Fountainhead, September 26, 1978






vol. 55 No. yr
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
:
26 September 1978
Helicopter service
begins in eastern N.C
The ECU
ool of Medicine
I an inauguration
ony for the Eastern
th Carolina Helicopter
am Thursday. Sept.
10 a.m. at Pitt County
smorial Hospital The
led to attend.
rr�e program was dev-
cooperation with
inty and the De-
of Human Re-
es' Office of Emer-
Medical Services,
oped an emer-
'copter program
! eastern portion of
state m an effort to
� e the quality of
� health care del-
e region.
- tei North Car-
copter Program.
military air
in.ce programs, will
counties in the
section of the
spitals
ics.
ases that re-
� 'reatment.
re deliver-
ies and severe trauma, may
be transported by helicopt-
er from anywhere in the
region to one of the health
care facilities deemed most
appropriate to hand'e that
specific case.
The program has its
roots in Dare County where
several years ago Sheriff
Frank Cahoon developed an
emergency air evacuation
service for persons in the
isolated Outer Banks area.
An army surplus UH-IB
helicopter, owned by Dare
County and commonly
known as "Huey will be
used for the new program.
Dare County will also
provide trained pilots, em-
ergency medical techni-
cians and supplies.
The ECU School of
Medicine will provide med-
coordinaiton for the
program under the direct-
ion of Dr. Walter J. Pories,
chairman of the Depart-
ment of Surgery. Pories will
act as medical director
assigning emergency cases
to the hospital which can
most effectively meet the
patients' needs. He will
also direct specialized med-
ical training of flight per-
sonnel.
The state EMS office
will aid the program with
administrative support and
funds for fuel and equip-
ment, such as oxygen,
ventilators, suction aspira-
tors and an incubator.
This is a remarkable
example of three units -
Dare County, the School of
Medicine and EMS - work-
ing together to provide
prompt, adequate access to
medical care in the
region says Steve Acai,
assistant chief of transport-
ation for EMS.
Historically, time ele-
ments and methods of
transportation have made it
difficult to transport pat-
ients in the east says
Pories. "This program will
be invaluable to local phy-
sicians, health facilities and
their patients. The program
can be considered to be a
model for other areas
A physician who wishes
to transfer a patient to a
facility will call Pories at a
central number at Pitt
County Memorial Hospital
in Greenville. After consul-
tation with the physician,
Pories - or a designated
official - will dispatch the
helicopter and made ar-
rangements at the receiv-
ing hospital for the arrival
of the patient.
A pilot, co-pilot and
certified emergency med-
ical technician will accom-
pany each flight The crew
is available 24 hours a day
and requires only 12 to 15
minutes to become airborne
after a call is received.
The program will serve
Beaufort. Bertie Camden.
Carteret. Chowan, Craven.
Curntuck. Dare. Gates,
Halifax, Hertford, Hyde,
Martin, Pamlico. Pasquc-
tank, Perquimans, Pitt, Ty-
rell and Washington
counties.
NEW HELICOPTER AMBULANCE, designed to ferry patients to Pitt
area
Photo by EMS office
To aid Joyner Library
Organization formed
Energy
Electric costs high on campus
By JULIE EVERETTE
News Editor
The Friends of the ECU
Library is a newly formed
organization in the Green-
ville area, open to all
persons interested in pro-
moting Joyner Library.
According to Dr Wilson
Luguire, associate director
of Joyner Library Services,
the primary mission of the
organization is to assist in
enhancing the library pro-
gram and developing its
resources.
Luguire said the Fri-
ends will enhance the stat-
ue and reputation of the
univensty Library, helping
ti braoden its potential and
to facilitate rapport with
eastern North Carolina.
According to Luguire,
membership is open to all
individuals, organizations,
businesses, industries, and
institutions interested in
aiding in library develop-
ment and enrichment.
Porposed membership
dues are as follows:
ER
t for
a iring
ire to
costs to
ECU campus
. to Larry
-ngmeer of
es de-
. a footbal
e hours costs
said
ed that to
ace he ECU cam-
$86,000 to
year
conditioning is
jst expensive
ampus, Snyder
�cider you keep
�gs the higher the
ECU Utilities purchases
the electricity used on
campus from the Greenville
ties
ECU utilities buys
electricity like a big indus-
try would at a bulk rate
said Charles Horne, direct-
or of Greenville Utilities.
The electricity is tran-
smitted from a Greenville
City transformer to ECU'S
utility power plant near
Mmges Coliseum which
transmits electric power
across campus said Horne.
Greenville Utilities
purchases bulk electric
power from Virginia Electr-
ic Power Co (Vepco)
at wholesale pricesHorne
explained
Greenville is one in 26
cities which have grouped
together to purchase bulk
electricity. These cities
have formed the Electra
City Co-op said Keith
Mills a staff writer for the
Da7y Reflector
The purpose for this
Electra City organization is
to have a board of directors
oversee the purchase of
electric power for each one
of the cities according to
Horne.
This organization pro-
vides a greater amount of
leverage when negotiating
with Vepco about rate
policies explained Horne.
The Medical School on
the West side of campus
will need a considerable
amount of electricity, ac-
cording to Horne.
"Greenville is growing
constantly therefore the
burden on utilities will be
greater said Horne.
Supreme Court rules
on press freedom, Bakke
POr ID, Ore AP
journalists
sustained recent
se'backs m efforts to
preserve confidential news
sources, the president of
the Associated Press Man-
aging Editors Association
�� e Stanford case, the
court ruled that police have
the right to search news-
paper offices for notes and
pictures on a "third party"
warrant although no
reporter is suspected of any
crime
It is the public who is
being hurt by this and
similar secisions
Barclay Jameson, man-
aging editor of The Santa
Fe New Mexican,cited the
US Supreme Court's
decision earlier this year in
a Stanford University
student newspaper case as
one of the most serious
setbacks, "not only for the
press, but for the public
Jameson said Sunday in
an interview on the eve of
the association's national
convention in Portland.
"The First Amendment -
guaranteeing freedom of
speech, freedom of the
press - is a public right not
just a press privilege
People who know of
wrongdoing in public busi-
ness can't fight the battle
alone he added. "And
the press can't fight
wrongdoing effectively un-
less it can protect the
confidentiality of its
sources
Jameson said the ruling
in the Stanford case "could
be construed to apply to
businessmen, doctors, even
lawyers, even private
homes
He said the case of
Myron Farber, a New York
Times reporter jailed for
refusing to turn over to a
New Jersey judge his notes
on a murder investigation,
is "another indication of
the crisis of a sort between
the press and the judici-
ary
"The press is accused
of being arrogant some-
times - and sometimes it
has been arrogant
Jameson said. "But is is
the New Jersey courts
which are being arrogant in
this case. They have put
themselves above the law
and thrown Farber into jail
w Hit a hearing
DAVIS, Calif. AP
Allan Bakke, a 38-year-
old engineer whose name
has become a symbol of
conflict over school ad-
missions and raoe, entered
the University of California
Medical School yesterday.
