riding a loaded-down
Panasonic bike with a jac-
ket proclaiming on the back
of it, Around the World
Cycling Trip via 70 Coun-
tries" with the word
"Japan written under-
neath it. you'll know you
nave passed Masami
Sammy" Kawano. a re-
markable man with a rem-
arkable dream
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e
T
s

Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 10 October 1978
Gun control needed
The following editorial is reprinted from the
July 26 edition of FOUNTAINHEAD.
Mention gun control in the south and
you will immediately elicit a number of heated
arguments against it. Recently, both of North
Carolina's senators, Morgan and Helms, got a
chance to have their arguments heard when
they voted to deny funding of a proposed
change in Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and
Firearms regulations which would allow for a
numerical registration system for handguns
and a national computer bank storing
information of registered guns.
While several good arguments were made
against the proposed change in the regula-
tions, they were mainly of a technical and
economical nature, since the registration
system is complicated and would cost $4.2
million.
As the law stands today, almost every adult
can own a handgun. Why do we license
drivers, automobiles, alcohol, and place strict
regulations on the firecracker industry and yet
leave firearms untouched?
The horror of unregulated handguns is
evident in the Son of Sam killings and the San
Francisco Zebra murders. A ban on firearms is
too extreme, as are undue restrictions on
hunting and sport firearms, but handguns,
espceially inexpensive Saturday Night Specials
and others should be severely restricted and
penalties for using them in a crime should be
more strict.
One of the favorite arguments of the
pro-gun lobby is that guns don't kill people,
people kill people, which is a little bit like
saying leaping off the top of a building doesn't
kill people, it's the impact.
American society is fascinated with guns.
Our children play with toy guns, they see
gunfire constantly on television, they eat candy
guns, they play cowboys, cops, robbers, spys,
all with guns. In most of these games,
someone is "killed" and the victor is a hero
(rarely a heroine).
Americans regard the gun as a macho
phallic symbol, the possession of which
supposedly increases one's masculinity. Until
this basic fallacy of the American psyche is
corrected, most any gun control plan will meet
with failure.
Commentary
Uppity Woman's lament
HESTER PETTY �
Uppity Women a
Greenville
I (the writer) thought
that you (the reader) would
be reading an article de-
voted to a comparison of
racism and sexism this
week. But I was wrong. You
will not be reading that
article because I have not
written it. I began to write
it but only the title and first
two paragraphs were about
racism and sexism. The
rest of it turned into this.
And this is about why that
turned into this.
I have been writing
articles for FOUNTAIN-
HEAD for the past six
weeks under the auspices
of Uppity Women of
Greenville (about which I
w'll reveal an awful secret
later in this article.) I wrote
them because I have some-
thing to say about women
and our place in this sexist,
male-dominated society. I
wrote them because I
thought you might be in-
terested in what I had to
say.
I do not know if you are
interested in what I have to
say, I do not know if you
even read the articles.
I do know of at least ten
people (not including
FOUNTAINHEAD staffers
who proof-read and re-type
articles) who read my ar-
ticles regularly and of about
three or four who have read
one or more.
I do not know if you like
or hate them. I do not know
if you couldn't care less. I
do not know because (ex-
cept for five responses) you
have not told me. Needless
to say I do not have extra-
sensory perception.
I am not writing these
articles for money. I am not
writing them to see my
name in print. I am not
writing them because I like
to write, because I am not a
writer. I am writing these
articles because I have
something to tell you and
since I don't know you
personally this is the eas-
iest way.
You are a major part of
my motivation. Your lack of
And I came up with an
answer.
I keep the group name
because starting the group
was such a damn good idea
that I can't let it go. And
because, in a way, these
articles - are my weekly
group meetings.
Now you may be getting
the wrong idea. You may be
thinking that I am totally on
my own. That's not true.
You see I am involved in
another group (it has no
"(Writing) has gotten harder
each week. And this week, I
said to hell with it
response makes it hard for
me to write. And it has
gotten harder each week.
And this week I said to hell
with it.
This week I said forget
the re-writes, the frustra-
tion, the worrying about
whether I am making my-
self clear. This week I
decided to tell you that I
am-out.
You know about my
group? Uppity Women of
Greenville? Of course you
don't. I mean, hell, I don't
even know about it. I don't
think it even exists.
Asa matter of fact (and
this is the awful secret I
was telling you about ear-
lier) I am the only member
of Uppity Women of
Greenville. This revelation
might cause you to wonder
why I even bother to use
the group name in my arti-
cles. I was wondering about
that myself just last week.
formal name). It is a
consciousness � raising
group.
We share our ideas on
lots of things. We talk
about our experiences and
ourselves. Andv my exper-
iences in this group are part
of the motivation to write
these articles.
But let me get back to
talking about Uppity Wo-
men of Greenville. One of
you asked me what my
group was all about. Since
there isn't much to it except
these articles, let me tell
you how it got started.
This past summer I
began to really feel isolated
from the women's move-
ment. Oh sure, I was
reading a lot of feminist
literature, but I didn't have
many women friends to talk
to and I didn't feel that I
was contributing much to
the movement. So I ran an
ad in Tru Da7y Reflector
FbunJainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over 50 years
EDITOR
Doug White
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Leigh Coakley
TRENDS EDITOR
Steve Bachner
NEWS EDITORS
Julie Everette
Ricki Gliarmis
ADVERTISING MANAGER
Robert M. Swaim
SPORTS EDITOR
Sam Rogers
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper of East
Carolina University sponsored by the Media Board of ECU
and is distributed each Tuesday and Thursday (weekly
during the summer).
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C.
27834
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni $6 annually.
Forum
Cops arrive quickly; search poorly
and over the air-waves of
WRQR inviting women to
call if they were interested
in being involved in a
feminist group.
I got some responses,
spread the word to my
friends, and called for our
first meeting. Several
meetings iater it became
clear that everyone was
interested in conscious-
ness-raising, but not in
political action. So our
awareness group was born
and Uppity Women of
Greenville labored on.
It will probably labor
right into the Guinness
Book of World Records. But
that's cool because the
consciousness - raising
group is great and it has
helped alleviate that feeling
of isolation. And my arti-
cles are my contribution to
the movement.
But I still have this need
to know if you are reading
this column. And I'd like to
know what you think about
it if you do read it. And
since I'm writing these
articles for you, how about
letting me know what you'd
like to read about? Do you
have any questions that I
might be able to answer in
some way? The lines are
open.
M aybe one question you
might have is who is Hester
Petty. I can answer that one
right now.
Hester is a 26 year old
woman with nice teeth (not
all of them are real) who
graduated from ECU a year
and a half ago with a BA in
Art. She is a minimumwage
peasant in food service and
she only has two long-
sleeved winter shirts be-
cause she spends all her
extra (non-foodshelter)
bucks on books.
She is legally married.
She has two cats and a car
with a gas tank that ex-
plodes upon impact. Her
astrological sign is Cancer.
She knows how to make
sandwiches and fry eggs,
but is otherwise confused in
kitchens.
She is at this moment
harboring a virus in her
body that will turn into a
horrendous cold or flu by
Tuesday. She hopes to
finish her article on the
comparison of racism and
sexism in next week's
FOUNTAINHEAD. She
enjoyed writing this article.
Uppity Women of Qraan-
ville, P.O. Box 1373,
Greenville, N.C. 27834 is
awaiting �a$t quantities of
mail.
To FOUNTAINHEAD;
To begin with, we would
like to commend the cam-
pus security on their
handling of the problem at
Jarvis Hall on the night of
Sept. 28 around 10:45 p.m.
They were very efficient
and careful in removing the
men from the ladies'
restroom.
However, we do have
one legitimate oomplaint:
The second trip could have
been avoided.
The campus police came
to the dorm around 10:40
on a report of two men on
the balcony on second floor
east. Security looked down
the halls and didn't see the
men.
