Fountainhead, October 5, 1978






Circulation 10,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
Vol. 55 No. 2
5 October 1978
SGA LEGISLA TURE MEETS for the first time. Libby Letter
was the first woman elected to the post of speaker. Photo
by Steve Homero
Honor Council, Review
Board seeking members
By STEPHEN WILSON
Staff Writer
The Honor Council and
Review Board are calling
for new ers, and all
interests are
urgedeither
grouace: to Kieran
ShaSGA Attorney
Genera
The� Council and
the Review Board consti-
tute the student judicial
system, and are respon-
sible for hearing any cases
concerning violations of the
codes contained in the SGA
Judicial Handbook.
Cases are first brought
before the Honor Council.
where, s the Review serves
as the appellate court.
Shanahan said that an
interim Honor Council is
now hearing cases and that
there are seven openings
for members and three
alternate positions avail-
able.
He also said there are
positions open for Assistant
Attorney General and for
Assistant Public Defender.
Applicants will be
screened before the SGA
Executive Council, which
consists of the SGA Pres-
ident. Vice President,
Treasurer, and the five
Class Presidents (inlcuding
the Graduate School Class
President).
Regular meetings are
held at 7 p.m. on Tuesday
nights. according to
Shanahan.
Shanahan said that
cheating is probably the
largest single offense, but
that this type of case was
seldom brought to trial.
He also mentioned that
there would be a crackdown
on cases of Book Selling,
which means that a student
has taken a book that does
not belong to him and has
sold it to another party.
Shanahan said that
students applying for posi-
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Rocky Horror Picture Show - see p. 5
Arthur Knight lectures on sex in cinema,
see p. 6
East Carolina travels to Lexington, Va. to
play VM I. see p. 7
Shopping Mall slated to open
Greenville next year, see p. 3
Homecoming plans are being made for
the fraternities and sororities, see p. 3
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�Sra Automatic Failing grade in
course, and one semester
suspended suspension.
i
SGA Legislature elects
Libby Lefler speaker
tionson either group will be
expected to be familiar with
the information in the SGA
Judicial Handbook, which
will be distributed to stud-
ents within the next few
days. �
He also added that the
Honor Council and Review
Board are "great ways for
students to serve the
campus community without
being political
The Honor Cuncil heard
one case last week and four
cases this week. Following
are the results of the trials:
Student accused of stea-
ling from a campus vending
machine. Disposition: Not
Guilty. No Sanction.
Student accused of stea-
ling records from WECU
radio department. Disposi-
tion: Guilty. Sanction: One
���:�
�.?x Semester Suspension.
Kg
:?: Student accused of van-
�: dalizing ECU street signs.
Disposition: Guilty. Sanct-
�x;
�:�:� ion: Written Reprimand
and Restitution (payed for
damages).
Student accused of bi-
gg cycle theft. Disposition: Not
SR Guilty. Sanction: none.
mS Student accused of
$: cheating on test. Disposit-
Guilty. Sanction:
By JANE BIDDIX
Staff Reporter
Two major precedents were set in the opening session of
the 1978-79 ECU Legislature Monday night.
The Legislature elected its first woman ever as Speaker.
Libby Lefler, Junior Class President won by a simple
majority vote over Senior Class .President Nicky Francis.
Spokesmen for Lefler prior to the election pointed out
her qualifications in having served in SGA for two years as a
dorm representative and as SGA Secretary.
Spokesmen said as Secretary, Lefler worked directly
with the Speaker and has a working knowledge of the
rsition and its duties.
The second precedent concerned a Consolidation of
Appropriations Bill introduced by Charlie Sherrod that
"proposes to streamline the appropriations process"
according to SGA Vice President, David Cartwright.
Cartwright said the bill is to insure equal consideration
for all budget requests instead of the previous first-come
first-serve basis.
The bill will be in effect only through Oct. 16, when all
budgets presented to the legislature should be reported on
by the Appropriations Committee.
Following the report by the appropriations committee,
the budgets in one consolidated form will be presented on
the floor of the legislature for their approval.
The Consolidation Bill, following a suspension of the
rules, was voted out favorably.
A budget report was given by SGA Treasurer, Zack
Smith. According to Smith this year'sLeo-laturehas a total
budget of $98,379.97 to be appropriated.
Bills introduced at this first session included
Constitutions for both the Model UN Club and the Young
Democrats Club as well as appropriation requests from the
Model UN Club for $10,122, the Transit System for $67,000.
and the ECU Playhouse for $33,000 and NCSL for $4,585
In her first address as speaker of the legislature Lefler
first thanked her supporters and then asked the legislators
to remember that they "are representing the students and
not their own individual interests
She spoke of her concern towards the apathetic attitude
surrounding the fall elections and of her hopes of leading in
the change of this low level of confidence in the credibility
of Student Government.
In other news, Playhouse General Manager. Preston
Sisk, gave a brief explanation of the requested funds.
Sisk said this year's Playhouse budget is $3,000 more
than last year's and is so because there will soon be a
decrease of revenues.
Sisk said the reason for the decrease in revenues is
because McGinnis Auditorium could not be used after
Christmas due to renovation.
He added, "The Studio Theatre is just not large enough
to bring in the receipts that productions in McGinnis do
Sisk hopes that "the legislature will continue to show
the strong support of the ECU Playhouse.
Board discusses BUC, WECU
By JULIE EVERETTE
News Editor
Th� m�di� board in a
meeting Wednesday dis-
cussed plans to examine
recommendations for a
board secretary and may
present candidates at the
next meeting for approval.
According to Rudolph
Alexander, media board
afvisor, four candidates for
the position were inter-
viewed last Tuesday by the
board.
In other news the board
discussed the
BUCCANEER controversy
and voted to make, a final
decision concerning laa
year's yearbook by Novem-
ber.
Craig Sahli, present
BUCCANEER editor, plans
to submit bids for yearbook
printing and contracts for
the 1979 book to the board
next week.
The board also dis-
cussed WECU'S proposal
to construct an antenna on
top of Tyler dorm.
According to media
board chairperson Tommy
Joe Payne, WECU plans to
brtoarln anoinaara to study
the dorm to determine its
capability of holding the
antenna.
No word has been re-
ceived on the proposal for
an FM license, Payne said.
In other news, The
Ebony Herald has re-
quested the use of the
FOUNTAINHEAD office
layout room on Fridays and
Saturdays.
A motion was made to
submit a memorandum to
FOUNTAINHEAD reques-
ting the use of the room.
Also, a motion was
passed to provide FOUN-
TAINHEAD funds to com-
plete payment from old
bills.
The board will meet
next Thursday at 3:30 p.m.
to discuss WECU and the
BUCCANEER.
Fountain repairs underway
ByARAH VENABLE
Staff Writer
The fountain on the
mall, which has not been
operating for several
months, is expected to be
repaired within the week,
according to James Lowry,
director of the physical
plant.
Lowry said there was
a leak in the fountain, and
the maintenance men are
presently repairing it.
William Whitehurst,
superintendant of buildings
and grounds, said there
was a leak in the bottom of
the fountain.
The hole, he said, is
underneath the pipe, and it
will be fixed this week,
weather permitting.
If the weather is dry, a
primer and sealant will be
applied, according to
Whitehurst.
Danger signs were
placed around the fountain
for student safety, White-
hurst added.
I llii - i
College Republicans to attend convention
By RICHY SMITH
Assistant News Editor
The ECU Student Rep-
ublicans are presently
forming their chapter for
this academic year
The club is composed of
approximately 35 memb-
ers. The club is active is
local, state and national
campaigns as well as other
functions of the Republican
party.
The College Republicans
is an organization compos-
ed of college students from
all over the state, according
to Bill Bennett, a graduate
of ECU and past state
officer of the club.
"Of course, you don't
have to be registered Rep-
ublican to join he as-
sures.
"Wehave membesfrom
other political parties. They
just happen to believe in
the principles and goals of
the Republican party he
added.
Our main purpose as a
group is to promote positive
action and involvement as
opposed to apathy or mere
criticism said Bennett.
The club is preparing to
attend the fall convention of
the Federation of College
Republicans at North
Carolina State University,
Raleigh.
The purpose of this
convention is to adopt a
new platform, according to
Tim Mertz, sophomore,
and president of the ECU
club.
"Along with the new
platform the Federation
will review and adopt resol-
utions pertaining to nation-
al and state issues he
said.
ECU has a state officer
this year and the chairman-
ship of the resolution com-
mittee.
Alonza Newby, soph-
omore, serves as chairman
of the committee.
'I am really looking
forward to working with the
Federation and with the
people in the party
Newby commented.
Another ECU delagata,
Susan Merricks, a sopho-
more and secretary of the
club, will be aiding the
state secretary.
"We' re and active club.
That's why I'm involved.
The experience is unlimit-
ed Merricks commented.
"We've had our ups
and downs, but like any
good organization, we're
thriving she added.
The convention is Octo-
ber 7 and 8 and the
delegates from ECU are
preparing to take their
stands.
FOUNTAIN ON THE mli may toon be filHd with wafer.
Photo by Steve Romero
Pre-registration issue
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P�9� 2 FOUNTAINHEAO S Octobw 1978
Computer Chess
There will be a demon-
stration of the computer
science department's PDP-
11 computer in Austin Rm.
201, Thurs Oct. 5 at 7:30
p.m.
There will also be an
association for computers
at that time.
All who are interested
are welcome.
Pre-Reg
Preregistration advising
for the Spring Semester
1979 will take place Oct. 9
through Oct. 13 in accor-
dance with the following
procedures:
UNDERGRADUATES
1. During this period,
each student will see his
advisor and have the Trial
Class Schedule Cards
completed in full, showing
the course name and
number, section, credit
hours, time and days.
2. The student must
take the Trial Class
Schedule Cards to Which-
ard Building immediately
for final processing and
further instruction.
Major Changes
It will also be possible
for students wishing to
change their major to do so
during these five days.
Preregistration will be
held from 8:15 a.m. to 4:45
p.m. Remember, despite
the fact that your advisor
has completed your trial
ass schedule cards, you
are NOT preregistered until
ydu deliver the schedule
cards to Whichard Build-
ing.
GRADUATES
1 See Graduate
Advisor who has preregis-
tration cards and complete
m full, showing the course
name and number, section,
credit hours, time and
days
2. Graduate students
may bring their completed
trial schedules to the
Whichard Building for final
processing during preregis-
tration week only, or leave
with advisor. However, it is
the student's responsibility
to see that he or she
receives the instruction
sheet for fee payment and
registration procedures for
preregistered students.
3. For the Spring
Semester, ai; graduate
students who do not
preregister and all new
graduate students must
register on the regular
Registration Day which is
Monday, January 8, 1979
through 12.00 Noon, Satur-
day. January 13, 1979.
The All-Campus Chess
Tournament, sponsored by
Mendenhall Student
Center will begin Mon
Oct. 9 at 7 p.m. in the
Mendenhall Student Center
Multi-purpose Room. All
full-time students are eligi-
ble to participate.
The tournament will be
conducted to determine the
one winner who will rep-
resent ECU in the Associa-
tion of College Unions -
International regional face-
-to-face tournaments to be
held in Knoxville, Tennes-
see on February 8, 9, and
10. All expenses for the
tournament will be paid by
Mendenhall.
Registration forms and
details are available at the
MSC Billiards Center. The
final day to register is
Thurs Oct. 5.
Bowling
Whether you'd like to
polish your game with some
steady practive or invite
three friends along for
some friendly competition,
you can rent a bowling lane
to use for one hour and it
only costs $3. Lane rentals
are available at the Mend-
enhall Bowling Center
every Saturday from Noon
til 6 p.m. Stop by and try it
out; it's a great way to
spend an hour.
Pi-Sigma
Bowling
There will be a meeting
of all Pi Sigma Alpha
members on Mon Oct. 9,
in Brewster BC 105.
All members are .asked
to attend.
Red Pin
FCSF
Services
Conregation Bayt
Shalom is pleased to invite
you to attend High Holy
Days services.
They will be held at the
First Presbyterian Church,
Elm and 14th St Green- j
ville. The schedule of ser-
vices is:
ROSH HASHANAH:
Sun, Oct. 1. 8 p.m. Mon
Oct. 2, 10 a.m Mon Oct.
2, 6:15 p.m Tues Oct.
3. 10 a.m.
YOM KIPPUR
Kol Nidrei - Tues Oct. 10
6:30p.m. Wed Oct. 11, 10
a.m. Mmchah, Wed Oct.
11.4 p.m.
A breaking of the fast
will be held at the home of
Dr. and Mrs. Ed Lieberman
311 King George Rd. All in
attendance of services mre
cordially invited.
Christ is coming back
very soon! He tells us in the
Bible what signs will tell
when the time of His return
is near.
By the rebirth of Israel
and other events, we know
that these are the end
times.
Your are invited to com
and learn more about
Jesus' soon return at
tonight's Full Gospel Stu-
dent Fellowship meeting in
Mendenhall 221 at 7:30
p.m.
Pastor Steve Jones of
Faith Assembly of God will
be sharing what the Bible
says about the second
coming of Jesus.
Writers
Co-op
Rounding-up writers,
dead and alive, and
bringing them to ECU is
what this meeting is about.
If you enjoy the marks-
manship of a well-aimed
pen or use a well-turned
line for a lasso, then come
to Austin Room 207, Oet. 9
at 3 p.m. to organize the
Student Writers' Guild.
All genres included. All
persons welcome.
Meeting
There will be a Home-
coming Steering Commi-
ttee meeting Thursday,
Oct. 5, 1978 at 4 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter, Room 244. Please plan
to attend.
Students interested in
participating in the Coop-
erative Education Program
spring semester should
make application or come
by to update their files on
or before Oct. 13.
The Co-op dtaff will
give first priority to stud-
ents whose applications are
received by Oct. 13.
After that date, stud-
ents must have a faculty
recommendation in order to
receive priority for spring
placement.
A representative from
Capson (Civilian Personnel
of the Navy) will be avail-
able in the Co-op office,
Rawl3l3,on FriOct. 13 to
interview students interes-
ted in a federal career.
This placement will be
in the Defense Printing
Service in Washington, DC.
Eligible students must
have a minimum GPA of
2.0, between 30-90 semes-
ter hours, and be enrolled
full time.
Students from Socio-
logy. INDT, Political
Science, Psychology, Com-
puter Science, Philosophy,
Anthropology, who have
had courses in manage-
ment are encouraged to
apply.
NYC
The Student union
Travel Committee is spon-
soring its new York Trip
again
The trip will be during
Thanksgiving (Nov 22-26)
Break.
The price of $65.00
includes transportation and
lodging.
Don't miss Macy's
Thanksgiving Day Parade.
Sign up ath the Ticket
Office in Mendenhall.
"Red Pin Bowling" is
held every Sunday evening
from 7 p.m. until 10 p.m. at
the Bowling Center of
Mendenhall. If you can
make a strike when the red
pin is the head pin, you win
one free game. It's that
simple! come over and try it
out this Sunday. It could be
your lucky day!
Ping pong
If you enjoy playing
table tennis, stop by the
Mendenhall Table Tennis
Rooms each Tuesday even-
ing at 7 p.m. when the
Table Tennis Club meets.
You will find players of all
levels of ability participat-
ing. Various activities such
as ladder tournaments are
often scheduled. All ECU
students faculty and staff
are welcome.
Car Wash
The SociologyAnthro-
pology Club will hold a car
wash on Saturday, Oct. 7
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at
Carroll's Exxon Station
(beside the Sonic Drive-in).
The cost is $2 per car.
Republican
Dr. John East, Political
Science instructor, will be
in Brewster B-102 for a
question-answer session,
Tues. at 7:30 p.m.
The meeting is spon-
sored by the College
Republicans and the public
is invited.
Concert
The Student Union Ma-
jor Attractions Committee
will present Brothers John-
son with special guest
Mother's Finest on Sal
Oct. 14 at 8 p.m. in M inges
Coliseum.
Tickets will be $4 for
ECU students and $6 for
the public. All tickets are
available from the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center.
In addition, public tick-
ets can be purchased from:
Apple Records - East Fifth
Street - School Kids
Records - Georgetown
Shoppes - The M usic Shop -
Greenville Square Mall.
Only public tickets will
be available at the door.
Gospel
The ECU Gospel Ense-
mble under the direction of
Johnice Johnson will per-
form in the Hendrix Thea-
tre on Sun Oct. 22 at 7
p.m. The Ensemble will
perform traditional as well
as contemporary gospel
selection. The concert is
being sponsored by the
Student Union Minority
Arts Committee. There will
be no admission charge.
Basketball
Tryouts for the ECU
men's basketball team will
be held Sunday morning,
Oct. 15 at 7 a.m. Tryouts
will be held in M inges
Coliseum.
Anyone interested in
coming out for the team
should register in the
basketball office Oct. 12
and 13. Students must
register in the basketball
office before they can try
out.
The " Mendenhall
Day-Student Bowiing Tour-
nament will be held Mon
Oct. 16 through Fri Oct.
27. Day-student bowlers
will have two weeks to bowl
nine games and totoal pins
will decide the top eight
winners in the men's divi-
sion and women's division.
The sixteen winners will
compete in the All-Campus
Tournament to be held
Nov. 9
Two five members
teams will represent ECU
at the Association of
College Unions - Internat-
ional regional face-to-face
tournaments to be held in
Knoxville, Tennessee in
February. All expenses for
the tournament will be paid
by Mendenhall.
Registeration forms and
details are available at the
Mendenhall Bowling and
Billiards Centers. The final
day to register is Fri Oct.
13.
Tournament
All day-students register
now for the Mendenhall
Day-Student Table Tennis
Tournament to be held
Tues Oct. 17. The tour-
nament will be held in the
Table Tennis Rooms at
Mendenhall at 7 p.m.
The four winner in the
men's division and
women's division will rep-
resent the day-students in
the All-ampusTable Tennis
Tournament to be held
Nov. 7.
One all-campus winner
in each diivsion will rep-
resent ECU in the Associa-
tion of College Unions -
International regional face-
to-face tournaments to be
held in Knoxville, Tenn-
essee in Febraury. All
expenses for the tourna-
ment will be paid by
Mendenhall.
Registration forms and
details are available at the
Billiards Center and the
final day to register is Fri.
Cisco
The Student Union M in-
ority Arts Committee will
present a "Disco Jam"
featuring Leroy
Dawson on Fri Oct. 6 from
8-11:30 in. the Mendenhall
Multipurpose Rm. Admis-
sion is 50 cents at the door.
Concert
Artist Series season
tickets will be on sale at the
Central Ticket Office now
thru 4 p.m. Wed Oct. 11.
Students save $4.50 (6
concerts). Student - $7.50.
Faculty - $15.00. Public -
20.00.
The first concert featu-
ring Jorge Bolet is Wed
Oct. 11 at 8 p.m.
Psi Chi
FOr anyone who is
planning to pre-register for
a psychology course Psi-Chi
is holding a pre-registerat-
tion briefing Thurs Oct. 5
at 7:30 p.m. in Speight 129.
The courses available and
choice of professors and
general information about
courses will be provided.
This can be a big help to
anyone who plans to pre-
register for a psychology.
Gamma Beta
Gamma Beta Phi will
hold its first Rush meeting
for Fall Semester Thurs-
day, Oct. 5 in Mendenhall
244 at 7 p.m.
Any student with a
grade point average in the
top 21 of hisher class is
eligible for admission.
All interested students
are welcome to attend this
meeting.
Social
Oct. 13.
Club
All past and present
Co-op students are urged to
attend an organization
meeting Thursday, Oct. 12
in Mendenhall 248 at 4
p.m.
In addition to discussing
the possibility of organizing
a Co-op Club, the group
will discuss attending the
State professional meeting
of the North Carolina
Cooperative Education As-
sociation which will be held
at the Holiday Inn in Nags
Head on Oct. 19-20.
Chancellor Brewer will
be the keynote luncheon
speaker.
The Co-op office may be
able to arrange rides for
students interested in
attending.
Housing possibilities
will also be discussed.
All majors, minors, and
interested persons are invi-
ted to a social hour on Oct.
11 at 6:30p.m. til 9:30 p.m.
in BD-302.
The purpose of this
meeting is to get acquaint-
ed with the faculty and
students.
Also, students can pre-
register and discuss
courses with advisors.
Theta Alpha
The Theta Alpha
Chapter of Alpha Kappa
Alpha Service Sorority will
sponsor a bake sale, Wed,
Oct. 11 from 10-4 p.m. in
the lobby of the student
bookstore.
All proceeds benefit the
NAACP.
Theta Alpha will also
sponsor a post-game,
Homecoming Celebration,
Saturday, Nov. 11 from
10-2 a.m. at the Ramada
Inn.
Ticket? will be on sale
during mid-October.
The affair is semi-
formal.
Phi Beta
All students interested
in joining Phi Beta Lambda
must fill out the application
posted outside of Richard
Dupree's office in Rawl
209.
Interested students
should bring thier dues at
the next meet (Kg, Oct. 11 at
450 in Rm. 130.
Christ
Come to the Leadership
Training Class for some
fun, fellowship and practi-
cal insight into the exciting
Christian life!
The class meets every
Thursday night in Brewster
B-102 at 7 p.m.
The class is sponsored
by Campus Crusade for
Christ.
There will be a meeting
of Omicron Delta Epsilon,
the honor society for
Economics, on Wedn Oct.
11, 1978, in Rawl 103.
Old members are en-
couraged to attend.
Those students may join
who have a 2.5 overall
G.P.A who have a 3.0
G.P.A. in Economics, and
whohave had at least 10
semester hours of Eco-
nomics.
Wilderness
Edward Easton will
speak on the future of
wilderness in the United
States at the Sierra Club on
Mon Oct. 9, at 8 p.m.
in the First Presbyterian
Church, Greenville.
Chairman of the Appa-
lachian Regional Conserva-
tion Council and Regional
Vice-President of the Sierra
Club, Easton is an expert
on the "multiple use"
policy used by foresters.
Anyone interested in
the controversies over land
use and the probable fate of
the remaining roadless
areas is welcome to attend.
The First Presbyterian
Church is located at 14th
and Elm, across from Rose
High School.
Bicyclists
'l full-time students
interested in a bicycle club.
This year an interested
student, in association with
the intramurals depart-
ment, is trying to form a
bicycle club. All interested
bicyclist are encouraged to
attend the first meeting so
an appropriate analyses can
be made on the future of
such a club The first
meeting will be Tues Oct.
10 at 8 p.m. in Memorial
Gym room 105.
Ski Trip
The Student Union
Travel Committee offers a
ski trip to Snowshoe, West
Virginia during Christmas
Break (Jan 1-5).
Enjoy days of skiing and
nights of socializing around
the lodge fire.
Sign up at the Ticket
Office in Mendenhall.
Gamma Beta
Gamma Beta Phi will
meet Thursday, Oct. 5 in
Mendenhall 244 at 7 p.m.
All members are urged
to attend.
Council
Time is still available to
apply for HonorCounciland
Review Board positions.
This is an excellent way
for responsible students to
become involved in the
university community.
No experience is neces-
sary.
Applications can be se-
cured in the SGA office in
Mendenhall.
The deadline to apply is
Tues Oct. 10 by 1 p.m.
Blood
4-H
There will be a meeting
of the ECU Collegiate 4-H
Club on Thursday, Oct. 5 at
6 p.m. at the Villa Roma on
10th Street.
All formter 4-Hers and
interested persons are
invited.
For more information,
call John Ward at 758-9944.
The Air Force ROTC
will be sponsoring a blood
drive Oct. 4 and 5 from 11
to 5 p.m. located in Wright
Auditorium.
We are asking everyone
taparticipate in this worth-
while cause in order to
reach the goal which has
been set for 700 pints of
blood. Sororities, fraterni-
ties, and other organiza-
tions are strongly urged to
take an active part in the
donation.
Trophies will be awar-
ded to the organization with
the most donors. Take time
out to help, give a pint and
save a life.
Horror
Brewer
The trustees, faculty,
staff, and students of ECU
request the honor of your
presence at the installation
of Thomas Brewer as
Chancellor of the Univer-
sity on Sat Oct. 28 at 10 30
a.m. on the North Lawn of
ECU.
�f you wish to attend
please call 757-6537 to
request tickets.
Classifieds
A strange combination
of mad professor movies
and beach party fucks
highlights the Rocky Horror
Picture Show. A cult film
wh.ch has recently gamed
tremendous critical atten-
JJ.Jt is probably the
oddest, most off-the-wall
f"m ever made by anybody
anywhere. y
It stars Tim Curry
Susan Sarandon, Barry '
Bostw,ck, and Richard
O Brian.
The show is scheduled
Stu"dJ"r th M��
Sudsm Center Theatre.
lor sale
a
SPECIAL: baby Pefuvian
long-halrsd Guinea pigs for
sate. Adorable and great
pats. Call Pam 758-6189.
FOR SALE: New Minolta
single lens reflex 35mm
camera SRT-MC II 1.4 lens
200.00 Come by 503 E. 2nd
St. Apt. B or call 756-8564.
FOR SALE: 8-cu. ft. old GE
refrig. in excellent cond.
$35. If interested call Jo at
758-3877.
FOR SALE: 1 Devon rec-
eiver $25.00; 1 old but
working refrig. $10.00; 1
Kitchen table $10.00 Call
758-5865.
NEEDED: A responsible
female roommate to share a
2 bdrm. apt. Call Lisa or
Polly at 758-5794.
PERSONAL: To anyone
who lost their (dorm) room
key (Wwith a red rubber
band attached to it), at the
Mendenhall bus stop.
(Gold) Don't despair - if
on the Gold bus.
P�sonol(3)
LOST: Men's 14K gold
wedding band. Big
Reward
YOGA: hetha yogs is now
being taught by Sunshine.
New deeeee forming. Relax
�tion, vitaiization. weight
teas, realization. ?w mor
info call 756-0736.
MID EASTER DANCE:
Aulhemtc Belly Dancing
taught by Sunshine. exp
� fer �, oarf
" J" Onto Meio
A�nta, and th M
mtm " "ow formim,
CeJi 758-0738.
a
�mmhi wfOaas





5 October 1�7S FOUNTAIHHEAD
Greek Forum
l�n?Z B1EAK UN,D�TIFIED student points to cast,
"e te�ale companions laugh.
Photo by Steve Romero
Mall
opening in 1979
By ANN THARRINGTON
Staff Writer
Local residents can look
forward to the opening of a
new Greenville mall in
1979, according to Susan Q.
Nobles, manager of public
relations for the Greenville
Area Chamber of
Commerce
The new Carolina East
Mall is under construction
on a 37-acre site off U.S.
Highway 264. Westhaven
Road, and N.C. Highway 11
and is scheduled to open in
the fall of 1979, according
to Ernest W. Hahn, Inc.
Developers
The mall will include a
Belk-Tyler store which will
occupy 146.000 square feet.
and Sears with an auto
center covering 75,600
square feet
A third unidentified de-
partment store will extend
65.000 square feet.
Te $16 million mall will
include space for seventy
shops, and 2.164 parking
spaces
Local merchants as well
as regional and national
merchants are expected to
sigr eases at Carolina
East according to reports
from the leasing agent,
Goodman Segar Hogan of
Norfolk. Virginia.
However, no merchants
other than Sears and Belk-
Tyler were identified in the
report.
The plans call for an
off-white brick exterior de-
sign combined with light
gray and off-white accent
tiles.
The interior will feature
stepped ceiling with sky-
lights.
Terraced brink planters
will hold full-grown trees
and flowers. Oak benches
will be placed in the court
areas of the mall for
shoppers' relaxation.
The plans were drawn
up by Charles Kober Assoc-
iates of Los Angeles, Calif-
ornia.
Carolina East could
draw many Greenville
shoppers away from the
downtown merchants, but
Helen Pope, owner of the
Snooty Fox and president of
the Downtown Greenville
Association, does not think
it will be a problem.
"Carolina East Mall will
draw a lot of traffic to the
Greenville area and I
believe many of the people
that go to the mall will also
come to downtown Green-
ville.
"People are always
looking for quality mer-
chandise and as long as we
have it. they will continue
to come downtown
said.
she
Pope also said that
downtown Greenville is still
a progressive and vital
area, welcoming the stud-
ents and looking for ways to
upgrade the merchant's
services.
According to Pope the
merchants are continually
looking for better parking
facilities and have investiga-
tes the possibility of con-
structing a parking deck.
However, construction
plans are not underway yet.
"We welcome the dev-
elopment of the new
Carolina East Mall as it will
provide an expanded shop-
ping area for not only
citizens of the Greenville-
Pitt County area, but also
for the entire eastern re-
gion of North Carolina
said Charles Burnette,
president of the Greenville
Area Chamber of Com-
merce.
ByRICKIQLIARMIS
News Editor
Homecoming is still
more than a month away
and already fraternities and
sororities are beginning to
prepare for the big week-
j.td.
There will be a meeting
this week concerning home-
coming and how the Greeks
will take part in the festivit-
ies this year.
Each year one girl from
each sorority is chosen to
represent the house for the
preliminary voting for the
homecoming court. The
IFC also selects one girl to
act as their representative.
Also, it is traditional for
each house to have decorat-
ions of some sort. Some
groups submit homecoming
parade floats while others
choose to decorate their
house and yard. The dec-
orations and homecoming
sponsors are all in their
planning stages now in
order that the year's home-
coming will be ECU'S best
ever!
Other activities for fra-
ternities and sororities
which are coming up are
Lambda Chi Alpha Field
Day and Panhellenic's
Pledges on Parade.
Lambda Chi Alpha Field
Day has officially been set
for Sat Oct. 28 beginning
at 10:30 a.m. The first half
of the field day will be held
at the bottom of the hill.
Following the field
events, the field day will
continue at the Lambda Chi
Alpha house. Rules and
regulationsfor the day will
be passed out this week to
each fraternity and soro-
rity. This year's coordinat-
or of the program is Joe
Hash.
Panhellenic is sponsor-
ing Pledges on Parade.
This dance will be held at
the Greenville Moose
Lodge on Oct. 27 from 9
p.m. until 1 a.m. This will
be a good chance to meet
the girls in the other
sororities and to get to
know their new pledges.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
The Cho Omega Sor-
The Ghi Omega Sor-
ority held its first Alumni
weekend this past weekend
with a pig picking and
dance. The weekend was a
JVt
tw
�Lakion. of iJHaxUxccJft to Ckoou. ftotn
PCanUx� XtiUxt
iPCaqut JvixxoA.
Chustmai. Oxncurtuxti.
CTfOUlS
Mon. & OVtA. iZOO bo 8:00,
C7iuv 9u. iiOO to 6:00 Sat. UOO bo 41OO
to8W.KtA StMMi (cAexoxfuymtL. cHatyy �toj
75X-0761
Error
In advertisements previously published in FOUNTAINHEAD for the
Helms for Senate Committee The disclaimer for those advertisements was
erroneously omitted . All advertisements that have been published to I
promote the campaign of Senator Jesse Helms were billed and paid for by
the Helms for Senate Committee. There is absolutly no substance whatsoever
to the charges that the ads were not paid for. FOUNTAINHEAD is in :
compliance with all local, state, and federal laws with regard to the Helms :
advertisements.