With protesters
announcing plans to picket
outside, Bakke, who is
white, is to begin classes at
the university's Davis
campus under a U.S.
Supreme Court order that
struck down the school's
preferential admissions
program for minorities.
The court ruled on a 5-4
vote that the program,
which reserved 16 places in
each class of 100 for
low-income minorities, vio-
lated Bakke's constitutional
rights. He had applied
unsuccessfully for admis-
sion in 1973 and 1974 to the
campus 15 miles west of
Sacramento.
But the court also ruled
on a separate 5-4 vote that
raoe could be taken into
account to maintain diver-
sity in admissions.
That portion of the
ruling was hailed by many
civil rights groups as the
preservation of affirmative
action program.
Student � $5 ; re-
gular member � $10
contributing member �
$25 , Patron � $50.
benefactor � $500 ; Life
member � $1,000
cor interested g-oups.
pro ised membership is
$25. for a non- profit
organization. $50. for
business, and $500 for
business benefactor
According to Luguire.
the organization will aid
beyond the tax oupported
programs of the library to
finance programs the li-
brary does not presently
have
Luguire said the organ-
ization hopes to raise
funds, donate money, han-
dle grants, donate books, or
give any other needed
assistance in the library
program.
"The library material
inflation rate is increa-
sing said Luguire. "and
is a much greater inflation
rate than concerns the
general public
"We need to compen-
sate in library budgets to
expand the services we
offer
The Friends' will have
its organizational meeting
and its first annual dinner
Wednesday, Sept 27. at
the Greenville Country
Club at 7 p.m.
Luguire said ECU cti
celor Dr Thomas E
will be the featured
at the dinner
According to L
proposed officers
organization will be a pres-
ident, a President-E
and a Secret i
and will be elected a: I
mee ng .Vednesday
Also, the Friends -
Laws, as proposed !
Steerng Committee
be presentee
ship approva thai e. e
There will be a . ;
tunity to join the organ-
ization at tKe mee!
Mrs Phoebe Ovv
served as coordinate I
Steering Committee
Ane Briley ser- I
chairperson of the B. .
Committee
The steering com
ttee. organized in a.
1978. was composed
library sta'f. university fa-
culty, library adminisi
tion and outsiders
Luyuire said tl a?.
organization is a
pendant orga
signed to assist tHe library
and its programs, bul I
not a part of the
structure
Reservations or the
dinnt ma re ade by
telephoning the library s
admmistrativce off ce
757-6514
Fcudkner studies
children 9s books
A BLEND OF classical and country music
filled Wright Auditorium Saturday night
at the first annual Hood Swamp Ball,
featuring the Super Grit Cowboy Band
and the ECU Symphony Orchestra. This
picture, and the ones previewing the ball
published in the last edition of FOUNT-
AINHEAD, were taken by John H.
Grogan. See story, p. 7.
What's inside
QUNNAR BJORNSTRAND
Co-operative Education program is ready
and waitingSee story, page 7
Bergman's Smiles of a Summer Night is
the Wednesday night special filmSee
page 8.
Football players get new atmosphere for
dining roomSee page 10.
Pirates' previous sluggishness diminish-
es See page 10.
New chairman for ECU Department of
GeologySee page 3.
By KAY WILLIAMS
Staff Writer a
A new genre in child-
ren's literature may be the
best birth control method
since the pill, according to
Janice Faulkner, associate
professor of English at
ECU.
Faulkner read a paper
on 20 children's books,
which she studied, to a
group of 14 at a meeting of
Sigma Tau Delta, the Eng-
lish Honor Society.
Mrs. Faulkner first read
the paper, "Affectionate
Illusion to the Contrary.
Children are not Nice
People at the Children's
Literature Conference at
ECU in April, 1978
The danger in the books
Mrs. Faulkner studied is
their power to diminish
children as people.
Aooording to Mrs.
Faulkner, "If these haras-
sed and tormented little
persons are typical exam-
ples of contemporary child-
ren, then I concede an
idealistic ignorance of child
-hood
Reading the books
made Faulkner glad she is
no longer a child but they
also made her . � :e
effect they are having
the nme to thirteen ear .
children who are 'eac ng
them
Most of the authors are
genre of children s litera-
ture people had better be
aware of
The books are hie
recommended in some lit-
erary circles, but Tonia
Black. President of Sigma
Tau Delta, said a'ter hear-
ing about the boo s Now I
don't want any kids
The children in the
books don't seem at all like
real children as there are no
dolls, games, songs,
other innocent fun, accord-
ing to Faulkner
Bonnie Parnsh, an ECU
student, is sad and disgust-
ed to think that kids are
reading these books
All children s books writ-
ten today are not included
in the group Mrs. Faulkner
finds so treacherous, but
she said there is still a
products of the protest era �
of the 1960s and, accord-
ing to Faulkner, the unrest
�n the 1960s caused this
kiddie porno.





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P�9�2 FOUMTAINHEAD 26 SwMmbv 1978
Communion
A servioe of Holy Com-
munion for Episcopal stud-
ents will be celebrated by
chaplain Rev. Bill Hadden
on Tues Sept. 26 at 5 p.m.
in the chapel at the Meth-
odist Student Center
(across Fifth St. from Gar-
ret Dorm).
Supper and Bible study
will be at 1003 E. Fifth St.
(Yellow house in front of
main gate ECU) at 6:30
p.m. Tues Sept. 26.
These programs are for
all students interested in
the liturgy and faith of the
church.
Honor council
There will be a meeting
of last year's Honor Council
on Tues Sept. 26 at 7 p.m.
in Mendenhall, room 248.
The Interim Honor Council
will be established at this
meeting and will serve until
the new Honor Council is
screened and appointed.
Applications are also
being accepted in the SGA
office for the 1978-79 Honor
Council and Review Board.
No previous experience is
necessary, just a conscien-
tious desire to serve the
university community. The
deadline for applications is
Oct. 3.
Pro-mod
There wlH be a pre-med
pre-dent meeting at 7:30
p.m. in 307 Flanagan.
Tonight, Tues Sept.
26, our program speaker is
Dean Hayek. Ph.D direct-
or of admissions, ECU
Medical School. All inter-
ested students are Wel-
come.
Crafts
ESA
Oct. 1 in the Social
Room of Fletcher Dorm
from 2 p.m. until 4 p.m.
All women students at
ECU are invited to attend to
learn more about Epsilon
Sigma Alpha, international
sorority. Sponsored by
Alpha Omega and Gamma
Delta Chapters of ESA.
Transportation can be
arranged for by called
756-4004 or 756-7098.
Come join in the fun.
Party
Hat Contest Tuesday
night, Sept. 26 at the
El bo Room. $25 cash prize
for most original hat. As-
sorted door prizes. Your
favorite beverages at re-
duced prices. Given by the
Sigma Nu Little Sisters.