The officers were told
that the door to the
suncourt was open as was
the gate leading outside.
They asked the one who
reported this if she had
looked around.
Upon her negative
reply, the officers shone a
flashlight from a second
story window onto the
sunoourt. Seeing no one,
the offioers left with advice
to call again if any trouble
arose. The men supposedly
were gone.
The men were not gone.
The campus police had
failed to look in one of the
more obvious places - the
ladies' restroom. The two
men were in the second
floor west restroom and
apparently had been there
the entire time the officers
were there the first time.
The campus police were
extremely quick to respond
a second time - something
we highly praise them for.
We are just saying that had
the restrooms been checked
the first time, much
excitement, anxiety, and
fear could have been
avoided.
Respectfully.
Daisy V. Jones, president.
Jarvis Hall
Kathryn L. Adams
Elizabeth Littleton
Patty Chin
Sandy Goodwin
Kim Moore
Alice Lynn King
If at first you don't succeed, then
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Perhaps Patricia Knight
should consider several
facts before viciously criti-
cizing a newspaper repor-
ter, as she did in the Sept.
28 edition of FOUNTAIN-
HEAD.
The story written by M s.
Arah Venable could have
been written better, true,
but instead of attacking
Ms. Venable as you did,
Ms. Knight, you should
have laid part of the blame
on the desk editors, if you
were going to place it
anywhere.
It is the desk editors'
responsibility to edit all
copy coming totheir desks.
While Venable could have
written a better story, the
desk editors oould have,
and should have, edited her
story more carefully.
I have a question: what
does being an English
major have to do with
writing for a newspaper?
The English majors I know
spend more of their time
studying literature instead
of the basics of writing.
For your information,
Ms. Knight, Doug White,
editor of FOUNTAIN-
HEAD, is a history major. I
was editor spring semester
and I'm a French major.
The editor before me was a
history major, and the one
before her was a political
science major. Certainly
our grammar is not always
perfect, but one doesn't
need to major in English in
order to write for a news-
paper.
When one is learning
the basics of a business, he
cannot be expected to pro-
duce perfect work while
beginning. I feel sure, Ms.
Knight, that you did not
produce great works of art
when you first began.
Ms. Venable was
pressed for time to get her
story to the news desk. Part
of writing for a newspaper
is learning to write well
under pressure, but in
order to do so, you must
practice. Give Venable time
and she will produce well.
FOUNTAINHEAD reporter defended
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
I have reserved com-
ment on the letter written
in this space until now. I
feel that I should respond to
the young lady who
launched a vicious attack on
Arah Venable. In the first
place, Arah Venable is a
girl. In the second place,
Arah is not illiterate, and to
say otherwise is unfair, no
matter whose syllogism you
use, false or otherwise.
English majors are not
the only ones who write for
this newspaper, and it is
inaccurate to assume that
all journalists are. Fred
Graham is a reporter for
CBS; he has a degree in
law. As for the author of
this letter's ability to type, i
cannot see what this has to
do with anything at all.
The author, a Ms.
Patricia Knight, says in her
article that Arah Venable
should not frustrate herself
by attempting to write
newspaper articles. Arah
Venable's story of that day
about security would not
win Pulitzer by any stretch
of the imagination. The
important thing about the
story was that (A) informa-
tion was given out to the
public and (B) Ms. Venable
was willing to try to write
the story.
You see, Ms. Knight, I
feel that that was an
important part of that story.
The reason is that I know
from bitter experience that
it is next to impossible to
find people who are willing
to try on this campus.
It is hard to find people
who want to write for the
news section. Student
apathy at this campus is at
an all-time high. One need
only look at the low voter
turnout at the recent SGA
election to see that this fact
is true. I certainly hope that
through the collective
efforts of all the people at
this university that this tide
of do-nothing mentality can
be stemmed.
Arah is willing to try
and I think that this is an
important attribute for any-
one to have. This university
certainly needs more Arah
Venables, not less.
The story came in , the
editors edited it, and it
didn-t turn out wall.
Conclusion: we blew it. But
since wa are humans, and
not androids, wa are
entitled to a few mistakes in
this life. Also, please bear
in mind, Ma. Knight, tnat
you are not dealing with the
editorial staff of the Raleigh
News and Observe, you
are dealing with a student
newspaper at ECU.
I wouldn't want to infer
that people should not
criticize the newspaper;
they should. Newspapers
are like that. If any student
has an opinion about this
newspaper, then they
should voice their opinions
openly. This is, after all, a
public forum which exists
for the purpose of the
exchange of ideas as well as
a dispenser of information.
We welcome letters of
dissent, and we prim all
letters which are submitted
to us, as long as the letters
are not Mbelous.
So it goes, Ms. Knight.
I hope that you - and others
like you - will continue to
write to this newspaper. I
also hope that you will not
blast someone without
knowing the facts. We are
concerned here with find-
ing people who can report
facts accurately.
We are also concerned
with finding people that ere
dependable - people who
can take a can-do attitude
about the things thai they
do outside of the classroom
Someone like Arah
Venable.
Merc Barnea
As for your suggestion
that she no longer frustrate
herself by trying to write
newi articles, tell me. who
are you to suggest to
anyone I give up some-
thing9 A- : ho are you to
declare that one is or is not
literate7
Perhaps you have re-
marked to your 'nends tha:
you wish to Decome a-
artist. Arah Venable wishes
to become a journalist
Cindy Broome
Chivalry is
dead at
ECU
To FOUNTAINHEAD
On the evening of
Oct. 5. at 7 p.m my
roommate and I decided to
go out Her car was parked
at the corner of Greene
Dorm parking lot
When we arrived at the
car. we discovered a flat
tire We proceeded to
change the tire While
changing the tire, about
five carloads of presumed
ECU males (not gentlemen)
drove by!
Not even one stopped to
offer help The worst part
of the whole deal was that a
female security cop
watched us change the tire,
but she was watching from
Fletcher Dorm. A short
time later she walked by us
(distance of about one and a
half feet) and kept on
walking.
She did not offer to call
someone to assist us nor
did she check to see if
everything was okay. I
think it is down right low of
people in this dsy and age
who cannot spare a few
minutes to help someone
out.
Thank goodness my
father had taught me how
to change e tire. That day I
laerned, that if ever in a
iam on ECU campus oon't
expect help from the ECU
Mf �"� especially from
the female security cops
Michele Parish
Ksthy George







Ml
10 October 1978 FOUNTAtNHEAD Psqs 5
Speakers and field trips planned
ECU' s geology club reorganized
ByARAH VENABLE
Staff Writer
A geology club has been
reorganized on campus.
The club will include host-
ing guest speakers and
taking vanousfield trips.
Allen Gtundy. an officer
of the club. said. "It's a
way for students to learn
geology in a different man-
ner
Tne club is very in-
formal, adds Bob Eaton, a
member of the club. Eaton
said the club is for the
advancement of geology,
and to help students be-
come more involved in this
field of study.
In past years, the club
has taken filed trips to the
mountain region, piedmont
plateau, and coastal plain
in N.C
Grundy said the club
meets at least once a
month, and twice if another
meeting is necessary The
meetings usually consist of
a speaker or slide show on a
present topic being re-
searched.
The next meeting is
Mori , Oct. 16. Stanley
Riggs is the guest speaker
Riggs will talk about his
trip to Australia and show
slides of phosphate dep-
osites which he has stud-
ied.
Eaton said the club
members want to get
people to speak to the club
on a variety of subjects.
Grundy replied that
through some of the talks,
students may become quite
interested in geology.
The club consists of
tribunal officers with equal
rank, undergraduate, and
graduate students. The of-
ficers are Allen Grundy,
Don Lewis, and Ernie Holt-
worth. The club is sup-
ported financially from
dues paid by the members.
