Fountainhead, October 3, 1978






Circulation 10,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
Vol. 55
No.
3 October 1978
Board of Trustees meets
By MARCBARNES
Assistant News Editor
The Board of Trustees
met m general session on
Saturday afternoon in the
Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter. Some of the topics
discussed were develop-
ments from the Medical
School, improvement of
parking, and the possibility
of inclusion into a future
athletic conference. The
Board also went into ex-
ecutive session
The meeting was open-
ed bv Chairman Troy Pate
Opening remarks by Pate
uded discussion of the
stee Bv-Laws commit-
im Powell, who is
"arge of presenting
recommendations about the
adc. f by laws by the
iad been slated to
� report about the
jsof his research. He
�.ever, that he
-eport was not yet ready for
isentation.
Louis Singleton
. the need for a
ttee system.
all items of
� ss to appear at a
�eeting should come
jmmittees. Singleton
�.ocated the adoption
- and regulations of
the board of
Aas no old bus-
re the board In
t isiness, however.
Sing asked the board
for passage of a proposal to
a ietter, thanking, the
University of North Caro-
a at Chapei Hill for their
hospitality during the re-
cent ECU-UNC contest.
The proposal also called for
a request that the athletic
contests between the two
universities be continued in
years to come.
The meeting then went
into a series of staff re-
ports. The first of these
reports came from the Vice
Chancellor of Academic
Affairs, Dr. John Howell.
Dr. Howell reported on
enrollment fugures which
show that the student
population at the University
continues to climb, and he
said that by 1980, a little
over 10,800 full time stu-
dents would be attending
ECU.
Howell commented
further that there has been
an increase in years past in
both transfer and freshmen
attendence. and he expects
this trend tocontinue.
Howell also said that
there was a variance in the
number of graduate stu-
dents enrolled in the uni-
versity, but he said that this
was normal, and not a
cause for alarm.
Vice Chancellor for
Health Affairs. Dr. Edwin
W. Monroe then reported
to the board.
Dr. Monroe said that a
new Neo-Natal center had
been opened, a facility to
provide care to critically ill
newborns. At the present
time. Monroe noted, 8-10
newborns are receiving
care at the center.
He commented further
that a lot of the patients are
from outside the Pitt Coun-
ty area. He said that
patients from all o er East-
ern N.C. are being helped
at the center Monroe men-
tioned that the center will
be formally opened later
this month with Governor
Jim Hunt present.
Dr. Monroe then com-
mented on the enrollment
m the Medical School.
Monroe said that there are
presently 65 students en-
rolled from 36 counties in
N.C. He went on to produce
figures which showed that
there are 36 females and 8
minority students enrolled.
He also said there are
presently 31 residents in
training from the Medical
School at Pitt County
Memorial Hospital.
A Mason committee will
come in November to ac-
credit the school for third
year instruction, according
to Monroe.
Monroe went on to say
that he was pleased with
the progress that the de-
partment of Health Affairs
had made so far with fund
raising.
Dr Robert Holt, who is
the Vice Chancellor for
administration then report-
ed on student affairs and
alumni.
Dr. Holt commented
that the dorms were 98
percent filled. He also said
that financial aid this year
is assisting some 2,906
students to attend school,
and that three million dol-
lars of financial grants,
loans and scholarships for
financially needy students
is presently in force.
Holt then went on to
praise the students who
work in Greenville to sup-
plement their educational
funds. He said that a
manager of a business in
downtown had recently ex-
pressed appreciation to him
for the job that the students
were doing.
Holt then turned his
attention to the placement
office, and he said that
most of the alumni who list
with the placement office
for jobs usually receive
them. He also reported on
the progress of the instal-
lation of a new computer,
which is to be made oper-
ational at the end of this
month.
K. Edward Greene
asked Dr. Holt if ECU was
having any trouble collect-
ing money from students
who may have defaulted on
federally funded loans. Dr.
Holt remarked that the
university has a collection
agency for the loans, and
only about 5 percent of the
students default on them.
Cliff Moore, who is
the vice chancellor for
business affairs, then re-
ported on improvement of
both the snack bar and the
parking lot facilities on
campus.
Two new facilities for
parking and dining will be
located at Wright Audi-
torium. Moore reported
that the recent food service
this year is much better
than it was last year, but
that the student's support
of the cafeteria had not
changed much in the two
years.
Moore said that the
Security office had been
upgraded, and that there
are now three more people
working for the campus
police. Moore added that
the telephone is now mon-
itored twenty-four hours a
day.
The vice- chairman of
the board. Mr. Ashley
Futrell asked Moore about
the possibility of the con-
struction of an overpass at
Tenth Street and College
Hill Drive. Moore repied
that the N.C. Department
of Transportation had pro-
mised to look into the
matter. Chairman Troy
Pate commented that a
leeter should be written to
the Depatment asking that
formal consideration of the
overpass project be under-
taken. Pate said that the
Trustees should take an
active voice in requesting
the overpass. The board
unanimously passed the
proposal.
See TRUSTEES, p. 5
BOARD OF TRUSTEES meet in general session. Topics discussed were medical school, parking and possible
inclusion into athletic conference.
Photo by John H Grogan
Education professor wins Civitan
award, honored by local chapter
By MARCBARNES
Assistant News Editor
The Board of Trustees
voted unanimously at the
executive session of their
meeting to replace two top
administrative posts at
ECU.
The posts are that of
vice chancellor for admini-
stration, presently held by
Dr. Robert Holt, and vice
chancellor for health affairs
presently held by Dr. Ed-
win Monroe. The two po-
sitions will be replaced by
two new positions, vice
chancellor for student life
and vice chancellor for
institutional advancement
and planning. The plan,
subject to approval by the
Board of Governors of the
University of North Caro-
lina would go into effect
next summer.
Chancellor brewer com-
mented on the reasons for
the changes. Brewer said
liminates positions
that "We felt that we want
to carry the university on to
higher levels of excellence
in the next decade. The
institution has already a-
chieved a high level of
maturity, but there are
areas that we felt that we
needed additional leader-
ship
He went on to say that
"everything we do is
geared to making this a
better place Dr. Brewer
also said that Dr. Robert
Holt had indicated to form-
er Chancellor Jenkins and
to himself a desire to return
to the classroom.
The proposed chancel-
lor for student life would
cover a "myriad of respon-
sibilities according to
Brewer. Brewer comment-
ed further that "a student's
life goes well beyond the
classroom, and encompas-
i
:�:�
ses the total range of
activities of a four year stay
at ECU
The other position,
chancellor of institutional
advancement and planning
would be a position to
coordinate various planning
and development phases of
the university. Brewer said
that "for a university to
achieve the mark of real
excellence requires the
support of all the consti-
tuencies of the university
including alumni, founda-
tions, friends and corpor-
ations " Brewer added
"this new office will give us
maximum effort in that
area. It will also enhance
the planning efforts of the
university
The chancellor went on
to say that the job de-
scription for the two new
positions had not yet been
completed. Brewer said
1
What's inside
William B Martin of
Greenville was the recip-
ient of ihe Good Citizenship
award for 1978 given by the
Greenville Civitan Club at
'he club's Fall installation
and awards cookout held
Thursday.
Martin, a professor in th
School of Education at ECU
received the award in rec-
ognition of his contribut-
ions to the Greenville com-
munity and for his work
with programs for retarded
persons
He is currently serving
as a regional vice-president
of the National Associaiton
for Retarded Citizens, a
past-president of the N.C.
Association for Retarded
Citizens, a member of the
board of directors of the
Greenville Sheltered Work-
shop and chairman of the
Aid to Handicapped, North
Carolina District East, Civ-
itan Club. For the past 11
years, he has directed a
camp for retarded children
at White Lake.
CIVITAN OF THE YEAR
The Civitan of the Year
award was presented to
Richard A. Stephenson, the
immediate past-president
of the Greenville Civitan
Club.
During his leadership,
the club contributed over
$4,000 to programs for the
mentally retarded, the phy-
sically handicapped and to
other community service
projects. The club has also
been designated the Out-
standing Club for Area
Nine, District East which
comprises Greenville, Kin-
ston, Havelock, New Bern
and Jacksonville.
Stephenson is a profes-
sor in the Department of
Geography at ECU.
New officers for the club
include: Hugh Wease,
president; Harold Jones,
president-elect; Richard
Murphy, vice president;
Ronald Sessoms, treasurer;
and Nicholas Radeka, sec-
retary.
Bill Marley of Golds-
boro, Civitan Governor for
N.C. District East, conduc-
ted the swearing-in cere-
mony. Julian Rawls of
Greenville, chairman of the
awards committee, presen-
ted the awards.
KEITH BERGER
mmm&
Chick Corea's new album. Friends is
reviewedsee p. 6.
Keith Berger, a student under Marcel
Marceau, will appear at Hendnx
Theatre, Wednesday nightsee p. 8.
Pirate's top Movin" Mavssee p. 9.
Volleyball teams play UNC tonight in
Minges at 7 p.msee p. 10.
A six-foot alligator wanders through
Wilmingtonsee p. 3.
ECU sponsered the Fourth Annual
Publications Workshop last weekend
see p. 3.
&
n