Register now for one of
the crafts workshops which
are being offered by the
Crafts Center at Menden-
hall Student Center. Sign
up for Beginning Dark-
room, Basic Pottery, Floor
Loom Weaving, Woodwork
-ing, Quilting, Silkscreen,
Beginning Jewelry, Con-
temporary Basketry, Mac-
rame, Inkle Weaving for
Christmas or Handbuilt
Christmas Ceramics.
All full-time students,
staff and faculty are eligible
to join the Crafts Cenetr.
Upon payment of a $10
semester Crafts Center
membership fee, an indiv-
idual may register for any
of the available workshops
without additional charges,
excluding costs of personal
supplies and supplies furn-
ished by the Crafts Center.
Cratfs Center memb-
ership are available during
regular operating hours, 3
p.m. until 10 p.m Mon.
through Frl and 10 a.m.
until 3 p.m. Sat. The last
day to register for fall
semester workshops is Sat
Sept. 30 Persons must
register at the Crafts Cent-
er and class space is
limited. Also, no refunds
will be made after the
workshop registeration
deadline.
KX-830 Stereo Cassette Deck
with Dolby
�Doiby is the trademark y Dolby Laboratories Inc
$ KENWOOD
KR-5030 AMFM-Stereo Receiver
60 Watts per Channel Min RMS at 8 ohms,
20-20.000 Hz. with no more than 0.1 total harmonic distortion
KENWOOD
KT-5500 AMFM-Stereo Tuner
KA-5700 Integrated Stereo Amplifier
40 Watts per Channel Mm RMS into 8 ohms
from 20 � 20 000 H wth no more than 0 04� total harmony distortion
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PAIR ELECTRONICS
Whzxz Sevjice. Come,
STORE HOURS
8:30-5:30 WEEKDAYS 8:30-12:30 SATURDAY
ON THE SPOT FINANCING AVAILABLE

$ KENWOOD
Classifieds
Psi-Chi
Applications for .mem-
bership for Psi Chi, the
national honor society in
psychology, are now being
accepted till Sept. 27.
Requirements are that
you must be a psychology
major or minor, be in the
top 35 percent of your class,
and have a minumum of
eight semester hours in
psychology.
Applications can be
found in the psychology
departmental office, and
should be turned in to the
Psi Chi mailbox as soon as
possible.
REBEL show
The Fourth Annual
REBEL Art Show will be
Oct. 22-28 in Mendenhall
Gallery. Students interest-
ed in entering their work
must register by 4 p.m. on
Wed Oct. 11.
No exceptions will be
made to this deadline.
Unregistered work cannot
be hung in the gallery.
Details, rules, and registra-
tion sheets are available at
the REBEL office in the
Publications Center or at
the Mendenhall Informa-
tion Desk.
The show is open to all
ECU students.
Law society
The ECU Law Society
will hold its organizational
meeting on Tues Sept. 26
at 7 p.m. in the Multipur-
pose Center. All interested
persons are invited to
attend.
Ski trips
Two more trips avail-
able
Beech Mountain, Ban-
ner Elk, N.C Jan. 1-5,
includes four sessions of
skiing and instruction with
all equipment included:
boots, skis, and poles, lift
fees, and lodging for four
nights on slope.
Snow Show, West Vir-
ginia, march 4-9, includes
skiing and ski instruction
with all equipment includ-
ed: boots, skis, poles, lift
fees, and lodging for five
nights on slope.
All participants must
attemd the meeting on
ThursOct. 12at 7:30 p.m.
in 142-143 Minges Col-
iseum.
For further information,
call Jo Saunders at Mem-
orial Gym, 757-6000.
Holidays
Bowling
Whether you'd like to
polish up your game with
some steady practice or
invite three friends along
for some friendly competi-
tion, you can rent a bowling
lane to use for one hour and
it only costs $3. Lane
rentals are available at the
Mendenhall Student Center
Bowling Center every Sat-
urday from Noon until 6
p.m. Stop by and try it out;
it's a great way to spend an
hour.
Any student, staff, or
faculty member needing
information or transportat-
ion to attend servioes for
the upcoming Jewish holi-
days (Rosh Hashannah and
Yom Kippur) please contact
Paul Breitman (757-6611 or
756-1054) or Danny Jacob-
sen (758-1171 or 756-4121).
Discount day
Check out 'Discount
Day' at the Mendenhall
Student Center recreation
area. Every Monday after-
noon from 2 p.m. until 5
p.m. bowling, table tennis,
and billiard prices are one
third off. Bring a friend,
catch the savings, and have
some fun.
Lecture
C.W. Kern, Program
Officer for Quantum Chem-
istry National Science
Foundation of Washington
D.C will present a sem-
inar on "Theoretical Stud-
ies of Hydrogen Bonding
Between DNA Base Pairs
on Sept. 29 at 2 p.m. in Rm.
201 of Flanagan Bldg.
Refreshments will be
served in the conference
room.
Nillel
Fencing
IVGF
"What is the Christian
Student?' Come to Inter-
Varsity Christian Fellow-
ship Wednesday night at 7
p.m. in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, room 221, and
find out.
For those seriously in-
terested, the Fencing Club
will have its first meeting
for this year at 7:30 p.m.
Wed Sept. 27. We will
meet in the lobby of
Memorial Gym.
Phi Alpha
Phi Alpha Theta, his-
tory honor society will meet
Tues Sept. 26, at 7:30
p.m. in the Richard C. Todd
Room in Brewster Bldg.
Plans for the fail picnic
will be finalized. All mem-
bers are strongly urged to
attend. All other interested
history majors or minors
are also invited to attend or
you may come by the
history office (Brewster A-
316) and leave your name if
you are considering joining
this organization.
Attention Jewish stud-
ents: Hillel, the Jewish
student organization, is
starting a new school year
with a variety of activities.
All those interested please
call Dr. Resnik at 756-5640
so that we can place you on
our mailing list.
F6SF
Is your life based on
something eternally solid:
Did you know that the Bible
is relevant to your life?
Did you know that you
can know the Author of the
Bible and he will teach you
how it applies to you and
then you will really be free?
Free from what?
Jesus offers you free-
dom from guilt, shame,
loneliness, insecurity,
fears, sickness, poverty and
eternal damnation. How
can you find out about this
freedom?
Come to a Fuii Gospel
Student Fellowship Bible
Study, Thurs Sept. 28 in
Mendenhall 221, at 7:30
p.m.
' the body shoppe
located on the corner of
14th St. and Greenville Blvd.
for the figure and fitness-minded woman
organized group exercise
individualized conditioning program
�? exercise apparel available
Manager: Theresa Holley, B.S. Health
and P.E. ECU Phone 758-7564
Student specials for limited time
JVt
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SLetionof tPCaiUxcviftto Cftoou. fiom
JlamA. Voama.
CkiUtmoi Qvuunn�s.
&towu.
cMon. & 4lW ItOO to 8.00,
Jum C7Xat. 'DxL iLOO to 6:00 � UOO to 4.00
K8 CW. KXk Sbuzt (ceoAifom th. cMappy Stou.j
752-OTti
"Jjflam do
lean do
msuiiii
Outward Bound is a
high-adventure trip into the
wilderness.