Any and all inquiries or questions involving this matter should be made :
to the director of advertising. I
?��?
.wjnj&Tgs
y�
DI,E
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6.Ground Beef2.604.305.20
7.Black Olive2.604.305.20
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11Mushroom2604.305.20
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ADDITIONAL ITEMS.40.50.60
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1. Spaghetti & Meat Sauce with Hot Garlic Bread 2.25
2. Spaghetti & Meat Ball's with Hot Garlic Bread 260
3. Spaghetti & Mushroom Sauce with Hot Garlic Bread 260
A. Spaghetti. Mushroom & Meat Bails wHot Garlic Bread 295
& Lasagna with Hot Garlic Bread 295
Extra Meat Balls .30
A C"�P To��c� Salad
8 Cttt Sated
(Lattuca. tomato, black otraw. �rttn ottva. ham, turfcav, cHmm andcarrott.)
Choice of DrewirtO 1. Thousand Island 2. Franch 3 Bleu Chactt 4 Italian
SANDWICHES
BREAD BAKED FRESH DAILY
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SHORT 1.50
VEGETARIAN
Onion, Green Pepper, Muthroom Sauce. Lettuce
Tomato, Mujtard, Mavonnaue. Cheese. Baked
SUBMARINE
Ham, Salami, Sauce. Cheese. Baked
MEATBALL SANDWICH
Meatballs & Meat Sauce
HOAGIE
Ham, Salami, Mustard. Mayonnaise
Olive Oil, Lettuce & Tomato
VERSUVIAN STEAK
Hamburger Steak, Lettuce & Tomato
Mustard, Mayonnaise
HAM & CHEESE
Ham. Cheese, Lettuce. Tomato. Mustard
HOT PASTRAMI
Pastrami, Pickle & Mustard
HOT ROAST BEEF
Roast Beef, Mustard, Tomato
TURKEY SANDWICH
Turkey Breast. Lettuce & Tomato A Mayonnaise
TUNA BOAT
Tuna, Lettuce, tomato. Mayonnaise, Relish ft Catary
65
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Coke- Mr. Wb-Sprite
iced Tea or Cof fea
FOR FAST Fftftt DtUVERY - CALL 76700
1.75 MINIMUM bnoin ON CAMPUS
3 SO MINIMUM ORDER IN DELIVERY AREA
successful one for all of the
guests.
The Kappa Delta Soro-
rity took their pledges to
the home of their province
president this past weeknd.
The time was spent making
plans for the remainder of
their pledge period and
making a banner for the
football game.
Libby Letter, a member
of Kappa Delta, was elect-
ed speaker of the legisla-
ture for 1978-79. She is the
first female speaker in
ECU'S history.
Several members of
Sigma Sigma Sigma atten
-ded their regional leader-
shop conference in Wilson
this past weekend at
Atlantic Christian College.
They found the weekend a
prosperous one.
The different chapters
shared ideas with each
other. The members that
attended the conference
were able to meet the
Sigma Sigma Sigma nat-
ional president, who also
attended the workshop.
UNIQUE PROFESSIONAL SERVICES OFFERED
CERTIFIED SALOMON SKBINDING DEALER
Offered by Gordon Fulp
located at Greenville Country Club.
Aitaff of PGA Qualified Golf Professionals willing to assist you with
your particular golf needs, and help you with your custom made golf
clubs as well as offering complete repair for golf clubs and ski
equipment IT DOES NOT COST ANY MORE TO HAVE A
PROFESSIONAL ASSIST YOU IN YOUR GOLF AND SKI
NEEDSIN FACT IT PROBABLY
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uordon D. Fulp
Golf Professional
Greenville Country Club
OH of Memorial Dr
Phone 756-0504
Open 7 days a week unt'i darv
Do it yourself framing and save.
48-hour custom framing service.
Dry mounting and shrink wrapping.
Over 150 colors of mats in stock.
Over 250 styles of molding in stock.
Large selection of prints and ready made frames.
106 Trade St.
756-7454
Hours
Mon.aWtd. 10AM -9PM
TuesSat. 10AM- 5PM
Bank Cards Welcomed
STAMP OUT
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v �.
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as





"1 �� 'Im� � �� m
-�.
SGA towing service?
necessary evil needed to insure that those who student) from �5 to � �Z�?ZXl
registered their vehicles get an equal chance at time of day. At these priSs and a ,r� - .
fmdmg a park. While it will never be a popular six cars per week a student owll0
policy, towing could be made into a profitable could generateTnywheTnl 22?. "��?
venture if the Student Governemn, Association before taxes and expend ,0 $624�'
ss srss asssra jsssss sxsrrs
wrecker services go back into the coffers of of the wcTer drvedh- ?Z� ?
easing the financial crunch SGA suffers TSoZTS.
Accord,� .� , , !T 900d r6COrd' accordS to a local
tvnil 9 V �Cal Wrecker i06- a 9 S8rvl0e- No sPecial "anses are
ypical new wrecker sells for about $15,000 reQed to drive a wrecker
sTacZTlnT be had ,0r as low as . .Wi,h a StUdem wrecker- the money
�iu.ooo. If the SGA could set aside $5,000 each scents pay local services could be put to
year for two or three years, or negotiate a loan, bet,er u by supplementing the monev
ne money generated from towing would pay already Paid student activity feea. After a
tor the truck within three years. few years, the wrecker would be paid off and
According to Joe Calder ECU director m T"1.1? a Pr�fU makinQ enterPrt� for SGA.
traffic and security, campus Police '� �" driV6r " a ��, thus
average of six vehicles towed pe" week" Z�? ' handfU' �f JOtS ,0r Students- Th.
although tha, number varies ,rol,0Ta ttJEXXfS. "
American Journal
Forum
Hopi prophecies foretell apocalypse
Reader defends nursing homes
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
In response to
Communique: Nursing
home fragments FOUN-
TAINHEAD Sept. 21, 1978.
There are two sides to
every nursing home story.
Sure, the people who
have not worked with the
geriatric patient may be
ignorant of what really goes
on as the kitchen staff may
be because they are not
closely related or interact
with the geriatric patient.
If you notice, the word
home is used, and that is
what the nursing home
institution is to be for each
patient A home, where the
patient is a resident not just
a patient
I have worked within a
resthome-intermediate care
facility as a Nurse's Aide
for two and one half years,
maybe our home was an
exception to the rule, but I
would like to present my
side as I see it.
As David's main con-
tention was that it is
ethically, financially, and
socially illegal to keep old
people alive against their
will and confine them to a
small building for the rest
of their lives is the conten-
tion of many.
Old people have rights
and it is presented that it is
not one of the rights for the
old person to life if he can
no longer support and do
for himself.
Nursing homes are ex-
pensive. The payments are
made by Medicare, Medi-
cade, and Social Security;
then savings and family
fundings take over.
David mentioned the
fact that he wanted to be
shot when he became old.
The farmer shoots his horse
because it is old and can no
longer work for its upkeep
and is too expensive just to
keep up the horse when you
are not getting anything
from the horse itself. This
will be true of your grand
mother, grandfater,
mother, father, aunt, uncle,
and eventually yourself!
Could you really shoot
your mother and father just
because they are old and
can no longer be an essen-
tial product of society?
Don't they deserve some-
thing?
The main purpose of
philosophy of the nursing
home is to rehabilitate and
help the person to live each
day one at a time to the
fullest extent.
Medical care should be
given to the geriatric pa-
tient. Why should it not?
Some old people are just
like babies. If you deny
them, deny the babies,
teenagers, and middle age
folks!
For the people to be
called names such as deri-
lict, hulks, and bags of
bones is inhumane. They
are just as much a person
as you are and they have
feelings, too! That bag of
bones can hear and under-
stand everything you say
about it.
The derilicts may be
derilicts only because the
family may neglect the
person because of the
wrong attitude and the
attitude of the workers such
as that of the cook's about
"I just feed these fuckers
and go home Each
patient needs love and
understanding even though
they may not be able to
respond. They make efforts
to communicate if you are
observant.
As confinement, this
facility provides many re-
creations such as checker
tournaments complete with
trophy and jacket, trips
downtown, gardening, art
and crafts, basketball, are
just a few. You are allowed
and encouraged to do your
own thing.
People are placed in
nursing homes in some
case as a last resort. In
these cases, the family
visits frequently and the
resident is happy and there
are good relations between
all sources. Others are
placed in nursing homes
just to be "out of the way
This is sad. You must help
this person just as you
would if a teenager had
been kicked out of the
house.
Sure, the geriatric pa-
tient has special problems
and they must be handled
in a special way. Yes they
do at times, some more
than others, shit in the bed
but if you recall, you did,
too. Your mom and dad
cleaned up, they still loved
you, and never gave you a
tremendous guilt complex
over it, why give them one?
Sympathy is nice in
extremely small amounts,
if you are overloading
sympathy on an old person
you just make them feel
sorry for themselves. That
can really mess them up.
Old people need love,
understanding, not apathy!
This society is all youth
oriented. Why? What has
youth got to do with
running the world? Youth
has much learning and
living to do! The youth gets
more respect from society
than the senior citizen
does! More emphasis
should be put on those old
beings! They've done a lot
for us and they deserve it.
Remember, one day you
will be in their place and it
will be sooner than you
think.
Up with Gray Power!
Libby JoAnn Owens
DAVID ARMSTRONG
"Do not let them tale whit 1$ underneath your
houses. For by that Urns, man will havs learned to make
another man. Seasons will change. And man will go into
space on platforms
Richard Kastl on the Hopi prophecies
What may be the biggest news of 1978, and beyond
remains a virtual secret, the property not of the madia
rnavene of the metropollten centers but of a little-known
Indian people in northeastern Arizona who call themselves
Hopi.
The Hopi - their name means "to be peaceful and have
faith in the Great Spirit" - have lived In the same rugged
arid place for centuries. They have nevar taken up arms
against the United Slates, nor have they ever signed a
treaty.
They consider them-
selves unique, and are so
considered by other native
North American peoples,
who generally accept the
Hopi as the spiritual guard-
ians of this continent, the
great Turtle Island of Indi-
an tradition.
Today, the Hopi,
through their traditional
elders, are trying to tell us
something. Namely,
" the Hopi fails, it will
trigger the destruction of
the world and all
mankind
Student proposes
clean-up campaign
ToFOUNTAINHEAD
I don't know if you've
seen this person, but there
is this kid I saw on campus
who was spending time
picking up trash left by
others. I looked over at this
Fcxjniainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over 50 years
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Leigh Coakley
EDITOR
Doug White
TRENDS EDITOR
Steve Bachner
NEWS EDITORS
Julie Everette
Ricki Gliarmis
ADVERTISINQ MANAGER
Robert M. Swaim
SPORTS EDITOR
Sam Rogers
FOUNTAINHEAD la the student newanar - m
Carolina University sponsored. EKHE �L fi
"wir �ow south Bu,w,n�'�����. n.c.
Editorial offices: 757-6368, 757-6367, 757-6306
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni $6 annually.
girl and got one ferocious-
ly defensive look.
As one who is becoming
more and more accustomed
to looks of this type, tread
this one as, " If you say one
word to ma fella � ril
knock your block off The
kid obviously felt pretty
strong about trash and
litter.
Now, I'm not opposed to
a clean-up campaign my-
self, but I sure don't think
one or two people will make
a big difference.
Maybe an appeal to the
student government for
more trash cans would be
helpful. There is surely
enough money to pay for a
few cans out of the
$150,000 they have in stu-
dent fees.
The campus police
could even help. They could
stop writing silly parking
tickets and write litter
tickets instead.
There ie e state law
against Uttering. This ie e
neglected, but obviously
necceaary law, considering
that there it no consensus
of human awareness to pick
up after themselves.
Wesley Williams
that if wa don't end our
ways of warfare and ecological suicide, this world will soon
self-destruct. Maybe this year, maybe next. Last year's
Western drought and bitter Eastern winter were, they
warn, only previews.
Now, predicting the end of the world is not new. Ouija
board wizards and folks claiming exclusive visiting rights
with Venusian saucer people have been doing it for years.
But the Hopi are not publicity seekers, not dilettantes.
They are an intensely religious people with a
detailed checklist for the apocalypse in prophecies that are
to psychic dabbling what a lightening bolt is to a 40-watt
bulb.
The Hopi prophecies are derived from a cosmology that
holds there have been several worlds before this one,
worlds that followed a pattern of growth, decay and
destruction brought on by human failures. Each world left a
few survivors, who carried the seeds of civilization with
them into the next world.
According to the Hopi worldview, they are the
seed-people of this world, and their land, to which they
migrated in annuity, is the center, the spiritual heart, of
this part of theplanet.The Hopi role, according to tradition,
is to protect the integrity of the heartland and to nourish the
heart through ritual and right livelihood.
The Hopi further believe that a turning away from this
delicate human ecology - both by humanity at a whole and
some Hopi themselves - has brought the present world to
the edge of destruction. The prophecies are signposts by
which to mark this cynical slippage.
Richard Kaeti ie a young Oeage-Creek Indian from
Oklahoma, a friend of the Hopi who often represents them
to the media and on speaking tours around the country.
Speaking �n Eugene, Ore. recently, Kaeti explained, "Long
before the white man came to thle land, It wee known that
men with white ekins would come from the East.
"The prophecy said they would come In a box by
anlmale, end the box wouidlater run by itself. There would
be long lines of these boxes, end there would be people
living inside them; ihey would go across the land like
snakes. Great roads would then pour across the land like
rivers; and man would begin to talk to man through
cobwebs in the sky. It was said that one man would be able
to see and hear another man over the mountains through a
box.
"The Hopi people said that there would be three
earth-shaking events that would take place if we started
going in the wrong direction Kastl continued. "The first
warning would come when a man bearing the swastikaWould
come to shake the world. And a man from the land of the
rising sun would come and shake the world some more
Then would come "a gourd of ashes from the sky that would
boil the rivers and the land for many years to come and
bring new sickness
The leadersof 17 Hopi clans, meeting in 1948, identified
the "gourd of ashes" as the atomic bomb. This so
concerned them, they decided to make the heretofore secret
of impending doom. They
see genetic engineering as
the fulfillment of the "man
making another man" pro-
phecy, while another vision
of "two brothers building a
ladder to the moon"
appears to be the joint
U.SSoviet orbiting space
station planned for 1979.
The final factor in the
prophecies, however,
" ' figures to happen not in the
skies, but under the earth Thi�
assault on the Hopi themselves, on their traditionV'and
This assault, led by corporate multinational and
land.
� by �� an. Hop, who have g.ven up th.�
��ys. rs proceeding apaoe with devastating results
Stripmining of Hopi land began in 1967 when the
PbodyCoa, Co. signed a long-term ,ease w�h ,h. eTed
.nb council. � accelerated in the rly W.n
Peabody began flaying Black Mesa a B,J
-religion, shipping TZZZ
2;Z Z 'leMe flran,M ,o a u"nium �-p�"y
�nd 13 oil companies for 1.5 million acres of ku .
half the Hopi holding fo, explor " "
w ' exploration of minerals and oil
The lease was approved in 1976 in an election in ,
only 229 of the a rwn w, an �ion in which
l� -I" be .n1 recomplt� h.7 " � �
y behave the drilling and digging wHI
A.r�dy, th. consldab amount, of water ,�, ,�'
the Four Corn MM hM lowww) t -TUT
Mar th. uni,u. wwn �, dry ��;
sou ou, - thi, wor.d mm �, ,� m Hopi J�
failed In their atew.rd.hlp. .
The only mmter now at ,�. ,���� ,�.
be whether all lit. mm be loat or onlv m. Z ,
�� nn, or only moat of t If vm
change course right away, they seem to augga w J2
um, j � wr�w, wa can at
�t avoid tha worst. Wrote Dan Katchongv who Zl
juet after completing hie book A u. J .
1972 "a, �msD0. "weep for AW �, in
P�op�e everywhere muet give the Hop! tt�elr meet
�"�owe ccnlder.tion. Our prophecies, our t-ching. and
our caramcnial dutieemuet continue, for if the Hop! to it
will triggar tha deduction of the world and all mankind
For further information, contact Friends of the Hopi,
Box 1882, Fiagetaff, Arizona 86002.





Curry stars in The Rocky Horror Picture Show
By STEVE BACHNER
Trends Editor
This Friday and Saturday night at 7 and 9 in
Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix Theatre, the Student
Union Films Committee will present the first genuine
cult' film of this decade, The Rocky Horror Picture Show.
Rocky Horror is a melange of farce, parody and satire
set against a backdrop of rock music, bizarre characteriza-
tions and intermittent sex. It is a hilarious, irreverent spoof
of the old horror and beach movie genres of film that will
never make it to TV intact.
Rocky Horror is overflowing with crazy ideas, people
bursting into song, boisterously funny bit roles, and the one
and only Tim Curry (pictured above) in the lead as a
franssexual vampire from Transylvania. The film sports
some of the most progressive perversions to date
It is entertaining, revolting, compelling, captious, and
campy all at once.
The untenable storyline revolves around newlywed
couple Brad (Barry Bostwick) and Janet (Susan Sarandon),
who are bouncing along the countryside en route to a
honeymoon hideaway when their car has a flat tire and they
are forced to seek refuge in a spooky Gothic castle in the
middle of nowhere. Its horrific occupants take them under
their wing: strip them down to the unmentionables, a la
Frankie and Annette, and sweep them along to the grand
ballroom cum laboratory where they witness the timeless
ritual dance of cosmogenic immortality.
The production number is entitled "Let's Do the
Timewarp Again" and the entire cast, some 20 or 30
players strong, joins in.
It is during the dance that the couple meets the lord of
the castle (Tim Curry), a transsexual varnprre who we rater
discover isfrom another planet. He has come to earth wW
a host of grotesque assistants who are all bent on, that's
right, creating a higher form of life, but who have so far
only succeeded in manufacturing a physiologically defective
atrocity whom they keep shut tight in a meat locker. (Rock
singer Meatloaf enters as the creature and does another
number with the cast while zooming about on a motorcycle.)
Curry and company finally do succeed in their efforts to
assemble the perfect teratology and they give us Rocky
Horror, a musclebound Aryan who looks to be the first of a
master race of Rocky Horrors . . . until Curry's twisted
sexuality compels him to get personally involved.
Rocky Horror is fast catching on as big box-office late
show fare all across the country. It has the reputation of
being the only real audience participation film ever made.
It didn t start out that way.
The stage version opened in London some years back to
mixed reviews. After a long and prosperous run, it closed
and pre-production work on a film version began almost
immediately. The film version did poorly on its first
commercial run in 1971 and came perilously close to being
written off for tax purposes.
Rocky Horror was re-released in 1976 and slowly, but
definitively, snowballed a cult following of midnight
audiences not merely content to trick or treat, but to
audition for every role as well. They beat the players to
their lines at every possible opportunity; copy many of their
movements; gesture when they gesture; learn the
choreaography and practice in the aisles; devise clever
means with which to reinforce the action on the screen;
learn all of the lyrics to all of the songs ;toss questions at the
scree and across the theatre to fellow devotees; warn them
when danger is present, and soon.
The setting at Chapel Hill's Varsity Theatre last
Saturday evening was one of characteristic bedlam (this is
what is realiy meant by the hypothesis of "audience
participation "). Patrons threw rice during the wedding
sequence at the beginning of the film; punned an on screen
toast by tossing real toast high in the air; switched on
pocket flashlights in order to aid Brad and Janet in their
plight to find the castle early on in the film (a double pun
because the couple sing a song entitled "There is a Light"
during the sequence); donned party hats and blew
noisemakers for a party scene, and, in one of the most
heralded rituals of all, shot squirtguns filled with an ample
supply of water at patrons sitting in the front portion of the
theatre in order to simulate the rain that purse earthward in
still another sequence. (Viewers down front brought
unbrellas to protect them from the shower.)
Needless to say, many of the participants came to Rocky
Horror in drag gear as a tribute to the hero of the film,
Curry. Groups of five and six posed near the boxoffice at
the witching hour to have their pictures struck before
entering the theatre.
It should already be evident at this point that
Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix Theatre is by no
means the best place to screen this sort of fare. The
slinging of debris is strictly forbidden in the theatre and
would be uncalled for anyway since most students will be
viewing the movie for the first time and will lack the proper
motivation that comes only from repeated screenings.
Not to worry, Rocky Horror gear may still consist of
pocket flashlights, party paraphanalia, and anything else
that will leave with the student atter his orientation
screening of the film.
Potential cultists may look forward to repeat perform-
ances of Rocky Horror at Greenville's Pitt Theatre The
movie is booked for sometime in late October.
It can be difficult to explain exactly why this wryly
decadent, obviously low budget effort has captured the
Saturday nights of so many filmgoers. Director Jim
Sharman calls the film "a magnificently contrived
cumulative piece that depicts a clash between the
generation of the Fifties and the music of the Seventies
Rocky Horror reminds us more of a Sixties
"underground" or "angry" film that has evolved into a
Felliniesque romp through a cemetary, and in this sense,
the musical numbers are an afterthought.
Rocky Horror seems to be the last of the "alternative"
films (films straying from the commercial cinema) but
certainly not one of the last experimental films. Transger to
the commercial cinema may not harm an avant-garde
filmmakers's talent, but it does tend to have the effect of
taking the edge off of his attack on the system.
Producers Lou Adler and Michael White have made full
use of the potential that became inherent in the artform
after the development of the 16 mm. camera during the
postwar years. Instead of producing movies for the
millions, almost-underground filmmakers like Adler and
White produce private films for themselves � the film
version branches out in directions that the play was never
even aim in. They were lucky, and it is hard to be sure why,
that they captured the support of a multitude of like-minded
supporters.
Farrah Fawcett-Majors and Jeff Bridges co-star in
Columbia Pictures' Somebody Killed Her Husband
By DARREN BERGSTEIN
Assistant Trends Editor
The beauteous Farrah Fawcett-Majors has done what
she finally wants. Her reasons for leaving Charlie's Angels.
she stated amply last year, was "to better my career by
graduating to the movies
Somebody killed Her Husband is Farrah's first film but
in making it has she bettered her career? Or even
graduated at all?
Yes, she certainly has. Farrah's portrayal of a simple
New York wife of a wealthy insurance man who is suddenly
thrust into the world of murder is one of gratifying fortitude
and accomplished grace.
She is five, ten, twenty times better than in the abysmal
Charlie s Angels. Let's face it: naturally the only thing that
keeps Angels qo'q is the bouncy and bubbly motions that
Kate, Jaciyn and Cheryl (once Farrah) execute. The acting
is definitely melodramatic and quite terrible.
In this film, however, Farrah comes across as anactress
possessing a surprising bit of talent. Though the dialogue
and basic plot-line is somewhat cliched, she plays her part
straight
Farrah portrays Jenny Moore, a woe-be-gone woman
with a baby and a marriage on the rocks.
Jff Bridges is the exact opposite of Mr. Moore. He is a
Macv s employee working behind a counter in the toy
aertment having battles of his own with a woman who
STother things on rtm mind besides stuffed animals.
This does not interest him, however, his main
preoccupation being his writing of children's books which
!�L�'t �am to be wanted.
He burnt into Farrah one day, spilling her pretzels,
starting off a really atypical relationship, (this never
happened to Raquel Welch.)
Of course, Farrah and Bridges fall in love, rather quickly
m fact. It's unusual that the three most confusing words in
the English language (I Love You) pop up in the first half
hour of the picture.
The main shock of the film comes when Bridges and
Farrah, having decided to tell her husband that they were
getting married, walk to the kitchen where they discover
the bloodied, stabbed body of Mr. Moore.
Farrah is understandably horrified, and Bridges
proceeds to go out of his mind trying to deduce who in the'
world would kill a corrupt insurance agent.
It's amazing how Bridges deducts each step logically
and seems to uncover the murderer's identity while finding
out that he was , terribly wrong�and the rather
' suspenseful' (to be more exact) hazy climax proves him so.
Bridges doesn't appear to be suited for the part of a man
falling head over heels for a pretty face (though hell, even I
would gladly take the vivacious poster girl Angel�and do
perhaps a bit more).
He stupidly follows her around like a starved puppy,
finally asking her out to lunch on a cold and blistery day.
Wonder what Lee thinks of all this
The Majors have a lot going for them. As a matter of
fact, Lee has himself made an adventure flick called The
Norseman about the discovery of North American by the
Vikings.
They plan to produce films in which either of them or
both of them would star in. Would it work? Again, only time
will tell
Farrah has become a heavy lady. After her severed
relationship with Charlie's Angels, she planned to C7t to
the world that she just wasn't another pretty face.
There came along the various commercials for Cougar,
Wei la Balsam Shampoo (she has, in fact, her own line of
shampoo and other cosmetics known as Farrah Fawcett
Shampoo�catchy name, huh?), Noxzema and perhaps one
or two others.
She was one of the hosts on the Emmy Awards, and has
made a number of appearances on Johnny Carson's Tonight
Show.
But, after all this seemingly glorious prestige, Mrs.
Majors really hasn't surfaced with a whoosh ever since she
left the Angels set.
Cheryl Ladd has grabbed all of Farrah's mail and
possibly more, taking over in her absence with aplomb.
Farrah may inwardly regret or envy this, but she is not
showing it, not publicly at least.
What about the posters though, huh?
Oh, man, yeah
What Farrah did become was the nation's no. 1
Sex Symbol.
I hat poster showing a pretty woman clothed in a
skimpy, revealing bathing suit, her lion's mane flowing like
two dozen snakes, makes Its' appearance on the walls of
college dorm rooms, bedrooms, discos, record shops,
bathrooms, army barracks, penthouses, business offices.
It is reported that that voluptuous item has sold over five
million copies, the hottest poster of 1976, 1977, and surely
one of the hottest posters of all time. Raquel Welch move
over�the lady with the hair Is here.
In the movies also
There is talk going on of her doino a science fiction film,
FLOOREDTHE SEARCH for an elusive killer challenges
Jeff Bridges and Ferrah Fawcett-Majors in "Somebody
Killed Her Husband
her second film beside the minute part she had in Logan's
Run. But hell, she looked good there
What is Farrah's outlook on the parts she wishes to
pursue? She has stated that nude portrayals would, or
maybe, come later in her career, she feeling that she has
too many young fans that couldn't accept their cover girl,
their neat gal, exposed. Or maybe that's how their parents
feel.
Speaking back of nude parts, there is a love scene in the
picture that makes one wonder if hubby Lee approves.
One may also think if Farrah cares if he approves, her
mind obviously atwirl with worrying about pursuing her
own illustrious career on her skateboard herself. Course
Lee will be at her side, but the lady's got ideas of her own.
Think of the basic sixties murder flick and you have
Somebody Kilted Her Husband. But the only reason for the
film it to see Farrah in full flight. And by God, she's done
pretty damn good.
.
,