Dr. Billings, chairman
of the geology department,
is the faculty advisor for the
club, but Eaton adds, the
entire geology faculty will
act as advisors
Lewis said, "The club
has been dormant in years
past He said the organ-
izational structure may
change with incoming
money. The club's mem-
bership should be larger
including more participa-
tion and field trips.
Any student interested
in joining the club nan ask
about it in Grahm 210.
Lewis said to be a member
one has to come to the
meetings regularly and pay
dues
Grundy said one doesn't
have to be a member to
come to the meetings or go
on field trips. He en-
courages anyone interested
to participate
,
Ssf
t
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Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 10 October 1978
MIME ARTIST KEITH Berger enacts a tug of war with an
nce participant
Photo by Pete Podeszwa.
Berger's 'superb sense of timing'
satisfied a near capacity crowd
UKE WHISNANT
Staff Writer
New York mime Keith
answered sustained
appiause with silence last
Wednesday night, and a
near capacity Mendenhall
crowd loved it.
e art of pantomime is
traditionally performed u-
smg only the body; the
mime creates his characters
a 'hout props or spoken
sound A good mime can
make you see almost any-
thing imaginable simply by
letting you see his reaction
toit.
Keith Berger is better
than good.
Berger who has been
lauded as Americas
premier mime opened
his ECU appearance with a
piece called Mechanical
Awakening Two students
carried a rigid Berger down
the theatre aisle, up the
steps, and stood him cen-
terstage, where the mime
swayed gently as if in a soft
breeze. After a few false
starts � falling into the
students' arms and having
to be re-balanced � Ber-
ger came to life.
His quick, jerky move-
ments conveyed a weird,
robot-like android, remini-
sent of Star Wars C3p0.
Berger's absolute lack of
human' expression caused
audible gasps from the
audience � it was that
eerie.
Berger dragged several
people onstage with him
during the show, including
a co-ed to whom he ex-
pressed his love by
"reaching into his chest
and withdrawing his heart.
He then presented the
still-beating organ to the
young lady, who didn't
show much enthusiasm.
The next piece was a
pantomime classic: "The
Flame One of the most
difficult selections in any-
one's repetoire, "The
Flame" requires lightning-
quick movements and great
control of the arms and
upper tody, as the mime
simulates a burning fire
from its ignition to its
eventual death. Performed
under a red spotlight, Ber-
ger's rendition of this clas-
sic showed emotion and a
superb sense of timing. The
audience could actually see
theflame.
Other highlights of the
show included Berger ori-
ginals "Le Cirque Biz-
arre a long presentation
of a circus of misfits, and
"Nightmare described as
"a dream of time, an
attempt to bury and escape
it "Nightmare" was per-
formed in a surrealistic,
Charlie Chaplinesque fren-
zy, complete with Berger's
tape recorded narration and
alarm clock sound effects.
"Instant Replay" was a
humorous collection of
video-type football mon-
tages, in which Berger
handed off, caught passes,
and announced the game in
forward, reverse, and slow
motion.
Berger's "Head Piece"
was explained on the pro-
gram as "I simply take off
my head and go inside
This was one of the more
abstract pieces, and some
members of the audience
grew restless trying to
follow the mime's explor-
ation of his own skull.
But the total perform-
ance bordered on the flaw-
less, and each piece con-
tained individual images
that stayed with the aud-
ience. No one there could
forget Keith Berger's cir-
cus acrobat skipping rope
with his own intestines;
Berger's tug of war played
with a little boy from the
audience and an invisible
rope; or Berger's hanging
suicide, neck stretched
grotesquely to one side and
one foot dangling off the
floor. In a night of pan-
tomime brilliance, these
were moments of genius.
JORGE BOLET
ECU Artists Series
presents Jorge Bolet
ECU News Bureau
Solo instrumentalists,
chamber ensembles and a
choral group will be featur-
ed during the 78-79 sea-
son, of ECU'S Artist Series.
The series includes
pianist Jorge Bolet (Oct.
11), TASHI (Nov. i, the
Gregg Smith Singers (Nov.
15). violinist Eugene Fodor
(Jan 30). classical guitarist
Chirstopher Parkening
(Feb. 20) and the Piedmont
Chamber Orchestra (April
5)
All events are evening
performances, scheduled
for 8 p.m. in the Curtis
Hendrix Theatre. Season
tickets for the series are
available at the ECU Cent-
ral Ticket Office (telephone
757-6611, ext. 266) at $20
each for the general public.
Jorge Bolet, a leading
keyboard figure of world
reknown, has won critical
acclaim for his solo recitals
and his appearances with
major orchestras. "His
Liszt playing is without
peer in the world today
noted Harold Schonberg.
TASHI (Tibetan for
"good fortune") inlcludes
See TASHI, p. 8
'Our society has become
visually oriented �Berger
By STEVE BACNHER
Trends Editor
and
DOUG WHITE
Editor
Most performers, when they think of playing in large
spaces, feel they need to enlarge their show: add more
sound, more lights, more performers, television monitors,
and soon. But Keith Berger, the mime who usually works
alone, just thinks of more audience.
His impact seems to grow to fill the required space. His
rule is: if he can be seen by everyone, he can get to
everyone. He uses the same technique to fix the attention of
a vast audience as engineers woufd use to hold the whole
place together - a balanced tension.
Out of doors, Keith looks for the highest point on the
landscape and soon has everyone watching him. One Spring
Sunday in New York City's Central Park, 300,000 people
crowded the Mall to "Eat a Bit of the Big Apple" - a feast
sponsored by many leading restaurants. Keith drew so
much attention that his manager's telephone was jammed
most of Monday with calls for Keith to perform and to
model.
Berger discovered his power to rivet people's attention
several years ago. He once performed in the Los Angeles
Sports Arena. To his surprise, he was able to control a vast
audience waiting to hear a rock star.
On another occasion, in the Jackson, Miss.
Coliseum - on a program with Doc Severison, Charlie Pride,
and Dorothy Kirsten - Berger drew the entire audience into
his world of silence. And Keith once offered to perform for
an all-night peace vigil in New York City's Catheoral of St.
John the Divine - the second largest church in the world.
In that vast, gothic space, under a ceiling 120 feet high,
as one of the clergymen put it, "Keith Berger's
performance created a powerful stillness. It is a rare
experience that a single figure in a building as immense as
the Cathedral can hold and move an audience so
intensely
Keith Berger first caught the attention of the public as a
performer for the New York Parks Department on the
streets of Manhattan. Some of his favorite performing
spaces were around the Pulitzer Fountain in front of the
Plaza Hotel, on the lions in front of the New York Public
Library, and on sidewalks in front of the Museum of
Modern Art, St. Thomas Church, and the Metropolitan
Museum of Art.
He has met movie producers and directors on the street,
as well as the people who became his managers. He even
met his girlfriend, a dancer, while he was performing on
Fifth Avenue.
Once, on a SoHo street while "pulling" cars and
"directing" traffic, Keith "built" a wall in front of a man's
car, then opened a "door" so the car could go through. The
man turned out to be a former executive of Genera! Motors,
and was so fascinated by Keith's ability to create illusions
with cars, he told Keith to have his managers get in touch
with the General Motors advertising agencies.
Chevrolet's ad agency (Campbell-Ewald) was inter-
ested, but not yet convinced, when they invited Keith
Berger to Detroit to perform for their creative staff. Keith
did, and shortly after was chosen to advertise 1977
Chevrolets in a 30-second pre-introduction commercial that
would appear on network television to promote the new
model year.
The commercial was filmed in a California wheat field
under a hot sun. Keith worried about his white makeup
running, but not about the car. There was none. He created
the illusion of a beautiful, shiny, new car that he petted and
admired: the soon-to-be-released 1977 model Chevrolet.