And a lot more.
It's a trip that shows vou what
you're made of. For the first time
in your life you confront vourself
face-to-face. You learn vou can do
anything you really want to do.
All this takes just three weeks.
But the self-confidence vou learn
might just last you a lifetime.
Send me full information.
Name
St reel
Tournaments
The ACU-I 1978 All-
Campus Recreational
Tournaments sponsored by
Mendenhall Student Center
will be held this semester
beginning Oct. 9. Events
will include bowling, bil-
liards, table tennis, back-
gammon, and chess.
If participation is suf-
ficient, the winner in each
division will participate in
the Association of College
Unions- International face
to-face regional tournament
in Knoxville. Tennessee or
Feb. 8, 9, and 10, with all
expenses being paid by
Mendenhali Student
Center.
All full-time under-
graduate or graduate stud-
ents of ECU are eligible to
participate. Day and dorm
student preliminary tour-
naments will be held in
October to select partici-
pants to compete in the
All-Campus Tournaments
to be held in November.
Complete tournament
information for each event
is available at the Billiards
and Bowling Centers at
Mendenhall. All partici-
pants must register by the
deadline established for
each tournament.
Bowling
"Red Pin Bowling" is
held every Sunday evening
from 7 p.m. until 10 p.m. at
the Bowling Center at
Mendenhall Student Cent-
er. If you can make a strike
when the red pin is the
head pin, you win one free
game. It's that simple
Come over and try it out
this Sunday. It could be
your lucky day!
SU Films
This week's Student
Union Free Flick is the
filmization of Joan Didion's
bestseller Play It As It
Lays. The film will be
shown Friday and Saturday
night at 7 and 9 p.m. in the
Hendrix Theatre located in
the Mpndenhall Student
Center. There will be a
Films Committee meeting
this Thursday at 4 p.m. in
the committee office on the
second floor of Menden-
hall. Films for Homecom-
ing will be discussed. All
committee members must
attend.
Citv
State
School
Phone
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IQutward Bound
1 The courar truiTJfrAJdf
NEEDED: a responsible
female roommate to share a
2 bdrm. apt. Coll 758-5794
and ask for Polly or Lisa.
MALE ROOMMATE: to
share apt. at aaatbrook. $55
plus utilities. Call
WANTED TO BUY t Fender
guitar amp. Also import
an bootleg tp'a by
Rolling Stories. 752-8132.
FOR SALE: AKC register-
ad Iriart Setter puppies
from champ show and
hunting stock. 12 weeks
old. Adorable! 758-3326.
stock. 1;
�bie! 7SC
FOR SALE: Hofner
"Beatle" baas guitar in
perfect shape. Purchased in
1962. $400 or will consider
offer, call 524-5027 after 4
p.m.
i
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aWar(KmiWlHiitia�tfTHt.i Mli!�aWiMBi�wr�n Lit yin-wMbi �.���4
personal
WANTED: e
part-time photographer for
too mag�lne Must have
��� �qulpmem ant do top
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28 S�pfmbf 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 3
Writers needed for NEWS
Call 757-6366
Li. BRINGS AN end to weekend beach excursions, and forces students to start studying.
Dr. Gale Billings
Geology chairman named
ECU NewsBureau
Or Gale Billings,
former djr.
ector of Continental Oil
Company's Environmental
and Regulatory Affairs div-
ision, had joined the East
Carolina University faculty,
as professor and chairman
of the ECU Department of
Geology
Dr. Billings' career has
also included teaching po-
sitions at the University of
Calgary. Canada. Louisiana
State University and the
New Mexico Institute of
V ning and Technology.
He has been involved in
research and administra-
tor Shell Research and
Development Cc, Sinclair
Oil and Gas Co and
Science and Engineering
Resources. Inc.
In addition. Billings has
been an associate editor of
the journal Chemical Geo-
logy and has worked in
isory or consultant po-
tions with the New Mex-
and Louisiana Water
Resources Research Insti-
tutes, the American Geo-
logical Institute, the U.S.
Environmental Protection
Agency, the Western In-
terstate Nuclear Board, and
several major industries
and municipalities
Billings holds degrees
from Oklahoma State and
Rice Universities and is the
author or co-author of more
than 85 publications and
research reports.
As head of the ECU
geology department, Bil-
lings succeeds Dr. Michael
O'Connor, who resigned
the departmental chair-
manship to return to full-
time teaching and research.
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I
'Biased9 editorials
Webster's New World Dictionary defines
"editorial" as an article in a newspaper, etc
explicitly stating opinions of the editor or
publisher That's all it is, a statement of
opinion. In FOUNTAINHEAD's case, all
editorials are written by the editor, and
therefore carry no byline. Many students,
however, have somehow gotten the impression
that editorials should be impartial and
objective, and so we are constantly getting
letters complaining of "biased" editorials.
The fact is, "biased editorial" is a
redundant phrase, since any opinion favors
one side of a question. An editorial should be
fair to both sides of an issue, but it has no
obligation to remain nonpartisan.
FOUNTAINHEAD editorials always
appear in the upper left hand corner of page
four, the "Editorials and Opinions" page.
They are also printed in a larger type size and
a different typeface from other copy in the
paper.
The type, the page, and the position on the
page all serve to clearly identify the editorial
as the opinion of the editor.
The other articles on the page are
identified as opinion because they are on the
Editorials and Opinions" page. The opinions
of our readers, through letters to the editor,
are grouped under the heading "Forum" and
each letter is signed by the author. Names are
withheld only in cases where the nature of the
letter would subject the author to ridicule or
ostracization, such as homosexuality or drug
abuse, and only when requested by the author.
Letters are edited for brevity, libel,
obscenity, and journalistic style, not to censor
opinion. The free flow of ideas in a public
forum is essential in helping our readers form
opinions on current issues. As John Milton
wrote in Areopagitica, "Let . . . (truth) and
falsehood grapple; who ever knew truth put to
the worse, in a free and open encounter?"
Throughout history, editorials have been
the shapers of public opinion, the crusaders
for reform. They have made their authors both
heroes and scoundrels, and many an editor has
found himself swiftly demoted from saint to
sinner after printing an unpopular editorial.
We do not pretend to wield such influence
here at ECU. We merely seek to offer
comment, criticism, and suggestion on those
issues we feel are in the public interest.
Readers should keep that fact in mind, that
editorials are one person's opinion, and they
should not hesitate to write letters rebutting
that opinion. But please, don't complain about
a biased editorial. Such letters, like this
editorial, state the obvious.
Commentary
Sexual harassment by teachers is
common on many campuses
HESTER PETTY
Uppity Women of
Greenville
This article will deal
only with the sexual har-
assment of female students
by male teachers as the
sexual harassment of male
students appears to be a
less significant occurence.