Page6 FOUNTAINHEAD 5 October 1978
Arthur Knight to speak on 4Sex in
the Cinema9 this Tuesday night
Arthur Knight, noted
film critic, will give a
lecture or) Sex in the
Cinema on Tuesday, Oct.
10. 1978 at the Hendrix
Theatre in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
The name Arthur
Knight is synonymous with
the study of the movies.
Since its publication in
1957. The Liveliest Art has
been recognized as the
comprehensive history of
films.
Arthur Knight is
presently a Professor of
Cinema at the University of
Southern California and
film critic for Playgirl and
Westways magazines.
He is the former film
critic to The Saturday
Review and has taught at
the City College of New
York, Columbia, Hunter
College, and the New
School for Social Research.
He has lectured at
Dartmouth, Tulane, Sand
Diego State College, City
College of Berkeley,
U.C.L.A and Sarah
Lawrence, among others
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Why was Citizen kane
omitted entirely from an
international "10 Best"
survey of the Fifties, but
topped the list in the
Sixties?
Professor Knighta
veteran of twenty-five years
as a practicing film critic in
new York and Hollywood,
speaks with authority on
the New York critics and
their methods of operation,
on their Hollywood
confreres, and on the
uneasy relationship bet
between the critics, the
motion picture industry,
and the creativeiersonali-
ties they either hate or
adore.
Knight also offers a
critique of the critics and a
guide to interpreting con-
temporary film criticism.
Arthur Knight, creator
of Playboy magazine's
"Sex in the Cinema" is on
tour with his exciting film-
lecture presentation "The
history of Sex in the
Cinema
Knight is a jury
member at the Venice, San
Francisco, Chicago, Van-
couver, Mar de Plata, and
locarno film festivals; he
serves on the selection
committee for the New
York and Dallas film fes-
tivals; and he is a member
of the board of directors of
Filmex (the Los Angeles
film festival).
In addition to his
diverse and myriad en-
deavors, Arthur Knight is
perhaps best known to the
general public as the author
of Playboy magazine's pop-
ular and controversial Sex
in the Cinema series.
From Thomas Edison's
The Kiss (1896) to Deep
Throat (1972), sex has
always been Topic A so far
as the movies are con-
cerned.
but the amounts of sex
permitted on the screen
vary with the times, and
concepts of morality change
with changing social condi-
tions.
Knight skillfully
and entertainingly relates
the alternating periods of
permissiveness and repres-
sion to their historical,
sociological, and psycho-
logical roots.
The content and quality of
Knight's presentation
were consistently excellent.
We were pleased, very
pleased.
-Assistant program
Director, University of
Illinois
would highly recommend
him as an asset to any
college program.
-Assistant Program
Director, Southern Illinois
University
Sponsored by the
Student Union Lecture
Committee, admission to
the lecture will be free for
ECU students with ID and
Activity cards. Tickets are
$2.00 for ECU faculty and
staff and for the general
public.
NOTED FILM LECTURER
and critic, Arthur Knight. Knight will
speak on the subject of Sex in the Cinema
this Tuesday at 8 p.m. at Mendenhall s
Hendricks Theatre.
Senior art student Larry Shreve
exhibits his paintings at Mendenhall
ECU News Bureau
Paintings by Larry
Shreve, senior student in
the ECU School of Art, will
be on display Oct. 1-7 in the
gallery of Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
The paintings, done
with acrylic paints and color
dyes, include a self por-
trait, genre paintings based
on local rural architecture
and two paintings from
Shreve's series with the
American flag as a unifying
theme.
A candidate for the
Bachelor of Fine Arts
degree in painting with a
minor concentration in
drawing, Shreve plans to
continue his art studies on
the graduate level.
His parents are Levi and
Sarah Shreve of 153 Meli-
ssa Drive, Rocky Mount.
Tenor Charles Moore to perform in
recital on Monday, Oct. 9
PHI
ECU News Bureau
Charles Moore, tenor, a
member of the School of
Music voice faculty, will
perform in recital Mon
Oct. 9, at 8:15 p.m. in the
A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
Dr. Moore will perform
Franz Schubert's 'Win-
terreise Opus 89, a cycle
of 24 songs based on texts
by Wilhelm Muller. The
cycle is one of the last of
Schubert's compositions,
written soon before the
composer's death in 1828 at
the age of 31.
Dr. Moore, chairman of
vocal music for the ECU
School of M usic. is active as
a guest choral director,
clinician and officer in
professional music educa-
tor's organizations.
He holds degrees from
Butler and Indiana Univer-
sities.
His public performance
in the area have included
featured roles in campus
opera and oratorio product-
ions, among them the lead
role in the ECU Opera
Theatre produciton of
"Tales of Hoffman
Accompanying Dr
Moore will be his wife,
pianist JoAnn Moore.
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5 October 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
ECU seeks third straight victory
Pirates on the road against Keydets
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
Even ECU head coach
Pat Dye admits VMl is not
the most exciting word in
the world when it comes to
collegiate football.
But don't think for one
second Dye and the rest of
his Pirates are taking the
Kedyets lightly this Satur-
day when ECU travels to
Lexington. Va. for its 1 :30
contest at Alumni Memor-
ial Stadium.
"It's certainly not the
st exciting place for
outsid' come play
d Dve at his weekly
cress eon. "But it
� means we'll
nave a tough game against
It's homecoming and
cadets always make a
lot of noise. The biggest
thing for them is that
they've now won eight
straight games at home,
and the last team to beat
them there was ECU back
in 1976
Last year, the Keydets
jumped out front 13-0 in the
first half before ECU came
from behind to capture a
hard fought 14-13 victory.
VMl, now 2-2 overall, won
its biggest game of the year
last week when the Keydets
topped Virginia 17-9.
"They certainly got a
big win against Virginia
last week noted Dye.
Last year's game was a
hard fought one and I know
they felt like they should
have won. They don't make
many mistakes and they
certainly won't beat them-
Simply Sports
Sam Rogers
selves.
ECU won its second
game in a row last week
over Texas-Arlington 23-
17, but once again quarter-
back Leanoer Green missed
most of the contest with an
injury. Green suffered a hip
pointer in the first quarter
and missed the second half,
but is expected to be back
in the starting lineup Sat-
urday against VMl.
"Leander hasn't prac-
ticed yet this week said
Dye. "And it's certainly
noticable that our offense
struggles when he's not
playing. When he got hurt
last week it kept us from
doing some things on
offense we normally could
have done.
"We didn't move the
ball well in the second half,
but we only turned the ball
over two times during the
game. We haven't done
that badly on offense con-
sidering all the injuries
we've had. If we can get
everybody healthy we'll be
a fine offensive football
team.
After Texas-Arlington
railed to tie the score at-
14-14 the ECU defense
allowed only three points
the remainder of the game
and shut down talented
Mav quarterback Roy
Dewalt. Dewalt completed
9 of 14 passes for 134 yards
in the first half but could
manage only two comple-
tions for 20 yards in the
second half.
"Our defensive line did
an excellent job containing
Roy Dewalt in the second
half praised Dye. "We
forced seven turnovers and
once again came up with
some big defensive plays
Dye cited D.T. Joyner,
Oliver Felton, Tommy
Summer, Mike Brewing-
ton, Zack Valentine and
Fred Chavis for their
performances against Tex-
as-Arlington. Defensive
backs Charlie Carter, who
intercepted two passes, and
Willie Holley also drew
praise from Dye.
Noting the PiratesThe
last time VMl defeated
ECU was in 1974, when the
Keydets won 13-3 and
captured the Southern Con-
ference Championship
Incidentally, Saturday's
game will count as a
Those surprising VMl Keydets
ni Memorial Stadium hardly resembles the
tares ECU has become accustomed to playing
I rst five games of the season.
indent Alumni Memorial structure seats only
s and ranns as one of the smallest stadiums in the
on One classification of major college football
� cram 1.000 screaming jarheads and their dates into
structure, along with a throng of ardent Keydet
aiumm and suddenly this stadium becomes-one Of the
.ghest places in the country to play in. Just ask�CU head
coach Pat Dye.
Lexington s probably not the most exciting place in the
world to play in. but they always play tough up there said
Dye Wednesday afternoon at his weekly press luncheon.
We had to fightour guts out there two years ago to come
away with a 17-3 victory. Those cadets make a bunch of
se everytime we play there and they make it awfully
jh for you
Hold it right there. Pat. VMl? The perennial patsy in the
Southern Conference which at one time over a four year
period won three games and lost a whopping total of 39?
Well, sort of.
er Keydet officials were fed up with enough of those
embarrassing 50-zip scores on Saturday afternoons, Bob
Thalman. a former assistant coach at North Carolina and
Georgia Tech was hired to make some changes.
Although the results weren't immediate, Thalman
slowly nursed the VMl program along and today the
Keydets have regained the respectability they once
commanded back in the late 50's and early 60's.
A glance at Thalman's record over the last four years at
VMl is remarkable considering the size of the tiny
� nstitutionand the obvious recruiting problems any mil-
itary school faces.
Top service academy
Since 1974. VMl has won more games than any of its
m-state rivals or any of the service academies. Add two
Southern Conference championships and suddenly
opposing teams no longer find the Keydets pushover on
Saturday afternoons.
No man ever worked harder or did more for VMl in
time of need than did Bob Thalman noted VMl Athletic
Director Tom Joynes recently. "When we hired him, we
were at a point where we couldn't raise money and we
couldn't sell tickets, not just because of the record but
because morale here was so low
This Saturday afternoon Pat Dye visits Lexington, Va.
for the third time since he assumed duties as head coach at
ECU The Southern Conference championship was on the
line the first time Dye visited VMl and the Keydets won
13-3 and finished the season 7-4.
Although the Pirates are no longer members of the
Southern Conference Thalman still admits ECU is one of
their biggest rivalries. "We always regard ECU as one of
our biggest games each year said Thalman. "We've
never liked the idea of being recognized as a small school
that cant play and I think we've proved we can play
winning football here.
"We're the smallest school in the NCAA Division I, but
we're competitive. I think our games against ECU over the
last four years certainly indicate how competitive we've
been
After dropping two of its first three games, the Keydets
bounced back tc dump big in-state rival Virginia last week
17-9 and appear ready o make another run at the
Southern Conference title.
�We have a tremendous amount of respect for ECU
said Thalman. "Year in and year out, they're one of the
best teams we'll face on our schedule
And despite its small size and less talented athletes, the
Keydets surprisingly remain one of ECU'S toughest
opponents. Year in and year out.
Just ask Pat Dye.
"It seems like every time I look acroea the line I aae
another great field goal kicker swinging his leg against us
!nd this week is no exception said ECU head coach Pat
nve VMl placekicker Cralg Jones owns ail the Key-
iaicking records booted two field goals aga'nat ECU
j�it year when the Pirates won 14-13.
Southern Conference con-
test for the KeydetsVMI
is the smallest Division I
school in the nation. Only
1250 students are enrolled
at VMlKeydet halfback
Butch Hostetter is the
team's top ground gainer
with 407 yards with a 5 yard
average per carry VMl
also ranked sixth in the
nation in passing defense
allowing only 64 yards a
game.
Bill Lamm remains
ECU'S top scorer with 26
points. The junior place-
kicker has converted 11-11
extra points and has con-
nected on five field goal
attemptsBill Ray Wash-
ington is the second leading
scorer with three touch-
down receptions. halfback
Anthony Collins is the
Pirates leading rusher with
259 yards
VMl sharpshooter
VMl PLACEKICKER CRAIGJones sends another field goal
through the uprights.
Pound for pound, he's the best
ECU cornerback Charlie Carter
Keydet QB
VMl QUARTERBACK ROBBY Clark directs the Keydet
offense Clark is also one of the the Keydet's tn-captains
this season.
Lamm provides
offensive kick
ByCHARLESCHANDLER
Assistant Sports Editor
ECU place kicker, Bill
Lamm, has eliminated one
worry yet added another.
But one can be sure that the
Satellite Beach, Fla. native
would much rather worry
about the latter than the
former.
Lamm tied a school
record by kicking three
field goals in the Pirates'
23-17 victory over Texas-
Arlington last Saturday.
That ended his old worries
about his ability to kick
successfully on the colle-
giate level.
Lamm claims that his
confidence is now at an
all-time high, yet he says
he has a new worry. "Now
I have to fight over-confi-
dence said Lamm. "After
a game like that, it's easy to
imagine myself getting a
little bigheaded. If I can
avoid that, I'll be ok. "
Lamm's three field
goal, 11 point effort against
the Movin' Mavs has Pirate
head coach Pat Dye
smiling. "I know this will
really help everyone's
confidence said Dye.
"Before when Bill would
miss a kick, it would really
hurt him, and the other
players. Maybe now they
will realize that a kicker
cannot connect every time.
I think he showed us what
he could do Saturday when
he tunes down
A walk on as a
freshman, Lamm is another
of the Pirates who had to
earn a scholarship through
hard work on the collegiate
level- Lamm was an
all-conference kicker and
two-year starter at quarter-
back at Satellite High
School.
ECU assistant coach
Ken Hutcherson was once
the head football coach at
Satellite, and decided to
talk to Lamm after his
senior season. Hutcherson
didn't have a scholarship to
offer, but evidently con-
vinced Lamm that, with a
little work, he could earn a
scholarship.
By deciding on ECU,
Lamm gave up his career as
a quarterback. "Coach Dye
tried me at defensive back
for a few days, but soon
told me to just stick to my
kicking. I guess that was
sort of a hint
Since that time Lamm
has put all his efforts into
kicking field goals and
extra points. All the hard
work culminated Saturday
night. Lamm's field goals
of 33, 40, and 29 .yards
reaffirmed his early season
feeling that he would have
a good season. "I felt a lot
better when we started
practice this summer than
ever before said Lamm.
"I felt ready to go. Usually I
kick so much before we
start practice that I'm worn
out when we do start. This
year I just took it easy, and
it's paying off
The Junior kicker
claimed that his perfor-
mance against Texas-Ar-
lington was one of the
biggest thrills in his life.
"It is definitely the high-
light of my career thus far.
it waa actually fun Saturday
night. I had a great time
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
It happens to even the best defensive backs, but ECU'a
Charlie Carter admits the bomb is every cornerbacks
nightmare.
Texas-Arlington quarterback Roy Dewalt caught Carter
napping Saturday night when he hit split end Scott Burt
with a 56 yard touchdown pass which tied the score early in
the second quarter.
But Carter returned in the second half to intercept two
of Dewalt's passes and helped the Pirate's secondary allow
only two completions the remainder f the game.
"We knew Dewalt could throw the ball, but I didn't
think he could throw the ball so accurately said the
former Terry Sanford prepstar. "I just took my eye off the
receiver for a split second and he got behind me. I really
didn't expect him to throw the long pass against us.
"Getting beat on long patterns like that bothers me and
you think about it the rest of the night, but coach Dye told
me to just forget about it and go out there and work harder.
After Dewalt completed nine of 14 passes for 134 yards
in the first half, the Pirates quickly made some necessary
adjustments at halftime.
"We tried to confuse him by disguising our coverage
explained Carter. "We did a lot more moving around and
switching and just gave them some different looks on
defense. I think it really began to confuse him because he
started checking off more. Their passing game really fell off
in the second half.
Carter's two interoeptions now gives him four for the
season and six career thefts. He has also been credited with
nine solo tackles this year and 12 assists.
"Interceptionsare the type things that just happend
said Carter. "But we want to always try and set up a good
return and get the offense in scoring position. You can
really give an offense some momentum when you put them
in scoring position after a long interception return
Carter played halfback and in the seconday during his
prep career at Terry Sanford, the 5-9, 175 pound junior.
gained 759 yards and scored 10 touchdowns during his
senior year. He spent one year at Massanuttem Military
Academy before coming to ECU.
"I really wasn't recruited by any big schools out of high
school, said Cane. Massanutten Virginia Tech
recruited me pretty heavily, but I decided on ECU because
it was closer to home and really thought I had a pretty good
chance to play
After seeing part time action during his freshman year.
Carter broke into the starting lineup last season. He was the
leading tackier in the secondary as a sophomore with 55
hits.
"Charlie is probably the most improved player in the
seconday this year praised defensive assistant Bobby
Wallace. "He's a very intenseplayerand loves contact. But
more importantly Charlie understands our coverages and
recognizes things receivers are doing on offense
"He'sone of the most enjoyable players to coach on the
-team continued Wallace. "He never gives you anything
less than 100 percent. Pound for pound he's the toughest
guy on the team
The Pirates travel to Lexington, Va. Saturday to face
VMl who upset Virginia 17-9 in Charlottesville last week
On the other side of the field will be assistant Carl Lombell
who coached Carter at Massanutten.
"They gave us a heckuva time last year at home (ECU
won 14-13) and they always seem to play us tough up
there admitted Carter. "We've just got to buckle dowr
and concentrate on winning the rest of our games

� '2i
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�ynrffBTini' 1 1 aWMi






Pane B FOUNTAINHEAD 5 October 1978
FOUNTAINHEAD Fearing Forecast
i
ECU AT VMI
N.C. STATE AT MARYLAND
VIRGINIA AT DUKE
MIAMI, OHIO AT UNC
WAKE FOREST AT PURDUE
NEBRASKA AT IOWA STATE
LSU AT FLORIDA
PENN STATE AT KENTUCKY
NOTRE DAME AT MICHIGAN STATE
rEXASTECH AT TEXAS A&M
MISSISSIPPI AT GEORGIA
OKLAHOMA AT TEXAS
SAM ROGERS
(42-15-1)
VMI 14-10
N.C. State
Duke
UNC
Wake Forest
Nebraska
LSU
Penn State
M ichigan State
Texas Tech
Mississippi
Oklahoma
CHARLES CHANDLER
(42-15-1)
ECU 24-14
M aryland
Duke
UNC
Purdue
Nebraska
LSU
Penn State
Notre Dame
Texas A&M
Georgia
Oklahoma
TERRY HERNDON
(41-16-1)
ECU 23-12
Maryland
Duke
UNC
Purdue
Iowa State
LSU
Penn State
Notre Dame
Texas A&M
Mississippi
Oklahoma
ECU 17-14
M aryland
Duke
UNC
Purdue
Nebraska
Florida
Penn State
Nortre Dame
Texas A&M
Georgia
Oklahoma
WOODY PEELE
Daily Reflector
ECU 21-12
M aryland
Duke
UNC
Purdue
Nebraska
Florida
Penn State
Notre Dame
Texas A&M
Georgia
Oklahoma
Forecast
race
tightens
Washington picked to win again
Redskin revival sparked by Pardee
��,�i�� Pnuuhnus hauA TAMPA Bt
ByCHARLESCHANDLER
sistant Sports Editor.
hat has happened to
e Washington Redskins?
s bunch of washed up
men improved their
ard to 5-0 after they
� ted the World Champ-
Mas Cowboys 9-5 in a
last Monday night.
Over The Hill Gang"
had been picked by some
. tics to finish as Ipw as
m the NFC East
sion. Why the big
Ound?
swer is new head
ack Pardee. He has
�he Skins and gotten
� st out of each player.
Pardee became
quarterback Joe
-arm has resembled
Tarkenton. fullback
Riggins has played
actually deserves his
nous salary, and the
nsive line has opened
res that Redskin backs
-earned of. The addi-
tion of two former Cincin-
� Bengals, defensive and
Coy Bacon and cornerback
Lemar Parnsh. has shored
�� e defense. Besides.
- ins aren't really that
The starting lineup
averages about 30 years.
Can the Redskin con-
tinue their win skein?
Here s a look at all of this
week's games:
WASHINGTON24
DETROIT 17
Yes indeed, the Red-
skins stay undefeated.
They will not be near as
sharp as in the Dallas
game, but Theismann
should be able to secure
enough points to hold off
the hapless Lions.
PITTSBURGH 24
ATLANTA 13
The Steelers are also
unbeaten, and rightfully so.
Terry Bradshaw, Lynn
Swann, and Franco Harris
have sparkled offensively.
The "Steel Curtain" def-
ense has also shined.
Atlanta quarterback Steve
Bartkowski had a great
game last week, but he
should find the Pittsburgh
defense a bit too much to
handle.
BALTIMORE 20
ST. LOUIS17
This matchup features
two of the largest disap-
pointments of the season.
Both have had to play
minus several star players
due to injuries.Baltimore
gets the edge because of
what can be a very good
defense. Cardinal coach
Bud Wilkinson could find
that his stay in the NFL is a
short one.
BUFFAL021
NEW YORK JETS20
For the last two weeks,
Buffalo coach Chuck Knox
has had his Bills playing
like bulls. The Jets perfor-
med well last week despite
the loss of quarterback
Richard Todd due to injury.
Todd isn't back yet. The
Bills win a close one.
CHICAGO 24
GREEN BAY 21
This game brings back
memories of the old days,
when these two clubs
always seem to face each
other in key games. The
Bears are 3-2, following
losses to Minnesota and
Oakland. The surprising
Packers are 4-1. The Bears
simply must win. A loss
would certainly damper
their chances for a division-
al title. This game will
seperate the men from the
boys. The feeling here is
that Bart Starr is still a year
or so away.
MIAMI24
CINCINNATI 21
It's hard to believe thai
the Bengals are 0-5. It's
almost equally hard to
believe that the Dolphins
are only 3-2. Both lost their
starting quarterbacks early
in the season, however.
Bengal quarterback Ken
Anderson should play in
this Monoay night enount-
er. Dolphin Bob Griese is
doubtful. If Anderson plays
well, the game should
prove interesting. Yet, the
feeling here is that the
Bengal losing string will
extend to six games.
should be able to gloat
little after this game.
OAKLAND 20
HOUSTON 17
Oakland seems to have
lost the ability, at least
temporarily, to win a game
in big fashion. All season,
Ken Stabler has had to pull
a miracle out of his two
minute offense, as he did in
the San Diego game. Last
week, Neil Colzie intercep-
ted a Chicago pass in
overtime to secure the
Raider victory. The Oilers
have also parricipated in
some cliff-hangers this sea-
son. Why break this string?
This one could possibly go
into overtime. Neverthe-
less, the Raiders should
win.
CLEVELAND 27
NEW ORLEANSU
The Browns have drop-
ped two consecutive heart-
breakers, to divisional
rivals Pittsburgh and Hou-
ston. Brown coach Sam
Rutigliano has done a fine
job with his club, and
SEATTLE 21
MINNESOTA 17
Here's mt upset pick of
the week. The old scram-
bler, Viking Fran Tarken-
ton, and the new one,
Seahawk Jim Zorn, should
have quite a battle for SAA
(Scrambler Association of
America) bragging rights.
The feeling here is that the
pesky young Seahawks will
catch the Vikes napping,
and that Zorn will have a
big afternoon.
DALLAS31
NEW YORK GIANTS 10
Ever since the first
game of the season, a 38-0
victory over Baltimore, the
champion Cowboys have
played lackadaisally. It's
about time the champs
played well. Look for big
performances by Roger
Staubach and Tony Dorsett.
NEW ENGLAND 23
PHILADELPHIA 20
The Eagles have a 3-2
record, and an excellent
offensive line. Halfback
Wilbert Montgomery is
among the league leaders
in rushing. The Patriots, on
the other hand, are loaded
with talent but have yet to
really put four good quart-
ers together. This week is
no exception, but still look
for a Patriot victory.
LOSANGELES27
SAN FRANCISCO 14
In this California battle,
the 49ers may as well by
singing along with the
Beach Boys. The unbeaten
Rams won't allow them to
do much else
TAMPA BAY 17
KANSASCITYU
The Buccaneers are no
longer the laughing stock of
the League. They have an
adequate defense and an
improving offense. The
Chiefs are also improving,
but not quite fast enough.
DENVER21
SAN DIEGO 13
The Chargers have pro-
blems; the Broncs have the
Orange Crush Need one
say more.
SAAD'S SHOE REPA
As college football's
sixth weekend approach,
a tight race has material-
ized for the championship
Of FOUNTAINHEAD'S
FEARLESS FORECAST.
Sports Editor Sam Rogers
has led from the beginning.
However, Charles
Chandler, assistant sports
editor, has moved into a tie
for first place on the
strength of last week's 11-1
mark. Terry Herndon,
assistant advertising man-
ager is only one game back.
This week's games offer
a formidable challenge for
our gridiron prognostica-
tes, and a complete turn-
around could occur in the
standings.
HAVE A "BOTTOMLESS" CUP OF
PEPSI FREE
ENJOY A FREE
PEPSI WITH THE
PURCHASE OF
ANY PLATTER,
QUARTER
CHICKEN OR
SANDWICH.
Offer good only
with coupon.
10th and Charles Streets-Greenville
FAMILY
RESTAURANT
113 GRANDE AVE
COLLEGE VIEW
CLEANERS
fltXS3006XSS3C
NEED TO RELAX AFTER
A DAY IN CLASSES?
THE SUNSET
U9E. 5th STREET
aBWBMBBaHBBggggg
S"Mlkes"Bicycle
Shop
University Arcade
Complete line of tools &
accessories. Years of
experience fixing
Greenville's bikes.
Guaranteed Service.
I
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v -TWii' 'if ���� - - r�, -i : J-
$H. L. Hodges Sporting Goods Outfits
iTHE MARSHALL TUCKER BAND
in Jgf Runnin9 Shoes
Sooners atop poll
WELDING fiP STEEL
FABRICATING
By The Associated Rress
Southern California,
getting an assist from an
Oklahoma school, isthe No.
2 football team in the land
while the University of
Oklahoma is still No. 1.
Southern Cal beat M ich-
igan State 30-9 last week
and moved from third to
second in The Associated
Press poll as Arkansas
dropped from second to
fourth after needing a
second-half- rally to beat
unranked Tulsa 21-13.
M ichigan also took advan-
tage of Arkansas' struggle,
beating Duke 52-0 and
moving up from No. 4 to
third.
Oklahoma, 4-0 after a
45-23 victory over M issouri,
received 38 of 63 first-place
jsfcflfei�
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TAYLOR
PERKEO.
votes and 1,226 of a possi-
ble 1,260 points Tuesday
from a nationwide panel of
sports writers and broad-
csstGrs.
Southern Cal received
14 first-place votes and
1,166 points, Michigan got
six first-place votes.
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Fri.�PSat. 11:00-13:
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A Short Walk From Campus