1
i
1
1
i
that "we will formuhze the
job description and criteria
before we start a national
search He went on to sav
that "we will attain the best
possible people in the na-
tion for these two posi-
tions
When asked If it was
possible that a person who
is already in the university
community might be ap-
pointed to one of the two
positions. Brewer reitera-
ted his desire to find the
most qualified person in the
nation and he went on to
say that if the person is
already in the university,
then that person is the one
we can use. To do less
would be unfair to the
constituencies of the uni-
versity which expect excel-
lance of us
When asked his rea-
ction to the changes. Holt
said that when Dr. Brewer
came on board I told him I
plan to work is this position
only one more year in this
period of transition, and
then go back to the class-
room He went on to say
that "I heartily concur in
what he is planning for this
position, and feel sure that
it will bring greater finan-
cial support to strengthen
our academic programs
Monroe reacted in this
way. He said that "I
recognize that the decision
has been made and I will
continue to assist the insti-
tution in whatever appro-
priate role seems feasible "
Monroe went on to say that
"I intend to evaluate al-
ternatives here and else-
where during the months
ahead When asked about
future career plans, he said
"no definite answer at this
time
Dr. Jack W. Peltason
Installation speaker announced
CHEMISTRY SEMINARS QIFT - Continuing �pport for a
program of seminars and symposia by ' Chemistry
department, East Carolina University, is tfir i ,trated by
Union Carbide Corporation in the latest . series of
contributions. Here David E. Pecot R, Union Carbide's
Greenville plant manager, presents a check for $2,500 to
ECU Chancellor Thomas Brewer.
Also present for the presentation are H. George
Lequear L, Union Carbide manager for Community
Relations, and ECU Chemistry chairman Angelo Voipe
second from left). ECU Nbws 8(rM( p�ofoJ
By WILLIAM SHIRES
ECU News Bureau
One of America's most
distinguished leaders in
higher education will be the
speaker for the formal
installation of Thomas B.
Brewer as chancellor of
East Carolina University on
Oct. 28.
He is Dr. Jack W.
Peltason, former chancellor
of the University of Illinois
at Urbana-Champaign who
is now president of the
American Council on Ed-
ucation.
"We are highly pleased
and honored to have such
an outstanding personage
as the speaker for this
important occasion said
Dr. Henry C. Ferreil Jr
chairman of the Committee
for the Installation.
Other distinguished
guests on the program will
include Gov. James B.
Hunt Jr University of
North Carolina president
William C. Friday, Jerry
W. Powell of Greenville,
president of the ECU
Alumni Assn Tommy Joe
Payne, president of the
Student Government
Assn ECU trustees chair-
man Troy W. Pate of
Goldsboro, William A.
Johnson of Lillington,
chairman of the UNC Board
of Governors, and Ferreil,
president of the ECU Fa-
culty Senate.
The Hon. Susie Sharp,
chief justice of the Supreme
Court of North Carolina,
will administer the oath of
office to Dr. Brewer.
Brewer, formerly vice
chancellor and dean of
Texas Christian University,
became the seventh chief
administrative officer of
East Carolina on July 1.
The formal ceremony of
installation of the chan-
cellor is the first for ECU
since the school attained
university status and be-
came a constituent of the
University of North Caro-
lina system.
Dr. Peltason served 10
years as chancellor at the
University of Illinois where
he had served some 20
years on the faculty and as
dean of the College of
Liberal Arts and Sciences.
He also served during
1964-67 as vice chancellor
for academic affairs, Uni-
versity of California at
Irvine.
He is a past chairman of
the National Association of
State Universities and
Land-Grant Colleges. He is
a member of the board of
trustees of the Educational
Testing Service, a trustee
of the Institute for Amer-
ican Universities, Aix-en-
Povenoe, France, and a
member of the Governing
Boa'd.Robert Wood John-
son Health Policy Fellow-
ship Program of the Na-
tional Academy of Scien-
ces.
In announcing program
details for the Installation,
Ferreil also extended an
invitation on behalf of the
ECU trustees, faculty, staff
and students for public
attendance. Those wishing
to attend the ceremony may
obtain information and
place ticket requests by
telephone, at 757-6537,
Greenville, Ferreil said. He
urged that ticket requests
be placed no later than Oct.
10.







u
II
Paga 2 FOUNTAINHEAO 3 Oetobar 1978
�MM
Services
Conregation , Bayt
Shalom is pleased to invite
you to attend High Holy
Days services.
They will be held at the
First Presbyterian Church,
Elm and 14th St Green-
ville. The schedule of ser-
vices is:
ROSH HASHANAH:
Sun Oct. 1, 8 p.m. Mon
Oct. 2, 10 a.m Mon Oct.
2, 6:15 p.m Tues Oct.
3, 10 a.m.
YOM KIPPUR
Kol Nidrei - Tues Oct. 10
6:30p.m. Wed Oct. 11, 10
a.m. Minchah, Wed Oct.
11,4 p.m.
A breaking of the fast
will be held at the home of
Dr. and Mrs. Ed Lieberman
311 King George Rd. All in
attendance of services are
cordially invited.
FGSF
FSOG
John Warencki, a
representative with the
Department of State, For-
eign Service Officer Corps,
will be on campus Oct 4
anf would like to meet with
interested staff, faculty,
and students.
We have arranged for
him tobe in Brewster B-103
at 9:15 a.m. to discuss
careers and entrance re-
quirements with th Foreign
Service with faculty and
staff At 10:15 a.m. he
would like to meet with
interested students from
your department to answer
questions and give them
general information about
the service.
� 2000 years ago, today's
society with ail of it's
problems were foretold in
the book of Revelation and
the ultimate outcome, the
eminent return of Jesus
Christ. The second coming
of Jesus Christ will have
eternal results for your life.
So come Thurs Oct. 5
when Steve Jones, Pastor
of Faith Assemby of God
will speak to the Full
Gospel Student Fellowship
in Mendenhall 221 at 7:30
p.m.
Gamma Beta
Gamma Beta Phi will
meet Thurs Oct. 5 in
Mendenhall 244 at 7 p.m.
All members are urged to
attend.
G:mma Beta Phi will
hold its first annual Rush
meeting for Fall Semester
Thurs Oct. 5 in Menden-
hall 244 at 7 p.m. Any
student with a grade point
average in the upper 20
percent of hisher class is
eligible for admission. All
interested students are wel-
come to attend this meet-
ing.
NTE
KYF
SCEC
The Student Council for
Exceptional Children will
meet Wed Oct. 4 at 5 p.m.
in room 129 Speight. Plans
for up-coming activities will
be discussed and refresh-
ments will be served. All
members and interested
persons are stronglv urged
to attend.
The National Teacher
Examinations NTE) will be
given at ECU Nov. 11.
Scores from the exam-
inations are used by states
for certification of teachers,
by school systems for selec-
tion and identification of
leadership qualities, and by
colleges as part of their
graduation requirements.
Educational Testing
Service, which prepares
and administers the tests,
says they are designed to
measure knowledge gained
from professional and gen-
eral education and in 26
subject-matter fields.
Bulletins describing
registration procedures ana
containing registration
forms may be obtained
from the ECU Testing
Center, 105 Speight Build-
ing, or directly from the
National Teachers Exam-
inations, Educational Test-
ing Service, Box 911,
Princeton, NJ 08541.
The deadline for regular
registration is Oct. 19.
On-the-spot registration is
not permitted.
Bicyclists
All full-time students
interested in a bicycle club.
This year an interested
student, in association with
the intramurals depart-
ment, is trying to form a
bicycle club. All interested
bicyclist are encouraged to
attend the first meeting so
an appropriate analyses can
be made on the future of
such a club. The first
meeting will be Tues Oct.
10 at 8 p.m. in Memorial
Gym room 105.
Ping pong
The King Youth Fellow-
ship will meet Oct. 5 in 305
Flanagan at 7 p.m. All
persons interested in Bible
study and fellowship please
come. If you wish to call for
information please call Mr.
Nicholson's office in Flan-
agan 305 or phone 757-6736
and 825-7501.
Invitation
The trustees, faculty,
staff, and students of ECU
request the honor of your
presence at the installation
of Thomas Brewer as
Chancellor of the Univer-
sity on Sat Oct. 28 at 10:30
a.m. on the North Lawn of
ECU.
If you wish to attend,
please call 757-6537 to
request tickets.
Concert
The Student Union Ma-
jor Attractions Committee
will present Brothers John-
son with special guest
Mother's Finest on Sal
Oct. 14 at 8 p.m. in Minges
Coliseum.
Tickets will be $4 for
ECU students and $6 for
the public. All tickets are
available from the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center.
In addition, public tick-
ets can be purchased from:
Apple Records - East Fifth
Street - School Kids
Records - Georgetown
Shoppes - The M usic Shop -
Greenville Square Mall.
Only public tickets will
be available at the door.
All day-students regis-
ter now for the Mendenhall
Day-Student Table Tennis
Tournament to be held
Tues Oct. 17. The tour-
nament will be held in the
Table Tennis Rooms at
Mendenhall at 7 p.m.
The four winners in the
men's division and wo-
men's division will repres-
ent the day-students in the
All-Campus Table Tennis
Tournament to be held
Nov. 7.
One all-campus winner
in each division will repre-
sent ECU in the Association
of College Unions - Interna-
tional regional face-to-face
tournaments to be held in
Knoxville, Tenn. in Feb.
All expenses for the tour-
nament will be paid by
Mendenhall.
Registration forms and
details are available at the
Billiards Center and the
final day to register is Fri.
Oct. 13.
t
Lecture
Or. George S. Wilson.
Chemistry Department of
the University of Arizona,
Tucson, Arizona, will pre-
sent a seminar on Electro-
chemical Studies of Thioe-
thersas Biological Models"
on Oct. 4 at 12 Noon In
Room 201, Flanagan.
Chess
The Student Union
travel committee once
again offers its low price
trip to New York City, Nov.
22 to Nov. 26. The price is
only $65. Reservations
can be made at Mendenhall
ticket office. Don't miss the
core of the big apple.
Bowling
Travel
Donors
The Air Force ROTC
will be sponsoring a Blood
Drive Oct. 4 and 5 from 11
to 5 p.m. located in Wright
Auditorium. We are asking
everyone to participate in
this worthwhile cause in
order to reach the goal
which has been set for 700
pints of blood. Sororities,
fraternities, and other or-
ganizations are strongly
urged to take part in the
donation. Trophies will be
awarded to the organization
with the most donors. Take
time out to help, give a pint
and save a life.
L
The deadline fa the
Student Union Travel
Committee New York trip is
Mon Oct. 16. The New
York trip is during Thank-
sgiving break, Nov. 22-26.
The price is $65 and
includes bus transportation
and group accomodations at
the Hotel Taft in midtown
Manhattan. There are
places for 90 students.
Registration is at Central
Ticket Office of Mendenhall
Last year was one of the
most successful seasons on
Broadway and this year
should be better. Eubie is
the seasons favorite, it is a
musical about Eubie Blake,
the last king of ragtime.
Annie, a AChorusUne,
Grease and the W iz are still
playing. Don't miss New
York this year.
The All-Campus Chess
Tournament, sponsored by
Mendenhall, will begin
Mon Oct. 9 at 7 p.m. in
the Mendenhall Multi-
purpose Room. All full-
time students are eligible to
participate.
The tournament will be
conducted to determine the
one winner who represent
ECU in the Association of
College Unions - Internat-
ional regional face-to-face
tournaments to be held in
Knoxville, Tenn. on Feb. 8,
9, and 10. All expenses for
the tournament will be paid
by Mendenhall.
Registration forms and
details are available at the
MSC Billiards Center. The
final day to register is
Thurs Oct. 5.
Phi Sigma
Phi Sigma Pi will hold
its monthly business meet-
ing Wed Oct. 4 at 6 p.m.
The meeting is in Austin
room 132 and all members
are urged to attend.
The Mendenhall
Day-Student Bowling Tour-
nament will be held Mon
Oct. 16 through Fri Oct
27. Day-student bowlers
will have two weeks to bowl
nine games and total pins
will decide the top eight
winners in the men's div-
ision and women's division
The sixteen winners will
compete in the All-Campus
Tournament to be held
Nov. 9
Two five member teams
will represent ECU at the
Association of College
Unions - International reg-
ional face-to-face tour-
naments to be held in
Knoxville, Tenn. in Feb-
ruary. All expenses for the
tournament will be paid be
Mendenhall.
Registration forms and
details are available at the
Mendenhall Bowling and
Billiards Centers. The final
day to register is Fri Oct
13.
Phi Eta
Skiing
The Student Union
travel committee is offering
a new trip this year to Snow
Shoe West Virginia, Jan. 1
to Jan. 5. Reservations can
be made at Mendenhall
ticket office. The price is
only $169.00. Price includes
lift tickets, 4 breakfasts and
3 evening meals, transport-
ation and lodging.
All members of Phi Eta
Sigma are reminded to
meet at Mendenhall on the
patio, for our donut sale
Wed Oct. 4 at 7 p.m
(Rain or shine!)
SOCIaNTH
The Sociology-
Anthropology club will
meet Wed Oct. 4 at 7:30
p.m. in BD-302. All majors,
minors, and interested per-
sons are invited to attend.
-a umvi�ic� y.
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IV
Brothers Johnson
univ�ii�
M
ri
With special guest
ECU Students $4.00
Only Public Tickets will J
be sold at the door, i
Mother's Finest
Sat Oct. 14, 1978
�l
.m.
Public $6.00
ON SALE ROWtt
Minges Coliseum
Students:
Buy your tickets either Tues or Wed.
and ycV automatically eligible to win
a free Concert T-Shirt
Winning Ticket Numbers will be in Thursday's FOUNTAINHEAD.
ECU Students $4.00
seeesseeestssseseeeeeseseseseessses
Only Public Tickets will S
be sold at the door.