Material for this article
was obtained from a paper
about sexual harassment
written by the Project on
the Status and Education of
Women, Association of A
mencan Colleges, 1818 R.
Street. NW, Washington,
D.C. 20009
� A Yale undergradu-
ate recently charged her
political science professor
with sexual harassment,
alleging that he offered he
an "A" in exchange for
sexual favors. She refused,
received a "C" in the
course, and has since filed
a lawsuit against the uni-
versity.
�A senior communi-
cations major at a state
university in California
testified before the Calif-
ornia State Legislature in
1973 that she knew of "at
least 15 professors who
offered students 'A's for
sex
WHATISSEXUAL
HARASSMENT?
Sexual harassment in
the classroom ranges form
inappropriately timed sex-
ual inuedos to coerced
sexual relations. It is dif-
ferent that "acceptable"
flirting or a "freely cho-
sen" relationship between
teacher and student al-
though considering the
power that the teacher has
over a student's grades,
one has to wonder if a
sexual relationship of this
kind can ever be"freely
chosen
Sexual harassment may
include verbal harassment
or abuse; subtle pressure
for sexual activity; sexist
remarks about a woman's
clothing, body or sexual
activities; unnecessary
touching, patting or pin-
ching ; leering or ogling of a
woman's body; constant
brushing against a wo-
man's body; demanding
sexual favors accompanied
by implied or overt threats
concerning one's grades,
letters of recommendation;
physical assault, etc.
HOW WIDESPREAD
ISIT?
Recent surveys all in-
dicate that sexual harass-
ment by teachers is not
confined to a few excep-
tions but rather that it is a
fairly common problem on
many campuses.
WHY ARE WOMEN
RELUCTANT TO TALK
ABOUTIT?
The most common rea-
sons given for not reporting
incidents of sexual har-
assment are: the woman
believed nothing would be
done; she believed the
incident would be treated
lightly or ridiculed; or she
tnougnt that she would be
blamed or suffer reper-
cussions.
As with rape, the wo-
man is made to feel re-
sponsible for the actions of
the male aggressor. In a
sexual harassment situa-
tion, the woman may feel
that it was her fault that her
outgoing personality was
"misinterpreted" by her
professor, or her talka-
tiveness, or her cuteness,
etc.
And it generally being a
case of her word against
his, who would take the
word of a young, seductive
daughter of Eve The Tem-
ptress over that of a kindly,
wise and venerable, (pos-
sibly even tenured) prof-
essor?
Most colleges do not
have a grievance procedure
designed to handle cases of
sexual harassment. This
leaves a woman isolated,
with no real method of
recourse, and with no sol-
ution to a problem that can
not only damage her learn-
ing experince in college but
the learning experiences of
other women as well. For if
this problem is allowed to
exist unchecked, it will
create an atmosphere of
suspicion' which will pro-
hibit dose studentteacher
involvement in the learning
process.
IS
SEXUAL HARASSMENT
BY TEACHERS
DIFFERENT THAN
SEXUAL HARASSMENT
BY PEERS?
Yes. When a woman is
verbally abused or propo-
sitioned by a male peer she
is free to react in any
manner she chooses. Her
response will only affect
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over 50 years
EDITOR
Doug White
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Leigh Coakley
TRENDS EDITOR
Steve Bachner
NEWS EDITORS
Julie Everette
Ricki Qliarmis
ADVERTISING MANAGER
Robert M. Swalm
SPORTS EDITOR
Sam Rogers
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper of
Carolina University sponsored by the Media Board of ECU
and is distributed each Tuesday and Thursday (weekly
during the summer).
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C.
27034
Editorial offices: 757-6306, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni 16 annually.
that particular male's opin-
ion of her and nothing else.
When she is harassed or
propositioned by a male
teacher she is conscious of
the fact that her response
could affect her grades and
even her future career. In
other words, the teacher
has an unfair amount of
power over her response.
DOES ECU HAVE A
SEXUAL HARASSMENT
PROBLEM?
I don't know. But I think
it is important that we find
out. Therefore I have writ-
ten a questionnaire that I
hope will be answered by
all those women who come
across it, whether they
have experienced sexual
harassment at ECU or not.
If sexual harassment exists
here, it should be exposed
so that it can be dealt
with.
SEXUA L HA RASSMENT
IN THE
ECU CLASSROOM:
A Questionnaire For
Women Students
Instructions: Put an X or
in the slot that follows the
appropriate answer. If
parts of a question don't
apply, leave that answer
blank. Some questions call
for a written response
These questions are mar-
ked with a and space has
been provided for that
response.
1a. Have you ever had a
male ECU teacher who
made lewd andor sexist
jokes or remarks during
class? YES D NO D
b. How often did he do
this? ONCE D A FEW
TIMES D FREQUENTLY
D
c. Did these remarks
make you fael uncomfor-
table or angry? YES D NO
n
d. Have you ever drop-
ped a couse because of a
teacher's lewd andor sex-
ist remarks?
YES D NO D
e. Did you complain
about this behavior to any-
one who was in the position
to correct the teacher's
behavior (a Dean or other
ECU official)? YES D NO
D
f. If you did complain to
higher-ups, do you feel that
your complaint wee acted
upon? YESNOD
2a. Have you ever had a
male ECU teacher touch,
See SEX p. 9
Forum
'Yes, we give a damn about our annuaV
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
In reply to the article
"The BUC: who cares?" :
Who in the hell do you
think cares? Obviously no
one, as your article pointed
out. Just becasue you
haven't received any letters
from concerned students
pertaining to the BUC; do
you think you are justified
to assume that no one
cares?
Students pay fees to go
to school and receive free
medical service, free adm-
ssion to athletic events and
other university functions. I
believe they have a right to
expect a BUC in with the
deal.
But for the past two
years there has been no
BUC. Don't bother to ex-
plain to me why, I've heard
it a thousand times and I'm
sick and tired of hearing
explanations! Why don't I
see any action?
There's nothing the av-
erage college student can
do but sit back and hope
some people get their shit
together so I may at least
receive on BUC before I
graduate.
Is that asking too much?
I don't think so!
This is a large univer-
sity and there's no reason
whysufficient funds cannot
by appropriated to the
BUC. They've done it in the
past, right?
I don't want to hear
anymore about students not
caring about the BUC.
W hat do you want us to do -
go on the streets and raise
money for it ourselves;
when it's rightfullyous in
the first place?
So if you ask yourself
whether or not the student
body as a whole really
gives a damn about the
annual - here's your
answer.
Yes, we give a damn
about our annual; but who
screwed up the production
of it in the first place!
Concerned Students
Rebecca M assey
Pam L. Beck
Lorene Roberson
Tina Jones
Lisa Bennett
Cindy Rouse
Susie Knox
Rebecca Ash
Betsy Johnson
Lisa Williams
Patty Brown
Congratulations
ToFOUNTAINHEAD:
To John Monds:
I hope this note will
express my appreciation to
you for your balanced and
accurate article on the liab-
ilities of police initiated tow
services. Please let us know
if we can help you in the
future.