Keith Berger has also worked for advertisers in media
other than television. Each August The New York Times
Magazine features back-to-school clothing articles with
photographs. Keith was chosen as the feature in a colorful,
seven-page spread on "Kid's Clothes
For several days he posed with 10 small, very
well-dressed children in Central Park, near the museums
and churches, and around the streets of New York. Within
days he posed again for a Trevira (fabric) ad in the same
Sunday magazine - this time with a beautiful female model.
Keith Berger has also appeared in a Time front-cover
articie on Bloomingdale's, the chic New York department
store where Keith introduced a new line of French
wristwathcesto an early morning press conference. Several
months ago, he made a public service safety ad for
television sponsored by Consolidated Edison.
With all the words and all the music television has to
offer, Keith Berger has created some of its most eloquent
moments with silence. For all the color available in print,
I this small, lithe mime, in black leotard and white face, often
catches the attention first.
Whether moving or still, Keith Berger expresses the
emotions of joy, surprise, fear, and wonder. Whether
Mechanical Man, gorilla in a cage, or hard-shooting
cowboy, Keith Berger has every eye on him.
The following interview was conducted during the
intermission of his performance last Wednesday night in
Mendenhall Student Center. The performance was
sponsored by the Student Union Theatre Arts Committee.
FOUNTAINHEAD: To what extent has Maroeau
influenced your art?
Berger: I was very inspired by what he does and some of
the same conventions we both do.
FOUNTAINHEAD: Was it Maroeau that inspired you
most?
Berger: No. Actually , it was a Frenchman by the name
of Jean Marie Barreau. He was in a movie by the name of
The Children of Paradise and you can see that movie
I'd say I got seriously interested in mime sometime in my
early teens.
FOUNTAINHEAD: When did you first start performing
professionally?
Berger: When I was about 19 years old I started
performing on the streets in New York City early on.
FOUNTAINHEAD: How many years did you study
mime?
Berger: I studied for about four or five years before I
really began my career.
FOUNTAINHEAD: Many performers studied mime
before going into their respective specializations. For
instance how does Harpo Marx rank as a mime?
Berger: Oh I think he's excellent. He's an excellent
mime.
FOUNTAINHEAD: David Bowie also began as a mime
Berger: That's correct. Bowie studied under a man by
the name of Lindsay Kemp. David is a very versatile
performer and I respect him. As a mime I think he is quite
good.
FOUNTAINHEAD: Is mime primarily a form of acting
or is it more a form of dance?
Berger: It's a cohesion of both. I can't really say it's
more one than the other. I think in a way it's more akin to
acting, believe it or not. It's a form of acting without words.
FOUNTAINHEAD: Do you prefer pure mime, which is
the style that you use, or do you prefer interspersing mime
witn other areas of performance like Marx. Bowie, et. al
Berger: I like the pure mime as it can be used for
many areas of performance: motion pictures, television,
stage.
FOUNTAINHEAQ: You concentrate a great deal on the
internal self in your pieces. Stance,
tonight you jumped rope with your intestines; went into
your head on several occasions. Would you comment?
Berger: It's just a phase I'm goin' through.
FOUNTAINHEAD: Mime is an ancient art Did it
originate in a single place like the commedia del arte in Italy
or did it evolve as a universal art?
Berger: I'd say that the best mime is done in Japan or
either the Balinese theatre. The No theatre and the Kabuki
do the best mime.
'The problem with television is,
once they see some of your
material, it's very hard to
repeat it, it gets stale fast on
TV. So a young performer
must be careful, and there
aren ft a lot of writers for mime
that can write it very welL
You have to be very careful
FOUNTAINHEAD : When did mime first become popular in
the western culture ?
Berger: With the commedia, and that came up from
Italy. The French adopted it and took the clowns out of it
and certain types of clowns were silent. They were known
as mime or mimie or mimes and they developed and the
head guy of the mimes was a guy by the name of
Debarreau. He started as a street performer and then later
was a hit attraction with a circus Phenombeau in Paris and
many mimes patterned themselves after Debarreau,
including Maroeau.
FOUNTAINHEAD: You did a lot of the same pieces in
tonight's show as in your appearance here last year
How many different programs do you do?
Berger: Let's see. I don't remember what program I did
last year? Was it this one?
I do about three different programs. Sometimes I do ihe
same program but with a few pieces changed
FOUNTAINHEAD: Do you prefer doing the routines
that you choreograph or write yourself or do you prefer
doing audience participation? For example, you did some
teasers today.
Berger: I like them both the same.
FOUNTAINHEAD: How do you choose your victims?
Berger: Weil, I have to look at them very closely,
because if l choose one who would be psychologically
damaged by it, it's not a good thing.
FOUNTAINHEAD: How many shows do you normally
do in a year?
Berger: About 75 or 80.
FOUNTAINHEAD: Where do you like to perform?
Berger: Colleges, universities, and especially theatres
I've also made a few commercials, a little more television
nowadays.
FOUNTAINHEAD: Do you have
branch out into other areas?
Berger: I'd like to go into film. I've got a new show that
perhaps will be out next fall about a space man. This will be
a whole show about one character, and it'll be kind of
production.
FOUNTAINHEAQ. Shields and Yarnall had their own
show and they used mime as a springboard rather than the
focal point. Why do you think their show failed?
any ambitions to
a
Berger: I really cant say. I think they're good and thev
e alot of energy, it's a different style and I thinkT.
usually at an artist's series or something like that. He plays more slapstick. They're good at it I guess it i at
a mime in that film and I saw it at around 11 or 12 and I me too much of Maroeau for me to watch it t�I rftm,nd8
said, "Hey, that's what I'd like to do really like todoa show of mv own I'm �.� � ,d
FOUNTAINHEAD: When did you first get seriously
interested in mime?
Berger: Well,l think when I was a kid I used to do it and
just not know it. Then later on I just sort of developed it. So
my own. 'm nid
their own show. It made a lot of people awar m m
Y but I b�, ywy w-i bJum th
is�� ecROER, p. 7)
Berger:
I





Tit
"� � 1 T
- - 1
Berger
10 Odobr 1976 FOUNTAINHEAD Pap 7
'He's become a central figure in the arts'
Le Cirque Bizarre" was the longest
piece Berger performed, "a long present-
ation of a circus of misfits.
Pete Podeszwa)
Photo by
Recording artist Crystal
Gayle comes to Raleigh
United Artists recording
star Crystal Gayle will
appear at Dorton Arena
at the North Carolina State
Fair in Raleigh on Oct. 18.
Gayle will per-
form material from her
current United Artists LP
entitled When I Dream ,
which is the follow jp
album to her platinum We
Must Beiieve In Magic
United Artists considers
When I Dream to be
Crystal's best album to
wide variety of music in-
cluding, among others,
great songs like, "Cry Me
A River "Wayward
Wind "Someday Soon
and her current his single,
"Talking in Your Sleep
GRAMMY WINNER
Gayle talked about
the album during a recent
interview - "I'm really
.excited about this album.
My producer, Allen
Reynolds, did a fantastic
job, and I feel it's by far the
The past year has been
a banner one for Crystal in
that she not only achieved
an R.I.A.A. gold award for
her smash hit, "Don't It
Make My Brown Eyes
Blue but also, a platinum
award for her We Musi
Believe In Magic album.
Add to that, a Grammy
and outstanding vocalist
awards from both the
Academy of Country Music
and the Country Music
Association and you've got
the hottest female singer in
continued from p. 6
problem with television is,
once they see some of your
material, it's very hard to
repeat it, it gets stale very
fast on TV, so a young
performer must be very
careful, and there aren't a
lot of writers for mime that
can write it very well. You
have to be very careful.
FOUNTAINHEAD: Do
you choreograph most of
your material?
Berger: Yes. Now, I've
written a film that might be
done on television, or it
might just be done as a
regular film and I think that
would be good, it would be
just one story and not one
each week. It would be like
a special.
FOUNTAINHEAD: Is
most mime today per-
formed in theatres and
auditoriums, or is it still on
the streets?