Public $6.00
�I SALE MOWtl
Classifieds
FOR SALE: 1 Derton etereo
receiver $29.00; 1 old but
working refrtg. $10; 1 kit-
chen table $10. Gail Mag at
FOR SALE :1yr.oid 8 track
Cretg power play with
power piay speakers pitta
player mount. $125 for ail.
Will throw in tape too. '77
XL 175 Honda Enduro in
excellent oond. $650. or
beet offer. Gait at 752-4186
after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: '75 Muatang
Ghta. AC, aunroof, pS,
PB, AMFM, and more.
Remarkable condition -
muat aae. $$460. Call David
at 750-6582.
FOR SALE: Oil heaters,
gas heater, has stove,
camping haatar, bow and
arrows boat, AKC Great
Dana - 2 yra. old. 756-4617.
ferwrt 9i
NEEDED: A responsible
female roommate to share a
two bedrm. apt. Cali Liaa or
Polly 758-6794.
ROOMMATE WANTED:
2 bedroom apt. completely
furnished. 103-6 Eastbrook
apt. Call Brad 752-1547.
ROOMATE NEEDED:
to share furniehed 2 bed-
room houee, rent and utili-
ties. Cali 761-0064.
LOST: Men's 14K gefd
sano. Big reward.
YOQA; Hatna yoga la now
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THE GAZEBO ON cmpv. alters a place ,� sluaents ,� meel �� � stumPhou by John � Qrogan
Alligator wanders through Wilmington
WILMINGTON. N.C.
(AP) � A six-foot alligator
who started wandering
from home will soon find
itself traveling to a com-
pletely new abode.
The alligator usually
stays in a drainage pond in
the Pine Valley Country
Club. But last Wednesday
it decided to wander
through the Pine Valley
subdivision, attracting a
crowd of about 30 people
who followed it down the
street, through some fron t
yards and across a porch.
The New Hanover
For journalists
County Sheriff's Depart-
ment finally cleared spec-
tators away and the gator
made its way back to its
watery home near the 12th
green of the country club
golf course.
The alligator didn't
cause any property damage
or hurt anyone, but its
presence caused some con-
cern among the area resi-
dents.
'Thisisonly the second
time in about three years
that it's roamed around like
this said Bobby Neil.
"It's gotten too large. It
could be dangerous since
we have alot of little kids
around here. It's gotten to
the size now where it's
frightening
The state Wildlife
Commission, notified of the
gator's presence, was ex-
pected to send in a team to
move it to an unspecified
location.
Russ Knowles, presi-
dent of the Pine Valley
Country Club, said he has
discussed the situation with
state wildlife officials sev-
eral times. He said the
animal has used the woods
behind the Pine Valley
Elementary School as a
hibernation ground during
the four years it has lived in
the pond.
"People would come by
and feed it chicken and hot
dogs. I guess you could say
it was an attraction to the
gold course. But now it's
just gotten too large for
around here
"We didn't mind hav-
ing it there because it
wasn't bothering any-
body Knowles said.
journalists
Workshop held
inn.ri Oolmar PnKlichmn
Approximately 225 high
school students, college
students, and advisors at-
tened the Fourth Annual
Publications Workshop at
ECU Sat Sept 30
The theme of the work-
shop was. "A Changing
Press in a Changing
Society
The workshop was
sponsored by the Society
For Collegiate Journalists,
the Journalism Program,
and the Division of Continu
-ing Education.
A combo from the
School of Music provided
entertainment during reg-
istration
Chancellor Thomas B.
Brewer extended the Un-
iversity welcome to partici-
pants. The keynote address
was given by Mr. Edmund
Welch, legislative assistant
to U.S. Rep. Walter B.
Jones. Welch spoke on the
relationship between polit-
icians and journalists.
Workshop sessions
were held for newspaper,
magazine, and yearbook
staffs There were approx-
imately 25 different ses-
sions held during the work-
shop.
Workshop consultants
included representatives
from the Greenville Oa7y
Reflector. Hunter Publish-
ing Uo Delmar Publishing
Co FOUNTAINHEAD
REBEL. and the
BUCCANEER.
The closing session
included a performance by
Bill Robinson, a prac-
ticing magician ,j$ay,
Williams, president of SCJ,
adjourned the workshop.
Many of the workshop
participants remained in
Greenville for the ECU
football game Saturday
night.
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Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 3 October 1978
Living with roaches
The following editorial is reprinted from the
July 12 edition of FOUNTAINHEAD.)
Roaches and other pests have long been a
problem in the dormitories, especially since
the Housing Office authorized dorm cooking
some years ago. Several spraying efforts have
been launched to no apparent avail; the
creatures continue to infest the dorms in ever
greater numbers.
Students have made several attempts in the
past to get the university to increase their
extermination efforts, but usually have no
more success than the pesticide purges against
the insects. The university's argument, that
they can do little to combat the roaches unless
students improve their housekeeping and
sanitation habits, although circular, has some
merit to it.
Usually, there are two or three Oscar
Madisonson a hall whose overflowing garbage
cans and week old dirty dishes act as a magnet
for the neighborhood roaches. As a result,
everybody gets to share in the fun of chasing
bugs in the night.
Probably the most effective solution to the
problem would be to ban cooking in dorm
rooms, but this .is an unsatisfactory solution,
since many students cannot afford to eat out.
University spraying efforts must continue, but
the only practical method at present is for the
residents of each room to fight them as best
they know how through cleanliness and poison.
Incoming freshmen should receive some
instruction either during orientation or as part
of one of the countless freshman brochures on
how to control and eventually eliminate a roach
population which might be sharing the same
room.
Roaches will remain one of Greenville's
perennial problems, like parking and the fall
monsoons. However, at least for the
forseeable future, the guys in Scott will still be
able to watch the beasts get high on Black Flag
and the ladies in Fletcher won't have to cancel
their Tuesday night roach races. And finally,
after all the spraying and poison fog
disappears, chances are the roach will still rise
victorious, having adapted itself to an insectide
laden environment.
So it goes.
Commentary
ERA will benefit all
By HESTER PETTY
Uppity Women of Greenville
Do you know what will
happen when the ERA
(Equal Rights Amendment)
becomes aw? I believe that
women would begin to be
treated fairly and equally in
most aspects of their lives.
I'd say that women would
� iiy have a legal means
to correct unfair and un-
equal treatment. I think
we'd begin to see an
attitude change in both
men and women concern-
ing the status of women.
What does the oppo-
sition believe will happen
when the ERA becomes
;aw? They say that women
win enter the Ladies Room
and find themselves in the
company of a man standing
over a urinal.
They believe that this
amendment will bring a-
bout the death of the
nuclear family (you know
the Nuclear's. Nice family.
Always keep their lawn
tidy.) The opposition warns
of a sudden rash of homo-
sexual marriages that will
be legalized by the ERA.
And they think that
many women will lose their
jobs because they can't lift
100 pounds of machinery
and won't the ERA erase
protective labor laws for
women?
What will happen when
the ERA becomes law?
Some of the answers to this
question can be found in
Pennsylvania where an E-
qual Rights Amendment
was written into the state
constitution in 1971. Four
things that did happen
were:
�A wife now has the
right to sue for "loss of
consortium" (affection,
companionship, and help
with home and children) if
her spouse is badly injured
or incapacitated in an ac-
cident . Huabends have had
this right for centuries, as
wives were always recog-
nized as valuable property.
�Parents have equal
responsibility (for their
children), according to their
resources, taking into ac-
count nonfinancial contri-
butions.
� Both a wife's mone-
tary and nonmonetary
contributions to the house-
hold must be recognized
when property is divided at
divorce. In the past all
household property was
presumed to belong to the
husband, unless the wife
could prove otherwise (with
canceled checks, for ex-
ample).
�Pennsylvania is one
of four states that has no
law granting alimony after
divorce. (This was true long
before the passage of the
ERA). The state does have
a provision for temporary
alimony during the time
that divorce proceedings
are in progress, and that
right, previously limited to
women, is now available to
the "economically depen-
dent spouse 1
Several things did not
happen. Ladies' rooms
were not replaced by Ladies
and Gentlemen rooms. It
was decided by the Penn-
sylvania attorney general
that the constitutional right
to privacy insured the right
of men and women to have
separate toliet facilities.
It is improbable that a
federal amendment to the
constitution would affect
this situation in any other
way.
The legal status of
homosexual marriages was
not changed by trie Penn-
sylvania ERA. They are still
illegal. It was decided that
the amendment dealt "with
laws affecting persons of
the same sex2 It ap-
pears (unfortunately) that
the ERA will not insure gay
people of their human
rights.
In Pennsylvania "the
ERA had not resulted in the
repeal of protective labor
laws for workers. Most of
those protections formerly
guaranteed under the
Women's Labor Law (which
was superseded in 1969,
well before the passage of
the ERA) have been ex-
tended to both men and
women through federal
legislation and other state
laws3 It is doubtful that
any other other state would
take if ferent approach.
it a state did repeal
proteste labor laws rather
ths end them to both
sex ne could assume
tha motive was sexist
and that the purpose was to
push women out of male-
prefered jobs. Those legi-
slators who favored repeal
should be replaced at elec-
tion time by men and
women who favor extension
of coverage to both sexes.
Before I discuss the
Pennsylvania ERA's affect
on the structure of the
American family I'd like to
talk about who this family is
Fojntainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over 50 years
EDITOR
Doug White
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Leigh Coakley
TRENDS EDITOR
Steve Bachner
NEWS EDITORS
Julie Everette
Ricki Gliarmis
ADVERTISING MANAGER
Robert M. Swalm
SPORTS EDITOR
Sam Rogers
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper of East
Carolina University sponsored by the Media Board of ECU
and is distributed each Tuesday and Thursday (weekly
during the summer).
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C.
27834
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni $6 annually.
that the ERA opposition is
so concerned about pro-
tecting. The nuclear family
i generally described as a
household consisting of a
married (heterosexual)
couple with one or more
children under the ag&pX
18. Of alt the UniiiilinUailB
the U.S 34,4 per cent are
nuclear families.
Will the ERA encourage
divorce as some opponents
say that it will? In Penn-
sylvania the divorce rate
has increased (just as it has
increased throughout the
U.S.) but it still remains
below the national average.
Will the ERA encourage
women to seek work out-
side the home and thus
disrupt family life? Over
half of all nuclear families
consist of households with
two wage earning parents.
Most families simply can't
manage on one salary
alone.
The ERA had not taken
mom out of the kitchen.
Inflation has. And if mom
has to go to work, wouldn't
the family be better off if
she is able to find a good
job that pays well? And if
sex discrimination keeps
women out of good jobs
with good salaries,
shouldn't that discimina-
tion be unlawful? And isn't
that what the ERA is all
about?
I hope that I have
suceeded in dispelling
some of the myths about
the ERA and what it will
and will not do. Perhaps I
haven't.
If I haven't it is prob-
ably because the anti-ERA
arguments do not make
sense and I have a hard
time answering stupid
questions.
The anti-ERA argu-
ments and questions are
seldom based on real fact or
evidence. They are usually
nebulous. And they are
often accompanied by "I
love being a woman"
speeches and "ERA will
take away our femininity"
fears.
I don't believe the ERA
opposition's predictions
will prove true. I do believe
that our status and con-
dition as women in this
male dominated society will
not improve as quickly or
smoothly without the ERA.
I need the Equal Rights
Amendment. All women
need It.
Note; Alt footnotes come
from Ma. Magazine, Sept-
ember 1976. See article
"Pennsylvania: ERA in
Practice on pane 92.
Forum
Parkins proposed is unfair to students
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Even in an easyTgoing
atmosphere like our cam-
pus, there are some faculty
members who feel a need to
undermine the student
body. As a student, I feel'
that it is my duty to report
to the day students a plan
to take the central campus
parking from them for
faculty use.
In the last meeting of
the Faculty Senate, a
proposal to take over day
student parking was
brought up and approved.
Who can honestly say that
this measure would be fair?
The day students out-
number faculty, and most
of them travel from a more
distant point than faculty. If
a faculty member has to
come to school early, he
she can relax in the office
with a proverbial cup of
coffee until class time.
As it is now, I leave
home an hour early before
my 9 a.m. class, drive the
20-minute drive, and still
have 30 or 40 minutes to
look for a parking space,
often with no luck, unfess I
choose the most distant
lots, located at least 10
minutes from my class.
If the faculty takes over
those centrally located lots,
even the more distant ones
will be crowded.
In this writers opinion,
a campus like ECU should
be mindful of the needs of
the day students. We com-
prise a fairly large portion
of the student body, which,
by the way, faculty mem-
bers, is necessary in order
for your jobs to be main-
tained.
I say students should
come first, and I will fight
the faculty against this
proposal in any way that I
can. The odd twist to this
"proposal is that it was not
reported in the paper's last
account of the Senate meet-
ing. I fear that the Senate
hoped to slip this action in
without too much student
involvement.
We day students cannot
afford to let that happen.
I do not have all of the
details, and challenge a
Faculty Senate member to
speak up for ECU'S primary
interest, the student.
Jo Ann Smith
Rifkin quoted sources out of context
To FOUNTAINHEAD.
During his stimulating
and provocative lecture on
Sept. 12, Jeremy Rifkin
referred to several well-
known scientists as eugeni-
cists and read quotations
from their writings as
representative of their
views. I am rather familiar
with writings of one of
them, Joshua Lederberg,
and I suspect that Rifkin
was quoting him (and
probably the others) out of
context.
Being a reductionist by
training, I attempted to
check Rifkin's reference for
the quotation from Leder-
berg, but I was unable to
locate it. Another of his
references to Lederberg is
an article titled "Biological
Innovation and Genetic
Intervention" which is in
the book, Challenging
Biological Problems: Dir-
ections Toward Their Solu-
tion (1972), edited by John
A. Behnke. In the article,
Lederberg makes it clear
that he does not advocate
the remaking of man.
I believe that it is very
likely that the quotations
from Francis Crick, James
Bonner, and probably even
Linus Pauling, were also
out of context.
Those who are inter-
ested may want to check
these references.
Rifkin gave the impres-
sion of having a concern for
the human individual. I
would have hoped that his
concern would extend to
those he chose to quote.
Can we not be holistic and
reductionist, too?
Quoting Rifkin out of
context, he promised a
member of the audience a
left-handed son of average
height. Does this mean that
he advocates the artificial
manipulation of the human
genotype? Those who
attended the lecture know
the answer.
Patricia Daugherty
Associate Biology Professor
'The Gnome of Death: stylish despair9
ToFOUNTAINHEAD:
To: Jim Barnes
A measure to erode the
mysticism surrounding
death.
The Gnome of Death
presides, it's true. We
watch from a corner (over-
informed and underknow-
ledged) while our generals
hump the planet and our
priests bless them on their
way (call it the way of the
cross) while greedy kings
do a death-grip waltz on the
bones of the same dance
done before and the tribal
legions raise their banners
against one another, while
the garbage and all the
bones collect waist-deep
around men who proclaim
each absurd war holy.
And informed sources
said today the God is on our
side, although the Lord was
not around to comment.
Death had this to say:
"Kiss my rumpled ass and
sing power. There are no
fair fights among men and
only can I save you from
love gone wrong It is
stylish to despair.
Still, imagination holds
out � for what isn't, and
never was, but mught,
some say, come to be. It's a
fool's vision, perhaps, but
they have found it in caves,
on ruined walls, and in the
notebooks of young, dead
poets.
Dumb dreams of the
'artist depicting a man in
love with someone, where
the Gnome is silly for a
time, and men can tweak
his beard and dare to be
naked and vulnerable, lov-
ing and inefficient, and
without the borrowed pow-
er of Death over one
another.
It's true the Gnome has
his way over man in the
end; the game isn't fair, it
just is. Still there is no
reason to serve the dark
bastard, to run his errands
for him, to extend a love-
less kingdom while we still
have the light.
For if Death is a threat,
life is our only revenge.
Sing: " K iss your own dead
ass, Death, there are no
real fights among men, and
no one needs saving from
love
David Latham
American Journal
Jerry Mander fights to abolish TV
By DA VID ARMSTRONG
Back in 1972, Jerry M ander had a row with a coilegue at
the public interest ud agency where they both worked. It
was over television and whether people could learn
anything useful from the phosphorescent box.
Mander insisted they couldn't, but he couldn't muster
the evidence to prove it. It was just a gut feeling, an
intuition that America's great national pasttime was in
truth a alignant social force.
The argument, and the frustration it engendered, was
to haunt Mander, a renegade from commercial advetising
who had often worked with television. Ha began to research
TV, digging into its history, its technology, its role in the
economy. The result of Mender's six-vr in
xrM� - Ess
tho boc
TV is not only a wasteTin! c
terrifying technological intrusion thaTTL ?
formaWa. � j "�-Xit unre-
M ander wants to pull the plug and v�
grounds that TV screana viawecs From exSLT
it is responsible only to tha corpora q?Z� ���
its $120,000 a minuta prime tima � raT �Horl
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Hsna�'i�n