Hugh Cox
Police Attorney
Crosswinds
'Death, the final frontier'
By JIM BARNES
"Death-the final frontierto go where no person has
dared to go before. This is the 12 week mission of
"Thanatos the new television program designed to
explore death in all of its manifestations and symbolic
content for the living
The start of a new television show this fall? If it were,
would you watch it? Or would it be in (God forbid) "bad
taste" or even downright "kinky"? Not to sound a
too-cheerful note, but our society is badly in need of some
measure to erode the mysticism surrounding death - the
one taboo which has a strangehold on our American society.
Our attitude toward death is, for lack of a better word,
unhealthy. That is to say that the way we view death (as
seldom and cosmetically as possible) strongly affects the
way we look at life (each day spent 'cheating the reaper' or
worse, spent languishing in the naive assumption that 'I
won't die' or 'I've got till 70 or 75').
It is frankly quite repulsive for some people to consider
death, whether their own or that of someone else. I
remember the case of a sportscaster who was very popular
in North Carolina prior to his moving to Pittsburgh some
years back. It seemed that when Sports Illustrated did a
story on him, the magazine ran a photo of the announcer in
repose in a coffin. The picture hangs over the announcer's
desk to remind him, as it was toid, of the way of all ends up.
It was in bad taste, many averred to have had such a
picture of oneself in a coffin. Why? I should think such a
straightforward attitude concerning physical death
ie purveyed under the protective umbrella of faith. All we
know for certain about death is that the physical body
ceases to function.
But we can no longer proceed with the above as a
definition of death. What about the human vegetables
looked up to machines, an existence which is neither
hopeful nor dignified? Does life stop with oessation of brain
or cardiac activity?
I have no answer to these and other weighty questions
concerning death, or at least not why I would care to push
off on anyone else, i feel that death shouldbe considered
existentially by each individual; what is important,
however, is that death is beginning to see the light of day ae
a topic worthy of our concern aa the living. There lies the
hope.
Some of us have the attitude of 'beat the reaper and
would gladly aide with Ethan Allen who, at his deathbed
when toid by his doctor that the angels ware watting said:
"Waiting, are they? Waiting, are thay? Weil, goddam am
let 'em wait A healthy attitude toward death is
necessary for the proper persepctive on life. What if we
didn't die? What happens, in the cryogenic future when
people live to be two or three hundred years? God what a
bore that would be.
The fact is. death defines life. It sets the bounds and
perspective for a limited organic existence for a given
number of years. Without death, life would be virtually
meaningless, for it is the ever-present spectre of death
looming before each of us which makes valuable this
nrMTH T� dCny d6ath' then' is to a�"��nish
nfatLYH h �SaWare'in a hea,th "� �"� ones
hfe could end at any moment, then perhaps this individual's
melninr8 " � � -
Henry Ward Beecher, the 19th century Preabvtenan
clergyman, said on his deathbed Now come- Z
mystery. This is another terrifying aspect of SeX he
no rair .We WOU'd UKe to kno � "�
not, as a culture, understand death then we �h.ii
myth-make about it all for there ���!�' .
even if it i� it ��1TV must � something to say.
Dr. Elizabth Kubler-Ro in k- �
and Dying QueTJsZ Deat 1 Z" �"W
much to lift the veil of Z�m�T" �Jf has ���
The Denial of Death, by lestILckfr T� " "�
treatise on the subject moTtf!E�; 1
Kubler-Ross. The reading of theTbos � ?,
is becoming . requirenLt � moSJT " "
schools. mor " "we medical
Traditionally, physicians have bean loath to or��w
death in any terms other than as aTJ!li consider
failure. The physician shoutd be J2SJL?
concept of death in term �f �. comfortable with the
are ill-trained in ZZof7.Jirry -
-gn that the medical commity soL W��m�
the quality of death as a viable ZJS ��ncern ����
But rfy cannot rrrtt
community. Each individual must oral ZL . m,icrt
tne haze and shroud covermo 1�ZL1 ,rom "���
be discussed opsniy SSST2? " �� �"�
voice our fear, .J enJl�� �� �ree to
more our society JSRSS
Hfe, the more value lite will have JfTHH?1?
must face M oonfront a�� �
M" � more ffHtfST





Possible sexual harassment at ECU
surveyed; is there a problem?
continued trn, � i ��
26 Septfnbf 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Pmm S
(conrrnued rrom p
n PinCh �u un-
necessarily? YES. NO
b How often did he do
th's7 ONCE a
TIMES
? OVERT
FEW
FREQUENTLY
D,d this unnecessary
ouchmg make you uncom-
fortable or angry? YES
d Have you ever drop-
ped a course because of a
teacher s unnecessary
touching-? YES NO
e How did you react
teacher touched,
'nched you?
lf you rebuked him for
"�is behavior, did you sub-
sequently notice a change.n
�s attitude toward you7
VES NO
S How did this change
manifest itself? GRADE
A AS LOWERED HE
��vOULDN'T RECOGNIZE
ME IN CLASS WHEN I
RAISED MY HAND HE
RIDICULED ME MY AN-
SWERS IN CLASS HE
CALLED ON ME EXCES-
SIVELY v HEN I HADN'T
RAISED MY HAND . HE
-F.ASED IE A-
MC Nl OF UNNECES-
TOUCHING
. -ER
Did you
ab
- A h C vS -
e � ne
EC
complain
or to any-
e position
teacher s
Dean or other
YES NO
ou feel that
:omplaint was acted
-ES NO
Have ever had a
ECU teacher suggest
jemand that you engage
�ercourse with
� ES NO
v as ;H is suggestion
J accompanied by
- d or overt threat
? our grades,
' re dation.
� ES NO
IMPLIED
OVERTQ
c. How often did he
suggest or demand sexual
intercourse? ONCE I A
FEW TlMESa
FREQUENTLY ?
d. Did this suggestion
or demand make you feel
uncomfortable or angry?
YES NO
e. Have you ever drop-
ped a course because of a
teacher's sexual suggest-
ions or demands? YES
NO
f. How did you react
when the teacher made this
suggestion or demand?
g If you rebuked him
for his behavior, did you
subsequently notice a
cnange in his attitude tow-
ard you? YES
YES NO
h. How did this change
manifest itself? GRADE
WAS LOWERED HE
WOULDN'T RECOGNIZE
ME IN CLASS
HE CALLED ON ME
EXCESSIVELY WHEN I
HADN'T RAISED MY
HAND HE RIDICULED
ME'MY ANSWERS IN
CLASS HE CALLED ON
ME EXCESSIVELY WHEN
I HADN'T RAISED MY
HAND HE BECAME
MORE INSISTENT WITH
HIS SEXUAL DEMANDS
OTHER
i Did you ever complain
about his behavior to any-
one who was in the posi-
tion to correct his behavior?