Berger: I think most of
it's done in theatres, but
there is some on the
streets, there just isn't
enough of it, that's all.
FOUNTAINHEAD: Do
you see mime increasing in
popularity?
Berger: Oh, yes, hope-
fully. I think it will, I think
because our society has
become more visually
oriented and less prone to
words. Even in television,
it's so visual, the words
must be the most simple
and banal. They don't want
to confuse anyone, so they
rely very heavily on action
and image and I think we' re
an image oriented society
now, so mime in that type
of society plays a very big
role.
EPILOGUE
Berger, 24, lives in New
York City's SoHo district
and has studied mime in
France and New York. He
is a small, soft spoken man
who speaks in a smooth
accent evenly mixed
between Paris and
Brooklyn.
At one time he sup-
ported himself as a
"busker" on the streets of
Washington, D.C. and New
York City-performing for
anyone who would watch.
Only a few years�and
many engagements�later,
his "Mime Over Matter"
series of three shows at
Lincoln Center's Tully Hall
attracted national critical
acclaim; and he was invited
to the Capitol to perform
and introduce 16 other
attractions appearing in the
nation's premier center for
the performing arts to
celebrate President
Carter's Inauguration.
Dr. Walter Anderson,
chairman of the National
Endowment for the Arts'
Music Division, and Head
of the 1977 Inaugural
Concert Series, invited
Keith Berger to Washing-
ton to be the "symbol" of
the performing arts at
Kennedy Center, where
many of the more than 200
cultural events were sched-
uled to celebrate the
change of administrations.
Appearing before the
largest crowd ever to
assemble in Kennedy
Center-more than 5,000
people-Keith Berger sil-
ently introduced classical,
gospel, dance, and jazz
artists appearing in
Kennedy Center's massive
Grand Foyer. He led
audiences from one end of
the hall (more than a city
block long and six stories
highto the other, drawing
them across the massive
red carpet, entertaining,
diverting, and acquainting
them with the technical
perfection of his art that
has made him the most
respected young mime in
the world. His frequent
appearances before so
many people from through-
out the country won him
many more enthusiastic
fans.
Once an aspiring artist
on the outside looking in,
Keith Berger has become a
central figure in the
principal performing arts
establishments of America.
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Registration deadline: WED. Oct. 11
Unregistered work will not appear in the show.
Show Dates: Oct. 22�28
Prize announcement on p. 2.
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Page's FOUNTAINHEAD 10 October 1978
Coming Home combines talents
By DA RREN BERGSTEIN
Assistant Trends Editor
Rarely does a film nowadays achieve the purpose it is
made for. Nor do most contemporary films offer such
brilliant acting, directing and overall marksmanship as
does Coming Home a tale focusing on the tragedies and
reconciled hopes of three people as a direct result of the
Viet Nam War.
Director Hal Ashby here conceives a story of excellent
taste, yet does it in such a way as not to offend the viewer;
as a matter of fact, he makes the audience think twice,
forcing them to recall what the war did to many thousands
. es
One of the characters he brings out is the role of the
less cripple Jon Voight portrays Lucas Martin, an
embittered war veteran who seems to make little effort to
concentrate on what he has left. Instead, he mopes and
even does this on a borderline basis, grumbling about on
s bed pushed along by canes, the only willpower he feels
he has left Once a fine high school quarterback, he blames
:he government for his current predicament, finding plenty
self-pity and remorse in the VA hospital he is stuck in.
Another character that Ashby brings out is the man who
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JANE FONDA AS an officer's wife, and Jon Voight,
playing a disabled war veteran, enjoy a meal at her beach
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is dedicated to his country. Bruce Dern portrays Captain
Bob Hyde, a man who has been prepping himself up for the
war for a long time, jogging in the mornings and enjoying
martinis at night.
He is eager to get to Nam, anticipating high honors and
glad in knowing what he was doing was right and just and
was in the favor of his country.
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Finally, there is the woman who comes between both of
these radically different men. Jane Fonda portrays Sally
Hyde, who, despite her seemingly positive attitudes about
her husband's morale, displays below the surface a
confused and frightened outlook�mainly for her husband's
safety.
Fonda decides to prove herself when she goes into
volunteer work at the VA Hospital and meets Lucas Martin,
who she remembers was the high school quarterback. She
questions him about how he came to be crippled, but he is
cynical and depressed and doesn't want to talk.
Gradually however, M artin begins to feel for Fonda, and
eventually the two fall in love, despite Fonda's protests that
she was always faithful to her husband.
The performances are excellent all around. Fonda surely
gives one of the best of her career having to be
two-faced�living up to the consequences with her
husband, and holding back Voight at the same time.
Bruce Dern, looking much better after his maniacal role
Cinema
in Black Sunday, is rash, arrogant, and even a bit selfish,
especially when he explodes with barrage after barrage of
profanity in the last half hour of the picture.
Jon Voight gives one of his finest performances,
showing pathos, and wanting pity from all who come into
contact with him. Of course, he finds it in Jane Fonda, and
fortunately for him, she lets him show his true feelings
towards her.
This film is one of the few that treads on the subject of
the Viet Nam War and exposes it for what it truly was.
Never was there such a waste of lives, a shattering of
futures, culminating in the Viet Nam tragedy. Here, Ashby
explores all this through his three pivotal characters.
They are normal, everyday people who are suddenly
thrust into harassing, frightening situations, and each
learns to cope with it in his own way. Ashby is in full
command and pulls off this project with meaning and
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ON LEAVE FROM the Marines, Bruce Dern enjoys the
Hong Kong sights with his wife, played by Jane Fonda
sensitivity.
His choices for the three leads were skillfully chosen
Bruce Dern, who has played messed up characters many
times before (as a matter of fact, that is the trademark he is
known for�the fanatical but tree-loving astronaut in Silent
Running to the power-hungry, vengeful elitist in Black
Sunday) proves that he can handle, and handle masterfully,
other choice roles. Here, he shows how Hyde s personality
and opinions are drastically changed.
In the beginning, his oulook on how presitgious and
gifted his captaincy could be is one of general happiness
and fulfillment. This rapidly degenerates when he is forced
to the front lines (though that is not actually shown�his
personality changes are displayed when he is sent home
following a gun shot wound that he inflicted on himself) and
becomes involved in the fighting, and the bloodshed and
the agony. He questions this once he is back homr but finds
the answers far too late.
Fonda, on the other hand, though perhaps she was
never really striving for anything, finds it in the form of the
crippled Voight. Her marriage to Dern is not a terribly
happy one, their sexual lives on the down and out
When Voight remarks how he spends 95 percent of his
time thinking of how he should make love tcFonda, she is
perturbed, and then ooks at the other side of the com
She makes her pig decision when, after returning home
from a visit Hong Kong to see her husband on leave, she
seeks out Voight. who is out of the hospital via wheelchair
and renewed willpower, and tells him that she wishes tc
spend the night with him. He is happy, but looks skeptical
at the same time, and probably a trifle frightened.
The finale of the film, though ending on a sad.
depressing note, bringsthe entire theme full circle, leading
the audience to the inescapable conclusion that even with
superficial differences resolved, what's underneath still
exudes tragedy and despair. It is these last two resolves
that make Dern reach the decision that Fonda should have
made before�to have himself or a striving, struggling
cripple who is perhaps more human than Dern is.
So the title. Coming Home, signifies a number of things
Yes. Dern has come home�but to a strange world where he
no longer belongs; and, perhaps. where his security is
back there on an Asian battleground.
Secondly, as one isaway, so life must go on. Be it for the
good or for the better. Little did these three people know
that due to that there would be definite, however tragic,
changes.
In short, a modern work of art that should establish
three already fine performers of immediate praise and
grandeur. Ashby has created the impossible: working on a
timely and touchy theme and yet bringing it off in a final.
climatic Mow.