5 October 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD P
P
Pre-registration for Spring Semester
Schedule of Courses
SCHEDULE OF COURSES
Spring Semester, 197f(7
?Courses listed on schedule forms should include the appropriate abbreviation and course
number only � for example, ACCT 2401. Include the section number on pre-registration card.
ACCT (Accounting)
COURSE SECTION
NO. NO.
:oi
i
201
201
201
?01
?01
?01
201
201
?01
2521
2521
J551
3611
3621
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6:wi
6811
681
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FINANCIAL
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MANAGERIAL
MANAGERIAL
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MANAGERIAL
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MANAGERIAL
MANAGERIAL
MANAGERIAL
MANAGERIAL
MANAGERIAL
MANAGERIAL
MANAGERIAL
MANAGERIAL
INTER ACCT
INTER ACCT
INTER ACCT
AUOITING (MWF
AUDITING (TTh
ACCT
ACCT
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ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
ACCT
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
8:00) (3)
8:00) (3)
9:00) (3)
9:00) (3)
10:00) (3)
10:00)
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11:00)
12:00)
12:00)
1:00)
1:00)
2:00)
2:00)
3:00)
3:00)
8
8
COURSE
NO.
SECTION
NO.
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
00-5:30)
00-9:30)
(3)
(3)
9:30-11:00) (3)
9:30-11:00) (3)
9:30-11:00) (3)
11:00-12:30) (3)
11:00-12:30) (3)
11:00-12:30) (3)
11:00-12:30) (3)
12:30-1:00) (3)
12:30-1:00) (3)
12:30-1:00) (3)
2:00-3:30) (3)
2:00-3:30) (3)
3:30-5:00) (3)
I (MWF 9:00) (3)
II (MWF 10:00) (3)
II (MWF 2:00) (3)
1:00) (3)
2:00-3:30) (3)
COST ACCT (MWF 11:00) (3)
COST ACCT (TTh 11:00-12:30) (3)
NON PROFIT ACCT (TTh 9:30-11:00) (3)
INCOME TAX I (MWF 11:00) (3)
INCOME TAX I (MWF 12:00) (3)
INCOME TAX II (TTh 9:30-11:00) (3)
ACCT THEORY (TTh 3:30-5:00) (3)
ACCT FOR DEC MK (W 6:30-9:30) (3)
COST ACCT (TTh 3:30"5:00) (3)
AUDITING (TTh 2:00-3:30) (3)
MGT INFO SYSTEMS (MW 2:00-3:30) (3)
FINA
AERO
1103
1103
2202
2202
2203
2:03
3302
3303
3303
02
02
03
03
(Finance�See page 7)
(Aerospace Studies)
1 US MIL FCS CON
2 US MIL FCS CON
1 CORPS TRAINING
2 CORPS TRAINING (TBA) (1)
1 THE DEV OF AIR POWER (Th
2 THE DEV OF AIR POWER (Th
1 CORPS TRAINING (T 12:00)
2 CORPS TRAINING (TBA) (T
1 AIR FORCE LEADERSHIP
2 AIR FORCE LEADERSHIP
1 CORPS TRAINING (T 12
2 CORPS TRAINING (TBA) (l)
1 NATION SECUR FORCES (MWF
2 NATION SECUR FORCES (MWF
1 CORPS TRAINING (T 12:00)
2 CORPS TRAINING (TBA) (1)
WORLD (T 9:00) (l)
WORLD (T 11:00) (1)
(T 12:00) (1)
9:00) (1)
11:00) (1)
(1)
(MWF 10:00) (3)
(MWF 12:00) (3)
00) (1)
9:00) (3)
11:00) (3)
ID
ANTH (Anthropology)
1000
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INTR ANTH (TTh 12:30"1:5) (3)
INTR ANTH (TTh 11:00-12:15) (3)
INTR ANTH (MWF 10:00) (3)
INTR ANTH (MWF 1:00) (3)
SOCIETIES, WORLD (MWF 9:00) (3)
SOCIETIES, WORLD (TTh 2:00"3:15)
(3)
INTR ARCHAEOLOGY (MW 9:00) (3)
INTR ARCHAEOLOGY LAB (Th 2:0000) (0)
INDEPEND STUDY (TBA) (3)
INDEPEND STUDY-ARCH LAB TECH (W 2:00"5:00)
CULT OF AFRICA (TTh 9:30"10:5) (3)
CULT OF S PACIFIC (MWF 11:00) (3)
PEOPLES OF LATIN AM (M 6:30-9:30) (3)
HIST OF ANTH (MWF 10:00) (3)
MEDICAL ANTH (MWF 11:00) (3)
PREHIST OF SE US (T 2:00-5:00) (3)
(3)
�BY PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR AND APPROVAL OF DEPARTMENTAL
CHAIRPERSON
ART (Art)
COURSE SECTION
NC. NO.
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1
1
9:00) (3)
11:00) (3)
11:00) (3)
00) (3)
COLOR & DESIGN (TTh 10:00-12:00; F 11:00) (3)
COLOR & DESIGN (MW 10:00-12:00; F 10:00) (3)
COLOR & DESIGN (MW 8:00-10:00; F 8:00) (3)
COLOR & DESIGN (TTh 8:00-10:00; F 9:00 3
COLOR & DESIGN (TTh 8:00-10:00; F 9:00 (3)
COLOR & DESIGN (TTh 8:00-10:00; F 9:00) (3)
COLOR & DESIGN (TTh 10:00-12:00; F 9:00) (3
COLOR & DESIGN (TTh 10:00-12:00;
COLOR & DESIGN (TTh 10:00-12:00;
COLOR & DESIGN (TTh 1:00-3:00: F
3-0 DESIGN (MW 8:00-10:00) (3)
3-0 OESIGN (TTh 8:00-10:00) (3)
3-0 DESIGN (TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
3-0 DESIGN (MW 10:00-12:00) (3)
3-0 OESIGN (TTh 1:00-3:00) (3)
DRAWING (MW 8:00-10:00) (3)
DRAWING (TTh 8:00-10:00) (3)
DRAWING (MW 3:00-5:00) (3)
FIGURE DRAW (TTh 3:00-5:00; F :00 3
FIGURE DRAW (TTh 1:00-3:00; 2;�� 3
F GURE DRAW (MW 1000;12:00; F 10:00) (3)
FIGURE DRAW (M 1:00"3:00; t 1:00 (3
FIGURE DRAW (TTh 10:00-12:00: F 11:00) (3)
INT DRAW (MW 8:00-10:00) (3)
INT DRAW (MW 10:00-12:00) (3)
INT ORAW (TTM 10:00-12:00)13)
NT FIG ORAW (MW 8:00-10:00; F 8:00) (3)
NT FIG ORAW (TTh 10:00-12:00; F 11:00 3
rreiMIC SURVEY (TTh 8:00-10:00; F 9:00)13)
CcSS C SKI! TTh 1:00-3:00; F 2jj�l (8)
sffliroSW-AS foojuj
! RO TO WOOD METAL (TTh 8:00-10:00,F9:00) 3
MTRO TO WOOD & METAL (TTh 1:00-3:00: F 2:00)(3)
NTRO TO TEX DESIGN (MW 8:00-10:00) (3)
JlRO TO TEX OESIGN (MW 10:00-12:00) (3)
NTRO NT DESIGN (MW 10:00-12:00) 13)
K NT OESIGN (TTh 1.00-300) (3)
PRINT SURVEY (TTh 8:00-10:00, F 8:00) (3)
PRINT SURVEY TTh 10:00-12:00, F lift MS)
rS NT SURVEY (TTh 1:00-3:00; F 2j00(3)
Sculpture survey (TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
SCULPTURE SURVEY (MW 1:00001 (3)
ART HIST SURVEY (MWF 2:00 3
ART H ST SURVEY (MWF 3:00) (3)
S! APPRECIATION (TTh 10:00 2
ART APPRECIATION (TTh 11:00) (2)
ART APPRECIATION (TTh 1:00 2
ART APPRECIATION (TTh 2:00) (2)
CERAMIC STUDIO I (TTh 10:00-12:00 3
CEMMC STUOIO II (MW 10:00-12:00) (3)
OBSERVATION (F 10:00) (l)
WTRO COM ART (MW 8:00-10:00) (3
GRAPH ICOESIGN I (TTh 8:00-10:00 3
SSpHIC DESIGN I (MW 10:00-12:00) (3)
SoD DESIGN STUOIO I (TTh 3:00-5:00, F:00) (3)
SSS OES 3 STUDIO I (TTh 8:00-lO:06) (3)
2311
2312
2315
2315
2316
2350
2560
2560
2560
2561
2600
2610
2700
2710
2920
290
3100
3110
3120
3200
3200
3210
3220
3220
3230
3230
3301
3302
3305
3306
3312
3316
315
325
3552
3555
3560
3561
3562
3563
3600
3610
3700
3710
3720
3850
3850
3850
3850
3851
3860
3860
3860
390
390
100
110
120
220
230
302
305
306
323
10
560
561
562
563
56
600
610
620
630
60
700
710
920
920
5100
5110
5210
5220
5230
5301
5302
5305
5306
5311
5312
5315
5315
5316
525
530
5610
5700
5710
5900
6100-6107
6300
6301
6302
6305
6306
6310
6311
6312
6315
6316
6320
6321
6322
6325
6326
6330
6331
6332
6335
6336
631
632
635
636
6351
6352
6355
6356
6361
6362
6365
6366
6371
6372
6375
6376
6550
6551
6552
6553
6560
6561
6562
6563
656
6565
6566
1 METAL DESIGN STUDIO II (MW 10:00-12:00; F 10:00
(3)
3:00-5:00; F :00)(3)
8:00-10:00) (3)
10:00-12:00) (3)
8:00-10:00) (3)
WOOD DESIGN STUOIO II (TTh
WEAV DESIGN STUDIO II (TTh
WEAV DESIGN STUDIO II (TTh
FABRIC DESIGN STUDIO II (MW
OFF LOOM TEX DESIGN
PAINT MAT & METHODS
MAT 4 METHODS
MAT & METHODS
COMP (MW 1:00
STUDIO I (TTh
STUOIO II (TTh
(MW 10:00-12:00) (3)
(TTh 8:00-10:00) (3)
(TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
(TTh 3:00-5:00) (3)
3:00) (3)
8:00-10:00) (3)
10:00-12:00) (3)
PAINT
PAINT
PAINT
PRINT
PRINT
SCULP STUDIO I (TTh 1:00-3:00) (3)
SCULP STUDIO II (TTh 1:00-3:00) (3)
ART OF MID AGES (MWF 11:00) (3)
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY (MWF 12:00) (3)
CERAMIC STUDIO III (TTh 3:00-5:00) (3)
CERAMIC STUDIO IV (TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
CERAMIC STUDIO V (TTh 3:00-5:00) (3)
TYPOGRAPHY (MW 1:00-3:00) (3)
TYPOGRAPHY (TTh 3:00-5:00) (3)
PRODUCTION (TTh 3:00-5:00) (3)
PHOTOGRAPHY I (MW 8:00-10:00) (3)
PHOTOGRAPHY I (MW 3:00-5:00) (3)
ILLUSTRATION I (TTh 8:00-10:00) (3)
ILLUSTRATION I (TTh 1:00-3:00) (3)
METAL DES STUDIO V (TTh 10:00-12:00; F 11:00) (3)
WOOD DES STUDIO III (TTh 3:00-5:00; F :00) (3)
WEAV DESIGN STUDIO III (TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
FAB DESIGN STUOIO 111 (MW 1:00-3:00) (3)
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
N
1
1
2
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
(TTh
3:00-5:00; F :00) (3)
F 1:00) (3)
WOOD DESIGN STUDIO V
FABRIC DES STUDIO IV (MW 1:00-3:00;
INTER MATER (TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
RESEARCH METHODS (TTh 1:00) (2)
PROB IN FIG DRAW (TTh 8:00-10:00; F 9:00) (3)
DRAW MED & TECH (TTh 1:03:00) (3)
PAJNTWATERCOLOR (MW 8:01 0:00) (3)
PAINT STUOIO I (TTh 3:00"b 00) (3)
FIG PAINT (MW 10:00-17:00; F 10:00) (3)
PAINT STUDIO II (MW 8:00-10:00) (3)
PRINT STUDIO III (TTh 8:00-10:00) (3)
PRINT STUDIO IV (TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
SCULPT STUDIO III (TTh 1:00-3:00) (3)
STUDIO IV (TTh 1:00-3:00) (3)
STUDIO V (TTh 1:00-3:00) (3)
ELEMSCH (MW 1:00"3:00; F 1:00) (3)
ELEMSCH (TTh 1:00-3:00; F 2:00) (3)
ELEM SCH (TTh 1:00-3:00; F 2:00) (3)
SCULPT
SCULPT
ART IN
ART
ART
ART
ART
IN
IN
IN
IN
ELEM
aEM
PARTICIPATION
PARTICIPATION
PARTICIPATION
(TAt REN (MWF
ITAL REN (MWF
CERAMIC STUDIO
SCH (MW 10:00-12:00;
SCH (MW 1:00-3:00; F
(M :00-5:30) (1)
(W :00-5:30) (1)
(Th :00-5:30)- (1)
2:00) (3)
3:00) (3)
VI (MW 10:00-12:00)
F 10:00) (3)
1:00) (3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
00)
(3)
00)
(3)
(3)
(3
CERAMIC STUDIO Vh (TTh 3:00"5:00)
CERAMIC STUOIO VIII (MW 10:00-12:00)
PHOTOGRAPHY II (MW 10:00"12:00) (3)
ILLUSTRATION II (TTh 1:00-3:00) (3)
WOOD DES STUDIO V (TTh 3:00-5:00; F :00) (3)
WEAV DES STUDIO V (TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
FABRIC DES STUDIO V (MW 1:00-3:00) (3)
ART IN SEC SCH (TTh 8:00-10:00; F 9:00) (3)
INTERIOR PROB II (MW 8:00-10:00) (3)
AOV PAINT I (TTh 1:00-3:00) (3)
ADV PAINT II (TTh 1:00-3:00) (3)
ADV PAINT III (TTh 8:00-10:00) (3)
ADV PAINT IV (TTh 8:00"10:00) (3)
ADV PAINT V (TTh 8:00"10:00) (3)
PRINT STUDIO V (TTh 8:00-10:00) (3)
PRINT STUDIO VI (TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
PRINT STUDIO VII (TTh 8:00-10:00) (3)
PRINT STUDIO VIII (TTh 10-12:00) (3)
PRINT STUDIO IX (TTh 8:00-10:00) (3)
SCULPT STUDIO VI (TTh 1:00-3:00) (3)
SCULPT STUDIO VII (TTh 1:00-3:00) (3)
19TH CENT PAINT (MWF 9:00) (3)
19TH CENT PAINT (MWF 10:00) (3)
CERAMIC STUDIO IX (MW 1:00-3:00) (3)
CERAMIC STUDIO X (MW 1:00-3:00) (3)
GRAPHIC DES III (TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
PHOTOGRAPHY III (MW 1:00-3:00) (3)
ILLUSTRATION III (TTh 1:00-3:00) (3)
METAL DES STUDIO (TTh 10:00-12:00; F 11
WUOD DES STUDIO (TTh 3:00-5:00; F :00)
WEAV DES STUDIO (TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
FABRIC DES STUDIO (MW 1:00-3:00) (3)
METAL DES STUOIO (TTh 10:00-12:00; F 11
WOOD DES STUDIO (TTh 3:00-5:00; F :00)
WEAV DES STUDIO (TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
WEAV DES STUDIO (MW 10:0012:00) (3)
FABRIC DES STUDIO (MW 1:00-3:00) (3)
PROF PRACTICES (TBA) (1)
INTER PROB IV (MTWTh 10:00-12:00) (6)
PRINT STUDIO X (TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
SCULPT STUDIO VIII (MW 8:00-10:00) (3)
SCULPT STUDIO IX (MW 8:00-10:00) (3)
ART OF THE US (TTh 9:30-11:00) (3)
PROB IN CERAMICS IMW 1:00-3:00) (3)
PROB IN DESIGN (TBA) (3)
PROB IN METAL DES (TTh 10:00-12:00; F 11:00) (3)
PROB IN WOOD DES (TTh 3:00-5:00; F :00) (3)
PROB IN WEAV DES (TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
PROB IN FABRIC DES (MW 3:00-5:00) (3)
PROB IN DESIGN (TBA) (3)
PROB IN METAL OES (TTh 10:00-12:00; F 11:00) (3)
PROB IN WOOD DES (TTh 3:00-5:00) (3)
PROB IN WEAV DES (TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
PROB IN FABRIC DES (MW 3:00-5:00) (3)
PROB IN DESIGN (TBA) (3)
PROB IN METAL DES (TTh 10:00-12:00; F 11:00)
PROB IN WOOD DES (TTh 3:00"5:00; F :00) (3)
PROB IN WEAVING (TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
PROB IN FABRIC DES (MW 3:00-5:00) (3)
PROB IN DESIGN (TBA) (3)
PROB IN METAL DES (TTh 10:00"12:00; F 11:00)
PROB IN WOOD DES (TTh 3:00-5:00; F :00) (3)
PROB IN WEAVING (TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
PROB IN FABRIC DES (MW 3:00-5:00) (3)
PROB IN METAL DES (TTh 10:00-12:00; F 11:00)
PROB IN WOOD DES (TTh 3:00"5:00; f :00) (3)
PROB IN WEAV DES (TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
PROB IN FABRIC DES (MW 3:00-5:00) (3)
PROB IN METAL DES (TTh 10:00-12:00; F 11:00)
PROB IN WOOD DES (TTh 3:00-5:00; F :00) (3)
PROB IN WEAV DES (TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
PROB IN FABRIC OES (MW 3:00-5:00) (3)
PROB IN METAL DES (TTh 10:00-12:00; F 11:00) (3)
PROB IN WOOD DES (TTh 3:00-5:00; F :00) (3)
PROB IN WEAV DES (TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
PROB IN FABRIC DES (MW 3:00-5:00) (3)
PROB IN METAL DES (TTh 10:00"12:00;F 11:00) (3)
PROB IN WOOD DES (TTh 3:00-5:00; F :00) (3)
PROB IN WEAV DES (TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
PROB IN FABRIC DES (MW 3:00-5:00) (3)
PROB IN DRAW (TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
PROB IN DRAW (TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
PROB IN ORAW (TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
PROB IN DRAW (TTh 10:00-12:00) (3)
PROB IN PAINT (MW 10:00-12:00) (3)
PROB IN PAINT (MW 10:00-12:00) (3)
PROB IN PAINT (MW 10:00-12:00) (3)
PROB IN PAINT (MW 10:00-12:00) (3)
PR08 IN PAINT (MW 10:00-12:00) (3)
PROB IN PAINT (MW 10:00-12:00) (3)
PROB IN PAINT (MW 10:00-12:00) (3)
6567
6600-6607
6700-67 06
6801
6903
6903
6909
6995
6996
PROB IN PAINT (MW 10:00"12:00) (3)
PROB IN PRINTMKG (TTh 10:00"12:00) (3)
PROB IN SCULPT (MW 8:00-10:00) (3)
SUPERV OF ART EDUC (T 6:30-9:30) (3)
19TH CENT PAINT (MWF 9:00) (3)
19TH CENT PAINT (MWF 10:00) (3)
SEMINAR IN ART HIST (T 3:00"6:00) (3)
THESIS SEMINAR (TBA) (3)
THESIS SEMINAR (TBA) (3)
ASMR (Area Studies�Medieval & Renaissance)
000 1 MED & REN STUD SEM (TBA) (3)
BTOL (Biology)
1051
105
1050
1050
1050
1050
1050
1050
1050
1050
1050
1050
1050
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1060
1060
1060
1061
1061
1061
1061
1070
1071
1071
1071
1080
1080
1080
1080
1081
1081
1081
1081
1081
2110
2110
2110
2M0
2111
2111
2111
2111
2111
2111
2111
2111
2120
2'20
2120
2120
2120
2120
2121
2121
2121
2121
2121
2121
2121
2121
2121
2121
2121
2121
2121
2121
2121
3310
3311
3311
3311
3550
50
51
550
5020
5021
5070
5071
5150
5151
5250
5251
5251
5251
5300
5301
550
551
590
591
5810
5811
5811
5850
5851
5860
5861
5880
5881
5910
5911
5995
6003
6010
6080
6081
6220
650
651
6700
699
6995
6996
6999
1
2
3
N
5
6
7
10
11
12
13
1
2
3

5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
1
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
1
2
3
1
2
3

1
1
2
3
1
2
3

1
2
3

5
1
2
3

1
2
3

5
6
7
8
1
2
3

5
6
1
2
3

5
6
7
8
9
10
1
12
13
1
15
PR IN
PR IN
PR IN
PR IN
PR IN
PR IN
PR IN
PR IN
PR IN
PR IN
PR IN
OR IN
FRIN
Pfi'N
PR IN
PR IN
PR IN
PR IN
PR IN
PR IN
PRIN
PR IN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
ENVIRON
ENVIRON
ENVIRON
ENVIRON
ENVIRON
ENVIRON
ENVIRON
GEN
GEN
GEN
GEN
GEN
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BluL
BIOL
CIOL
BIOL
BIjL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIUL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(TTh
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
I LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
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LAB
8:00)
8:00)
8:00)
9:00)
9:00)
9:00)
10:00)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
3)
!3)
10:00) (3)
10:00) (3)
1:00) (3)
1:00) (3)
1:00) (3)
11:00-12:15)
(M 11:00-2:00) (1)
2:00-5:00) (1)
8:00-11:00) (1)
11:00-2:00) (1)
2:00-5:00) (1)
6:30-9:30) (1)
2:00-5:00) (1)
8:00-11:00) ll
(1
(M
(T
(T
(T
(T
(W
(Th
(Th
11:00-2:00
(Th 2:00-5:00) (1)
(M 11:00-2:00) (1)
(M 2:00-5:00) (1)
(T 8:00-11:00) (1)
(T 11:00-2:00) (1)
(1 2:00-5:00) (1)
(W 00-5:00) (1)
(Th 00-11:00) (1)
(Th r:00-2:00) (D
(Th 2:00-5:00) (1)
(M 2:00 5:00) (1)
(T 2:00-5:00) (1)
(W 2:00-5. Xl (1)
(Th 2:00-5:10) (l)
(TTh 12:00-2:01) ()
(TTh 12:00-2:00) ()
(TTH 12:00-2:00) l)
LAB (M 2:00-5:00) �0)
LAB U 2:00-5:00 (0)
LAB tW 200-S00) (0)
LAB (Th 2:00-5:00) (0)
BOTANY (MTThF 10:00) (5)
BOTANY LA6 (M 2:00"5:00) (0)
BOTANY LAB (T 2:00-5:00) (0)
BOTANY LAB (Th 2:00"5:00) (0)
ZOOLOGY (MTThF 8:00) (5)
GEN ZOOLOGY (MTThF 8:00) (5)
GEN ZOOLOGY (MTThF 11:00) (5)
GEN ZOOLOGY (MTThF 11:00) (5)
GEN ZOOLOGY LAB (M 2:005:00) (0)
GEN ZOOLOGY LAB (T 2:00-5:00) (0)
GEN ZOOLOGY LAB (W 2:00"5:00) (0)
GEN ZOOLOGY LAB (Th 2:005:00) (0)
GEN ZOOLOGY LAB (F 2:00-5:00) (0)
FUND MICROBIOL (MW 3:00) ()
FUND MICROBIOL (MW 3:00) ()
FUND MICROBIOL (TTh 3:00) ()
FUND MICROBIOL (TTh 3:00) ()
LAB (TTh 8:00-10
BIOL
BIOL
BICL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
FUND MICROBIOL
FUND MICROBIOL
FUND MICROBIOL
FUND MICROBIOL
FUND MICROBIOL
FUND MICROBIOL
FUND MICROBIOL
FUND MICROBIOL
HU PHYS ANAT
HU PHYS ANAT
HU PHYS ANAT
HU PHYS ANAT
HU PHYS ANAT
HU PHYS ANAT
HU PHYS ANAT
HU PHYS ANAT
HU PHYS ANAT
HU PHYS ANAT
HU PHYS ANAT
HU PHYS ANAT
HU PHYS ANAT
HU PHYS ANAT
HU PHYS ANAT
HU PHYS ANAT
HU PHYS ANAT
HU PHYS ANAT
HU PHYS ANAT
HU PHYS ANAT
HU PHYS ANAT
CELL PHYS
CELL PHYS
00) (0)
LAB (MW 8:00-10:00) (0)
LAB (MW 10:00-12:00) (0)
LAB (MW 12:00-2:00) (0)
LAB (MW :00-6:00) (0)
LAB (TTh :00"6:00) (0)
LAB (TTh 8:00-10:00) (0)
LAB (MW :00-6:00) (0)
(TTh 8:00-10:00)
(TTh 8:00-10:00)
()
I)
()
(TTh e:00"lO:00!
(MTThF 11:00) ()
(MTTh F 11:00) ()
(MTThF 11:00) ()
(M 2:00-5:00) (1)
(T 8:00-11:00) (D
(T 11:00-2:00) (1)
(T 2:00-5:00) (1)
(W 11:00-2:00) (l)
(W 2:00-5:00) (1)
(Th 8:00-11:00) (1)
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
(Th 11:00-2:00) (1)
(Th 2:00-5:00) (1)
(M 2:00-5:00) (l)
(T 11:00-2:00) (1)
(T 2:00-5:00) (1)
(W 2:00-5:00) (l)
(Th 11:00-2:00) (1)
(Th 2:00-5:00) (1)
(TTh 12:30-1:5) ()
LAB (M 2:00-5:00) (0)
CELL PHYS LAB (W 2:00"5:00) (0)
CELL PHYS LAB (Th 2:00-5:00) (0)
BIOLOGY HONORS (TBA) (1)
RES PROB BIOL (TBA) (2)
RES PROB BIOL (TBA) (2)
BIOLOGY HONORS (TBA) (2)
ANIM PARASITOL (MWF 8:00) ()
ANIM PARASITOL LAB (M 2:00-5:00) (0)
ORNITHOLOGY (TTh 8:00) (3)
ORNITHOLOGY LAB (S 8:00-10:00) 10)
HERPETOLOGY (TTh 12:30'1:5) ()
HERPETOLOGY LAB (W 2:00-5:00) (0)
ECOLOGY (MWF 9:00) ()
ECOLOGY LAB (M 2:00-5:00) 10)
ECOLOGY LA8 (T 2:00-5:00) (0)
ECOLOGY LAB (W 2:00-5:00) (0)
GENETICS (MWF 9:00) (3)
GENETICS LAB (W 2:005:00) (l)
HISTOLOGY (TTh 10:00) ()
HISTOLOGY (TTh 2:0000) (0)
BIOL aECTRON MICROS (MWF 11:00)
BEM LAB (W 2:00-5:00) (0)
PRIN BIOCHEM tl (MWF 11:00) ()
PRIN BIOCHEM II LAB (T 2:00-5:00)
PRIN BIOCHEM II LAB (W 1:00-5:00)
BIOMETRY (TTh 1:00) 13)
BIOMETRY LAB (TTh 2:00"5:00) (0)
BIOL APP COMPUTERS (F 1:00) (3) j
BIOL APP COMPUTERS LAB (TBA 2:00-5:00) (0)
MICRO PHYSIOL (TTh 8:009:15) ()
MICRO PHYSIOL LAB (Th 12:00-3:00) (0)
PLT SYSTEM (MW t:00) ()
PLT SYSTEM LAB (WF 2:0000) (0)
INTERNSHIP (TBA) (1)
SEMINAR (TBA) (l)
ESTUARINE ECOL (S 10:00-12:00) (2)
FUND ENDOCRm (MMF 10:00) ()
FUND ENOOCRIN LAB (Th 2:00-5:00) (0)
EVOLUTION (MWF 1:00) (3)
RES PROB BIOL (TBA) (2)
RES PROB BIOL (TBA) (2)
PLT PHYSIOL ECOL (HNF 9:00) ()
INTERNSHIP (TBA) (1)
THESIS (TBA) (l)
THESIS (TBA) (l)
RESIDENCE (TBA) (0)
()
(0)
(0)
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Pay 10
FOUNTAINHEAD 5 October 1978
BUED (Business Education)
COURSE
NO.
1001
1002
1003
2112
211
2116
2120
2123
2135
21V5
220
221?
3200
321
3225
3228
3267
3291
3292
3293
329
3302
V312
V323
V32V
325
V326
V330
V330
5301
5389
fc��22
695
SECT ION
NO.
BEGIN TYPEWRITING (MWF 12:00) (1)
INTERH TYPEWRITING (MWF 11:00) (2)
AOV TYPEWRITING (MWF 1:00) (2)
INTRO TO DATA PROCESG (TTh 1:00) (2)
BEGIN SHORTHAND (M-f lOiOO) (3)
INTERM SHORTHAND (M-F 9:00) (3)
INTRO TO TRANS (TTh 2:00) (2)
EARLY EXP FOR PROS TECH (T :00) H)
BUS TECH I REPROG (TTh 10:00) (2)
BUS TECH II OFF MACH (TTh 9:00) (2)
APPLIED TYPEWRITING (TTh 11:00) (2)
BUS COMMUNICATIONS (M 3:00-5:00) (2)
OIST TECH I MDSNG (MWF 2:00) (3)
ADV SHORTHAND (M-f 11:00) (3)
OFF SIM & WORD PROCSG (MWF 2:00) (3)
AOMIN MGMT (MWF 8:00) (3)
COORDINATION TECH (TTh 10:00) (2)
INTERN SUP WORK EXP (TBA) (1)
INTERN SUP WORK EXP (TBA) (2)
INTERN SUP WORK EXP (TBA) (3)
INTERN SUP WORK EXP (TBA) ()
DIST TECH III: SELLING (TTh 9:00) (2)
SECRETARIAL PROCED (TTh 1:00) (2)
MM TCH BUS SUBJ (M-F 9:00) (1) (110-30)
MM SHORTH & OFF PRCT (M-F 8:00) (1) (12"213)
MM TYPE BKPG DATA PROC (M-F 10:00) (l)
(12H-213)
MM BASIC BUS SUBJ (M-F 2:00) (1) M2-213)
PRIN IN BUED (TTh 2:00) (2)
PRIN IN BUED (TTh 12:00) (2)
MID GRAO OC DE 4 BUED (T 6:30-9:30) (3)
SEM: BUS 4 DE (Th 6:30-9:30) (3)
PROB BUED ACCT BKPG (M 6:30"9:30) (3)
TRENDS, ISSUES 4 VOC PHIL (W 6:30"9:30) (3)
BU
SA (Business Administration)
2002
2002
2002
2002
2002
2002
2002
2002
2002
2002
2002
2002
2002
2002
2002
2002
2002
2002
2002
2002
2002
?:02
200?
2002
2002
2002
2002
2002
222
222
222
22i�2
222
222
222
222
22H2
?V?
322
222
?2U?
?2U2
-
322
322
32V2
3352
3352
3352
3352
3352
3352
3352
3352
3352
3352
3352
3722
3722
3722
3722
3722
3722
3832
3832
3832
3832
3832
3832
3832
3832
V352
352
V62
VV62
V62
6?
62
62
562
562
1(662
i662
1662
i�66?
�732
H732
�752
752
�77 2
1772
i8i�2
82
82
82
82
i�852
H872
892
962
962
6222
6602
6622
662
6722
6802
6822
1
2
3
i
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
1
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
2
25
26
27
28
1
2
3