YES NO
j. If so, do you feel that
your complaint was acted
upon7 YES J NO
4a Have you ever had a
male ECU teacher phy-
sically force you to engage
in sexual intercourse with
himYES NO
b Was this accompan-
ied by an implied or overt
threat concerning your
grades, letters of recom-
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mendation, etc. YES I I NO
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c. How often did he
force you to engage in
sexual intercourse? ONCE
A FEW TIMES
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d. Have you ever drop-
ped a course because of
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e. If you remained in his
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f. Did you complain
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g If so, do you feel that
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5. If you have any
additional comments to
make about one of your
answers, something that
was not covered in the
questions, or the question-
naire in general please do
so here.
This questionnaire
was prepared by Uppity
Women of Greenville.
Please cut it out and send it
no return address or name
needed to Hester Petty,
P.O. Box 1373, Greenville,
N.C , 27834. Your response
is important.
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LOOK FOR THE ACTION PRICE SIGNS
THROUGHOUT YOUR A4P STORE When AP
buyers make � special purchase at a lower
price, we paes the saving on to you. That lower
I � C&J? aB �etton P"6 Anfl �"�� ACTION
PRICES are In addition to our money saving
v weekly specials
ALL FLAVORS
HAWAIIAN PUNCH V� 59�
FRANCO-AMERICAN
SPAGHETTI OS 4 TUtm
KILLOOOS SENECA
CORN FLAKES'� 89 APPLE JUICE.u 99
WELCH S SCOTT ARTS t FLOWERS OR COLORS
GRAPE JELLY '� 99 TOWELS jroVl� 65e
I'll RAN
PEANUT. CREAMY not
BUTTER CRuncMv JAm
EXTRA STRENGTH
109 TYLENOL
TABLETS
1SSCT $059
�Tt �.
KEN L-RATION - DOG FOOD
TENDER CHUNKS 20,
NORTH CAROLINA GROWN US FANCY GOLDEN OR
-��uao�i!i88c
$2.69
Hygrade boiled or
BAKED HAM (sl,ced to order
Sandwich cut
LS$2.49
(sliced to order)
SWISS CHEESE
$1.99
Meat or
(sliced to order)
BEEF BOLOGNA lb $1.29
APPLES
FULL OF FLAVOR
RED RIPE
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SEEDLESS
GRAPES LB
PLUMP JUICY - FULL OF FLAVOR
CRAPES
49c
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59C
OREER FREESTONE
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Chicken
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!���-W1"r�� Greenville
.





Pag 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 26 S�pfmbf 1978
(
PAIR ELECTRONICS
(vvn�.X�. curies
ON THE SPOT
FINANCING AVAILABLE
STORE HOURS
8:30-5:30 WEEKDAYS
8:30-12:30 SATURDAY
SANSUI MODEL AU-517 DC INTEGRATED STEREO AMPLIFIER
SANSUI MODEL SC-2100 "DIRECT-O MATIC' STEREO CASSETTE DECK
THE ECU CLASS of 1990 walks through campus, apparently unaware of the studying which lies ahead
ECU, Latin scientists conduct
study on nervous system cells
By GEORGETTE HEDRICK
ECU Medical Writer
A dis-
cussion at a professional
meeting two years ago
resulted in a meeting this
summer between an ECU
physiologist and a Latin
American biophysicist who
together studied fo the
first time a fundamentally
important cell of the ner-
vous system and proved it
was possible to examine the
cell in other animals.
Dr. Edward M. Liber-
man, a professor at the
ECU School of Medicine,
spent three months at the
Venezuelan Institute for
Scientific Research colla-
borating with Dr. Jorge
Villegas, a professor of
biophysics who had done
extensive studies on var-
ious ceils of the nervous
system.
For several years Lie-
berman has been studying
the delicate balance of
sodium and potassium in
nerve cells, a ration that
must be maintained if
nerves are to perform pro-
perly. Villegas, on the other
hand, has been concen-
trating on Schwann cells
that surround the nerve
and are particularly sen-
sitive to neurotransmitters.
researchers have known
about the existence of
Schwannells, but Villegas'
lab is the only one in the
world to have studied and
recorded the electrical ac-
tivity of the cell, which is a
mere one fifty-thousandth
of an inch thick.
Villegas, whose work
had been done with tropical
squid, believed the results
of his experiments could be
duplicated with cells from
other animals. Lieberman
agreed and suggested the
use of his laboratory model,
the crayfish.
Using the same soph-
isticated techniques that
Villegas had used on squid,
the two were able to repeat
for the first time Villegas'
experiments on Schwann
cellsof the crayfish.
Schwann cells are im-
portant because of their
role in maintaining the
proper environment for
nerve cells, the vital com-
munication line in the body.
Many diseases of the ner-
vous system are associated
with abnormal functions of
the Schwann cells, and they
are essential in triggering
repairs to damaged nerves.
Lieberman is currently
preparing his lab to con-
tinue the studies started
this summer. His work will
be funded in part by a
two-year. $74,000 grant
from the National Science
Foundation.
He and Villegas will
continue to collaborate on
the interactions between
the various types of cells in
the nervous system. And
they plan to meet again this
winter back where they
started � at a professional
meeting where they will
present the results of this
summer's work to the sci-
entific community.
Breakfast
front 7 a.m.
to 11a.m.
specializing
in large
country ham or sausage
biscuits. Hot cakes. Scrambled
eggs with country ham or
sausage. Our 14 lb. beef
burgers are ground from fresh
Western Chuck. We have pure
soft served Ice cream. Also
serving ham and cheese,
chicken fillets, hot dogs, chili
and beans, french fries, apple
turnovers, and a variety of soft
drinks. Located on the corner
of 5th and Reade St. and on
Hwy. �64 in Washington.
V
V





1 L!
W W f K,
Art A
26 September 1978 rOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
iood Swamp
5all: a most
i
Music
Unusual one
word titles
enhance sf
Books
'�' � the first annual Hood Swamt
-op Program "ready and waiting' to provide jobs
f a ND peter Donviiie prepare
V -e b-t department
� of
education whicf �� . ��� classroom
study with planned an ed work
experience m va

�� led expi �
- erative Ed
ffic
- erative Ed
' . . � , u
teg r at
��-� an
- � nk
S It IS
it . - � � � icat
i � l( . �
of
i n bin
n a tota �� I icat
igram
The a
coop can be �
explorat e or a
exDei ei �
� �
� ne � � �. �
il
ir if teat � .i e
- � ' i f f i r -
ned � � are
while otI
ege w111 ompIe ffei
ils in it
. a
��- � the oper a 11 v Ed

i ariety I work-study
binal
1 � .ement Office
tei ship
m state government in an
ittempt to involve students
in public service, to �
courage students to enter
puhhc service careers, and
to make postsecondary cur
more meaningful
" ampus serv ice
learning opportunity
As part of the N( V10.