TASHI
continued from p. 6
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l





10 October 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 9
Pirates win third straight game
MM �
�w"
Defense carries ECU past Keydets
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
LEXINGTON, VA. - VMI'stiny Alumni Memorial Field
has never been an easy place to play, for ECU teams and
Pirate head coach Pat Dye was obviously relieved to escape
with a narrow 19-6 victory here Saturday afternoon.
I was scared to death, and I always am when we come
here to play admitted Dye. "But the game turned out
about like I expected it to. Coach Thalman did a good job of
getting his boys ready for the game. He always does
Once again, the Pirates were forced to rely on a superb
defensive perfornmance hile a battered and bruised offense
managed just enough points to win.
ECU safety Gerald Hall had his finest performance of
the season and almost single handedly stopped the fired up
Keydets. Hall scored ECU'S first touchdown on a
spectacular 74 yard punt return and set up a first half field
goal with another 30 yard return. Hall finished the
atternoonwkthfour for 121 yards and also picked off two VMI
passes and returned them for 14 yards.
Gerald's returns certainly gave us a big lift today
noted Dye. "I felt like we could run a punt back on them for
a touchdown. We worked hard on punt returns in practice
iast week and I knew if we executed we could probably
break one
After the Pirates failed to score on its first three
possessions of the game, Hall gathered in a short Lou
Darden punt near the right sidelines, sidestepped about
five VMI defenders and outraced the rest of the Keydets
into the end zone.
And again early in the second quarter, Hall grabbed
another punt and went to his right, this time for 30 yards
before he was run out of bounds at the VMI 38.
Quarterback Steve Greer and halfback Eddie Hicks
eeieo off big gains of 18 and 12 yards in the following
series, but the Keydets stopped ECU short on third down at
the two yard line and the Pirates opted for a field goal.
Bill Lamm connected from 19 yards and the Pirates
moved ahead 9-0 which was the way the score remained at
halftime.
The ECU defense held VMI to just four first downs and
minus 13 yards rushing in the first half. However, the
Pirates quickly put themselves in trouble early in the
second half with two costly fumbles. Fullback, Theodore
Sutton fumbled on the first play of the second half and
VMI's Rick Gilbert recovered on ECU'S 21 yard line.
But the Pirates' defense stiffened and All-America
placekicker Craig Jones connected from 43 yards and VMI
trailed 9-3.
Midway through the third quarter, Leander Green's
errant pitch actually hit an official, and VMI's Tony
Hamilton recovered at the ECU 36. However the Keydets
advanced nowhere, and once again Jones added another
field goal, this time from 49 yards out.
ECU came right back on its next possession and moved
all the way to the VMI seven yard line before the offense
bogged down again. Lamm added his second field goal from
24 yards out with just 22 seconds left in the third quarter.
Although the Pirates had numerous scoring opport-
unities in the second half, ECU'S score came on its
final possession when the Bucsmarched 54 yards for a
touchdown.
Sutton got the big play in the drive with a 38 yard dash
around the right side on third which moved the ball to
VMI's 14 yard line. Four plays later, halfback Sam Harrell
went around the left side for three yards and the
touchdown. Lamm's conversion made the final score 19-6.
I was disapppointed that we got the ball into scoring
position so many times and didn't score said Dye. "Of
course the VMI defense had a lot to do with that. But I
don't worry about the score. I'm just happy to win. I just
hope we can keep playing this well on defense and improve
our offense.
"Fumbles hurt us again, but we haven't turned the ball
over but four times in the last two games so we're
improving there
Although Green didn't start the game, he completed
two passes for 42 yards while Greer rushed 13 times for 54
yards and directed the Pirates final scoring drive late in the
fourth quarter. Sutton was the Bucs top ground gainer with
25 carries for 115 yards. Hicks added 36 yards on ten
carries.
"I don't want to make any excuses about our offense
said Dye. "But Leander got no work in practice last week.
We've got to do something on offense. We can't change
anymore people, we've just got to start executing
ECU 6 3 3 7-19
VMI 0060-6
ECU-Hall 74 punt return (kick failed)
ECU-Lamm 19FG
VMI-Jones 43 FG
VMI-Jones49 FG
ECU-Lamm 24 FG
ECU-Harrell 3 run (Lamm kick)
A-6900
RUSHING
ECU-Sutton 25-115, Hicks 10-36, Collins4-13, Greer 13-54
Green 3-(-13), Harrell 3-5, VMI-Hostetter 20-47, Woolwine
-4 Clark 2H-44), Washington 4-8, Allen 1-4, Hupertz
1-(-18)
PASSING
ECU-Greer 1-2-0-10, Green 2-9-1-42, VMI-Clark 4-17-3-71,
Hupertz 1-2-0-6
RECEIVING
ECU Gallaher 2-13, Washington 1-39, VMI Savage 2-47,
Weaver 1-15, Hostetter 2-15.
A streaking Hall
ECU SAFETY GERALD Hall streaks down the sidelines
with another punt return. Hall returned four punts for 121
yards and a touchdown against VMI Saturday. He also
intercepted two passes in the Pirates 19-6 victory over the
Keydets. ECU Sports Information photo
Intercepts two passes
Hall's heroics pace Pirates
Pirate defense makes another big stop
ONCE AGAIN THE Pirate defense came
up with a. superb performance against
VMI m Saturday's 19-6 victory. ECU
yards. Here. Wayne Perry makes a stop
on an unidentified Texas-Arlington
running back in last week's game.
sacked VMI quarterbacks 13 times for 62 Photo by Chap Gurley
Determined Stewart is
ECU's top tennis threat
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
LEXINGTON, VA. �
With just four minutes
remaining in the ECU-VMI
game Saturday afternoon,
Keydet quarterback Robby
Clark picked himself up off
the ground for the last time
and slowly limped towards
the sidelines.
The sparse homecoming
crowd of 6900 at Alumni
Memorial Field gave Clark
a standing ovation and it
wascertainlywell deserved.
By the end of the
contest, Clark had been
dumped behind the line of
scrimmage 12 times for a
whopping 44 yards. Even
his back-up Larry Hupertz
was sacked once for a big
18 yard loss.
"Our pass rush really
surprised me today said
ECU head coach Pat Dye
after the Pirates had taken
a close 19-6 victory over the
underdog Keydets. "I felt
we had to come on and put
the pressure on the pass. I
was concerned with con-
taining Robby Clark and
keeping VMI from con-
trolling the football'
Almost every member
of the Pirates' defense got a
piece of Clark or Hupertz.
Defensive end Zack Val-
entine got to Clark three
times while Fred Chavis,
Oliver Felton, Tommy
Summer and cornerback
Ruffin McNeil were in on
two sacks.
Linebacker Mike Brew-
ington and tackle D.T.
Joyner added one sack
apiece. Joyner also made
five tackles and recovered a
fumble.
"We were all psyched
up for this one admitted
Joyner. "All week long the
coaches said Clark could
scramble, but we worked
hard on containment and
today I think it really paid
off.
"They started double
teaming me for a while
which kept me from getting
to the quarterback, but
pretty soon I was back to
one-on-one and I was doing
a pretty good job of pres-
suring Clark as well as
stopping the run
The Pirates limited VMI
to just 78 total yards in the
game. At the half, the
Keydets had minus 13
yards rushing and finished
the game with only one net
yard on the ground.
"This could have been
our best defensive game of
the year said Dye. "It
was a combination of blitz-
es and stunts that gave
them a lot of problems
And even when Clark
managed to elude the Pi-
rates' fierce rush, he could
complete only four of 17
passes for 71 yards while
three of his aerials were
intercepted.
Gerald Hall picked off
two of Clark's passes while
linebacker Tommy Summer
intercepted one and re-
turned it 14 yards. Hall's
final interception stopped
VMI's last serious scoring
threat.