5
6
7
8
9
10
1
2
3
i
5
6
7
8
9
10
1
2
3

5
6
7
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

5
6
1
2
3
��
5
6
7
8
1
2
1
2
3

5
6
1
2
1
2
3

1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
3

5
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
INTRO TO BUS (MWF 8:00) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (MWF 8:00) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (TTh 8:00-9:30) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (TTh 8:00-9:30) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (MWF 9:00) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (KJF 9:00) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (TTh 9:30-11:00) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (TTh 9:30"11:00) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (TTh 11:0012:30) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (TTh 11:00-12:30) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (MWF 12:00) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (MWF 12:00) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (MWF 1:00) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (MWF 1:00) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (MWF 2:00) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (MWF 2:00) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (TTh 12:30-2:00) (3)
INTRO TO bUS (TTh 12:30"2:00) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (TTh 8:00-9:30) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (TTh 8:00-9:30) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (MWF 11:00) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (MWF 11:00) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (TTn 9:30-11:00) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (TTh 11:00-12:30) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (MWF 8:00) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (MWF 8:00) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (MWF 9:00) (3)
INTRO TO BUS (MWF 9:00) (3)
LEG ENViR BUS (MWF 9:00) (3)
LEG ENVIR BUS (MWF 9:00) (3)
LEG ENVIR BUS (MWF 12:00) (3)
LEG ENVIR BUS (MWF 12:00) (3)
LEG ENVIR BUS (TTh 11:00-12:30) (3)
LEG ENVIR BUS (TTh 11:00-12:30) (3)
LEG ENVIR BUS (TTh 12:30-2:00) (3)
LEG ENVIR BUS (TTh 12:30-2:00) (3)
LEG. J4VIR BUS ITTh 9:30l:00) 13)
LEG ENVIR BUS (TTh 9:30-11:00) 13)
ORGANIZATIONAL MGT
ORGANIZATIONAL MGT
ORGANIZATIONAL MGT
ORGANIZATIONAL MGT
ORGANIZATIONAL MGT
ORGANIZATIONAL MGT
ORGANIZATIONAL MGT
ORGANIZATIONAL MGT
ORGANIZATIONAL MGT
ORGANIZATIONAL MGT
INTERNATIONAL BUS
INTERNATIONAL BUS
INTERNATIONAL BUS
INTERNATIONAL BUS
INTERNATIONAL BUS
INTERNATIONAL BUS
INTERNATIONAL BUS
INTERNATIONAL BUS
INTERNATIONAL BUS
INTERNATIONAL BUS
INTERNATIONAL BUS
OPERATIONS MGT (MWF
OPERATIONS MGT (MWF
OPERATIONS MGT (MWF
OPERATIONS MGT (MWF
OPERATIONS MGT (TTh
OPERATIONS MGT (TTh
MARKETING MGT (TTh
MARKETING MGT
MARKETING MGT
MARKETING MGT
(TTh
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(NWF
(MWF
)
(MWF 8:00) (3)
(MWF 10:00) (3)
(MWF 11:00) (3)
(MWF 11:00) (3)
(TTh 8:00-9:30) (3)
(TTh 8:00-9:30) (3)
(TTh 11:00-12:30) (3)
(TTh 9:30-11:00) (3)
(MWF 1:00) (3)
(MWF 1:00) (3)
IMWF 12:00) (3)
(MWF 12:00) (3)
(TTh 9:30-11:00) (3)
(TTh 9:30-11:00) (3)
(MWF 9:00) (3)
(MWF 9:00) (3)
(MWF 11:00) (3)
(MWF 11:00) (3)
(MWF 8:00) (3)
(MWF 8:00) (3)
(MWF 11:00) (3)
10:00 (3)
10:00) (3)
12:00) (3)
12:00) (3)
9:30-11:00) (3)
9:30-11:00) (3)
8:00-9:30) (3)
8:00-9:30) (3)
. li
1:00) (3)
1:00) (3)
MARKETING MGT (MWF 8:00) (3)
MARKETING MGT (MWF 8:00) (3)
MARKETING MGT (tF 10:00) (3)
MARKETING MGT (MWF 10:00) (3)
SaLING 4 SALES MGT (MWF 6:00)
SELLING 4 SALES MGT (MWF 12:00)
MANPOWER MGT (MWF 10:00) (3)
MANPOWER MGT (TTh
MANPOWER MGT (MWF
MANPOWER MGT (TTh
MANPOWER MGT (MWF
MANPOWER MGT (MWF
MARKETING STRATEGY
MARKETING STRATEGY
MARKETING RES (TTh
MARKETING RES (MWF
MARKETING RES (TTh
MARKETING RES (TTh
CONSUMER BEHAVIOR
(3)
(3)
11:00-12:30) (3)
1:00) (3)
11:00-12:30) (3)
1:00) (3)
10:00) (3)
(MWF 9:00) (3)
(TTh 11:00-12:30)
12:30-2:00) (3)
2:00) (3)
9:30-11:00) (3)
12:30-2:00)- (3)
(MWF 11:00) (3
(3)
(3)
CONSUMER BEHAVIOR (MWF 2:00) (3)
AOV 4 PROMOTION MGT (TTh 8:00-9:30) (3)
ADV & PROMOTION MGT (TTh 11:00-12:30) (3)
MARKETING CHANNa MGT (TTh 8:00-9:30) (3)
MARKETING CHANNEL MGT (TTh 12:30-2:00) (3)
BUSINESS POLICY (MWF 10:00) (3)
BUSINESS POLICY (MWF 1:00) (3)
BUSINESS POLICY (MWF 10:00) (3)
BUSINESS POLICY (MWF 1:00) (3)
BUSINESS POLICY (MWF 9:00) (3)
PRIN OF REAL ESTATE (TTh 11:00-12:30)
REAL ESTATE MGT-SROK (MWF 12:00) (3)
PRIN TRANSPORTATION (MWF 8:00) (3)
TOPICS IN MGT AND MKT (TTh 12:30-2:00) (3)
TOPICS IN MGT ANO MKT (MWF 10:00) (3)
MGT SCIENCE I (T 6:30-9:30) (3)
MGT SCIENCE 11 (Th 6:30-9:30) (3)
INTERNATIONAL BUS (M 6:30-9:30) (3)
BUS I AND MKT RESEARCH (MW 00-5:30) (3)
BUSINESS POLICIES (T 6:30-9:30) (3)
ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR (T 6:30-9:00) (3)
MKT MGT II (Th 6:30-9:30) (3)
CHEM (Chemistry)
0150
1020
1020
1120
1120
1121
1121
1121
1150
1150
1150
1150
1151
1151
1151
1151
1151
1151
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
3
1
2
3

1
2
3

5
6
PREP COL
GEN DESCR
GEN DESCR
BASIC GEN
BASIC GEN
BAS GEN &
BAS GEN &
BAS GEN &
GEN CHEM
GEN CHW
GEN CHEM
GEN CHB4
GEN Qm
GEN CHB
GEN CHB4
GEN CHW
GEN CHW
GEN CHW
CHEM (MWF 11:00) (2)
IP CHEM (MTThF 10:00) ()
IP CHEM (MTWTh 1:00) ()
& ORG CHEM (TTh 12:30"1:5) (3)
& ORG CHEM (TTh 12:30"1:5) 13)
ORG CHEM LAB (W 2:00-5:00) (1)
ORG CH94 LAB (Th 8:00-11:00) (1)
ORG CH94 LAB (Th 2:00-5:00) (1)
& QUAL ANAL (MWF 9:00) (3)
& QUAL ANAL (MWF 9:00) (3)
& QUAL ANAL (MWF 11:00) (3)
& QUAL ANAL (MWF 11:00) (3)
QUAL ANAL LAB (M 2:00-5:00) (1)
QUAL ANAL LAB (M 2:00-5:00) (l)
QUAL ANAL LAB (T 8:00-11:00) (1)
QUAL ANAL LAS (T 8:0011:00) (O
QUAL ANAL LAB (T 2:00-5:00) (l)
QUAL ANAL LAB (T 2:00-5:00) (1)
1151
1151
1151
1151
1160
1160
1160
1160
1161
1161
1161
1161
1161
1161
1161
1161
1161
1161
2030
2031
2031
2250
2251
2251
2620
2620
2620
2620
2620
2620
2621
2621
2621
2621
2621
2621
2621
2621
2621
2621
��2621
2621
2750
2751
2751
2760
2761
2761
2761
3850
3851
3960
3961
3961
505
H506
507
515
��516
H517
5360
5361
5950
5951
6103
6500
6502
6503
650V
6505
6531
6950
6995
6999
7
8
9
10
1
2
3

1
2
3
i�
5
6
7
8
9
10
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
3

5
6
1
2
3

5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
1
2
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
GEN CHEM QUAL ANAL LAB (W 2:00-5:00) (1)
GEN CHB QUAL ANAL LAB (W 2:00"5:00) (1)
GEN CHffl QUAL ANAL LAB (Th 2:00-5:00) (1)
GEN CHEM QUAL ANAL LAB (Th 2:00-5:00) (1)
GEM CHEM & QUAL ANAL (MWF 8:00) (3)
GEN CHEM 4 QUAL ANAL (MWF 8:00) (3)
GEN CHEM 4 QUAL ANAL (MWF 10:00) (3)
GEN CHEM 4 QUAL ANAL (MWF 10:00) (3)
GEN CHEM QUAL ANAL LAB (M 2:00"5:00) (1)
GEN CHEM QUAL ANAL LAB (M 2:00-5:00) (l)
GEN CHEM QUAL ANAL LAB (T 2:00-5:00) (1)
GEN CHm QUAL ANAL LAB (T 2:00-5:00) (l)
GEN CHEM QUAL ANAL LAB (W 2:00"5:00) (1)
GEN CHEM QUAL ANAL LAB (W 2:00-5:00) (1)
GEN CHEM QUAL ANAL LAB (Th 8:00-11:00) (l)
GEN CHEM QUAL ANAL LAB (Th 8:00-11:00) (1)
GEN CHEM QUAL ANAL LAB (Th 2:00-5:00) (1)
GEN CHEM QUAL ANAL LAB (Th 2:00-5:00) (l)
CHEM ENER 4 ENVIRON (MWF 9:00) (3)
CHEM ENER 4 ENVIR LAB (Th 9:00-11:00) (1)
CHEM ENER 4 ENVIR LAB (Th 9:00-11:00) (1)
QUANT 4 INSTRUM ANAL (MWF 11:00) (3)
QUANT INSTRUM ANAL LAB (MW 2:00-5:00) (2)
QUANT INSTRUM ANAL LAB (TTh 2:00-5:00) (2)
BASIC BIOCHEM (MWF 9:00) (3)
BASIC BIOCHEM (MWF 9:00) (3)
BASIC BIOCHEM (TTh 1230-1H5) (3)
BASIC BIOCHEM (TTh 12:30"1:V5) (3)
BASIC BIOCHEM (TTh 2:00-3:15) (3)
BASIC BI0CH91 (TTh 2:00-3; 15) (3)
BASIC BIOCHEM LAB (M 12:00-3:00) (1)
BASIC BIOCHW LAB (M 12:00-3:00) (1)
BASIC BIOCHEM LAB (M 3:00-6:00) (1)
BASIC BIOCHEM LAB (M 3:00-6:00) (1)
BASIC BIOCHEM LAB (T 8:00"11:00) (1)
BASkC BIOCHEM LAB (T 8:00-11:00) (1)
BASIC BIOCHEM LAB (T 2:00-5:00) (1)
BASIC BIOCHEM LAB (T 2:00-5:00) (1)
BASIC BIOCHEM LAB (W 8:00"11:00) (1)
BASIC BIOCHEM LAB (W 2:00-5:00) (1)
BASIC BIOCHW LAB (Th 8:00-11:00) (l)
BASIC BI0CH91 LAB (Th 2:00"5:00) (1)
ORGANIC CHW (MWF 1:00) (3)
ORGANIC CHEM LAB (TTh 8:00-11:00) (2)
ORGANIC CHW LAB (TTh 2:00-5:00) (2)
ORGANIC CHEM (MWF 9:00) (3)
ORGANIC CHEM LAB (MW 2:00-5:00) (2)
ORGANIC CHEM LAB (TTh 8:00-11:00) (2)
ORGANIC CH91 LAB (TTh 2:00"5:00) (2)
INTRO PHYS CHEM (MWThF 11:00) (V)
INTRO PHYS CHEM LAB (W 2:00-5:00) (1)
PHYSICAL CHEM (MTWF 10:00) (V)
PHYSICAL CHEM LAB (M 2:00-5:00) (l)
PHYSICAL CHEM LAB (T 2:00-5:00) (1)
IND STUDY (TBA) (1)
IND STUDY (TBA) (2)
IND STUDY (TBA) (3)
RESEARCH PROB CHEM (TBA) (1)
RESEARCH PROB CHEM (TBA) (2)
RESEARCH PROB CHEM (TBA) (3)
INSTRUM ANAL II (TTh 9:00) (2)
INSTRUM ANAL LAB tl ITh 2:00-V:00) (1)
INTRO NUCLEAR CHEM (MW 1:00) (2)
INTRO NUCLEAR CHB LAB (M 2:00"5:00) (1)
CHEM SEMINAR (F 2:00) (1)
INTRO RESEARCH (TBA) (3)
RESEARCH (TBA) (2)
RESEARCH (TBA) (3)
RESEARCH (TBA) (V)
RESEARCH (TBA) (5)
SPEC TOP ORG CHEM (MWF 11:00) (3)
INTRO THEOR CHEM (MWF 9:00) (3)
THESIS (TBA) (3)
RESIDENCE (TBA) (0)
30081
3001
3002
30V03
30601
30631
30801
VOOO1
H0011
H0091
V0V71
i�0561
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20001
21231
22101
22111
22112
22113
2211V
22115
2200
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2230
3309
V320
V321
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5330
600
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6521
6522
6990
6991
COSTESfORT�ESCM)!3!00,(H,
iCTIM II ("� "i?�:1iim 13)
SS B SSQK (3)
DAVC ARTS WORKSHP (TBA) (3)
INTRO DR ED (MWF 12:00) (3) .
EARLY EXP DR TR S FOR TRS Th 11:00) (1)
MOTORCYCLE SAFETY (MJ:00Mj)
MOTORCYCLE SAFETY LAB T 10:00 12.00MVI
MOTORCYCLE SAFETY LAB Th 10:00 12.00 MUJ
MOTORCYCLE SAFETY LAB M 2:00 00 0
MOTORCYCLE SAFETY LAB T 2:00"H:00) (0)
MOTORCYCLE SAFETY LAB (Th 2:00 :00) (0)
HIGHWAY TRANS SYSTEM (J 6:30 8:3�m
PRAC DR & TRAF SAFETY (TTh 1:00) U)
TRAFFIC LAW (TTh 12:00) (2
AOV DRIVER ED (M 6:30-9:30 3
LAB PROG DR T S E (MW J-?0')
LAB PROG DR T S E LAB TTh J:003.00) 101
METHOD TEACH DR 4 TR SA (M"F 9:00-10:30 (
K-12 TRAF SAF FOR TEA (Th 6:30-9:30 3
ORG 4 DIR PROG DR T SA H 6:30-9:30) (3)
HUMAN FACTORS IN DR (M 6:30-9:30) (3)
READ DR 4 TRA SA (TBA) 2
READ DR L TRA SA (TBA) (2
EXTERNSHIP DR TR S E (TBA) (2)
EXTERNSHIP DR TRA S E (TEA) (2)
�DRIVER TIME TBA
��FIRST 6 WEEKS OF SEMESTER
ECON (Economics)
COAS (Coastal & Marine Resources)
2150
2151
5002
5026
li
1 INTRO NAUTICALSCI (TBA) (2)
1 NAUTICAL SCIENCE LAB (TBA) (1)
1 COASTAL MARINE ANAL (TBA) (3)
1 MAN AND THE SEA SEM (TBA) (l)
COED (Counselor Education)
5358
601
602
6H0it
605
605
606
682
6183
6500
6521
6990
6991
6992
TESTS 4 MEAS (S 9:00-12:00) (3)
ANAL INDIV (M 6:30-9:30) (3)
THE INFORMATION SERV (T 2:00-5:00) (3)
COUNSa THEORY TECH (T 6:30-9:30) (3)
GROUP PROCEDURES (S 9:00-12:00) (2)
GROUP PROCEDURES (Th 2:0000) (2)
ORG AOMIN GUIO SERV (T 6:30-9:30) (3)
SUPV PRAC COUNSELING (M-F 8:00-5:00) (3)
SEMINAR-COUN PROB (Th 5:00-7:00) (2)
SPEC FIELDS STUOY GUI (TBA) (2)
DIR REAO (TBA) (2)
COUNSELING INTERNSHIP
COUNSELING INTERNSHIP
COUNSELING INTERNSHIP
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(3)
(3)
(3)
CORE (Community Health)
3000
HOOO
H500
501
�502
9B9
H990
6000
6200
6500
6501
6502
6990
6991
THEO PRAC COMM HLTH EDU (TTh 12:30
METH TRNG 4 STAFF DEV (TTh 9:00"11
IND STUOY (TBA) (l)
IND STUOY (TBA) (2)
IND STUDY (MWTh 1:0000) (3)
SEM COMM HLTH EDUC (TBA) (1)
INTERN COMM HLTH EDUC (TBA) (8)
HLTH CARE SYS 4 PROB (W 6:30-9:30)
COMM HLTH EDUC I (W 2:00-5:00) (3)
IND STUDY (TBA) (2)
IND STUOY (TBA) (2)
IND STUDY (TBA) (3)
INTERN COMM HLTH (TBA) (3)
INTERN COMM HLTH (TBA) i3)
�1:5) (3)
:00) ()
(3)
?FIVE-WEEK BLOCK
CORS (Correctional Services�see p.)
CSCI (Computer Science)
158 1 LINEA ALG COM APPLIC (TTh 12:30"1:5) U)
158H 2 LINEA ALG COM APPLIC (MWF 1:00) f9)
2200 1 HAND HaD CALCULATOR (TTh 2:00) (1)
357 1 NUMER ANALY II (MWF 2:00) (3)
3600 1 INTRO DIGIT COMPUT (MWF 10:00) (3)
3600 2 INTRO DIGIT COMPUT (MWF 12:00) (3)
3600 . 3 INTRO DIGIT COMPUT (MWF 2:00) (3)
3601 1 COMP ORG & PROGR (MWF 10:00) (3)
3601 2 COMP ORG & PROGR (MWF 1:00) (3)
36Q1 3 COMP ORG 4 PROGR (TTh 2:00-3:15) (3)
1627 1 PROCED LANG & COMPIL (MWF 10:00) (3)
5726 1 SCIENTIFIC PROGR (TTh 11:00) (1)
577 1 PROGR FOR RESRCH (W 6:30-9:30) (3)
6702 1 INTRO INFO PROCESS (Th 6:30-9:30) (3)
DHEA (Division of Health Affairs)
COURSE
NQr
2002
2002
5000
509H
5096
5098
SECTION
NO.
1 ALCH HLTH SOC PROB (MWF 11:00) (3)
2 ALCH HLTH SOC PROB (M 6:30-9:30) (3)
1 S01 HUM SEX DYS (W 6:00-8:00) (2)
1 TRT OF ALCOHOLISM (T 6:30-9:30) (3)
1 PREV OF ALCH ABUSE (MWF 2:00) (3)
1 HLTH PROG ALCH ABUSE (MWF 10:00) (3)
DRAM (Drama)
1000 1 INTRO TO THEATRE (TTh 12:00) (2).
1000 2 INTRO TO THEATRE (TTh 10:00) (2)
1000 3 INTRO TO THEATRE (TTh 9:00) (2)
1012 1 CONTEMPORARY OANCE I (MTWTh 11:00-12:15) (3)
1021 1 BALLET II (M-F 8:20-9:20) (3)
1021 2 BALLET II (M-F 9:WM0:W)) (3)
1021 9 BALLET II (M-f SsMMOttO) (3)
1022 1 CONTBtFORARY OANCE II (M-F 8:20-9:20) (3)
1022 2 CONTEMPORARY OANCE li (MTWTh 12:30-1:H5) (3)
1023 1 JAZZ OANCE II (M�F :W-10:W) (3)
1023 2 JAZZ OANCE II (MTWTh 12:30-1:15) (3)
2002 1 STAGE SCWERY II (MWF 1:00-2:�(5) (3)
2002 2 STAGE SCENERY II (MTWTh 3:3050) (3)
2002 3 STAGE SCBIERY It (MTTh 1:00-2:�5) (8)
20H1 1 BALLET IV (MTWTh 2:00-3:15) (3)
20H3 X JAZZ DANCE IB (MTWTh 3:30H5) (3)
2123 1 EARLY EER PROSP TCHR (TBA) (?)
3000 1 SPEC THEATRE PROJECTS (TBA) (l)
3001 1 SPEC THEATRE PROJECTS (TBA) (l)
3003 1 STASE LIGHTING (MW 10:0011:15) (3)
3005 1 SCBIERY DESIGN II (TTh 10:00-11:15) (3)
2113
2113
2113
2113
2113
2113
2113
2113
2113
2113
211H
211H
211
211H
211H
211H
211U
211H
211H
211H
211H
211�
211�
211H
2133
2133
2133
2133
2133
2133
2133
2133
2133
2133
213H
213H
213H
213V
213H
213H
213V
213V
213V
213V
213V
213V
213V
213V
2223
2223
2223
2223
2223
2283
2283
2283
2283
2283
2283
32V3
32V3
32V3
32V3
32V3
32V3
3623
3623
3623
3623
3623
3623
V?03
V203
V213
V?93
V363
VR93
V9V2
6203
6663
t.683
6823
1
2
3
V
5
6
7
8
9
10
1
2
3
V
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
1V
1
2
3
V
5
6.
7
6
9
10
1
2
3
V
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
IV
1
2
3
V
5
1
2
3
V
5
6
1
2
3
U
5
6
o
3
V
5
6
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
I (MW
I (MW
I (MW
I (MW
I (MW
I (MW
I (MW
I (MW
I (MW
I (MW
I (F
I (F
I (F
I (F
I (F
I (F
I (F
I (F
I (F
10:00)
10:00)
10:00)
10:00)
10:00)
10:00)
10:00)
10:00)
10:00)
10:00)
10:00)
10:00)
10:00)
10:00)
10:00)
10:00)
10:00)
10:00)
10:00)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PBIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
PRIN
INTRO
INTRO
INTRO
INTRO
INTRO
STAT
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
TO
TO
TO
TO
TO
ANAL
(F 10:00) (0)
(W 2:00) (0)
(W 2:00) (0)
(Th 2:00) (0)
(Th 2:00) (0)
(MW 11:00) (3)
11:00)
11:00)
11:00)
I
I
I
I
I
II
II
II
II
II
II
II
II
II
II
II
II
II
II
II
li
II
li
I I
II
II
II
II
II
COMPUTERS
COMPUTERS
COMPUTERS
COMPUTERS
COMPUTERS
I
I
(MW 11:00) (3)
(MW 11:00) (3)
(MW 11:00) (3)
(MW 11:00) (3)
(MW 11:00) (3)
(MW'11:00) (3)
IMW 11:00) (3)
(MW 11:00) (3)
(MW 11:00) (3)
(F 11:00) (0)
(F 11:00) (0)
(F 11:00) (0)
(F 11:00) (0)
(F 11:00) (0)
(F 11:00) (0)
(F 11:00) (0)
(F 11:00) (0)
(F 11:00) (0)
(F 11:00) (0)
(W 3:00) (0)
(W 3:00) (0)
(Th 3:00) (0)
(Th 3:00) (0
(TTh
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(TTh
(TTh
11:00) (3)
8:00) (3)
10:00) (3)
11:00-12:30) (3)
9:30-11:00) (3)
(3)
STAT ANAL
STAT ANAL
STAT ANAL
STAT ANAL
STAT ANAL
MICROtCONOMICS
MICROECONOMICS
MICROECONOMICS
MICROECONOMICS
MICROECONOMICS
MICROECONOMICS
MGMT
MGMT
MGMT
MGMT
MGMT
MGMT
SCI
SCI
sc
SCI
SCI
SCI
LABOR RELATIONS
LABOR RELATIONS
PUBLIC FINANCE
I I
I
I
I
(MWF
(MWF
(TTh
(MWF
(TTh
(TTh
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(TTh
(TTh
8:00-9:30)
12:00) (3)
1:00) (3)
9:00) (3)
12:30-2:00) (3)
11:00-12:30) (3)
(TTh 8:00-9:30) (3)
(MWF 9:00) (3)
(TTh 12:30-2:00) (3!
(MWF 12:00) (3)
(MWF 1:00) (3)
(TTh 2:00-3:30) (3)
12:00) (3)
1:00) (3)
8:00-9:30) (3)
2:00) (3)
12:30-2:00) (3)
9:30-11:00) (3)
(TTh 11:00-12:30)
(MWF 11:00) (3)
(MWF 10:00) (3)
(3)
STAT ANAL II (MWF F:00) (3)
COMPAR ECON SYSTEMS (MWF :00) (3)
BUS INFOR SYSTEMS (TTh 11:00-12:30) (3)
FINANCIAL MARKETS (MWF 11:001 (3)
BUSINESS ENVIRON IM 6:30-9:30) (3)
MACROECONOMICS ANAL (W 6:30-9:30) (3)
STATISTICAL METHODS (M 6:30-9:30) (3)
BUS AND SOCIETY (W 6:30-9:30) (3)
EDAD (Educ. Administration & Supervision)
6V00
6V06
6V07
6V09
6V53
6V5V
6V83
6V8V
6VR7
6V90
6V91
6989
6990
6991
6992
6993
699V
7V08
7V29
7V60
7V72
7521
7522
7523
7991
7993
799V
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
SBINAR-SUPERVISION (Th 6:30-9:30) (2)
ELEM SCH ADMIN (Th 6:30-9:30) (3)
PUBLIC SCH FINANCE (W 6:30-9:30) (3)
SEC SCHOOL AOMIN (W 6:30-9:30) (3)
THE ADULT LEARNER (T6:30-9:30) (3)
CERONTOLOG PLAN AD ED (M 2:00-5:00) (3)
INTRO TO SCHOOL LAW (M 6:30-9:30) (3)
ORG 4 ADMIN ADULT ED (M 6:30-5:30) (3)
PROCESS IN ADULT ED (Th 6:30-9:30) (3)
PROB IN ADULT EDUC (TBA) (3)
PROB IN ADULT EDUC (TBA) (3)
ADMIN INTERN IN AD ED (TBA) (3)
AOMIN INTERN IN AD ED (TBA) (3)
ADMIN INTERN-SUP PRAC (TBA) (3)
ADMIN INTERN-SWINAR (TBA) (3)
CUR INST SPEC INT I (TBA) (3)
CUR INST SPEC INT I (TBA) (3)
PUBLIC SCH ADMIN (M 6:3Q-30) (3)
PROB IN EDUC SUPERV (W 6:30-9:30) (3)
ADV PUBLIC RELATIONSUh 6:30-9:30) (2)
ISSU PROB RES ED (TS:30-9:30) (2)
LEADER (TBAi (2)
LEADER (TBA) (2)
LEADER (TBA) (2)
LEADER (TBA) (3)
INT II (TBA) (3)
INT II (TBA) (3)
DIR
DIR
DIR
DIR
CUR
CUR
READ EDUC
REAO EDUC
READ EDUC
REAO EDUC
INSTR SPEC
INSTR SPEC