American
Journal
continued from p. 4
people physiologiadly, and that only coarse ,
imagery can come through the cathode ray tube effective?
in KsTr! pXpanded �" th6Se P0ints in a recent view
m n.s San Francisco, apartment. Smoking Gauloises and
appmg expresso before a picture window view of The
Golden Gate Bridge, he explained : "Whenever somebody
hears the ,dea, their first reaction is to laugh or think Irs
absurd But that .idea-elimlnating telsL ls he
conclusion of hundreds of points. I wouldn't advocate the
el.mmat.on of any technology, certainly not television for
a r� ?; �leven �-of those reasons-lVs �ywnen
add ,t up that you get the big picture, how it is really part of
a monohthic technological juggernaut that affects every-
tning '
Most people assume that technology is neutral, without
poht.cs. Mander disagrees. He draws a parallel between TV
technology and the technology of nuclear power, by way of
� �lustration.
"If you accept nuclear power plants, you also accept a
� echno-scientific-industrial-military elite he writes
"You and l getting together with a'few friends could
TRUSTEES
continued from p 1)
Trie"
notbuild such a plant, nor could we make personal use of
its output, nor handle or sore the radioactive waste
products (that). In turn, determine that future societies will
have to maintain a technological capacity to deal with the
problem and the military capacity to protect the wastes
So, too, TV. The technology of the small screen, Mander
argues, is poorly-suited for conveying peacefulness ro
nuance, but perfect for portraying anger, violent action and
lifeless forms that are complete in themselves-i.e.
commodities. People who try to harness TV technology for
humanistic, non-commercial purposes, Mander says,
almost invariably fail.
You can't get a bunch of traditional Hopi Indians and
say, OK, America's watching, make your program on Hopi
awareness. Put it through and we'll stop those stripmines
They can't put it through. They wouldn't be Indians any
more if they did. They'd have to become sophisticated
tech no-experts. It's just those that are the most pervasive
that are the most sinister
TV, by Mander's reckoning, creates humans in its own
image: bored, anxious, with a short attention span that
affects adults and children alikea combination of
aggressiveness and detachment from others that can, in
borderline cases, explode into violence. He talks about the
recent trial in Florida-itself televised, perhaps the ultimate
media event-of a 15-year-old boy who claimed that violent
TV shows drove him to kill.
"I think the defense was right-on. I don't know if it was
right-on in that specific case, but I think you do turn into the
images you see. I've watched violence on TV and I don't go
out and murder somebody. But you carry that image
athletic director,
William Cam, then
presented his report before
the board. Cain com-
mented that Title IX griev-
ances were being completed
with, and that there is
increased scholarship aid in
women's basketball, as
we as other sports.
In other sports related
developments, Cain an-
nounced the formation of
the Independent Associa-
tion for Athletic Officials.
Members of the Associa-
tion include ECU, Pitt,
Penn State, West Virginia,
and South Carolina.
Cain went on the say that
we may in the future be
able to schedule the other
teams in the association.
Cam envisioned a time
when the teams who are
now getting together for
the purpose of officials may
form a new athletic con-
ference. Cam commented
that ECU would be in "high
cotton if it were competing
against the likes of Penn
State and Pitt.
Dr. Angelo Volpe. who
s chairman of the chem-
stry department, then pre-
sented a technical study
�hat his department has
e on plymers and plas-
tics.
Some practical uses for
the research that Dr. Volpe
has been doing include
Teflon coating for cook-
ware, thermo plastics, and
polyester cloth used for
clothing.
Dr. Volpe gave the
same report to the Chem-
ical Society of America and
will appear in the Soviet
Union later on this year to
speak on the same subject.
Dr. J. Earl Daniely
thanked Dr. Volpe for his
speech and he said that we
all need this kind of re-
search, and that it is
important and significant.
The meeting then ad-
journed, and the board
went into executive ses-
sion, where they looked
over personnel matters.
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reset sirgap to specs, check all electrical connec-
tions and check coll voltage.
OFFICIAL NORTH CAROLINA STATE INSPECTION STATION
WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS
KPQOOdrieh CogginsCaM
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implanted there by a strangerand it makes It easier to
behave that way
tha?s Mander'8 f,nd,n0S �"� �" direct conflict with
those of Marshall McLuhan, the medial guru who described
TV a decade ago as a "participatory, tactile" medium
urawng on recent physiological research, Mander
describes TV s fluorescent flicker as a hypnotic deadener of
the critical functions of the left hemisphere of the brain.
"Watching television he concludes, "is participatory
only ,n the way the assembly line or a hypnotist's blinking
flashlight is it is also addictive.
"Saying 'the medium is the message' was a
tremendously important statement Mander allows
referring to McLuhan's famous equation. "But McLuhan
oidn t have a political stance, and so I think in the end he
created more flash around television and turned into
another television character
M ander's book is itself more tactile than anything one is
likely to find on TV. It's infused with a rich texture of
animism and natural magic that Mander contrasts with the
flat, monochromatic style of TV, and loaded with sensory
depth charges that reverberate in the mind long after the
reader has put the book away. It is also a work that invites
the reader's col labor at ion, with a series of mental exercises
designed to break the spell of TV by breaking down the
technical trickery of the programmers.
As for Mander, he's steering clear of it. Oh, he logs a
few hours of tube time now and then "to keep my hand in "
But he'll do no TV talk shows to promote the book, feeling
1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Paoe S
that to do so would contradict what he's written As for
ITZXVL" MyS h �� no dentil"
Diueprint. But he s ready for work to begin.
"I got a letter a week after the book came out from a
woman in Oregon who's ready for a movement. I think one
will emerge, but I don't know where or how or who will be
m it or what political perspective it will have" In the
meantime, "I just think people should disconnect
themselves torn that medium as much as they can "
proud to present a HOT new group
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Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAO 3 October 1978
Bishop one of pop
music's 'best writers'
By CHRiSFARREN
Staff Writer
Some two years in the
making. Stephen Bishop's
second album Bish is
a solidly created album by
one of pop music's freshest
writers. However.
'oliowup to
e of the most commer-
cia infusing albums
ev e
Bisphop's first
aibum. Careless he had
smash singles with
"On and On" and "Save It
a Rainy Day each
ng over a million units,
ih le the album itself
ggied to sell only a few
dred thousand copies.
Still, while the album
s somewhat overlooked.
:oce Bishop's
um format formula: an
even mixture of slow and
fast tunes with stylized
hooks and choruses, and
utilizing some of the best
studio musicians around.
This format holds true
in Bish with a few new
twists added Once again
we find Bishop in the
company of such contem-
porary standouts as Tom
Scott. Natalie Cole, Lee
Sklar, Chaka Kahn, and
M ichael McDonald.
Once again the songs
are clever with ingraving
like hooks and choruses,
and bouncy rhythms. The
difference is that this time
around Bishop is more
experienced, aware, and
sure of himself.
Unlike Careless .Bis-
hop produced this album,
and you get the feeling that
the songs sound exactly the
way Bishop himself wanted
them to sound.
His initial effort at pro-
ducing is effective. The
songs are tastefully full
sounding, yet not overdone
The harmonies are espec-
ially crisp and creative.
The rhythm charts on
"Everybody Needs Love"
are particularly energetic
while the vocals and sax
lines on Never Known a
Night Like This" are im-
mediately appealing. Look
for either one of these tunes
as a single.
If there are weaknesses
in the Bishop formula, in
the past as well as now,
they would have to be in his
saccarine voice and his
obsession with love, ersatz
Paul Simon.
His romantic approach
is overwhelming at times,
with the tone and outcome
generally repetitive.
While his songwriting
style is versatile enough to
go from a quiet solo guitar
tune to a full sounding
up-tempo number, his
voice sometimes lacks the
forcefullness to really make
it click.
In the end, Stephen
Bishop has created a new
album which is equally as
solid as his first album in
most aspects, and even
better in the others.
The music is thoughtful
and genuinely first class.
Certainly Bishop, with over
600 songs to his
credit, has established
himself as one of today's
most prolific writers, if not
one of the best.
f
v:?-
xy-
,v. j
ECU Playhouse opens with Pippin;
slates an 6A11 American' season