"Clark was watching
his tight end the whole time
on my second intercep-
tion explained Hall. "I
saw the tight end coming
out and I got a good break
on the ball and cut right in
front of him. What really
helped us today in the
secondary was the trem-
endous pass rush our line-
men put on them. It makes
our job alot easier back
there
Hall, a 5-11, 185 pound
safety from Edenton,
scored ECU'S first touch-
down on a brilliant 74 yard
punt return and also set up
a first half field goal with
another 30 yard return.
"We worked all week
on setting up returns to the
right side said Hall who
tied a school record for
return yardage in a single
game with 121 yards. "It
really paid off. but the
blocking on a return is
always the key. Today, the
holdup seemed to be pretty
good which is a real .credit
to the blocking. I'll trust my
blocking any day rather
than try to get outside and
do it on my own
Next week the Pirates
travel to Hattiesburg, M iss.
to face Southern M ississ-
ippi who upset Mississippi
State 24-22 Saturday. ECU
destroyed the Golden
Eagles 49-0 in the Pirates
opener in 1976.
"There's no question
what a great game our
defense played today
said Dye. "But offensively,
we just don't seem to be
having any fun out there.
We've been very fortunate
to win the last two weeks
By JIMMY DUPREE
Staff Writer
The 1978 ECU girl's
tennis team is character-
ized by good overall depth
and talent. "We only re-
quire the players in flights
four through six to play
consistantly and do their
best to make good place-
ment on all their shots
said head coach Barbara
Olscher. "We expect the
top three seeds to be more
aggressive and attack their
opponents more
The player who best
exemplifies those qualities
is junior Pat Stewart.
Stewart is a transfer
student from Hofstra Uni-
versity in New York. Al-
though classified as a junior
this will probably be her
only year of eligibility at
ECU.
Stewart explains that at
Hofstra they play a spit
season, some of the
matches are held in the fall
and the rest in the spring.
"My first year I only
played the spring sched-
ule said Stewart. "I
played both seasons my
second year and the fall
season the third year.
That's being counted as
three full years of eli-
gibility The matter will
be appealed to the AIAW
for a ruling.
Stewart admits that she
was unhappy at Hofstra but
adds that "I am very satis-
fied here at East Carolina. I
played number one at Hof-
stra, but they are not at the
same level as this program.
The competition ECU faces
is much better
Olscher analyses Stew-
art as, "a consistent player
who never argues with line
calls. She has an excellent
temperment for the game
of tennis and never tries to
cover her mistakes with
excuses. Pat had good
ground strokes and is not
afraid of using the serve and
volley technique
During the summer,
Stewart practiced daily with
a teaching professional, but
she feels that she is not
playing as well now as she
was at home in St. Peters-
burg, Florida. "I haven't
played well thus far. My
overhead is consistent and
my serving has been fair. I
think my problem lately has
been my concentration
Pat won the second
flight of the Methodist
Tournament held earlier
this season, but was unable
to defeat her most recent
opponent, Susan Lawless of
Old Dominion University,
losing 6-4, 0-6, 2-6. The
team, however, was vic-
torious by the score of 5-4.
"If I could have been a
little more patient, I prob-
ably could have beaten
Susan. I let a bad call in the
first set upset me and I
never really got my con-
centration going again
"I had trouble with my
knees while I was at Hof-
stra, but I worked hard over
the summer on building up
strength in them. I also
worked on losing weight,
which will eventually im-
prove my speed ex-
plained Stewart, who was
elected co-captain by her
teammates.
The team has matches
still remaining with the
UNC Junior Varsity, St.
Mary's, Duke, and the
UNC Varsity. Stewart feels
that "we should do better
playing Carolina and Duke
this late in the season than
if we had played them in
September. We are more
prepared for them than we
were for State and Duke
Gamecocks
defeat ECU
ECU'S soccer team tra-
veled to Columbia, South
Carolina Friday, and were
soundly defeated by a
superior South Carolina
squad 7-0.
The Pirates will battle
N.C. Wesleyan College to-
day at 3XX) p.m. in the first
of three consecutive home
games.
ECU wants UNC series continued
BILL CAIN
ByCHARLESCHANDLER
Assistant Sports Editor
The ECU Board of Trustees has joined the school's
athletic department in an effort to continue the annual
football series between the Pirates and the North Carolina
Tar Heels. The series is contracted throughout the 1981
season.
After 1981, however, the continuation of the series
appears doubtful. The UNC athletic department has stated
that they will no longer schedule games with teams inside
the state of North Carolina, excluding Atlantic Coast
Conference games.
The ECU Board of Trustees recently made a proposal
to draft a letter thanking UNC for their hospitality displayed
in this season's Pirate-Tar Heel contest. The letter also was
to include a request that the series be extended beyond the
1981 season.
ECU Chancellor Thomas Brewer says ECU will continue
to negotiate with UNC, hoping that there will be some sort
of breakthrough. "We will definately continue to talk
said Brewer. "We feel the series is beneficial to both
schools. All we can do is negotiate and hope for the best
The view held by UNC at the present time seems to
mean that the efforts by ECU are in vain. Yet, UNC Athletic
Director Bill Cobey says ECU'S efforts are still hopeful.
We're not saying there's absolutely no way noted Cobey.
"We're just saying that the chances are very slim for the
continuation of the series. The reason we feel this way has
nothing at all to do with ECU"
"I have the highest regard for Bill Cain (ECU Athletic
Director) and Pat Dye (Pirate heed football coach). They
have a first class organization
Cobey said that the refusal of UNC to continue the series
was being done in the best interest of the university and the
athletic program. "We have to look at things on a practical
basis said Cobey. "We now have seven conference
members that we have to play, since Georgia Tech joined
us. That leaves us only four more games to schedule. And
we'd like to be able to play six games in Kenan Stadium.
We actually can schedule only three games, because we
play South Carolina each year
"We need to use the remaining games to promote our
program said Cobey. "We simply need to travel. The
game with Pittsburgh this year, for example, shows how
beneficial traveling can be to us. Games like that help our
reputation and national exposure to grow. There is also the
possibility that our recruiting can be bolstered by playing
teams from other parts of the country
ECU Athletic Director Bill Cain feels the ECU-UNC
series has a place on the Tar Heels schedule. "We're very
happy with the series said Cain. "We certainly would like
to see it continue. I think the game is good for all
concerned. The fans in North Carolina really seem to enjoy
the game
"This year's game, for example, was just super. The
game was dose to the very end. Both sides had fans giving
their all. You just cant beat that sort of atmosphere. It was
really exciting, and that's what college football'is all
about
Cain noted that he could see some of UNC's reasoning
in their decision. "Sure, we need them more than they need
us. I just hope that they'll see fit to continue the series, on
the basis that the game is good for both parties
Cain said that he felt much the same way about UNC
that Cobey feels about ECU. "They have a super
organization said Cain. "They always treat us with the
utmost courtesy when we play them. And I want it known
that we really appreciate the fact that they've played us as
much as they have. It's meant a lot to our program
Cobey continually mentioned his respect of the ECU
program. "As I said, our decision, has nothing to do with
personalities noted Cobey. "A similar situation always
evolves concerning our basketball schedule. The University
of North Carolina at Charlotte continually requests that
they be added to our schedule. But the same rule about
in-state teams applies there also
" And the U NC-C athletic director is one of my very best
friends. I'd love to help him out, as I would ECU in football,
but we must do what we feel is in the best interest of our
program. That comes first
Cain is also thinking of his university's program. "We
are certainly better off if we can continue the series said
Cain. "But, right now we're just waiting on them. I just
hope they'll take another look at us
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Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 10 October 1978
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In intramural action
On Your Back wins tourney
By JOHN EVANS
Staff Writer
The co-rec Softball
championships and intra-
mural track and field
championships highlighted
last week's intramural
action. This week, the
divisional playoffs begin in
men's flag football play.