SOotobf 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Pag 1t
EHLT (Environmental Health)
COURSE
NO.
2100
2100
3100
3V00
3H01
3500
3501
3502
3700
V300
6200
6300
6501
6502
6700
6995
(TTh 8:00) (2)
(T6:30-8:30) (2)
(TTh 1:00) (2)
(MWF 1:00) U)
LAB (W 2:00-5:00)
SECTION
� NO, .
1 INTRO TO ENVIR HLTH
INTRO TO ENVIR HLTH
ACCIDENT PREVENTION
UQSOL WASTE TREAT
UQSOL WASTE TREAT
PROB IN EHLT (T V:00) (1)
PROB IN EHLT (TBA) (2)
PROB IN EHLT (TBA) (3)
OCCUP HLTH (MWF 10:00) (3)
INST & REC AREA SAN (TTh 12:30"1:V5)
TOPICS IN ENVIR HLTH (M 1:00) (1)
WATER S SEWER SYSTEM (Th 6:00-9:00) (3)
PROB RES ENV HLTH TBA) (2)
PROB RES ENV HLTH (TBA) (2)
WORK ENVIR (Th 2:00-5:00) (3)
THESIS (TBA) (3)
(0)
(3)
ELEM (Elementary Education)
0092
0092
0092
0092
0092
0092
2101
2101
2101
2101
2107
2107
3111
3203
3203
3203
3203
320V
320V
320V
320V
3205
3205
3205
3205
3220
3220
V30V
V30V
V305
V3V0
V3V1
V3V2
V3V3
V3VV
V3V5
V3V6
V3V7
V3V8
V532
V533
V53V
5306
5310
5312
5313
5316
5316
5317
6V05
6V16
6V17
6V1S
6V19
6V22
6k25
eves
1
2
3
V
5
6
1
2
3
V
1
2
1
1
2
3
V
1
2
3
V
1
2
3
V
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
REMEDIAL
REMEDIAL
REMEDIAL
REMEDIAL
REMEDIAL
REMEDIAL
INTRO TO
INTRO
INTRO
INTRO
EARLY
EARLY
LANG
LANG
LANG
LANG
LANG
FUND
FUND
FUND
FUNO
TO
TO
TO
CH
CH
ARTS
ARTS
ARTS
ARTS
ARTS
OF
OF
READING
READING
READING
READING
REAOING
READING
EDUC (MWF
EDUC (MWF
(TTh 1:00)
(TTh 1:00)
(TTh 1:00)
(MW 1:00)
(MW 1:00)
(MW 1:00)
8:00)
9:00)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(3)
(3)
MAT
TCH
TCH
TCH
OBS
OBS
OBS
OBS
OBS
OBS
OBS
OBS
OBS
PROB
PROB
PROB
SOC
TCH
EDUC (MWF 10:00) (3)
EDUC (MWF 11:00) (3)
LD CURRICUL (MWF 10:00)
LD CURRICUL (MWF 12:00)
UEG (TTh 10:00-12:00)
LEG (MW 8:00-10:00) (V)
LEG (MW 9:00-11:00) (V)
LEG (MW 11:00-1:00) (V)
LEG (MW 12:00-2:00) (V)
READING (MWF 9:00) (3)
READING (MWF 10:00) (3)
(MWF 12:00) (3)
(MWF 12:00) (3
RDG (MWF 2:00)
RDG (MWF 1:00)
RDG (MWF 1:00)
RDG (MWF 2:00)
(M-F 9:00)
(M-F 9:00)
(M-F
(M-F
(M-F
(TBA
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(3)
(3)
V)
OF READING
OF READING
DIAG-PRESC TCHG
DIAG-PRESC TCHG
DIAG-PRESC TCHG
DIAG-PRESC TCHG
MAT METH KIND EDUC
METH KIND EDUC
LRN X TEST LEG
LRN X
LRN X
X
X
S
1
I
I
s
x
I
STU
STU
STU
STU
STU
STU
STU
STU
STU
IN EDUC
IN EDUC
IN EDUC
STUD IN
EVAL ER
TEST LEG
TEST UEG
TCH KINO
TCH
TCH
TCH
TCH
TCH
TCH
TCH
TCH
LEG
LEG
LEG
UEG
UEG
UEG
UEG
UEG I
TBA)
(TBA
(TBA
ELEM SCH (T
CHI ED (Th I
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(2) (110-216)
(2) (110-216)
12:00-2:15) (V) (110-216)
12:00-2:15) (V)
8:00-11:00) (6)
(8)
(8)
(8)
(8)
(8)
(8)
(8)
(8)
(8)
110-216)
(110-216)
6:30-9:30)
:30-9:30) I
(3)
3)
IMPROV READ INSTR (Th 6:30"9:30) (3)
READ REMED X PRAC (M 6:30-9:30) (3)
APPLIED PHONICS (MWF 10:00) (3)
APPLIED PHONICS (M 6:30-9:30) (3)
READ JR 4 SR HI SCH (W 6:30-9:30) (3)
INVEST TCH READ (W 6:30-9:30) (3)
PROB LO ELEM GRADES (TBA) (3)
PROB UPPER ELEM GRADES (TBA) (3)
READ THE LEARN BASES (T 6:30"9:30) (3)
FOUNDATIONS OF READ (T 6:30-9:30) (3)
REM OF READ DIS (M 6:30-9:30) (3)
ELEM SCH CURR (W 6:30-9:30) (3)
AOV LANG ARTS ELEM SC (Th 6:30"9:30) (3)
ENGL (English)
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
120O
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1
2
3
V
5
6
1
2
3
V
5
6
7
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
(MWF 1:00) (3)
(T 6:30-9:30) (3)
(MWF 2:00) (3)
(TTh 12:30"1:V5) (3)
(MWF 8:00) (3)
(MWF 11:00) (3)
(TTh 12:30-1:V5) (3)
(TTH 2:00-3:15) 13)
(TTh 9:30-10:V5) (3)
(MWF 9:00) (3)
(TTh 11:00-12:15) (3)
(TTh 8:00-9:15) (3)
(MWF 9:00) (3)
(MWF 11:00) (3)
(MWF 9:00) (3)
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
2100
2100
2100
2123
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2200
2300
2710
2750
2750
70
2750
3260
3V10
3V50
3V60
3V80
3570
3570
3570
3570
3570
3570
3570
3600
3610
3710
3810
38VO
3850
3850
3860
3880
3880
V010
V050
V080
V090
V150
V170
V250
V323
V510
V520
V550
V555
V650
V890
V920
V950
V950
V950
V960
5180
5230
5350
5VV0
5V70
5V90
5660
5700
5720
58V0
5850
5850
5860
5870
5880
5900
6030
6050
6070
6130
6180
6390
6570
6980
6990
6995
6996
6999
81
82
83
8V
85
86
87
88
89
1
2
3
1
1
2
3
V
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
1
1
2
3
V
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
V
5
6
7
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
MAJOR BRIT
MAJOR
MAJOR
INTRO
MAJOR
MAJOR
MAJOR
MAJOR
MAJOR
MAJOR
MAJOR
MAJOR
MAJOR
MAJOR
MAJOR
MAJOR
BRIT
BRIT
ENGL
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
WRITERS
WRITERS
WRITERS
EDUC (T
WRITERS
WRITERS
WRITERS
WRITERS
WRITERS
WRITERS
WRITERS
WRITERS
WRITERS
WRITERS
WRITERS
WRITERS
:00) (3)
:00) (3)
0:00) (3)
1:00) (3)
:00) (3)
:30"10:V5) (3)
1:00-12:15) (3)
:00-3:15) (3)
:30-V:V5) (3)
(MWF 9:00) (3)
(MWF 10:00) (3)
(TTh 1230-1:V5) (3)
11:00-12:15) (1)
(MWF 12:00) (3)
(MWF 9:00) (3)
(MWF 1:00) (3)
(TTh 11:00-12:15) (3)
(T 6:30-9:30) (3)
(MWF 9:00) (3)
(MWF 8:00) (3)
(TTh 2:00-3:15) (3)
(TTh 9:30-lO:V5) (3)
(TTh 9:30"10:V5) (3)
(MWF 10:00) (3)
(MWF 11:00) (3)
V0151 SOILS (Th 2:00-5:00) (3)
ii323 11 TEACHING OF CEOG (MWF 9:00-12:00) (3)
5007 !1 SEMINAR-URBAN (TTh 9:00-11:00) (3)
502VI REGIONAL DEVaOPMENT (Th 6:30-9:30) (3)
5080I AOV CARTOGRAPHY (TTh 9:00-11:00) (3)
50831 AERIAL PHOTO INTER (MWF 11:00) (3)
5501 1PR0BL94S (TBA) d)
5502 1I PROBLWS (TBA) (2)
55031 PR0BL9W (TBA) (3)
60011 SWINAR-PHYS GEOG (M 2:00-V:00) (2)
600V 11 SEMINAR IN CEOG (W 2:00-V:00) (3)
6008 11 POLITICAL CEOG (T 6:30"9:30) (3)
65211 REAOINGS (TBA) (3)
6500 11 RESEARCH URBAN (TBA) (3)
65011 RESEARCH ECONOMIC (TBA) (3)
6502 1RESEARCH CART (TBA) (3)
65031 RESEARCH PHYSICAL (TBA) (3)
650V1 RESEARCH GEOG ED (TBA) (3)
6995 11 THESIS (TBA) (3)
69961 THESIS (TBA) (3)
6999 11 RESIDENCE (TBA) (0)
REC BRIT AM WRITERS (W 6:30-9:30) (3)
ENGLISH GRAMMAR (MWF 10:00) (3)
GRAM LING ELEM MAJORS (MWF 11:00) (3)
GRAM LING ELEM MAJORS (TTh 9:30"10:H5)
GRAM LING ELEM MAJORS (MWF 8:00) (3)
GRAM LING ELEM MAJORS (MWF 9:00) (3)
BLACK LIT AMERICA (M 6:30-9:30) (3)
INTRO TO POETRY (MWF (9:00) (3)
NORTH EUR MYTH (TTh 8:00-9:15) (3)
CLASSICAL MYTH (TTh 12:30"1:V5) (3)
SCIENCE FICTION (MWF 10:00) (3)
AMERICAN FOLKLORE (MWF 10:00) (3)
FOLKLORE
FOLKLORE
FOLKLORE
FOLKLORE
FOLKLORE
FOLKLORE
HOMER TO
(3)
AMERICAN
AMERICAN
AMERICAN
AMERICAN
AMERICAN
AMERICAN
CLASSIC
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
DANTE
12:00) (3)
11:00) (3)
1:00) (3)
1:00) (3)
9:00) (3)
10:00) (3)
(MWF 9:00) (3)
HUMAN VALUES IN LIT (Th 6:30-9:30) (3)
ADV ENGLISH GRAM (MWF 10:00) (3)
ADV COMPOSITION (TTh 9:30"10:V5) (3)
INTRO POETRY WRITING (TTh 12:30"1:V5) (3)
INTRO FICTION WRITING (TTh 2:00-3:15) (3)
INTRO FICTION WRITING (TTh 3:30V:V5) (3)
INTRO NON FICTION WRIT (TTh 9:30"10:V5) (3)
WRIT BUS & INDUSTRY (TTh 9:30-lO:V5) (3)
WRIT BUS & INDUSTRY (TTh 11:00-12:15) (3)
MEDIEVAL LITERATURE (MWF 12:00) (3)
ENGL RENAISSANCE (MWF 10:00) (3)
SHAKESPEARE: COMEDIES (MWF 12:00) (3)
SHAKESPEARE: TRADED IES (MWF 11:00) (3)
ROMANTIC PERIOD (MWF 1:00) (3)
VICTORIAN LIT (TTh 9:30"10:V5) (3)
AM LIT: 1865-1920 (TTh 8:00-9:15) (3)
TEACHING ENGL HS (TTh 9:30-10:V5) (3)
DIRECTED READINGS (TBA) (3)
DIRECTED READINGS (TBA) (3)
SEMINAR (TBA) (3)
SEMINAR (TBA) (3)
X CULT (MWF 11:00) (3)
IN WRIT (TTh 3:30"V:V5) (3)
HIST II (MW 2:00-V:00) (3)
LDREN (MWF 10:00) (3)
SENIOR HONORS
SENIOR HONORS
STUDY POP LIT
PRAC: CAREERS
FILM LIT &
LIT FOR CH
GEOL (Geology)
1500 1
1500 2
1501 1
1501 2
1501 3
1501 V
1501 5
1501 6
1501 7
1501 8
1501 9
1600
1601
1601
1700
1800
1801
3100
3101
3200
3201
5200
5201
5V00
5V01
5500
5510
5520
5710
5711
6200
6201
6230
6231
6300
6301
6570
6703
6713
680V
6995
6996
PHYSICAL GEOLOGY (T 6:30-9:30) (3)
PHYSICAL GEOLOGY (MWF 11:00) (3)
PHYSICAL GEOL LAB (M 12:00-3:00) (l)
PHYSICAL GEOL LAB (M 12:00-3:00) (l)
PHYSICAL GFOL LAB (M 3:00-6:00) (l)
PHYSICAL GEOL LAB (T 12:00-3:00) (1)
PHYSICAL GEOL LAB (T 3:00-6:00) (D
PHYSICAL GEOL LAB (W 12:00"3:00) (1)
PHYSICAL GEOL LAB (W 3:00-6:00) (l)
PHYSICAL GEOL LAB (Th 12:00-3:00) (1)
PHYSICAL GEOL LAB
(Th 6:30-9:30) (1)
HISTORICAL GEOL (MWF 10:00) (3)
HIST GEOL LAB (M 12:00-3:00) (l)
HIST GEOL LAB (T 3:00"6:00) (1)
ENVIRON GEOL (TTh 10:00-12:00) (V)
GEOL NAT PARKS (MWF 10:00) (3)
GEOL NAT PARKS LAB (W 12:00-3:00) (l)
PETROLOGY (MW 11:00) (V)
PETROL LAB (MW 3:00-6:00) (0)
INTRO FiaO METH (M 2:00) (2)
INTRO FIELD METH LAB (W 12:00-3:00) (0)
SEDIMENTATION (TTh 11:00) (3)
SEDIMENTATION LAB (F 2:00-5:00) (0)
OPTICAL MIN (TTh 10:00) (3)
LAB (T 12:00-3:00)
(T8A) (2)
(TBA) (2)
(TBA) (2)
HYO (TBA) (3)
HYO LAB (TBA)
PET (WF 9:00)
(TBA) (0)
(0)
(3)
OPTICAL MIN
DIR STUDIES
DIR STUDIES
DIR STUDIES
GROUNOWATER
GROUNOWATER
SEDIMENTARY
SEO PET LAB
CLAY MINERALOGY (TBA) (3)
CLAY MIN LAB (TBA) (0)
SEO ENV (TBA) (3)
SED ENV LAB (TBA) (0)
TECTONIC ANAL (TTh 12:00) (2)
TRACE ELEM & HLTH SEM (TBA) (1)
SEMINAR-MIN & MILL (TBA) (1)
INTRO TO RESEARCH (TBA) (2)
THESIS (TBA) (3)
THESIS (TBA) (3)
(0)
LIT FOR CHILDREN (MWF
LIT FOR CHILDREN (MWF
LIT FOR HIGH SCHOOL (MWF
ENGL NOV: SCOTT TO HARDY
SO REGIONAL WRITING (TTh
AM NOV: 1800-1920 (MWF 1
CONTEMPORARY DRAMA (MWF
9:00) (3)
11:00) (3)
11:00) (3)
(TTh 12:30-1:
11:00-12: 15)
:00) (3)
12:00) (3)
GERM (German)
V5)
(3)
(3!
CONTEMPORARY POETRY (TTh 12:30"1:V5) (3)
ADV STUDIES IN FANTASY (TTh V:00"5:15) (3)
HIST OF LIT CRITICISM (TTh 2:00-3:15) (3)
CULT X LING HIST ENGL LANG (Th 6:30-9:30)
DESCRIPT LING (MWF 12:00) (3)
ADV POETRY WRITING (TTh 2:003:15) (3)
ADV FICTION WRITING (T 6:30-9:30) (3)
ADV FICTION WRITING (W 6:30-9:30) (3)
ADV NONFICTION WRITING (W 6:30-9:30) (3)
ADV EDIT X ABSTRACT (W 6:30"9:30) (3)
AOV WRIT BUS 4 INDUS (T 6:30-9:30) (3)
SPECIAL STUD IN FILM (TTh 2:00-V:00) (3)
ARTHURIAN ROMANCE (MWF 10:00) (3)
16TH CENT ENGL LIT (M 6:30"9:30) (3)
STUDIES IN SHAKESPEARE (M 6:30"9:30) (3)
AGE OF JOHNSON (TTh 9:30"10:V5) (3)
VICTORIAN EDWARD CULT (T 6:30-9:30) (3)
SPEC STUDIES SEMINAR VI (W 6:30-9:30) (3)
FOLKLORE & LIT (Th 6:30-9:30) (3)
ADV STUDIES IN CHILD LIT (T 6:30-9:30) (3)
TEACHING INTERNSHIP (T 6:30-9:30) (3)
THESIS (TBA) (3)
THESIS (TBA) (3)
RESIDENCE (TBA) (0)
(3)
10011
10021
10022
10031
100V1
22151
31081
32321
V36V1
ELB1 GERMAN (MWF 12:00) (3)
aW GERMAN (MWF 9:00) (3)
aW GERMAN (MWF 11:00) (3)
INTERMED GERMAN (MWF 9:00) (3)
INTERMED GERMAN (MWF 12:00) (3)
PHONORAL PRACTICE (TTh 10:00) (2)
CONVERSATIONAL GERM (MWF 1:00) (3)
CLASSICISM-REALISM (MWF 9:00) (3)
19TH CENTURY PROSE (MWF 10:00) (3)
HIST (History)
10 COMPOSITION (MWF 11:00) (3)
11
12
13
IV
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
2V
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
3V
35
36
37
38
39
VO
V1
V2
V3
VV
V5
V6
V7
V8
V9
50
51
52
53
5V
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
6V
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
7V
75
76
77
78
79
80
IT ION
IT ION
IT ION
IT ION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOS
COMPOS
COMPOS
COMPOS
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOS ITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
COMPOSITION
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(TTh
(TTh
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(TTh
(MWF
(TTh
(TTh
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(TTh
(MWF
(TTh
(TTh
(MWF
(MWF
(TTh
(TTh
(MWF
(MWF
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(MWF
(MWF
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(MWF
(MWF
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(MWF
(MWF
1:00)
9:00)
9:00)
10:00
9:00)
12:00)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
FINA (Finance)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
9:30-10:V5) (3)
11:00-12:15) (3)
12:00) (3)
10:00) (3)
11:00) (3)
2:00) (3)
12:00) (3)
1:00) (3)
3:30-V:V5)
10:00) (3)
2:00-3:15)
12:30"1:V5)
11:00) (3)
10:00) (3)
11:00) (3)
1:00) (3)
11:00-12:15)
12:00) (3 )
12:30-1:V5) (3)
2:00-3:15) (3)
12:00) (3)
1:00) (3)
12:30"1:V5) (3)
2:00-3:15) (3)
12:00) (3)
1:00) (3)
12:30"1:V5) (3)
8:00-9:15) (3)
9:30"10:V5) (3)
11:00-12:15) (3)
12:30-1:V5) (3)
2:00-3:15) (3)
1:00) (3)
2:00) (3)
11:00-12:15) (3)
8:00-9:15) (3)
11:00-12:15) (3)
2:00-3:15) (3)
1:00) (3)
2:00) (3)
8:00-9:15) (3)
9:30-lO:V5) (3)
11:00-12:15) (3)
8:00) (3)
12:00) (3)
2:00) (3)
8:00-9:15)
2:00-3:15)
8:00) (3)
2:00) (3)
8:00-9:15)
11:00-12:15) (3)
(TTh 2:00-3:15) (3)
(MWF 8:00) (3)
2:00) (3)
8:00-9:15) (3)
11:00-12:15) (3)
8:00) (3)
12:00) (3)
8:00-9:15) (3)
9:30-lO:V5) (3)
11:00-12:15) (3)
2:00-3:15) (3)
3:30"V:V5) (3)
372V1 FINANCIAL MGT (MWF 8:00) (3)
372V2 FINANCIAL MGT (MWF 9:00) (3)
372V3 FINANCIAL MGT (MWF 10:00) (3)
372VV FINANCIAL MGT (MWF 11:00) (3)
372V5 FINANCIAL MGT (TTh 11:00-12:30) (3)
372V6 FINANCIAL MGT (TTh 3:30"5:00) (3)
V30V1 INVESTMENTS (TTh 8:00-9:30) (3)
V87V1 PROPERTY INSURANCE (MWF V:00) (3)
V96V1 TOPICS IN FINANCE (MWF 1:00) (3)
660V1 FINA MANAGEMENT II (Th 6:30-9:30) (
FREN (French)
1001
1001
1001
1002
1002
1002
1002
1002
1002
1002
1003
1003
1003
100V
100 V
100V
2100
2115
3232
3233
5521
1
2
3
1
2
3
V
5
6
7
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
aEM
ELEM
ELEM
ELEM
ELEM
FRENCH
FRENCH
FRENCH
FRENCH
FRENCH
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
9:00) (3)
10:00) (3)
12:00) (3)
8:00) (3)
9:00) (3)
aEM FRENCH (MWF
aEM FRENCH (MWF
aEM FRENCH (MWF
ELEM FRENCH (MWF
aEM FRENCH (MWF
INTER FRENCH (MWF
INTER FRENCH (MWF
INTER FRENCH (MWF
INTER FRENCH (MWF
INTER FRENCH (MWF
INTER FRENCH (MWF
CONTEMPORARY FRANCE
FRENCH CIVIL (TTh 1
FRENCH LIT 1718 CENT
FRENCH LIT 1920 CENT
SPEC TOPICS FREN STUO
10:00) (3)
10:00) (3)
11:00) (3)
12:00) (3)
1:00) (3)
9:00) (3)
11:00) (3)
12:00) (3)
9:00) (3)
11:00) (3)
2:00) (3)
(TTh 9:30)
00) (2)
(2)
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
10:00) (3)
1:00) (3)
11:00) (3)
GEOG (Geography)
(MWF
(TTh
(TTh
(MWF
(MWF
(TTh
(TTh
(MWF
(TTh
(TTh
(MWF
(MWF
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(3)
(3)
(3)
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
2002
2003
2003
200
2005
2005
2006
2007
2007
2006
2008
2019
3006
30V7
305V
3055
3072
3078
1
2
3
V
5
6
7
8
9
10
1
EARTH
EARTH
EARTH
EARTH
EARTH
EARTH
EARTH
EARTH
EARTH
EARTH
EARTH
WORLD
ECONOMIC
ECONOMIC
PHYSICAL
PHYSICAL
PHYSICAL
PHYSICAL
PHYSICAL
PHYSICAL
MAP READ
MAP READ
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(TTh
MAN
MAN
MAN
MAN
MAN
MAN
MAN
MAN
MAN
MAN
MAN (TTh
GEOG PT
GEOG
GEOC
GEOG
GEOG
GEOG
GEOG
GEOG
GEOG
&
X
INTER
INTER
8:00) (3)
9:00) (3)
9:00) (3)
10:00) (3)
11:00) (3)
11:00) (3)
12:00) (3)
1:00) (3)
2:00) (3)
9:30"10:V5) (3)
11:00-12:15) (3)
2 (MWF 11:00) (3)
(MWF 9:00) (3)
(MWF 11:00) (3)
1 (MWF 9:00) (V)
1 LAB (Th 1:00-3:00) (0)
1 LAB (Th 3:00-5:00) (0)
2 (TTm 9:30-l0:�) U)
2 LAB (T 1:00-3:00) (0)
2 LAB T 3:00-5:00) (0)
(TTh 9:00-11:00) (3)
(MW 11:00-1:00) (3)
10V0
10V0
10V0
10V0
10V0
10V0
10V0
10V0
10V0
10V0
10V1
10V1
10V1
1050
1050
1050
1050
1050
1050
1050
1050
1050
1050
1050
1050
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1551
1553
2123
21V0
3031
3100
3100
3100
3100
3100
3110
3110
3130
32V5
3V10
3V30
3611
3711
3780
V210
V310
V323
VV81
V521
V522
V550
5120
5350
5V70
5920
6035
6365
6910
6920
6995
6996
6999
1
2
3
V
5
6
7
8
9
10
1
2
3
1
2
3
V
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
V
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
V
5
WORLD
WORLD
WORLD
WORLD
WORLD
WORLD
WORLD
WORLD
WORLD
WORLD
HIST
HIST
HIST
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
EUR
EUR
TO
TO
TO
TO
TO
TO
TO
TO
TO
TO
SINCE
SINCE
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1500
1500
1500
1500
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1500
1500
1500
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(MWF 11:00) (3!
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HIST TO 1877 (MWF 11:00) (3)
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ENGINEER GRAPH I (MWF 1:00-3:00 V
ENGINEER GRAPH I (TTh 2:00-5:00) (V)
GRAPHIC ARTS I (M 1:00-3:00) (V).
GRAPHIC ARTS I LAB (TTh 1:00-3:00) (0)
GRAPHIC ARTS I LAB (WF 1:00-3:00) (0)
GRAPHIC ARTS I LAB (TTh 3:00-5:00) (0)
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POWER TECH LAB (TTh 10:00-12:00) (0)
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GEN MECH DRAWING (T 6:30-9:30) (2)
GRAPHIC ARTS II (M 8:00) (3)
GRAPHIC ARTS II LAB (WF 8:00-10:00) 101
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GRAPHIC ARTS HI (M 9:00) (3)
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COLLEGE ALGEBRA (M-F
COLLEGE ALGEBRA (M-F
COLLEGE ALGEBRA (M"F
COLLEGE ALGEBRA (M-F
COLLEGE ALGEBRA (M-F
COLLEGE ALGEBRA (M-F
COLLEGE ALGEBAR (M-F
COLLEGE ALGEBRA (M
JOUR (Journalism)
20001
20002
2100
3200
3300
V100
V510
V520
V530
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LATH(Latin)
COURSESECTION
NO.NQr
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10021
10022
10031
100 V1
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INTRO TO MASS MEDIA IMWF 9:00) (3)
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6 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh 10:00) (1)
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8 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTm 11:00) (1)
9 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh 12:00) (l)
10 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh 1:00) (1)
11 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh 1:00) (l)
12 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh 2:00) (l)
13 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh 2:00) (1)
IV RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh 3:00) (1)
15 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh 3:00) (1)
16 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh V:00) (l)
17 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh V:00) (l)
18 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh V:00) (1)
19 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh 8:00) (1)
20 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh 8:00) (l)
21 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh 9:00) (1)
22 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh 9:00) (1)
23 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh 10:00) (1)
2V RESEARCH SKILLS (TTm 10:00) (1)
25 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh 11:00) (1)
26 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh 11:00) (1)
27 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh 12:00) (1)
28 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh 1:00) (1)
29 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh 1:00) (1)
30 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh 2:00) (1)
31 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh 2:00) (l)
32 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh 2:00) (l)
33 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh 3:00) (1)
3V RESEARCH SKILLS (TTh 3:00) (1)
35 RESEARCH SKILLS (TTm 3:00) (1)
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PRECALCULUS MATH
ELEM OF CALCULUS
ELEM OF CALCULUS
ELEM MATH MODaS
BASIC CONCMATH
BASIC CORC MATH
BASIC CONC MATH
BASIC CONC MATH
BASIC CONC MATH
BASIC CONC MATH
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BASIC CONC MATH
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CALCULUS
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ELEM STATIS METH I (MWF 1:00) (3)
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SEMINAR (M 10:00-12:00) (l)
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GENERAL a IN EOUC (TBA) (1)
CLIN CHEM II (TTh 8:00; M 9:00) (3)
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(T
(T
(T
(T
(M
(M
(M
(M
(M
IF
(F
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
ITBA
(TBA
(TBA
2:00,
2:00)
2:00)
2
2
9
5
9
9
9
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
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(1)
(1)
(1)
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(1)
(1)
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(1)
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(1)
(1)
(1)
00)
00)
00)
00)
:00)
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(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
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30-9:00)
:30-9:00
:30"9:00)
:30-9:00)
:30-9:00)
00) (1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
) (
(CONT)
(CONT)
(CONT)
(CONT)
(VOCAL)
(VOCAL)
(VOCAL)
(VOCAL)
(VOCAL)
(F
(F
(F
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(W
(W
(W
3
3:00)
3:00)
3:00)
3:00)
2:00)
2:00)
2:00)
2:00)
2:00)
1:00)
1:00)
1:00)
1:00)
1:00)
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(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(W
w
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
8:00-10:00)
8:00-10:00)
8:00-10:00
8:00-10:00)
8:00-10
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
) (
00) (
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(TBA)
(0)
(MW 12:00) (1)
(MW 2:00) (1)
(TTh 8:00) (1)
(MW 9:00) (1)
(TTh 9:00) (1)
(MW 11:00) (1)
(TTh 2:00) (1)
(MW 7:00) (1)
9:00) (4)
9:00) (4)
9:00) (4)
11:00) (4)
11:00) (4)
(1)
(1)
COMPRE MUSIC
COMPRE MUSIC
COMPRE MUSIC
COMPRE MUSIC
WOODWIND GRP
WOODWIND
MUS HIST
WOODWIND
WOODWIND
WOODWIND
BRASS GRP
GRP
LAB
LAB
LAB
LAB
(MW
(TTh
10:00)
10:00)
10:00)
10:00)
10:00)
12:00) (1)
12:00) (1)
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(TTh
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
4 LIT (MW 8:00) (2)
GRP (TTh 8:00) (1)
GRP (TTh 10:00) (l)
GRP (TTh 2:00) (1)
(MW 9:00) (1)
BRASS GRP (TTh 12:00) (1)
PERC GRP (TTh 8:00) (1)
PERC GRP (TTh
INT PIANO GRP
MT PIANO GRP
INT PIANO GRP
INT PIANO GRP
INT PIANO GRP
12:00) (1)
(TTm 11:00) (1)
(TTh 1:00) (l)
(MW 8:00) (1)
(MW 10:00) (1)
(TTH 10:00) (1)
2115
2115
2123
2123
2166
2166
2166
2166
2208
2208
2218
2248
2258
2305
2315
2325
2336
2386
2386
2386
2386
2416
2455
2465
3018
3018
3018
3018
3018
3018
3018
3018
3018
3028
3028
3038
3048
3048
3205
3227
3227
3247
3267
3297
3336
3376
3376
3376
3386
3465
3717
3946
3946
3956
3956
4277
4306
�4323
4333
4336
4376
4465
4506
4550
5267
5316
5406
5436
5716
5717
5727
5747
5796
5957
5997
6016
6336
6364 .
649?
6506
6927
6937
6957
6977
4
5
1
2
1
2
3
4
1
2
1
(MWF 10:00) (3)
(MWF 12:00) (3)
(MWF 11:00) (3)
(MW 12:00) (2)
(TTh 12:00) (2)
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
4
1
1
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
INT PIANO GRP (TTh 12:00) (l)
INT PIANO GRP (MW 1:00) (1)
ERLY EXPER PROSP TCHR (T 8:00) (1)
ERLY EXPER PROSP TCHR (T 8-00
BASIC MUSICIANSHIP (MWF 9-00) (3
BASIC MUSICIANSHIP 5
BASIC MUSICIANSHIP
BASIC MUSICIANSHIP
MUSIC APPRECIATION
MUSIC APPRECIATION ,
ORCHESTRAL MUSIC (TTh 1:00) (2'
MUSIC OF WORLD'S PEOPLES (TTh 3:00)
HIST OF JAZZ MUSC (TTh 1:00) (2)
STRING GRP (TTh 8:00) (1)
STRING GRP (TTh 9:00) (1)
STRING GRP (TBA) (1)
COMPOSITION (T 11:00) (2)
COMPRE MUSIC LAB (MW 10:00) (1)
COMPRE MUSIC LAB (TTh 11:00) (1)
COMPRE MUSIC LAB (TTh 11:00) (1)
COMPRE MUSIC LAB (TTh 11:00) (1)
MUS HIST 4 LIT (MW 8:00) (?)
ACCOMPANYING (W 5:00) (1)
ACCOMPANYING (W 6:00) (l)
BASIC MUSIC SKILLS (MWF 8:00) (3)
MUSIC SKILLS (MWF 9:00) (3)
MUSIC SKILLS (MWF 10:00) (3)
MUSIC SKILLS (MWF 10:00) (3)
MUSIC SKILLS (MWF 11:00) (3)
MUSIC SKILLS (MWF 12:00) (3)
MUSIC SKILLS (MWF 1:00) (3)
MUSIC SKILLS (MWF 2:00) (3)
MUSIC SKILLS (MWF 3:00) (3)
ELEM GRD (TTh 9:00) (2)
(2)
BASIC
BASIC
BASIC
BASIC
BASIC
BASIC
BASIC
BASIC
ME IN
ME IN ELEM GRD (TTh 10:00) (2)
ME INTERMEDIATE GRD (TTh 9:00) (2)
MUSIC EXCEPT CHILD (TTh 12:00) (2)
MUSIC EXCEPT CHILD (TTh 1:00) (2)
VOICE FUND (TTh 8:00) (l)
REH TECH SEC INST ME (TTh 11:00) (2
REH TECH SEC INST ME (TTh 11:00) (2
REH TECH SEC VOC ME (TTh 11:00) (2)
MUSIC THERAPY II (MWF 10:00) (3)
ORIENT TO THERAPY (TBA) (1)
COMPOSITION (T 11:00) (2)
COMPRE MUSICIANSHIP (MWF 9:00) (3)
COMPRE MUSICIANSHIP (MWF 9:00) (3)
COMPRE MUSICIANSHIP (MWF 10:00) (3)
ELECTRONIC MUS COMP (MW 12:00) (2)
ACCOMPANYING (TBA) (1)
ELEM PIANO PEO (MW 1:00) (2)
CHORAL CONDUCTING
CHORAL CONDUCTING
INST CONDUCTING 4
INST CONDUCTING 4
MUSIC FOR GRP ACT
ADV THEORY (MW 12
MAT & METHOD INST
MAT 4 METHOD VOC
ARR
ARR
(MWF
(MWF
ARR (MWF 11
ARR (MWF 11
(TTh 12:00)
00) (2)
TEAC (M-F 9
TEAC (M-F 9
11:00)
11:00)
00)
:00)
(2)
;00)
00)
(3)
(3)
(2)
(2)
(3)
(3)
COMPOSITION (T 11:00) (3)
ADV COMP ELEC MED (TBA) (3)
ACCOMPANYING (TBA) d)
DIR STUDY MU THEORY (TBA) (?)
MUSIC HONORS PROGRAM (TBA) (2)
PSYCH FDN OF MUSIC (TTh 10:00) (2)
TONAL COUNTERPOINT (TTh 10:00) (?)
MUSIC OF BAROQUE ERA (MW 10:00) (2)
TWENTIETH CENTURY MUS (TTh 12:00) (2)
ADVD APPLIED COND (MWF 2:00) (3)
ADVD PIANO PERF PROB (TTh 1:00) (2)
PIANO PED: OBSERV ST TEACH (TBA) (2)
PIANO LIT 4 ADV PED (MWF 9:00) (3)
OPERA HIST (MW 12:00) (2)
INST PROB 4 TECH (TTh 11:00) (2)
CLINICAL INTERNSHIP (TBA) (1)
MUSIC STRUCT 4 STYLE (TTh 1:00) (2)
COMPOSITION (T 11:00) (2)
SPEC PROB, ELEC MUS (TBA) (2)
SW'RES IN MUSIC (TBA) (2)
DIR STUDY IN THEORY (TBA) (2)
SEM PROB IN MU EO (TBA) (2)
SEM PROB IN MU ED (TBA) (2)
PHIL OF MU ED (TTh 9:00) (?)
CUR PR & TR IN M ED (T 7:00-9:00) (2)
�JANUARY 10-FEBRUARY 16, 1979
NURS (Nursing)
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
2106
2107
2107
2107
2107
2110
2111
2111
3201
3202
3201
3202
3201
3202
3230
3231
3231
3250
3305
3306
4300
4301
4301
4315
4316
4315
4316
4330
4330
4340
4340
4350
4351
5500
5500
5500
5501
6010
6015
.6200
6400
6405
6410
6521
6990
6995
�6250
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
1
2
3
4
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
3
3
(K
PERSPECT NURS
PERSPECT NURS (W
PERSPECT NURS (T
PERSPECT NURS (T
10:00-12:00)
1:00-3:00) (2
10:00-12:00)
10:00-12:00)
(2)
)
(2)
(2)
(2)
PERSPECTINURS (W 10:00-12:00)
PERSPECT NURS (TBA) (2)
NUTR COMM SETTING (M 1:00) (2)
NUTR COMM SETTING L (M 3:00-5:00) (0)
NUTR COMM SETTING L (T 1:00-3:00) (0)
NUTR COMM SETTING L (W 3:00-5:00) (0)
NUTR COMM SETTING L (Th 3:00-5:00) (0)
MED SURG NURS (MThF (10:00-12:00) (8)
MED SURG NURS L (T e:00-4:00) (0)
MED SURG NURS L (W 8:00-4:00) (0)
ADV MED SURG NURS (MTWTh 1:00-3:00) (11)
ADV MED SURG NURS L (MTW 7:00-12:00) (0)
ADV MED SURG NURS (MTWTh 1:00"3:00) (11)
AOV MEO SURG NURS L (MT 3:0011:00) (0)
ADV MED SURG NURS (MTWTh 1:00-3:00) (11)
ADV MED SURG NURS L (WTh 3:00-11:00) (0)
1 MATER & CHILD CARE
1 MATER 4 CHILD CARE (MTh 1:00-3:00:
Th 8:00-12:00) (11)
(T 8:00-4:00;
W 8:00-12:00) (0)
MATER 4 CHILD CARE (T 8:00-4:00;M 8:00-12:00(0)
GERIATRIC NURS (Th 5:00-7:00) (3)
CLIN NURS SPEC (TBA) (3)
CLIN NURS SPEC L (TBA) (0)
COMM MEN HLTH NURS (F 8:00"10:00;W 5:00-7:00(8)
COMM MEN HLTH NURS L (MTWTh 9:00"3:00) (0)
COMM MEN HLTH NURS L (WTh 9:00"3:00) (0)
COMM HLTH NURS (F 8:00-10:00; W 5:00-7:00) (8)
COMM HLTH NURS L (MT 9:00-4:00) (0)
COMM HLTH NURS (F 8:00"10:00;W 5:00-7:00) (8)
COMM HLTH NURS L (WTh 9:00-4:00) (0)
(Th 5:00-7:00) (2)
(Th 5:00-7:00) (2)
(F 1:00-3:00) (2)
(TBA) (2)
(F 10:00-12:00) (5)
(MT 7:00-4:00;T 4:00"9:00)(0)
(TBA) (3)
(TBA) (3)
(TBA) (3)
(TBA) (2)
(W 10:00-12:00) (2)
NURS
NURS
NURS
NURS
NURS
PROBL
HLTH
HLTH
HLTH
TRENDS IN
TRENDS IN
PROF NURS
PROF NURS PROBL
LEADERSHIP NURS
LEADERSHIP NURS L
INDEPENDENT STUDY
INDEPENDENT
INDEPENDENT
INDEPENDENT
THEORIES OF
ROLE CHANGE
STUDY
STUDY
STUDY
NURS
1170
1171
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
.1500
2271
2271
2280
2280
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2320
2330
2340
2581
3452
4347
5271
5282
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4
1
1
2
3
M
5
6
7
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
HUMAN
MAN 4
INTRO
INTRO
INTRO
INTRO
INTRO
INTRO
INTRO
INTRO
INTRO
INTRO
CONDUCT (MWF 2:00) (3)
THE STATE (MWF 2:00) (3)
TO LOGIC (MWF 8:00) (3)
(TTh
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
TO
TO
TO
TO
TO
TO
TO
TO
LOGIC
LOGIC
LOGIC
LOGIC
LOGIC
LOGIC
PHIL
PHIL
OF
OF
PHIL
8:00-9:30) (3)
10:00) (3)
11:00) (3)
12:00) (3)
1:00) (3)
2:00) (3)
ART (MWF 12:00) (3)
ART (MW 4:00-5:30) (3)
OF SPORT (MWF 9:00) (3)
INTRO PHIL OF SPORT (MWF 11:00) (3)
ANCIBIT PHIL (MWF 9:00) (3)
MEDIEVAL PHIL (MWF 10:00) (3)
MODERN PHIL (MWF 1:00) (3)
CONTEMP PHIL (MWF 2:00) (3)
MORAL PROB IN MED (TTh 9:30-11:00) (3)
EXISTENTIALISM (TTh 12:30-2:00) (3)
PHIL AND SPORT (TTh 9:30-11:00) (3)
ETHICS (TTh 9:30-11:00) (3)
MATHEMATICAL LOGIC (TTh 2:00-3:30) (3)
INTRO PHIL OF SCIENCE (MWF 1:00) (3)
PADM (Public Administration)
6110
6150
6161
6198
6199
1 PUB PERSONNa ADM (Th 6:30-9:30)
1 SEM IN PUB ADM (W 6:30-9:30) (3)
1 POLICY ANALYSIS (T 6:30-9:30) (3)
1 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (TBA) (3)
1 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (TBA) (3)
(3i
PHYE (Physical Education)
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1018
1021
1021
1021
1021
1021
1021
1026
1027
1101
1101
1104
1104
71105
71105
1107
1109
1111
1111
1115
1116
1118
1119
1120
1120
1121
1139
1139
1139
1357
2123
2123
2278
2300
2300
2323
2323
2530
2530
270
22729
1-2730
4-2760
32763
3-2765
2767
2767
3-2773
2778
3-2784
4-2785
6-2788
6-2788
2800
3545
3545
3546
3560
3560
3570
3600
4-3616
3-3617
3-3618
4-3619
4-3786
4-3787
3-3790
4-3791
4-3793
3-3794
3850
5-4323
5-4323
4403
4804
4805
4906
5303
5303
6104
6202
6203
6207
6303
6501
6990
6991
6995
6996
1
2
3
4
5
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
FOUNO PHYE LAB (TTh 9:30-10:30) (1)
FOUND PHYE LAB (TTh 10:30-11:30) (1)
FOUND PHYE LAB (TTh 11:30-12:30) (1)
FOUND PHYE LAB (TTh 12:30-1:30) (1)
FOUND PHYE LAB (TTh 1:30-2:30) (1)
&EM SWIMMING (MW 9:00) (1)
TENNIS (MW 9:00) (l)
(MW 10:00) (1)
(MF11:00) (1)
(MF 12:00) (1)
(WF 1:00) (1)
(MW 2:00) (1)
(TTh 12:00)
TTh 12:00)
aw
aEM
ELEM
ELEM
aEM
ELEM
ADAPT ACTIVITIES
ADAPT ACTIVITIES
TENNIS
TENNIS
TENNIS
TENNIS
TENNIS
(1)
1)
PHYSICAL COND (MW 9:00) (i)
PHYSICAL COND (MW 10:00) (i)
ARCHERY (TTh 8:30) (D
ARCHERY (MF n:00) (1)
SNOW SKIING (TTh 4:00) (l)
SNOW SKIING (TTh 4:00) (1)
SQUARE DANCE (MW 9:00) (l)
INT MOO ONCE (MF 11;00) (D
SOCIAL DANCE (TTh 2:00) (1)
SOCIAL DANCE (TTh 2:00) (1)
TAP OANCE (MF 2:00) (l)
BADMINTON (TTh 8:30) (l)
INT SWIM (MW 10:00) (1)
VOLLEYBALL (MW 9:00) (1J
GOLF (MW 12:00) (l)
GOLF (MW 1:00) (1)
ADV TENNIS (TTh 8:30-9:30) (1)
BOWLING (TTh 8:30) (1)
BOWLING (MW 10:00) (1)
BOWLING (MW 11:00) (1)
HPERS MOD SOC (MF 11:00) (?)
ERLY EXPER PROS TCHR (MW 00) (1)
ERLY EXPER PROS TCHR (TTh 3:00) (i)
BASIC SCUBA DIVING (MW 8:00-10:00) (
FOUND OF MOVEMENT IMW 12
(TTh 8
11:00)
10:00)
(TTh 7
:00-2:00) (2)
:00-10:0C) (2)
(?)
(?)
:00) (2)
FOUNO OF MOVEMENT
PR IN OF PHYE (TTh
PRIN OF PHYE (TTh
GRP CMS LOW ORGAN
CSP CMS LOH ORGAN (MW 8:00) (2)
TUTONWC (MW 3:00) (1)
SPTS OFF-BSKBL (MW 9:00-11:00) (2)
SPTS 0FF-BS8L (TTh 2:00-4:00) (l)
S M - GOLF (MW 8:00-10:00) (1)
S 4 M - SWIM (MW 10:00-12:00) (l)
S 4 M - TUMBLING (MW 8:0010:00) (1)
S 4 M - GYMNASTICS (TTh 8:00-10:00) (?)
S 4 M - GYMNASTICS (TTh 10:00-ir:00) (?)
S 4 M - VLLBL (MF lO:OCr:00) (1)
SENIOR LIFE SAVING (MW ?:00-3:30) (2)
S 4 M MOD ONCE (MU 12:00-2:00) (1)
S 4 M FLK 4 SO ONCE (MW :00-lO:00) (1)
WAT SAF INST (MWF 3:00-6:00) (-)
WAT SAF INST (Mv;F :00"6:00) ('�)
HUM KIN " MTR LRNC (MW 10:00-11:00;
F I0:00'?:0r)'(3)
4 PROC ELEM SCH (TTh 11:00) (:�)
4 PROC ELfcM SCH (Mfc �0:00 M
SCH INST (TTh r:00-2:00) (?)
PROC ERLY CHILD (MU CC) (?
4 PROC ERLY CHILD ifF
MOV 4 DNCE CHILD (MF
THEOR (TTh ?:00) (?)
TRACK (TTh 12:00-1:30)
PRAC
PRAC
aEM
PRAC
PRAC
CREAT
COACH
COACH
COACH
COACH
COACH
S M
S 4 M
S 4
S 4
S 4
4
U:00) ()
?:00-11:0C)
M
M
M
M
. (1)
GYMNASTICS (MW 12:00-1:30) (l)
SWIMMING (TTh 12:00-1:30) (1)
BASEBALL (TTh 1?-90i:a0 (l)
- SOC SPOPL (MW 10:00-1?-CO) I
-FOOTBALL (MF 10:0r-i; :C2) 1
- WRESTLING (TTh PtOC"?
- TRACK (TTh !?tOP-f:Opj
- TENNIS (MW F:00-10:00)
- ARCH 4 RCQTPALL (KK r
KINESIOLOGY (MfcF s00) C)
METH TEACH FHYE IM-f P:OP�
METH TEACH PHYF (M-F 0C
ORG 4 ADM PHYE (MWF 10:00)
TESTS 4 ME AS PHYE (T P:OC
PHYS OF EXERCISE (MM lsPO-T
OEV 4 AOAPT ACT (TTh
PER MENT RETARD (MWF
PER MENT RETARD (TTh
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CURRICULUM IN PHYE (MWF 90C) ("j
MOTOR LEARNING (TTh P:0C-9:30I -�1
MECH ANALYSIS (w 6:30-�0) (-)
PHYS OF EXERCISE (MWF 8:00) (3)
PHYE ONS HAND (T 6:309:30) (3)
INO STUDY (TTh 3:00) (?)
PRACTICUM (T 4:0C) (1)
PRACTICUM (TTh 4:00) (2)
THESIS (MWF 4:00) (-)
THESIS (MWF 4:00) (3)
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(?)
SEM (F 9:0011:00 (2)
CLIN NURS THEOR (T 3:00-6:00) (3)
NURS CUR DEVEL (T 6:00"�:00) (3)
S9 IN NURS EDUC (Th 3:00-5:00) (2)
METH EVAL IN NURS (M 5:00-8:00) (3)
READ 4 RES IN NURS (W 3:00-5:00) (2)
FIELO EXP TEACH NURS (Th 5:00-7:00) (3)
SW RES PROJ OR THES (M 3:00-5:00) (4)
CLIN EXP IN NURS (W 5:00-7:00) (3)
OCCT (Occupational Therapy)
1-CLASS MEETS JANUARY 11 - FE8RUARY 15
2-CLASS MEETS JANUARY 10 - MARCH 26
3-ClASS MEETS JANUARY 10 - MARCH 1
4-CLASS MEETS MARCH 12 - APRIL 26
5-CLASS MEETS JANUARY 10 - FEBRUARY 16
"CLASS MEETS MARCH 12 - APR?L 26
7-SECTION 1 MEETS CLASS FROM OCTOBER 31 - DECBWra 7 mn
SKIIS BEECH MOUNTAIN OR SUGAR MOUNTAIN FROMANUARrU
ssi'SoE- isr&ffgr JUWY - �a' s ���
THERE WILL BE AN INFORMATIONAL MEETING FOR BOTH SFCTION m
THURSDAY, OCTCSER 12 �T 7:30 PM IN 142-lH MANGES SllSuS
3002
3012
3013
3991
4021
4022
4031
4040
4522
4991
4996
OCCT THER AGENTS II (MW 1:00-3:00) (2)
OCCT THER THEORY II (MW 10:00) (3)
OCCT THER THERAP TECHN I (MWF 11:00) (0)
FLO WORK LEV I (TBA) (1)
OCCT THER THEORY IV (T 1:00) (2)
OCCT THER THEORY IV L (TTh 2:00) (0)
OCCT THER $W II (TTh 8:00-9:30) (2)
LEADERSHIPS OCCT THER (MW 1:30-3:00) (3)
PROF LIT (TBA) (2)
FLO WORK LEV l-APP TO NEURO DEV (T�Ai (1)
FLP WORK LEV li (M-f 8:00-5:00) (6)
PHIL (Philosophy)
1100
1100
1100
1100
1100
1170
1170
3 KNOWL,
4 KNOWL,
5 KNOWL,
6 KNOWL,
7 KNOWL,
2 HUMAN CONOUCT
3 HUMAN CONDUCT
EXIST
EXIST
EXIST
EXIST
EXIST
VALUE
VALUE
VALUE
VALUE
VALUE
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(TTh
(MWF
(MWF
10:00)
11:00)
10:00) (3)
11:00) (3)
11:00-12:30)
12:00) (3)
1:00) (3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
r