ECU News Bureau
ECU Play-
iouse will salute American
anAII-
an season this
bill of fare, the
sented before
Ginnis Auditor-
: ies extensive
feature
; � Auctions of
� ���' authors.
e season will also
Je two studio" pro-
� i play by an
lywright and
; nai dance
-ican chor-
eason v oe
" � re ent Broad-
based
loosely on the life of the
medieval emperor Charle-
magne's eldest son. Pippin.
the idealist.
This light-hearted and
marvelously entertaining
musical will be directed by
Ken Miller, a new member
of the ECU drama faculty
who danced for a year and a
half in the Broadway pro-
duction The play will run
Oct.20-22. 26-27 at 8:15 in
M cG inn is Auditorium.
The second major pro-
duction on the bill will be
Marathon 33. a stage
memoir of entertainer June
Havoc which captures the
noise, frenzy, tawdnness
and desparation of almost
3.000 hours of marathon
dancing.
The atmosphere of this
garish phenomenon of the
1930s is deftly depicted in
Miss Havoc's own thea-
trical and touching story, as
the youthful entertainer is
engaged by a callous porter
to compete in the dance
marathon. Her reward:
$5 and a meal.
Often strident, some-
times amusing and pro-
foundly sad. this touching
glimpse of the American
will- to survive against
insurmountable odds will
be directed by Edgar R.
Loessin, Playhouse artistic
director and chairman of
the ECU Department of
Drama and Speech. Mara-
thon 33 will run Dec. 5-9 at
8.15 p.m. in McGinnis
Auditorium.
The Playhouse will wel-
come 1979 with a new play
for the new year. Emily, a
haunting and tender por-
trait of the human side of
one of America's greatest
poets, explores the delicate
borders of love and loss
between Emily Dickinson
and her brother.
Written by North Caro-
linian Thomas Patterson,
the play has uncovered a
fascinating, heretofore un-
spoken explanation of the
mysteries and enigmas of
Miss Dickinson's life and
work, and brought it to the
stage in a searing and
passionate evening of
drama.
See PLAYHOUSE, p. 8
fc
STEPHEN BISHOP 'ONE cf music's freshest songwriters
Professor of ethnomusicology to
perform recital of electronic music
ECU News Bureau
Dr Otto Henry, profes-
sor of ethnomusicology and
electronicmusic in the ECU
School of Music, will per-
form some of his own works
at a recital of electronic
music Sun . Oct. 8. at 8:15
p.m.
His program will
include "Music for 'A
Midsummer Night's
Dream written earlier
this year for an ECU
Playhouse production of the
Shakespeare comedy; "The
Pure Land written in
1977 for Moog synthensizer
and painted slides: his
electronic realization of
three Eric Satie "Gymno-
pedes featuring chore-
graphy and dance by Sara
Berman: Four Landscapes
from H.G. Wells a com-
position which uses voices
quoting from four of We s
science fiction works and
an electronic realization of
Wagner's The Ride of the
Valkyries '
Dr Henry ,as as
year's winner of the H-
Honigman Gold Cup. a
statewide award
Corea's fluent piano highlights his new album, Friends
� FF ROLLINS
Trends Editor
Me would im-
Corea's new
ends, is a warm.
int album of quartet
jazz Of course, all the
songs are composed by
e ' i !d on this
� seems like he's
ither conservative
his music.
Not that the album is
boring or predictable. On
the contrary, this album is
quite a delightful surprise.
But there are no harsh-
sounding, staccato, semi-
ahtract passages that
charactenzedso much of his
work before now
Corea plays Fender
Rhodes Piano and Stemway
Acoustic Grand Piano on
Fnends His pianistic style
is tess brittle now and more
' ienl in expression, es-
pecially m expression of
the gentler sentiments.
Joe Farre11 plays reeds
and flute. On the song
'Waltse for Dave which
is dedicated to Dave Bru-
beck, Farrell givesa
good idea of his
ability to make his
instrumentsexciting
members of a jazz
quartet.
Steve Gadd is the per-
cussionist of the group and
he plays rums with agility
and fine ,e His -hythms
are intricate and stirring
and his be bs are right in
there.
Eddie C iez plays an
acoustic oass and he is one
of the most entertaining
members of this very tal-
ented group f friends. In
his sense of jazz-espirit he
is of the same mind as
Corea. Gomez's sound is
uniquely modern and com-
pelling.
The title cut. the song
Friends" well describes
the feeling of the album
The song is based on a
warm bearing melody
and � eds to become
first-rate jazz. Corea on
Fender Rhodes piano does
it multo expressivo with a
child-like delight in the love
and companionship of
friends.
"Sicily is an up-beat
number in which each
musician handles his al-
lot ed 20 -measure solo
with panache, especially
Joe Farrell on the reeds.
There are two "Chil-
dren's Songs" on the al-
bum, "Children'sSong 5"
and "Children's Song
15" Apparently, Corea has
a whole series of children's
songs These are short,
ostensibly simple pieces
that possess an innocence
and ease of expression that
belie the sophisticated tal-
ent necessary to compose
and perform them.
It is easy to foresee a
whole album of these chil-
dren's songs. They are
supposedly for children.
but like so many other
works f � idren. i
instance Prokofiev's Peter
and the Won their content
can best be appreciated by
adults.
The band really proves
its merit on Cappucino
Here are some of the best
jazz passages on the album.
Each musician plays con
brio, not 'he least Corea
himself, .vho s work on the
piano is nothing short of
classic.
Of course, Corea's
whole oeuvre has a definite
Latinsavor, but on this song
it becomes even more, if
still :btl, it parent. Cor-
ea Latin young man who
tak. , . nms in his
biood and attenuates them
into the finest, moving jazz.
"The One Step" is a
laid-back piece that one
.vould play on a sleepy
Sunday morning in. Corea
is back on Fender
Rhodes and coaxes from
it a crystalline
sound.
"Waltz for Dave"
is a beautiful,
.mellow, sunny
song. Joe Farrell's
flute is effervescent
against the background
of Steve Gadd's
isitive snares
and cymbals. Chick Corea
outdoes himself on the
grand piano, playing with
confidence and competence
at the height of his powers.
Waltse for Dave" is a
work of love for a respected
mentor and compositionally
it shows that Corea had
been an � traordinary
pupil
Possibi. never so rich
ped up m the worries and
problems of myself and the
world around -re 11 a
looked ver. I i
"I looked a- a
material obiects that
owned and sudden . �
ied that the.
little meaning . ��
comfort, safeness and joy I
the friendships I - �-
" � 'nends
'Friends' is not a concept album
per se but it w strongly based on
the feelings that good friends
inspire in us. This � the way
Corea himself introduces the
album
and full a
me from a q
� ch is he 1
Song Th
oiece de res,
has ever
as that
Samba
album's
ir.ee.
I thought of my friends
and h0 much our com-
panionship and love meant
to me and I felt very rich in
the actual treasures of life
Life no longer looked dim
but very Dright and the
th'ngs that were problems
now 'ooked i,ke so many
small imperfections which
stmpiy needed (end an(j
repair "
"Id like toded.cate this
album to all our fnends '
'f you're not one al-
a?bala,ter,isten-Qtoth,s
a'bum you become one of
Chick Corea'sapprecators.
A you'll know someth.na
about the good feelings t
oan come from FnenSs
Thanksagain R9COfd
COREA AND FRlFunsH. �
taw. (W,m.�an�eZlT1 "CWM' �'�
Corea trips the light
fantastic on the piano and
the rest of the group runs
just as fast There is a
rhythmic section m the
song where Corea on p,anC
and Gadd on drums per-
form an astonishingly able,
intense duet
nds is not a concept
album per se but it iS
t� rigly based on the feel-
�ngs that good friends
inspire us. This is the way
Corea himself introduces
the album.
"One night I sat wrap-
t