Registration takes place
this week for Putt-Putt
co-rec play and soccer.
Registration for those two
events runs through this
Thursday, October ,12.
Co-rec Archery registration
will run through the 18th
and two-on-two basketball
will be helf from Oct. 16-19
for registration.
The co-rec softball
championship was won by
On Your Back, which had to
down the Time-Outs in two
consecutive contests on the
same day to win. The
Time-Outs were favored
going into the finals, but
the On Your Back team
made the finals with a 10-1
win over the Peppers, then
survived the first champ-
ionship game with a narrow
2-1 win.
In the all-or-nothing at
all title game, On Your
Back prevailed by a 13-12
score when Eddie Rhodes
singled to score Stan
Chambers with the winning
run in a two-run seventh
inning. The Time-Outs; led
by Debbie Freeman, Billy
Bass, Roger Horton and
Dennis Bellamy, had led by
as much as 12-5 in the
championship game.
The winners, however,
came back and scored eight
runs in the seventh when
the Time-Outs intentionally
walked three guys to pitch
to the girls, but ended up
walking six other players
for nine walks which forced
in six runs and made it
12-11.
That set the stage for
the late heroics. Jeannie
Tyler beat out an infield hit
to score M aybell Jones with
the tying run and then
Rhodes delivered his game-
winning hit to score
Chanbers and beat the
impending darkness.
The Time Outs had
grabbed their big lead with
eight runs in the fifth
inning. That outbreak
brought them a 10-3 lead,
which went to 12-5 in the
top of the seventh, before
the roof caved in to the tune
of eight runs.
In earlier games, On
Your Back scored nine runs
in the fifth inning of their
game with the Peppers for
a 10-1 lead and scored two
runs in the fourth inning to
overcome a 1-0 deficit
against the Time-Outs.
Chambers smacked a grand
slam in the 10-1 win and
batted in one of the two
runs in the second game
Jill Little batted in the
winning run in that game.
The men's intramural
track and field meet was
won by Aycock's A team,
with four firsts in the track
events and 110 points The
Star Trekkers did well in
the field events, winning
three events, and came in
second with 79 points
Scott's P and L finished
third with 58 points, edging
jones Blazers, who had 56
and the Independents, whc
had 54
Sigma Nu led all the
fraternities with 51 points
Phi Kappa Tau and Pi
Kappa Phi followed among
fraternities with 45 points
each
Oklahoma defeats Longhorns
By
HERSCHEL NISSENSON
A P Sports Writer
The Texas Longhorns
art convinced � for now �
that Oklahoma is the na-
tion's No. 1 college football
team, but they're not sure
how they'd feel if they
played the Sooners again
next week.
"Oklahoma certainly is
the No. 1 team in the nation
they were today Texas
linebacker Lance Taylor
said Saturday after the top-
ranked Sooners rolled to a
31-10 victory over the No. 6
Longhorns.
But, he added: "This is
a game I'd like to be able to
play again next week. We'd
just like to go back and start
this game over again
That's because Okla-
homa stormed 77 yards in
just five plays on its first
possession, with Billy Sims
scoring from 18 yards out
after a 55-yard dash by
Kenny King. Sims, who
carried 25 times for 131
yards, tallied again on a
1-yard plunge in the sec-
ond period and the outcome
never really was in doubt
thereafter.
Southern California,
runner-up in The Associ-
ated Press ratings, had the
weekend off but Michigan,
Arkansas and Penn State.
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the 3-4-5 teams, kept pace
with Oklahoma.
Michigan, however, al-
most stumbled just one
week after Coach Bo
Schembechler promised the
Wolverines would be psy-
ched up for every game.
They fell behind Arizona
17-7 in the first half but
rallied to grind out a 21-17
triumph when Russell Da-
vis plunged across from a
yard out with 512 minutes
remaining � on fourth
down, no less.
"We made colassal
mistakes and we were lucky
to win Schembechler
said, "but maybe this will
help us in the long run. You
don't drop punts, you can't
drop passes in the open and
you can't have passes in-
tercepted in the end zone.
And, besides, our defense
didn't play all that well
Jerry Eckwood and Mi-
chael Forrest each scored
twice in leading Arkansas
to a 42-3 romp over South-
west Conference rival Tex-
as Christian while Ron Cal-
cagni threw a touchdown
pass to Robert Farrell and
directed the fourth-ranked
Razorbacks to three other
scores.
TCU Coach FA. Dry
was asked to compare
Arkansas with Penn State,
which crushed the Horned
Frogs 58-0 a week ago.
"They're not as strong
as Penn State he said.
"They're quicker, but not
as physically strong. I don't
know who would win be-
tween them
Arkansas Coach Lou
Holtz said the Razorbacks
"looked more like a com-
plete team then what we
had. We blocked and ex-
ecuted pretty well on of-
fense. We still have an
awful lot of 15-yard pen-
alties, and you just can't
keep going in that vein and
hope to be successful a-
gainst the kind of people
we have to play on down
the line
Fifth-ranked Penn State
extended the nation's, long-
est major college winning
streak to 15 games and
avenged last season's only
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setback by blasting Ken-
tucky 30-0.Chuck Fusma
threw two passes to Scott
Fitzkee to set up a short
plunge by Matt Suhey and
then hit Fitzkee for an
18-yard touchdown as the
Nittany Lions took a 14-0
first-period lead.
"I don't know whether
we were a test for them or
not. but if we were, they
certainly passed. said
Kentucky Coach Fran Cur-
ci. "They beat us in every
department. It was 30-0
and they were still socking
it to us.
"As I said earlier. !
think they're one of the two
or three great teams in the
country. They can do it a
Fusina is definitely a Heis-
man Trophy winner. And I
think their two defensive
tackles (Bruce Clark and
Matt Millen) are super. We
couldn't handle either one
of them
Penn State's Joe Pat-
erno didn't sound too far
away from claiming great
things for his squad.
"I thought at the start
of the season that this could
possibly be our best team.
hesaid. "We're not there
yet, but we're getting a
little better each week "
Rounding out the Top
Ten:
Seventh ranked Texas
A&M spotted Texas Tech
an early 6-0 lead and then
roared back to trample the
Red Raiders 38-9 in an
SWC game as Curtis
Dickey carried 20 times for
161 yards, his fourth con-
secutive 100-yard effort of
the season. Dickey scored
on a 15-yard run while
David Brothers tallied twice
and Mike Mosley contri-
buted a 64-yeard scoring
gallop.
�Alabama, the No. 8
team, got the go-ahead
touchdown on Tony Na-
than's third-period plunge
and a 36-yards pass from
Jeff Rutledge to Rick Neal
in the fourth quarter pro-
vided the clincher as the
Crimson Tide held off Wa-
shington 20-17
"This is the first time
our team has looked like an
Alabama team since the
Nebraska game beamed
Bear Bryant.
� Ninth-ranked Pitt
Dreezed past Boston Col-
lege 32-15 as Rooster Jones
scored twice while Rick
Trocano tallied one touch-
down and passed 29 yards
to Gordon Jones for a-
n other.
�Tom Sorley scored
one TD and threw for one in
leading No. 10 Nebraska to
a 23-0 Big Eight rout of
No.15 Iowa State. The
losers got into Nebraska
territory only four times
and managed just 50 yards
on the ground.
Louisiana State's,Char-
les Alexander gained 156
yards on 40 carries and
scored once as the nth-
ranked Tigers whipped
Florida 34-21 in South-
eastern Conference action.
Steve Atkins' 98-yard
kickoff return in the third
period and Steve Trimble's
end zone fumble recovery
cxi the ensuing kickoff
helped No 12 Maryland de-
feat No. 20 North Carolina
State in an Atlantic Coast
Conferenoe clash.
Auburn was the on�y
member of the Top Twenty
to bow to an unranked
team.
r
r





Title
Fountainhead, October 10, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 10, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.516
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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