Psm 14 FOUNTAINHEAD I Octobr 1fTt
PHYS (Physics)
COURS
N0X
1050
1050
1050
1050
1050
1050
1061
1070
1080
1080
1081
1081
1081
1061
1081
1081
�'090
��1090
�1091
�1091
��1091
��1091
?51
'1251
1751
160
1760
1761
1261
1261
1261
1?61
1761
1 '61
���1�61
?C
7360
���?3J0
'360
3517
3651
3716
3717
371F
UM 1?
1.566
1617
r:6UC
56H1
:
6312
66o
6621
C900
6Q96
e997
SECTI ON
NO.
1
2
3
1
5
6
1
1
1
2
1
2
3
1
5
6
1
2
1
2
3
1
1
?
1
7
3
V
5
1
7
1
1
5
6
7
8
1
2
1
9
c
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
PHYS ANO THE ENVIR (MTNTm 9:00) (1)
PHYS ANO THE ENVIR (MTNTh 10:00 (1)
PHYS ANO THE ENVIR (MTWTh 11:00 1)
PHYS ANO THE ENVIR (MTWTh 12:00) (1)
PHYS ANO THE ENVIR (MTWTh 1:00 1
PHYS AND THE ENVIR (MTWTh 2:00) (1)
EXPERIMENTAL PHYS (Th 1:006:00) (U
PHYS ANO MAN (MWF 9:00) 13)
PHYS ANO THE UN IV (TTh 2:00"3:15 (1)
PHYS ANO THE UNIV (MWf 12:00) (1)
PHYS ANO THE UNIV LAB (M 7:009:00) (0)
PHYS AND THE UNIV LAB (M 9:00-11:00) 10)
PHYS AND THE UNIV LAB (W 7:00-9:00) (0)
PHYS AND THE UNIV LAB (W 9:00-11:00 0
PHYS ANO THE UNIV LAB (Th 7:00-9:00) (0)
PHYS AND THE UNIV LAB (Th 9:00-11:00) (0)
PHYS OF SOUND (MWF 9:00) (1)
PHYS OF SOUND (MWF 10:00) (1)
PHYS OF SOUND LAB U 8:00-10:00) (0)
PHYS OF SOUND LAB (Th 8:00-10:00) 0
PHYS OF SOUND LAB (T 10:00-12:00) (0)
PHYS OF SOUNO LAB (Th 10:00-12:00) (0)
GEN PHYS (MWF 8:00) (3)
GEN PHYS (MWF 12:00) (3)
GEN PHYS LAB (T 2:00-1:00) (1)
GEN PHYS LAB (T 1:00-6:00) (1)
GEN PHYS LAB (W 1:00"3:00) (1)
GEN PHYS LAB (W 3:00-5:00) (1
GEN PHYS LAB (W 5:00-7:00) (1)
GEN PHYS (MWF 11:00) (3)
GEN PHYS (MWF 12:00) (3)
GEN PHYS LAB (M 2:00-1:00) (1
GEN PHYS LAB (M 1:006:00) 1
GEN PHYS LAB (T 2:00-1:00) (l
GEN PHYS LAB 0 1:006:00) (1)
GEN PHYS LAB (W 1:00"3:00) (1)
GEN PHYS LAB (W 3:00"5:00) (1)
GEN PHYS LAB (W 5:007:00) (l)
GEN PHYS LAB (T 2:00-1:00) ID
AOV GEN PHYS I (MTWTh 9:00) (1)
AOV GEN PHYS I (MTWTh 1:00) (1)
AOV GEN PHYS II (MTWTh 11:00) (1)
ADV GEN'PHYS II (MTWTh 1:00) (1)
AOV GEN PHYS II (MTWTh 1:00) (1)
PROB IN PHYS (TBA) (1)
PROB IN PHYS (TBA) (1)
PROB IN PHYS (TBA) (1
MED INSTRUMENTATION (TTh 12:00) (3)
MED INSTRUMENTATION LAB (M 7:00-1:00) (0)
ANALOG COMPUTATION (TTh 11:00) (3)
ANALOG COMPUTATION LAB (W 3:00-5:00) (0)
ADV PHYS LAB (TBA) (1)
AOV PHYS LAB (TBA) (2)
ADV PHYS LAB (TBA) (3)
MODERN PHYS (MWF 10:00) (3)
TECH THEORETICAL PHYS (MWF 11:00) (3)
APPLIED PHYS TECH (TTh 8:00-10:00) (3)
SOLAR ENERGY (TTh 10:00) (3)
SOLAR ENERGY LAB (W 11:001:00) (0)
THERMO 4 STAT PHYS (MWF 10:00) (3)
MATHEMATICAL PHYS II (TTh 11:00-12:15) (3)
AOV TECH IN EXP PHYS (TTh 1:00) (2)
AOV TECH EXP PHYS LAB (TBA) (1)
INTRO TO RESEARCh (TBA) (3)
THESIS (TBA) (3)
THESIS (TBA) (3)
RESIDENCE (TBA) (0)
� SIC MAJORS SHOULD ENROLL IN THESE SECTIONS.
�� AP MAJORS SHOULD ENROLL IN THESE SECTIONS.
���PHYSICS MAJORS.SHOULD ENROLL IN THESE SECTIONS.
PLAN (Planning)
3011
3011
fOOC
6CC5
PLAN TECH II (M 1:00-1:00) (3)
PLAN TECH II (W 1:00"1:00) (3)
PLAN LEGISLATION (M 6:30-9:30) (3)
COASTAL AREA PLAN (T 6:30-8:30) (2)
SEM IN URBAN PLAN (Th 6:30"9:30) (3)
SOIL RES AND LAND USE PLAN (T 1:00-1:00)
(3)
POLS (Political Science)
COURSE
NO.
1010
1010
1010-
1010
1010
1010
1010
1010
1010
1010
1010
1010
1010
2102
2102
2102
210V
2106
2107
3011
3035
3155
" 3203
3235
3211
3253
3795
3370
1306
W3?1
1.325
1373
�380
1381
1501
1502
' 1521
1522
1552
6050
6080
6710
6350
6120
6995
6996
SECTION
NO.
1
2
3
1
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
AMER
STATE
STATE
GOVERNMENT
GOVERNMENT
GOVERNMENT
GOVERNMENT
GOVERNMENT
GOVERNMENT
GOVERNMENT
GOVERNMENT
GOVERNMENT
GOVERNMENT
GOVERNMENT
GOVERNMENT
GOVERNMENT
4 LOCAL
& LOCAL
(MWF 8:00) (3)
IMWF 9:00) (3)
(MWF 9:00) (3)
(MWF 10:00) (3)
(MWF 10:00) (3)
(MWF 11:00) (3)
(MWF 11:00) (3)
(MWF 12:00) (3)
(MWF 1:00) (3)
(TTh 8:00-9:15) (3)
(TTh 9:30-10:15) (3)
(TTh 11:00-12:15) (3)
(TTh 12:30-1:15) (3)
9:00) (3)
10:00) (3)
12:00) (3)
00-12:15) (3)
GOVT
GOVT
(MWF
(MWF
STATE 4 LOCAL GOVT (MWF
CIVIL LIBERTIES (TTh 11:
INTL REL (MWF 11:00) (3)
COMPARATIVE GOVT (TTh 1?:30"1:15) (3)
POL ISSUES (MWF 1:00) (3)
POL PARTIES (MWF 9:00) (3)
NATL SECURITY POLICY (TTh 8:009:15) (3)
AMER EXECUTIVE (MWF 9:00) (3)
EAtT EUROPEAN POL SYS (MWF 10:00) (3)
URBAN POL (MWF 12:00) (3)
GOVT FISCAL AOM (MWF 10:00) (3)
INTERNATIONAL LAW (TTh 17:30-1:15) (3)
AM POLITICAL THOUGHT (MWF 8:00) (3)
INTERGOV REL IN US (TTh 9:30-10:15) (3)
SOUTHERN POLITICS (TTh 12:30-1:15) (3)
CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (MWF 11:00) (3)
WEST POL THOUGHT II (TTh 11:00-12. 15) (3)
INTL POLITICS (TTh 9:30-10:15) (3)
INTER-AM POLITICS (MWF 11:00) (3)
INDEP STUDY IN POLS (TBA) (1)
INDEP STUOY IN POLS (TBA) (2)
DIR READ POLS (TBA) (1)
DIR READ POLS (TBA) (2)
HONORS IN POLS (TBA) (3)
SM POL ORG AND BEH (W 6:30-9:30) (3)
AM FOREIGN Ra (T 6:30-9:30) (3)
AM POLITICAL THOUGHT (Th 6:30-9:30) (3)
SEM IN COMP GOVT (TTh 1:00-5:30) (3)
SEM IN INTL REL (M 7:00-5:00) (3)
THESIS (TBA) (3)
THESIS (TBA) (3)
1050
1050
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
1051
�2101
�2101
�2101
�2101
�2101
�2101
�2102
�210?
�2102
�2102
�2102
�2102
2150
2150
3201
3201
3201
3201
3201
3206
3706
3206
�3210
�3210
�3210
�3211
�3211
?3211
3221
3221
3225
3225
3225
3210
3210
3210
3210
3210
3211
3275
3275
3275
3275
3275
3280
3290
1300
1300
1305
1305
1305
1305
��1305
1310
1310
1501
1502
1571
1522
1523
���1990
���1991
���199?
531?
5313
5311
5325
5325
5333
5333
5313
5350
5372
5375
5375
5380
5380
5521
���5990
���5991
���5992
�102
6105
6108
6112
6118
6122
6127
6130
6168
6169
6185
6501
16
17
1
2
3
1
5
6
7
8
1
2
3
1
5
6
1
2
3
1
5
6
1
2
1
2
3
1
5
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
5
1
1
2
3
1
5
1
1
1
GENERAL
GENERAL
GENERAL
GENERAL
GENERAL
GENERAL
GENERAL
GENERAL
GENERAL
GENERAL
STATIST
STATIST
STATIST
I (TTh 3:00) (2)
I (WF 9:00) (2)
II (WF 8:00) (2)
(TTh 9:00) (2)
(TTh 9:00) (2)
(TTh 10:00) (2)
(TTh 10:00) (2)
(TTh 11:00) (2)
(TTh 11:00) (2)
(TTh 11:00) (2)
(MW 9:00) (3-
SCIE (Science Education)
II
II
II
II
II
II
II
ICS
ICS
ICS
(MW 10:00) (3)
(MW 11:00) (3)
STATISTICS
STATISTICS
STATISTICS
STATISTICS LAB (W
STATISTICS LAB (M
STATISTICS LAB (T
STATISTICS LAB (T
STATISTICS LAB- (T
STATISTICS LAB (Th
APPLIEO (TTh 8
APPLIEO (TTh 9
CHILDHOOD (MWF
CHILDHOOO (MWF
CHILDHOOD (MWF
CHILDHOOD (MWF
CHILDHOOD (MWF
DEVELOPMENTAL
DEVELOPMENTAL
DEVELOPMENTAL
(MW 12:00) (3)
(TTh 11:00) (3)
(TTh 12:00) (3)
2:00-5:00) (0)
2:00-5:00) (0)
2:00-5:00) (0)
8:00-11:00) (0)
2:00-5:00) (0)
2:00-5:00) (0)
00) (2)
00) (2)
9:00) (3)
11:00) (3)
1:00) (3)
1:00) (3)
2:00) (3)
(MWF 11:00) (3)
(MWF 1:00) (3)
(MWF 2:00) (3)
EXPERIMENTAL
EXPERIMENTAL
EXPERIMENTAL
EXPERIMENTAL
EXPERIMENTAL
EXPERIMENTAL
SOCIAL (MWF
SOCIAL (MWF
(MW 11:00) (3)
(TTh 11:00) (3)
(TTh 11:00) (3)
LAB (M 1:00-1:00) (0)
LAB (T 1:00-1:00) (0)
LAB (Th 1:00-1:00) (0)
9:00) (3)
1:00) (3)
1250
1250
1250
1250
1251
1251
1251
1251
1251
1260
1260
1260
1260
1261
1261
1261
1261
1261
1261
1261
2110
2110
2111
2111
2111
2111
2111
2123
3216
3216
3716
3218
3216
3350
3351
3527
1000
1
2
3
1
1
2
3
1
5
1
2
3
1
1
2
3
1
5
6
7
1
2
1
2
3
1
5
1
1
2
3
1
5
1
1
1
1
aEM ED MAJ (MWF
EL EM EO MAJ (MWF
EL91 EO MAJ (MWf
ELW ED MAJ (MWF
ELEM ED MAJ
EL EM EO MAJ
EL EM EO MAJ
EL EM ED MAJ
ELEM ED MAJ
SCIE aEM MAJ
SCIE ELEM MAJ
SCIE ELEM MAJ
SCIE ELEM MAJ
SCIE ELEM MAJ
SCIE ELEM MAJ
SCIE ELEM MAJ
SCIE ELEM MAJ
SCIE aEM MAJ
SCIE ELEM MAJ
SCIE ELEM MAJ
PHOTOGRAPHY
PHOTOGRAPHY
PHOTOGRAPHY
PHOTOGRAPHY
PHOTOGRAPHY
PHOTOGRAPHY
PHOTOGRAPHY
OR I EN SCI TCHNG
SCI IN ELEM SCH
SCI IN ELEM
SCI IN ELEM
SCI IN ELEM
SCI IN ELEM
OESCRIPTIVE ASTRONOMY
DESCRIPTIVE ASTRONOMY
INV IN EARTH SCI (TTh 1:00"3:00)
BIO SCI PRAC SEC TCHRS (TBA) (D
PHY
PHY
PHY
PHY
PHY
PHY
PHY
PHY
PHY
BIO
BIO
BIO
BIO
BIO
BIO
BIO
BIO
BIO
BIO
BIO
ELEM
ELEM
ELEM
ELEM
ELEM
ELEM
ELEM
INTRO
TCHNG
TCHNG
TCHNG
TCHNG
TCHNG
SCIE
SCIE
SCIE
SCIE
SCIE
SCIE
SCIE
SCIE
SCIE
ENV
ENV
ENV
ENV
ENV
ENV
ENV
ENV
ENV
ENV
ENV
OF
OF
OF
OF
OF
OF
OF
(M
(T
1
(W
(Th
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
(MWF
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
9:00) (1)
10:00) (1)
11:00) (1)
1:00) (1)
1:0000) (0)
12:00-3:00) (0)
3:00-6:00) (0)
1:00-1:00) (0)
1:00-1:00) (0)
9:00) (1)
10:00) (1)
11:00) (1)
1:00) (1)
12:00-3:00) (0)
3:00-6:00) (0)
12:00-3:00) (0)
3:00-6:00) (0)
12:00-3:00) (0)
3:00-6:00) (0)
00) (0)
(M
(M
(T
(T
(W
(W
(Th 12:00-3
(T 11:00) (2)
(Th 11:00) (?)
00-1:00)
00-1:00)
-1:00)
SCH
SCH
SCH
SCH
(0)
(0)
(0)
-12:00) (0)
:00) (0)
10:00) (2)
-12:00) (2)
3:00) (2)
-10:00! (2)
0-12:00) (2)
00) (3)
:00-9:00) (0)
(2)
LEARNING (MWF 9:00) (3)
LEARNING (TTh 9:30-10:15) (3)
LEARNING (MWF 2:00) (3)
ADOLESCENCE (TTh 9:30-10:15) (3)
ADOLESCENCE (MWF 10:00)
ADOLESCENCE (MWF 10:00)
ADOLESCENCE (MWF 11:00)
ADOLESCENCE (MWF 12:00!
PERS 4 INDUST PSYC (MWF
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
10:00)
(3)
1
2
3
1
5
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
ADJUSTMENT (MWF 8:00) (3)
ADJUSTMENT (MWF 10:00) (3)
ADJUSTMWT (MWF 10:00) (3)
ADJUSTMENT (MWF 11:00) (3)
ADJUSTMENT (MWF 11:00) (3)
HIST OF PSYC (TTh 9:30"10:15) (3)
COMPARATIVE PSYC (MWF 1:00) (2)
PERSONALITY (MWF 9:00) (3)
PERSONALITY (MWF 10:00) (3)
EDUCATIONAL (MWF 9:00) (3)
EDUCATIONAL (MWF 10:00) (3)
EDUCATIONAL (MWF 11:00) (3)
EDUCATIONAL (MWF 1:00) (3)
EOUCATIONAL (M-F 2:00-1:00) (3)
PHYSIOLOGICAL (MWF 9:00) (3)
PHYSIOLOGICAL (MWF 10:00) (3)
PSYCH RESEARCH I (TBA) (2)
PSYCH RESEARCH II (TBA) (2)
READ IN PSYC I (TBA) (1)
READ IN PSYC II (TBA) (1)
REAO IN PSYC III (TBA) (1)
FIELD EXP IN PSYC (TBA) (1)
FIELD EXP IN PSYC (TBA) (1)
FIELO EXP IN PSYC (TBA) (1)
LAB METH PHYSIO PSYC (W 1:00) (3)
LAB METH PHYSIO PSYC LAB (W 2:008:00) (0)
PSYC OF RaiGION IM 6:30"8:30) (2)
INTRO PSYC TEST ING (HW 200-3; 151. (3)
INTRO PSYC TESTING (TTh 2:00-8:15) (3)
CONT MGT IN CLASS (MWF 1:00) (3)
CONT MGT IN CLASS (W 6:30"9:30) (3)
PSYC OF ORGAN BEHAV (M 6:30-9:30) 13)
PSYC OF SEX BEHAV (MWF 1:00) (3)
PSYC OF COGN PROC (TTh 2:00-3:15) (3)
ABNORMAL (MWF 9:00) (3)
ABNORMAL (MWF 11:00) (3)
PSYC OF EXC CHILD (TTh 9:30-13:15) (3)
PSYC OF EXC CHILD (T 6:30-9:30) (3)
DIR READ (TBA) (3)
FIELD EXPER IN PSYC (TBA) (1)
FIELO EXPER IN PSYC (TBA) (1)
FIELD EXPER IN PSYC (TBA) (1)
TECH FOR SCH PSYC (MW 1:00-6:00) (1)
ADV ED PSYC (M 6:30-9:30) (3)
FUND PSYC CONC (M 6:30"8:30) (2)
ADV PHYSIOLOGICAL (WF 11:00) (3)
BEH PROB OF CHILD (TTh 3:30-1:15) (3)
GROUP DYNAMICS (TTh 9:30-10:15) (3)
AOV PR INC OF LEARN (TTh 2:00-3:15) (3)
ADV STAT RES DES (MWF 2:00) (3)
THEOR OF PSYCHOTHERAPY (W 6:30-9:30) (3)
BEHAV MOD (MWF 2:00) (3)
PSYC ASSESS II (MWF 1:00) (3)
PROB IN PSYC I (TBA) (1)
1010
1020
1323
5990
6000
6020
6505
6506
6507
6522
6535
6995
6996
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
EAR SCI
PHY SCI
MAT ANO
APPRENT
SCIENCE
REC DEV
PROB IN
PROB IN
PROB IN
READ IN
sa TOP
THESIS
THESIS
PRAC SEC TCHRS (TBA) (l)
PRAC SEC TCHRS (TBA) (l)
MET IN SCI (M-F 9:00-12:00) (3)
ICESHIP SCI (TBA) (3)
4 SOCIETY (T 6:30-9:30) (3)
IN SCIE TCHNG (W 6:30-9:30) (3)
SCIE EOUC-ELEM (TBA) (3)
SCIE EDUC-SEC (TBA) (3)
SCIE EOUC-COL (TBA) (3)
SCIE EOUC (TBA) (l)
IN EARTH SCIE (Th 6:30-9:30) (3)
(TBA) (3)
(TBA) (3)
SEED (Secondary Education)
�FOR ALL COURSES WITH LABS, COURSE AND LAB SECTIONS MUST
AGREE
�F IRST FIVE WEEKS, FOR STUDENT TEACHERS
���BY PERMISSION OF CHAIRPERSON ONLY
3272
�3272
3272
�3272
�3272
�3272
�3272
�3272
�3272
�3272
�3272
�3272
�3272
�3272
�3272
�3272
3272
3272
3272
3272
�3325
3325
�3325
�3325
�3325
1321
5321
5371
5371
6123
6121
6121
6130
6131
6135
6151
6180
6180
6160
6180
1
2
3
1
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
11
15
16
17
18
19
20
1
2
3
1
5
1
1
1
2
1
1
c
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
INTR AUO VIS INSTR (TTh 8:00) (?)
INTR AUO VIS INSTR (M-F 8:00) (2)
INTR AUD VIS INSTR (TTh 9:00) (?)
INTR AUD VIS INSTR (M-F 9:00) (2)
INTR AUD VIS INSTR (M-F 10:00) (2)
INTR AUO VIS INSTR (M-F 10:00) (2)
INTR AUO VIS INSTR (M-F 11:00) (2)
INTR AUO VIS INSTR (M-f 11:00) (2)
INTR AUD VIS INSTR (M-F 12:00) (?)
INTR AUO VIS INSTR (M-f 12:00) (2)
INTR AUD VIS INSTR (M-F 1:00) (2)
INTR AUD VIS INSTR (M-F 1:00) (2)
INTR AUO VIS INSTR (M-F 2:00) (2)
INTR AUD VIS INSTR (M-f 2:00) (2)
INTR AUD VIS INSTR (M-F 3:00) (2)
,NTR AUO VIS INSTR (M-f 3:00) (2)
INTR AUD VIS INSTR (T 6:30-9:30) (?)
INTR AUD VIS INSTR (T 6:30-9:30) (2)
INTR AUD VIS INSTR (W 6:30-9:30) (2)
INTR AUO VIS INSTR (Th 6:30-9:30) (2)
THE SECONOARY SCH (M-F 8:00-9:30) (3)
THE SECONDARY SCH (MWF 10:00) (3)
THE SECONDARY SCH (M-F 10:00-11:30) O)
THE SECONOARY SCH (M-f 12:00-1:30) (3)
THE SECONDARY SCH (M-F 12�3O"2:0O) (3)
OBS SUP TCH HI SCH (TBA) H)
EDUC COMM METH MAT (M 6:309:30) (3)
DES MULT INST MAT (W 3:(KK:00) (3)
DES MULT INST MAT (W 6:30-9:30) (3)
HIST 4 PHIL EDUC (M 6:30"9:30) (3)
FOUNOA CURRIC OEVa (TTh 2:00-3:15) (3)
FOUNOA CURRIC DEVEL (W 6:30-9:30) (3)
STATISTICS IN EDUC (T 6:30"9:30) (?)
FLO PROB EDUC COMM (TBA) (3)
INST OEV EDUC COMM (TBA) (3)
FOUNOA AMER EDUC (M 6:30-9:30) (3)
INTRO TO RESRCH (T 6:309:30) (3)
INTRO TO RESRCH (W 6:30-9:30) (3)
INTRO TO RESRCH (Th 6:30-9:30) (3)
INTRO TO RESRCH (TTh 9:3010:15) (3)
6502
6503
6519
6520
���6980
6981
6982
6990
6991
6992
6993
6995
6996
7990
7991
PROB IN PSYC
PROB IN PSYC
INDEP STUDY
INDEP STUOY
FiaD EXPER
FIELO EXPER
FIELO EXPER
CLIN PRACT I
CLIN PRACT I
SCHOOL PRACT
SCHOOL PRACT
THESIS (TBA)
THESIS (TBA)
SCHOOL PRACT
SCHOOL PRACT
II (TBA) (1)
III (TBA) (1)
I (TBA) (3)
II (TBA) (3)
IN PSYC (TBA)
IN PSYC (TBA)
IN PSYC (TBA)
(TBA) (1)
I (TBA) (1)
I (TBA) (1)
II (TBA) (1)
(3)
(3)
IN (TBA) (1)
IV (TBA) (1)
�JANUARY 10-FEBRUARY 16, 1979
SLAP (Speech, Language & Auditory Pathology)
(1)
(1)
(1)
���BY PERMISSION OF CHAIRPERSON ONLY
PTHE (Physical Therapy)
PRCA (Parks, Recreation & Conservation)
7000
2600
3000
3000
3001
3002
3002
3100
3101
3101
3200
3200
3201
3301
1200
1602
1990
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
INTR TO LEIS SERV (MWF 8:00) (3)
OUTDOOR LIVING (TTh 11:00) (?)
GRP PROC LEI SER (TTh 9:00) (2)
LEI SER (TTh 10:00) (2)
LEI SER LAB (M 2:00-1:00) (1)
4 AOM (TTh 12:00) (2)
4 AOM (TTh 1:00) (?)
(W 6:30-9:00) (2)
(MWF 9:00) (3)
3122
3201
3202
3212
3301
3302
3990
121?
1350
1991
1 ELECTRO (TBA) (2)
1 P T THEOR 4 PRAC I
1 P T THEOR
1 PROB PROF
1 P T THEOR
1 P T THEOR
1 CLIN EOUC
1 PROB PROF
1 SEMINAR (TBA) (3)
1 CLIN EOUC IV (TBA
(TBA) (2)
& PRAC LAB (TBA) (1)
PRAC II (TBA) (1)
& PRAC II (TBA) (2)
5 PRAC LAB (TBA) (1)
I (TBA) (1)
PRAC IV (TBA) (1)
(8)
PROC
PROC
PLAN
PLAN
GRP
GRP
REC
REC
COMM 4 SCHOOL AOM
REC PROG 4 DESIGN
RECO (Rehabilitation Counseling)
REC PROG 4 DESIGN (MWF 10:00) (3)
THER REC (MWF 12:00) (3)
THER REC (MWF 1:00) (3)
REC FOR THE AGEO (TTh 11:00) (?)
REC INT OF CUL & NAT RES (TTh 3:00) (?)
REC PROG & ACT ANA TH SY (TTh 8:009:15)
PRIN & PHIL OF LEI SER (TTh 2:00) (2)
REC FLOW (TBA) (12)
(3)
PSYC (Psychology)
1050
� 1050
1050
1050
1050
1050
1050
1050
1050
1050
xA 1050
�R 1050
Wi 1050
f 1050
1050
1GENERAL1 (WF 6:00) (2)
2GENERAL1 (TTh 8:00) (2)
3GENERAL1 (WF 8:00) (2)
1GENERAL1 (TTh 8:00) (2)
5GENERAL1 (WF 8:00) (2)
6GENERAL1 (TTh 8:00) (2)
7GENERAL1 (WF 8:00) (2)
8GENERAL1 (TTh 6:00) (2)
9GENERAL1 (TTh 9:00) (2)
10GENERAL1 (WF 9:00) (2)
11GENERAL1 (WF 12:00) (2)
12GENERALI (TTm 12:00) (2)
13CENERALI (WF 12:00) (2)
1GENERAL1 (TTh 12:00) (2)
15GENERAL1 (TTh 2:00) (2)
6000
6200
6302
6102
6501
6502
6502
6503
6501
6505
6506
6521
(522
6523
8991
992
6993
8991
8997
8998
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
MED ASPECTS OF REHAB (M 6:30-9:30) (3)
SOMATOPSYC DISABILITY (T 6:30-9:30) (3)
REHAB COUN PRACT (MW 9:3010:15) (3)
REHAB EVALUATION (TTh 9:30-10:15) (3)
RESEARCH (TBA) (1)
RESEARCH (TBA) (1)
RESEARCH (T 3:005:00) O)
RESEARCH (TBA) (l)
RESEARCH (TBA) (1)
RESEARCH (TBA) (1)
RESEARCH (TBA) (1)
REHAB (TBA) (1)
REHAB (TBA) (1)
DIR REAO REHAB (TBA) (l)
INTERNSHIP IN REHAB (TEA) (3)
INTERNSHIP IN REHAB (TBA) (3)
INTERNSHIP IN REHAB (TBA) (3)
INTERNSHIP IN REHAB (TBA) (3)
THESIS (TBA) (3)
TMESIS (TBA) (3)
PROB
PROB
PROB
PROB
PROB
PROB
PROB
OIR REAO
DIR READ
2100
2200
2100
2101
3100
3200
3225
1225
1276
5000
5510
5511
5512
6002
6005
6101
6103
6101
6107
6108
6225
6226
6227
6??8
6230
6231
623?
6233
6520
6521
6522
6523
6990
6991
8995
6996
6997
8999
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
t?)
6:3000)
:00) (?)
(MWF 9:00) (3)
:O0-3:0C) (0)
10:30-12:30) (1)
(MW 1:00) (2)
COMM DISORDERS (M
PHONETICS (TTh 10:
ANAT PHYS SP HRG MECH
ANAT LAB HRG SP (Th
AUO & AURAL REHA6 (MM
PRO APPRAI IN SP PATH
LAB CLIN PRAC (TBA) (0)
CLIN PRAC (W 1:00) (3)
PRAC IN APPRAISAL (TBA) (i !
AOM SP PATH A AUD (MTWTh 8:30-10:00) (2)
SPEC PROB SP 4 HRG (TBA) (?)
SPEC PROB SP 4 HRG (TBA) (?)
SPEC PROB SP 4 HRG (TBA) (?)
SEM IN AUO (INO AUO) (M 1:00-1:00) (3)
PATH AUO MECH (TTh 10:00-11:30) (3)
LANG DIS IN CHILD (M 6:30-9:30) (3)
RESEARCH DESIGN (MWF 11:00) (3)
SEM VOICE DIS (TTh 8:30-10:00) (3)
NEURAL PATH (TTh 10:00-17:00) (1)
SEM IN ARTICULATION (MW 9:0-10:30)
CLIN PRACT IN SP (TBA) (l)
SP (TBA) (2)
SP (TBA) (3)
SP LANG (TBA
AUO (TBA) (1)
AUO (TBA) (?)
AUO (TBA) (3)
AUO (TBA) (0)
(3)
CLIN PRACT IN
CLIN PRACT IN
LAB CLIN PRAC
CLIN PRACT IN
CLIN PRACT IN
CLIN PRACT IN
LAB CLIN PRACT
(0!
MASTER OF SCI PAPER (TBA) (2)
READ SP HRG RES (TBA) (l)
REAO SP HRG RES (TTm 1:00-2:30)
REAO SP HRG RES (WF 9:00-10:30)
INTERNSHIP (TBA) (2)
INTERNSHIP (TBA) (2)
THESIS SP HRG (TBA) (3)
THESIS SP HRG (TBA) (3)
THESIS SP HRG (TBA) (3)
RESIDENCY (TBA) ()
(?)
(3)
ROSS (Russian)
1002
1 affl RUSSIAN (MWF 10:00)
1 INTERNED RUSSIAN (MW
0) (3)
11:00)
(3)