JSgSSjMy. FOUNT -M -
CB
ers
fyEVANSWlTT
Associated Press Writer"
WASHINGTON (AP) - As Carl
Njo-iof Seattle l.stLeS to
band radio one day he
ered.fhecou.ddeveli
xpens-ve way to keep others
rom eavesdropping on CB
XTf0ns and Vbe even
on telephone conversations.
w'th the help o, th
NlO0lai dld deve
chadev,oe.Butnowthefcx;
-ventors are squared off agam-
the most secret governemnt
teihgenoe agency over whet-
her the device poses a threat to
national security.
re U.S. Patent Off.ce has
sued a seaecy order against
Nicola, and the others which
�ns they can , talk about the
'nvent.onm any deta.l whatever
'thout nskmg a ,a,l term.
rhe four are fighting the
ter.
' the meantime, they are
caught in a financial squeeze.
' until the legal quest-
answered, no one can
jfacture the device they
I thousands of hours and
thousands of dollars to develop.
� re ruining us Nidai
The secrecy order, issued at
equest of the super secret
anal Security Agency, is of
type usually used to protect
ms developed under
lent personnel from for-
�enigence agencies.
But that is not the case for
enl .
- � �"� strange about
the law. It is extremely strange
for it to be a crime for inventing
somethingthis is totally priv-
ately funded - that means you
lose your freedom of speech
said Nicolai in a telephone
interview.
As is it's practice, the NSA,
the little-known agency charged
with codes, code-breaking and
eavesdropping on foreign gov-
ernments, had no comment.
The sketchy information
available suggets the device
apparently usesanew technique)
to scramble or encode voioe
communications, so that an
eavesdropper would hear noth-
mg but garble.
The intended recipient of the
message, however, would have
one of the devices which would
make the voioe intelligible.
The device would cost less
than $100 and would work easily
with currently available radios.
And it could be adapted to
work with telephone conversat-
"ons. the inventors say.
The inventors disagree with
the NSA findings. "I cannot
imagine any legitimate threat to
national security from our dev-
ices said one of them. William
Raike of Monterey. Calif.
Voice scrambles now avail-
able are quite expensive and
have not been adapted for uses
such as CB radio.
Qffi
Last March, six months after
their patent application was
filed, the four inventors receiv-
ed the secrecy order. "Your
applicationhas been found to
contain subject matter, the
unauthorized disclosure of
which might be detrimental to
national security the Patent
Office wrote.
The inventors disagree with
the NSA finding. "I cannot
imagine any legitimate threat to
national security from our dev-
ices said one of them, William
Raike of Monterey, Calif in a
telephone interview.
"In fact, it was designed so
as to not threaten national
security.
Raike and Niclai, Carl Quale
and David Miller, all of the
Seattle area, "specifically in-
vented this for non-military,
non-government applications
"It appears a part of a
general plan by the NSA to limit
the privacy of the American
people.
They've been bugging
people's telephones for years ad
now someone oomes along with
a device that makes this a little
harder to do, and they oppose it
under the guise of national
security.
Breach of contract suit
filed against Redd Foxx
LOS ANGELES (AP) - ABC,
which outfoxed NBC three years
ago to lure away Redd Foxx, has
filed a $5 million breach-of-
contrad suit against the veter-
an oomedian.
ABC said the suit, filed
Wednesday in Superior Court
also seeks a permanent injunct-
ion to keep Foxx "from render-
ing his aervioes to any person or
entity other than ABC
The network said the suit
alleges that Foxx and three
production oompanies he owns
breached an October 1975 con-
tract to make a pilot for a TV
series that would have starred
the oomedian.
In addition to $5 million in
general damages, the network
also seeks a judgement for
$350,000 it says it advanced to
Foxx who starred in NBC's
"Sanford and Son" before
leaving it to sign with ABC
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8:30-12:30 SATURDAY
�ODDS CHART EFFECTIVE SEPTEMBER 10. 1978
GAME
$1000
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$ 100
S 20
S 10
1
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250
1 500
3.000
5.000
125.000
000S
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1 in 11667
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26
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1 in 16.827
1 in 2.692
1 in 449
1 in 224
1 in 135
1 in 5 3
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- U ' !�
'
- -
Pag S FOUNTAINHEAD 3 Octobf tWl
Mime artts JSCeitft
Berger featured in
return engagement
218 East Fifth Street
What do crop cool evenings, colorful
autumn leaves, and Pirate Football
have in common? They're all a part of
fall semester at E.C.U. For those cool
evenings we have a fine selection of
fall clothing. This Shetland
Cable Knit by GANT is
only one of the many great
looking things we have.
Please drop by
and have a look.
ECU News Bureau
After conducting one of
the most outstanding work-
shops of the Theatre Arts
Series last year, mime
artist Keith Berger is to be
featured in a return en-
gagement Oct. 4.
The performance will
begin at 8 p.m. in the
Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter's Hendrix Theatre.
Berger has studied the
classic French mime of
Marcel Marceau and an-
cient oriental methods of
movement, and his own
style is heavily influenced
by the techniques of Paul
Curtis, director of the Am-
erican M ime Theatre.
His appearances have
included performances at
the Kennedy Center, Lin-
coln Center and many
campuses
Berger is only 24, but he
has been called "the best"
by the best - Marcel
Marceau.
Keith Berger works
completely alone. He, the
audience and the stage are
his only properties.
His performing credits
range from television com-
mercials to the New
Orleans Superdome.
Berger first caught the
attention of the public as a
performer for the New York
Parks Department.
There he met movie
producers, advertising ex-
ecutives, his manager, and
his girlfriend. During one
of his performances, he met
a General Motors executive
who helped him get a real
start.
The executive took
Berger to the General
"BERQER HAS STUDIED the classic
French mime of Marcel Marceau and
ancient Oriental methods of movement,
and nis own style is heavily Influftcad by
the techniques of Paul, director of the
American Mime Theatre.
Motors advertising agency,
which was interested but
not convinced.
The agency decided to
try Berger, and after his
performance, even the
cameramen swore he could
see the sleek impala whose
illusion Keith Berger cre-
ated.
After many other ads
for Time magazine,
Bloomingdales Department
store, and the New York
it.
W-Mi.
7

i
N
STAMP OUT NAKED WALLS
imiHIitimTni-rrnrnninipififiiMTHiitiijji tili
FRAME-IT
YOURSELF SHOPPE
Times Magazine, Berger
turned to television specials
and college campuses.
With all the words and
music television has to
offer, Keith Berger has
created some of its most
eloquent moments with
silence. For all the colors
available in print, this
small, lithe mime, in black
leotard and white face,
often catches attention
first.
Whether moving or
still, Keith Berger express-
es the emotions of joy,
surprise, fear and wonder.
Whether Mechanical
Man, gorilla in a cage, or
hard-shooting cowboy,
Keith Berger has every eye
on him. Attention never
w vers.
Tickets for Berger's
ECU performances are a-
vailable at $3 each for the
general public, with dis-
counts for persons in
groups of 20 or more.
They may be purchased
at the ECU Central Ticket
Office in Mendenhall
& o)
106 Trade St.
756-7454
Hours
Mon.&Wed. 10AM-9PM
TuesSat. 10AM- 5PM
Bank Cards Welcomed
ecu
Big year planned
for ECU Playhouse
continued from p. 6
Also directed by Loes-
sin, Em7y will be per-
formed Feb. 7-10 and 12-17
at 8:15 p.m. in the ECU
Studio Theatre.
Rounding out the roster
of major productions at the
Playhouse this spring is A
Cry of Players.
This rousing and pro-
vacative work by William
Gibson � author of The
Miracle Worker and Two
For The Seesaw � is a
poignant portrait of the
youthful William Shakes-
peare.
Based on conjecture and
published folk-tradition a-
bout the early life of the
greatest poet of our Ian-
i
1
V
SUPERMARKET
'P
3W
58 (reg. 83�)
Kellogg's Corn Flakes
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Cheerios 3$l.oo (reg. $��)
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Stir it' Frost 69 (reg. 99)
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Golden Grahams cereal
10 ox. box
Gwaltney Franks
12 ox. package
Shasta drinks
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89
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i�i' n
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TABLETS
'00 s
4M
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TRACH
rI
Free cart service available
for students
HEAD
SHOULDERS
.it,1 j y�
lufe
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I CARTRIDGES
�: . � I
ARWD EXTRA DRY
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1000
Biggs Drug Store
300 Evans - On the Mall
(opposite the courthouse)
Ph. 752-2136
Hargett' Drug Store
2500 S.ChaH�s St. feet.
Ph. 756-3344
guage. tms exquisitely
wrought work is far more
than a colorful biography of
a playwright.
Directed by ECU drama
faculty member Del Lewis,
the play will run April 4-7
and 9-14 at 8:15 in the
Studio Theatre.
In addition to the four
major productions, the
Playhouse will offer two
studio' productions:
works-in progress running
for limited engagements.
The fall production will be
Lanford Wilson's recent
Broadway success The Hot
L Baltimore.
The satiric comedy will
be directed by Del Lewis,
and will run Nov. 2,3 and 4
at 8:15 in the Studio .
Theatre. In the spring, the
Studio will teature an or-
iginal choreographic work
by members of the ECU
dance faculty, running Feb.
22-24 at 8:15 in the Studio
Theatre.
All Playhouse produc-
tions are open to the public.
Season tickets, which en-
title patrons to see all six
shows. are available
through the Playhouse Box
Office for $8.50. telephone
757-6390.
The East Carolina Play-
house is the producing
agency of ECU'S
Department of
Drama and Speech Found
ed during the early 1960s
by Edgar R. Loessin, the
department has a faculty of
20 professionals who offer
pre-professional training to
ECUs undergraduate stu-
dents within the liberal arts
concept.
Last year's Playhouse
season drew more than
15,000 with seven produc-
tions. This year. said
Playhouse General Man-
ager Preston &sk. were
going to top that mark We
hope to move into our
newly- renovated facility
next year with a dedicated
audience
more
20,000 or
SEErn
H





3 October 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 9
ECU quarterbacks operate against Movin' Mais
GREER left and Leander Green right are shown
irough the stingy Texas-Arlington defense
Green completed four passes for 62 yards
before leaving the game after the first quarter with an
injury. Gree played most of the second half, left photo
by Steve Romero and right photo by Chap Gurley
Dye, Pirates impressed
with abilities ofMav QB
HANDLER
�-Editor
ber 17 is a
�nd anyone
game
that He's sorre-
absoiutely some-
-�re the words
ed ECU head
Dye used to
- mgton
Roy Dewalt
ites' 23-17
. over the Mavs Sat-

every-
� en Stadium
-1 Dewalt
awesome display
ng that
� : the Mavs
ECU
s statistics
ed by a tough
se. Dewalt still
� mght. He
ards rushing on
14 carries His official total
yards were trimmed to only
21 because of several sacks
by the Pirate defense.
Dewalt displayed a rifle
arm when throwing the
ball. Although several of
his passes were dropped,
he still completed 11 of 22
passes for 154 yajrds and a
touchdown
The touchdown pass
covered 56 yards and went
to Mav split end Scott Burt.
Burt's scapegoat on the
play was Pirate defensive
back Charlie Carter. Carter
came back later to vindicate
himself, though, intercept-
ing two of Dewalt's bullets
in critical situations. Carter
was impressed with the
UTA quarterback. "Dewalt
is quite a quarterback
exclaimed Carter. We knew
he was good, but we had
not anticipated that his arm
was so strong. He's a super
runner, no question. 'Burt
his passing came as some-
what of a shock
Carter said that Dewalt
had the combination of
tools rarely found in a
quarterback. "He can do it
all said the Fayetteville
native. "He has the arm of
Hog Henry (All-American
at Southwestern Louisiana
last year) and the running
ability of Mike Dunn (All-
Conference from Duke).
He's the only guy I've
ever faced that really show-
ed me that much more than
I expected. I'd have to say
he is the best quarterback
I've ever faced here, and
that includes Mike Dunn
Carter was backed up
by Pirate defensive tackle
Noah Clark. "I was very
impressed said Clark.
"He's the best I've ever
faced in my three years
here. He can hurt you in so
many ways, running and
passing. He can really read
a defense also. The thing
that relly impressed me
though was his poise. He
just �"�"��rln't qet skaken
up Other metes, includ-
ing quarterback Leander
Green and split end Terry
Gallaher. heaped praise
upon Dewalt. "All I can say
is that he is just real, real
good exclaimed Gallaher.
Green felt that Dewalt
was blessed in every phase
of the game. "He's got it
all said the Pirate quart-
erback. With the natural
ability Dewalt displayed
Saturday, one could find it
hard to believe that he was
a walk-on in 1975.
It can be taken for
granted that Roy Dewalt
needn't worry about college
expenses any longer. UTA
head coach Bud Elliott has
surely taken care of that.
First shutout of the season
ECU defeats Campbell 2-0
By DA VID MAREADY
Staff Writer
ECU'S soccer team rec-
oreded its first shutout
victory of the season here,
Saturday, in a 2-0 defeat of
the Campbell College
els on Mtnges Soccer
F leld
The Camels kept the
ball in Pirate territory for
most of the opening ten
munites of the game.
Campbell had numerous
scoring opportunities dur-
ing this time, but they
failed to score because of
lack of support near the
goal
The Tide turned with
21 :05 gone in the game
with Jeff Karpovick's goal
on an assist by Mike
Hitchcock.
Eleven more shots were
attempted on the Camel
goal by the Pirates in the
first half with Karpovick
the only one to hit paydirt.
ECU goalie, Kevin Tyus,
has an energetic, first half
ECU soccer action
PhOtO hV ft M ntrnn"1
workout with eight saves.
The remainer of the first
half went without incident,
and the score remained
ECU 1, Campbell 0.
ECU soccer coach Brad
Smith, was pleased with his
club's performance in the
first half. "We played them
tough around our goals,
said Smith. "Although our
transition was slow, ourboys
hung in there and kept up
the pace
The Camels gained
momentum in the opening
minutes of the second half,
but failed to score because
of the excellent defensive
play by the Pirates.
Campbell's assistant
soccer coach was ejected
from the game early in the
seond half after he called a
controversial decision by
the referee "stupid
Norris Baker and Lee Web-
ster, Camel players, were
given warnings by the
referees in the second half
for their unsportsmanlike
behavior.
Shawn Beryy iced the
win for the Pirates with an
insurance goal late in the
game. Stan Griff was credi-
ted with the assist.
"Shawn really helped
the team's morale with his
goal said Smith, "We
started to get sloppy offen-
sively at the beginning of
the second half, and that
goal gave the whole team a
boost
TYUSHAS17SAVES
From that point on, it
was just a matter of letting
the clock run out. The
Camels tried to speed up
their offense late in the
half, but they could not
score because of superb
defensive efforts by goalie,
Kevin Tyus, and fullback,
Jeff Kluger. Tyus ended
the day with seventeen
saves. According to Smith,
this was the first time ECU
has beaten Campbell
College on the soccer field.
BERRY'SSCORE
CLINCHER
"Overall said Smith,
"we played a super game,
i'm very proud of my team
because they stuck together
and played as a unit. We
got the lead in the first half,
controlled the later stages
of the second half after
Shawn's goal, and that's
what it took to win the
game
PIRATES NOW 2-4-1
The win upped the
Pirate soccer team's record
to 2-4-1 while the Camels
dropped to 1-3-1 on the
season.
Pirates stop Movin' Mavs,
FG'sgive ECU 23-17 victory
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
ECU'S narrow 23-17 victory over Texas-Arlington
Saturday night was nothing impressive, but as head coach
Pat Dye said after the game you've got to win some games
like this every year.
"If you're going to be a good football team and have a
good record winning comes in a lot of different ways
observed Dye. "And sometimes you win when you're not
supposed to.
"But I was proud of our team and I'm happy we won
Each year you just have to win some games like this.
Texas-Arlington was certainly a much better team that
Southwestern Louisiana
Once again, when the Pirates offense bogged down in
the second half after quarterback Leander Green was
injured, it was the Bucs' defense and the toe of Bill Lamm
which provided the victory. Lamm's second half field goals
from 40 and 29 yards out gave the Pirates their only second
half points as well as ECU'S final victory margin.
And after Texas-Arlington's Roy Dewalt completed nine
passes for 134 yards in the first half, the ECU secondary
limited the talented Mav quarterback to just two
completions for 20 yards in the second half. Charlie Carter
intercepted two of Dewalt's passes and returned them for
34 yards.
"I don't think there was any question that our defense
came up with an awful lot of big plays, particularly in the
four down zones said Dye. "We were able to make some
adjustments at the half that worked pretty well. We took
away about everything in the second half except the
handoff inside
On paper the Movin Mavs certainly did some movin.
totaling 343 yards to the Pirates 209. The Mavs outrushed
ECU 224 to 185 and had 154 yards in the air compared to 62
for the Pirates. But five Texas-Arlington turnovers proved
disastrous as the M avs dropped their fifth straight game of
the season. The victory was ECU'S second in a row and the
Bucs are now 3-2 for the year.
They were obviously a fine offensive football team and
I think a fine defensive team noted Dye. "They gave us
problems moving the ball and they were certainly a physical
team But I think th.s was typical of the games they have
played this year The game began much like last week's
35 point first half explosion against Southwestern
Louisiana. ECU'S Dennis Mulholland jarred the ball loose
from John Johnson on the opening kickoff and Fred Chav.s
recovered on Texas-Arlington's 15 yard line.
Four plays later, halfback Anthony Collins swept around
the right side from two yards out for the touchdown Bill
Lamm s conversion put the Pirates ahead 7-0 with 13 339 in
the first quarter.
ECU came right back on its next possession moving 58
yards in just nine plays for another touchdown Leander
Green capped the drive with a three yard YD run and the
Pirates moved out front 14-0 with 8:44 still rema-mng ,n the
first period
Big plays in the drive were Green's pass to halfback
Eddie H.cks for 13 yards and another Green aenal to split
end Billy Ray Washington for 27 yards on a third and 11
situaiton.
But the Movin' Mavs refused to wilt before the partisan
Ficklen Stadium crowd and got two quick field goals from
Tom Skoruppa to close with.n eight points at 14-6
Skoruppa's first field goal came from 35 yards out in the
first quarter and his second one was a 27 yarder
Dewalt caught the Pirate secondary napping midway
through the second quarter when split end Scott Burt
hauled in a 56 bomb for a touchdown.
Dewalt's run for the conversion was good and suddenly
Texas-Arlington had tried the score at 14-14 with 4v
remaining in the half.
Lamm, who tied a school record with his three goals
gave the Pirates the lead for good when he sent a 33 yarder
through the uprights which also gave ECU a 17-14 lead at
the break.
Texas-Arlington's lone score in the second half came
midway through the fourth quarter when Skoruppa booted a
33 yard field goal.
"I didn't think we were flat. " said Dye. But we
weren't quite as ready as we were last week. But we've got
to mo'e physical if we expect to continue to win on down the
line
Hicks was ECU'S top ground gamer with 66 yards on 10
carries Collins added 22 yards on nine attempts while Sam
Harrell gained 21 yards on six rushes.
Leander Green directs the ECU offense
ECU QUARTERBACK LEANDER Green prepares to hand
the ball off to a running back in action Saturday night
against Texas-Arlington. Pirate halfbacks, Anthony Collins.
and fullback Theodore Sutton along with Matt Mulholland
head the blocking
Photo by Steve Romero
UTA impressive despite loss
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor �
ECU head coach Pat
Dye and rest of his Pirate
knew before the game
Texas-Arlington was cer-
tainly no pushover despite
its somewhat misleading
0-4 record. And one glance
at the stat sheet after
ECU'S narrow 23-17 victory
over the M avs proved again
Texas-Arlington is just a
few turnovers away from
being a 5-0 ballclub.
"I don't know what it
looked like from up there in
the stands, but we obvious-
ly played a fine offensive
football team tonight said
Dye. "We knew offensively
they were a fine football
team, but they also played
well on defense.
The Movin'Mavstotalled
343 yards as compared to
just 209 for ECU while
Texas-Arlington ground out
19 first downs while the
Bucs could manage only
ten. But seven turnovers,
four which came in the
second half, proved oostly
for the Mavs.
"It wasn't the
fumbles explained
Texas-Arlington head
coach Bud Elliott. "We just
lost
Pirate quarterback
Leander Green was forced
to miss the entire second
hald after suffering a hip
pointer on his three yard
touchdown run in the first
quarter.
"I saw an inside open-
ing on the touchdown run
and took it said Green. "I
was hit hard on the hip. But
it's funny I didn't feel it
right and I didn't even
notice it until the next
series.
"But then it really
began to bother me. M y hip
felt better when I took it
slow, but when I took it
slow, but when I sped up it
really hurt. It shouldn't be
any problem though. I'll be
ready next week
Reserve quarterbacks
Steve Green and Henry
Trevathan played the re-
mainder of the game, but
both players had plenty of
problems directing the
Pirates' offense. After
Green completed four pas-
ses for 62 yards in the first
half, the Bucs could not
manage one pass reoeption
in the second half.
"We knew we all had to
work just a little bit harder
after Leander went out
siad guard Wayne Inman.
"We had to help Steve.
He's a good quarterback,
but he was put into a
difficult situaiton tonight.
Pirate split end Terry
Gallaher was also impres-
sed with the Mavs offense
and admitted they were
certainly no 0-5 team.
"They wouldn't quit
said Gallaher who caught
one pass for 14 yards. "We
really passed a true test of
character. We could have
laid down and died, but
when you're in a situation
like us, with no conference
to play in every game is the
biggest game of the year
Their record is no
indication of what type of
team they have. They really
played with a lot of charac-
ter out there tonight.
ECU-UTA
Stat�
UTA 31 03�17
ECU 14 3 6 0�23
ECU-Collms 2 run (Lamm
kick)
ECU-Green 3 run (Lamm
kick)
UTA-Skoruppa35 FG
UTA-Skoruppa27 FG
UTA-Burt 56 pass from
Dewalt (Dewalt run)
ECU-Lamm33FG
ECU-Lamm40FG
ECU-Lamm 29 FG
UTA-Skoruppa33FG
Attendance � 25,986
RUSHING
ECU-Hicks 12-66. Collins
9-22, Harrell 6-21; UTA-
Williams 15-66, Dewalt 14-
20, Jessie 4-24.
PASSING
ECU-Green 4-4-0-62, UTA-
Dewalt 11-22-2-154.
RECEIVING
ECU-Washington 2-36,
Gallaher 1-14, Hicks 1-13!
UTA-Burt 4-96, Woodard
3-23.
t
f