8 October 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 15
V- � v
S P EII (S p
i! )
Ml
s

MARR it
-� A Hi i3)
MARRIA �.�� 13'
tARRI
-
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Mfc!
MV.I
,
Mu
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(3)

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RCA AS
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t
a: �� wRiT.N
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MWI 3)
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PEAK (HF 1 00) (?)
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� - -(
, STAGE (TTn 2:00) (2)
A v-T M �:00) (3)
TECH t rechnoL
. � �
Imagine a world without
WHALES
Imagine a world without
GREENPEACE
Only GREENPEACE
Hands between the
whale and the
harpooner's cannon.
Entire whale tpecles are
threatened with
extinction, but we can
save them.
Send your contribution
to:
Greenpeace Foundation
240 Fort Mason
San Francisco, CA 94123
Send mv full information
Outward Bound
.�aMM
4�











4�

4�
I




4�







4�
4�
4
Baby bottle disease - there big money in it.
p.
But i
-
net lula St
tuivn
I � �
ii
bottle feed ins
enl
and pri
I hese campaign;
been incredibk successful
In Singapore, in 1951.7 1 ol all
babies from lov income lamilies
were breast fed lwent years
later. onl r were
Bui
an expensive and unnccessan,
oduct lo use intant tormula
safelx requires pun val
to sterilie bottles and nipj
and enous '
essarx amount ol lormula N
ti igeiatoi is als
Km mula is to be prepared
few hours
B cau - i clusie IxMtK
feeding v an cost oei (
total income, mam tamuies
dilute infant formula, which
���

.

s
j,e
t o he 11
i Action i
.it l l I niu i sit ve SI 1
aoolis. 1 1
But m st my
ou see a est i t n
woi '
Crunch Nestle quick.
flout mi iinvthtn � � iuim
I � : b tiUti StOllltft
r),���� dirkti
K, � . l � I - 1M , v � u - A ir,
K
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univiicvH�r,
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Aweb&nfo


Brothers Johnson
With special guest
Mother's Finest
Saturday, October 14, 1978
8p.m.
Minges Coliseum

T-Shirt Give-away
















Winning Student Ticket Numbers
0698225299420
18111231319423
19141249325507
38143267364511
47156269376513
55179273381519
63197281393523
79219287400525
Winning ticket holders must claim their T-Shirt by Monday, Oct. 9, 1978








in room 234 Mendenhall.

ECU Students $4.00
: Only Public Tickets will :
j be sold at the door. :
Public $6.00
ON SALE NOW
ECU Students $4.00
j Only Public Tickets will
� be sold at the door.
Public $6.00
ON SALE NOW





Title
Fountainhead, October 5, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 05, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.515
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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