Pag 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 3 Octobf 1978
Pirates defeat Appalachian, lose to UNC
flu iilivnionrr
By JIMMY DUPREE
Staff Writer
A little known aspect of
ECU'S athletic program is
its girl's volleyball team.
This year's squad has fas-
hioned an overall record of
5-4, a record many skeptics
would call mediocre. Last
week ECU traved to Chapel
Hill where they took on the
Tar Heels of UNC and also
Appalachian State Univer-
sity. In the opening match
of the evening, the Pirates
scored an impressive vic-
tory over Appalachian State
15-9 and 15-12.
However, against the
Tar Heels the Pirates did
not fair so well. They
succumbed to Carolina to
the tune of 5-15 and 12-15.
"We have beaten the
teams we are supposed to,
but not upset the teams we
are capable of beating
said Alita Dillon. "Our
offense is not flowing
smoothly. Our serving has
been consistant, but our
defensive coverage has not
advanced to the point we
would like to see The
Pirates traveled to Raleigh
Friday to meet Virginia
Cmmonwealth University
and North Carolina State.
ECU opened the season
with Virginia Common-
wealth and suffered a dis-
appointing loss of 15-7,
14-16, and 8-15. "Against
VCU we played our usual
game, except that at the
end we kind of fell apart
explained DillonThe girls
had a meeting while State
and VCU played and did
aom� soul searching. We
pulled right together
against State
The Pirates, howeverm
�ost to NCSU 15-9, 11-15
and 8-15.
"It may not look to
good on paper because we
lost the match, but it's the
first time we have played as
a unit added Dillon. "We
realize that things are
going to go up from here on
out
Junior setter LaVonda
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"I think the students
would be surprised at the
caliber of volleyball we
play said Dillon. If they
enjoy volleyball at all on
television, I think they
would be pleasantly sur-
prised with our level of
com petition
Admission is free to
ECU students with a valid
ID. The ECU colleyball
team hosts the State Tour-
nament Nov. 10 and 11 in
Minges. Coliseum.
Tommorpw night the
Pirates travel to Chowan
College for a 7 p.m.
matchup. This weekend the
Lady Pirates travel to Col-
umbia, S.C. to participate
in the University of South
Carolina Invitational Tour-
nament.
Later this month, the
Pirates must face Wake
Forest, Elon College, N.C.
State, and Duke.
Duncan has been constant-
ly improving in the Pirates
early matches. The setter
serves as the quarterback
of the team who directs the
offense. Dillon also men-
tioned that freshman
Yvette Lewis broke into the
starting lineup quickly and
has been a very pleasant
surprise to the staff. She
also noted this year's trans-
fers have added depth and
experience to the squad.
The Pirates compete in the
North Carolina Association
of Intercollegiate Athletes
for women and are current-
ly in fourth place behind
undefeated UNC, Duke,
and State. "The seond half
of the season's matches will
decide the seedings for the
state tournament said
Dillon. "I feel that we will
do better in the second
half
The Pirates face North
Carolina tonight at 7 p.m.
in Minges Coliseum.
Breakfast
from 7 a.m.
to 11a.m.
specializing
in large
country ham or sausage
biscuits. Hot cakes. Scrambled
eggs with country ham or
sausage. Our 14 lb. beef
burgers are ground from fresh
Western Chuck. We have
soft served ice cream. Also
serving ham and cheese,
chicken fillets, hot dogs, chili
and beans, french fries, apple
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3 October 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 11
Timeouts continue to blister opposition
A tough game
ost exciting intramural sports on
ta rhese young ECU co-eds
� - lves Photo by Chap Gurley
Who Done It wins
Almost Anything
Goes carnival
By JOHN EVANS
Staff Writer
If anyone questioned
the scoring power of the
Scott Time Outs, the de-
fending champs set out to
prove themselves last week
as they embarrassed two
overmatched opponents.
As defending campus
champions, the Time Outs
scored an intramural record
of 104 points in one game
last week and scored a total
of 170 points for the week
as they ran their record to
6-0 on the season and
continued their three-year
unbeaten streak to 20
games. The Time Outs held
the old intramural record of,
90 points, set last year.
The victim in the Time
Outs record-setting per-
formance were the Jones
No Names The final score
was 104-46 as the Time
Outs led by only 40 points
at the half.
The hero in the win was
Billy Bass. Bass passed for
a record ten touchdowns in
the win and ran for another.
Kevin Thomas scored five
times and Dennis Bellamy
had three scores. Terry
Campbell and Chuck Pope
both scored twice. The
Time Outs also came up
with seven interceptions.
In a slightly less awe-
some display of their scor-
ing power, the Time Outs
topped Aycock Dorm 66-22.
Bass threw for six scores in
WELDING & STEEL
FABRICATING
that game, three each to
Bellamy and Thomas. Ro-
ger Horton and Jimmy
Wilkins added scores off of
pass interceptions.
Tnere were a number of
other exciting games in last
week's men's football play.
The Village People ran
their seasonal mark to only
2-4 as they downed the
Rugby Leathernecks,
40-34, in an exciting game
filled with long touchdown
passes and a stron second
half comeback. Lambda Chi
kept alive its hopes for a
fraternity playoff berth with
a merciless 54-0 wim over
Delta Sigma Phi. The Jones
Running Rougues kept a-
live their slim hopes for a
playoff berth, too, with a
44-26 win over the Belk
Raiders.
The loss dropped the
Raiders' record to 2-4. The
Scott Stooges also kept
alive playoff hopes with a
46-20 win over the Aycock
Kamikazes as Rodney Os-
borne passed for four
touchdowns. Glenn Ellis
highlighted the win.
though, with a 75-yard punt
return for a touchdown.
This is the last week of
the regular season for the
men, who begin divisional
playoffs on Monday, Oct-
ober 9 The top four
fraternity teams, and ties,
will play in that divisional
playoff In the dormitory
and cluindependent play-
offs, the top two teams and
ties in each division will
compete. The all-campus
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Team members on the
second-place Jocks and
Jockettes were Sim Ses-
soms. Lonme Smith, Ther-
esa Bemis. Lynn Mobely.
Doug Shanker. James Dai-
Mark Beanne and
Dennis Weaver.
playoff will begin on Tues-
day. October 17 and the
championship game is ten-
tatively scheduled for the
nect day. October 17
There are only six teams
that remained unbeaten in
men's play. In addition to
the Time Outs they are the
Scott Meames. Aycock Top
of the Roost. Phi Kappa
Tau. the SoooJo
Anthropology club team,
and the Sdaharu Ohs. who
beat On Your Back in a
Tracker League showdo
last week
9or JL XittCt
Jnlncji Jhut
erf (Li ZPbaAuiz
-Jo Lfoux Lif&.
f�.inuilb, jy.C 27834


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I U l
t -
T t �� 1 1 f
Page 12 FOUNTAINHEAD 3 October 1978
Collins scores for Pirates
Photo by Steve Romero
�Jean 'd tsnofagwaAAw
203 South Evans St.
Greenville, N.C. 27834
Phone: 752-3980 Monday-Friday
Other hours by appointment

��
� 1. -� q� C j � �
i I. �TT�wryj�

Gnan Op��.S. Oct 30
8" Decwv� i�m�
Arkansas ranked second
Sooners atop NCAA poll
NORMAN, OK LA. (AP)
� As far as M issourl coach
Warren Powers is con-
cerned, Oklahoma, which
currently sits atop the
college football rankings, is
a better team than Ala-
bama, ruler of the nation's
gridirons earlier in the
season.
"They are much more
explosive offensively than-
Alabama and overall a
much stronger team said
Powers, who's 14th ranked
Tigers were blown out
45-23 by Oklahoma Satur-
day. They lost to Alabama
38-20 two weeks earlier
after leading 20-17 at half-
time.
This time, it was no
contest. The Sooners had
28 points before Missouri
scored with Billy Sims
scoring three of his four
touchdowns in the first
half. Sims rushed for 166
yards on 14 carries while
David Overstreet added 153
yards on ten carries.
"I think our perform-
ance should enhance our
position in the polls said
coach Barry Switzer, who's
Sooners reeled off 484
yards on the ground. "We
felt like we could go out in
the first half and score
every time we had the ball,
and we almost did
Meanwhile, runnerup
Arkansas trailed Tulsa 7-0
at halftime, but pulled out a
21 -13 victory as Ben Cow ins
scored on runs of 24 and 3
yards in the third quarter.
Tulsa coach John Coop-
er cast his vote for the
Razorbacks as the nation's
number one team after they
held the Golden Hurricane
to 148 yards total offense.
I think they' re the best
team in the oountry he
said. "We just got beat.
We played about as good a
game as we oould. Ark-
ansas has everything a
college team could want�
t good players, good
coaches, good facilities and
super fans
But Arkansas' Lou Holz
begged to differ with Coop-
er on one point.
"I'm not sure we're the
best team in the country
he said. "But I am sure we
have the best fans in the
country
Besides Oklahoma and
Arkansas the next seven
teams in the Associated
Press ratings posted vic-
tories, but 10th ranked
Florida State lost to Hou-
ston 27-21.
Southern California, the
nation's number three
team, trounced Michigan
State 30-9 Friday night,
touching off a high scoring
weekend. Harland Huck-
leby scored on two short
plunges as fourth ranked
M ichigan buried Duke
52-0. Booker Moore tallied
three times and Chuck
Fusina passed for a pair of
touchdowns as number five
Penn State routed Texas
Christian 58-0.
Sixth ranked Texas
turned back Texas-Tech
24-7 with Johnny "Ham"
Jones rushing for a career
high 128 yards, including
touchdowns of 14 and 16
yards.
Seventh ranked Ala-
bama, bounced from the
top spot by last week's loss
to Southern Cal, trailed
lowly Vanderbilt 21-16 until
Tony Nathan galloped 63
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yards in the third period,
sparking the Crimson Tide
to a 51-28 victory.
"When wh got ahead, I
knew we had better do
something quick Nathan
said, fearing the wrath of
coach Bear Bryant, who
growled "We seldom look-
ed like a football team and
we never looked like one
that had any coaching
Curtis Dickey sprinted
65 yards for a touchdown on
Texas A & M' s f irst play and
the 8th ranked Aggies went
on to crush Memphis State
58-0. Dickey, who gained
167 yards in 11 carries,
added a 31 yards score in
the first period.
itronize .
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Dave
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HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH
On the Mall Downtown Greenville � 752-3651
L.i���MyMji





Title
Fountainhead, October 3, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 03, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.514
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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