� , Huffman used his
math omj liter . �noe
background . ung a
computer . � n for tl
utilization and update of
, a e
gained at s
5ee v - Of f -
r'M - � � item for the
tate Musi f Natura HiStorV
prepares artwork for the e� hoepa"
me






Page 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 26 September 1978
Bergman classic will be
shown Wednesday night
The Student Union
Films Committee will
present Ingmar Bergman's
Smiles of a Summer Night
as a special film presenta-
tion this Wednesday night
at 8 p.m.
This rollicking comedy
is a classical exercise in the
spicy sport of partner
switching. At the beginning
the men have their proud
illusions, but before mys-
terious midsummer's night
is over, the women have
their men. Bergman s
brilliant style and structure
here lie halfway between
Shakespeare and the Marx
Brothers.
Fredrlk is a lustful
lawyer living a platonic
marriage with a virginal
wife, Anne. Henrik, his son
by his previous marriage, is
after Petra, the family
maid. Fredrik's old mis-
tress, an actress Desiree, is
in town, and he goes to see
her. But now she has a new
lover, the fierce Count
Malcolm, who in turn has a
fierce wife, Charlotte.
SEDUCTION SCENE
HIGHLIGHTSFILM
All are invited to
Desiree's mother's estate
for a weekend party. After
flirting here and there
Petra ends up in a hay stack
with Frid, the groom.
Charlotte tries to seduce
Fredrik, hoping to get him
back from Desiree. Anne,
ALL YOU
CAN EAT
for $2.39
Fish
Fry
miMirs
1890
Seafood
Dinner
Meal includes
Golden Crisp
French Fries.
Cole Slaw, Tartar
Sauce and the
wor Id's best
hushpuppies.
Fredrik's wife, discovers a
strong attraction for
Henrik.
Einar Lauritzen, of
SWEDISH FILMS, says of
Smiles of a Summer
Night This is something
rare in Swedish films
productionan erotic
comedy. Bergman has
chosen the period at the
end of the last century. By
doing so he may have
added to the piquancy of
his tale and avoided the
danger of being dated
which always threatens a
comedy. "Smiles of a
Summer Night" is a very
cleverly constructed film
and the complicated in-
trigue, involving many
people, has been clearly
presented
Films are open to ECU
students, faculty and staff
and their guests. Admis-
sion is by ID and Activity
cards or Mendenhall Cen-
ter Membership Card. All
films are shown in the
Mendenhall Student Center
Theatre.
Co-op works with students
continued from p. 7
Ices Administration, and
others.
Some placements are
parallel, which involve
working and attending
school simultaneously.
Other placements are for
the summer.
Co-op encourages stud-
ents to consider alternating
periods of study and work,
however, which involves a
decision to postpone grad-
uation. The ideal situation
might includea semester of
work followed by a semest-
er of school, with this
sequence followed for two
years.
After graduation the
student, if successful in the
program, would be assured
of a job at the place of his
internship.
Allen Daniel and Keith
Rhodes, both Computer
Science majors, followed a
similar sequence and had
two separate placements in
the Supply Department of
the Marine Corps Air Stat-
ion at Cherry Point. Allen
and Keith are now eligible
to return after graduation
for non-competitive job
placements.
Marilyn Turner em-
phasizes cooperation with
businesses as one of the
main reasons for co-op
success. "Margie White
from the Galleon Esplanade
in Nag's Head comes up
and spends hours inter-
viewing students to work.
She lets communication
arts students completely
redesign her displays, as
well as doing retail selling.
She's terrific about giving
them the full run of the
place
Business Education ma-
jor Dana Spear enjoyed her
Co-op experience in Nag's
Head.
"Working at the Gal-
leon Esplanade, I became a
part of theories and exper-
iences which I had prev-
iously only read about or
performed in a classroom
environment. Performing
my duties at work helped
me to realize the full
importance of my school
curriculum.
"Now that I have seen
my studies being used in
real life situations, I feel
that I am better prepared
to become a teacher and
pass on the things I have
learned to my students
she said.
The variety of academic
fields covered by Co-op is
too great to discuss
thoroughly in this aride.
Psychology majors have
been placed at Ca swell
Center, nursing majors at
Pitt Memorial Hospital, ed-
ucation majors in child care
centers, and social work
majors in the Department
of Corrections.
Several students were
employed in summer
campuses around the
country. One co-op partici-
pant was placed as Parks
and Recreation Conservat-
ion Director for the town of
Robersonville. A journal-
ism student worked in a
radio station. A student
interested in Library
Science worked in the N.C.
State Library system.
Marilyn Turner em-
phasizes that "Co-op works
with students of virtually all
majors, depending on de-
partment cooperation
Students are selected on
the basis of both personal
and academic accomplish-
ments. Qualified men, wo-
men, and handicapped
students are encouraged to
apply-
Any student interested
in joining the Cooperative
Education program should
contact their department
head or come by the main
office in room 313, Rawl, to
make an appointment with
one of the three coordinat-
ors, Karen Frye, Sandy
Green. or Dr. Barry
Davidson.
Students who apply be-
fore Oct. 14 will receive
priority for spring place-
ments.
Sun. thru Thun. 4:30-9:00
Frl. & Sat. 4:30-10:00
Potters create 'beautiful artwork9
fj
Friday's Seafood
23X1S. Evans St,
People come from as
nearby as Whynot and as
far away as England. They
come to see the potteries of
Moore County and Sea-
grove, - Cole, Jug-
town, M.L. Owens, Sea-
grove Teague, and West-
more.
Here potters create
beautiful and utilitarian ob-
jects using methods passed
from generation to genera-
tion and materials found
around them.
The "Raised in the
Mud" Pottery Celebration
to be held Oct 19-21 in
Robbins, is an attempt
to allow young craftsman
an opportunity to learn
from the hands and voices
of experience.
Speakers and workshop
leaders are coming togeth-
er with local potters to talk
about pottery for 3 days.
One of the most inter-
esting aspects of the Cele-
bration will be a panel
discussion of potters -
Dorothy Auman, Wayne
Cole, Charlie Craven, Joe
Owen, M.L. Owen, Vernon
Owen, Walter Owen and
Duck Teague. The panel
will be moderated by Ralph
Rinzler, Director of Folklife
Programs, Smithsonian In-
stitute.
Other events planned
are discussion on "The
Potter's Family a slide
show on "Traditional
Shapes and Glazes" and a
"History of Moore County
Pottery" Ten workshops
will be conducted by pot-
ters from Jugtown, Teague,
and Westmore Potteries
and others.
SPECIA L RA TE OFFERED
Registration for the 3
day event �� S32. which
includesa.lunch, barbecue,
and square dance on Friday,
printed materials, proceed-
ings, etc.
Residents of Anson,
Chatham, Hoke, Leem
Montgomery, Moore, Ran-
dolph, and Richmond coun-
ties may pay a special rate
of $22.
Daily registration is av-
ailable at the door for $3
with the exception of the
workshops which must be
pre-registered.
Brady paintings on
display in MSC gallery
1
HAIR IDENTITY
SOB N. Sylvan Drive
Off Hooker Road
For Men and Women
Haircuts for �5.00
Shampoo & Set JMJ.OO
00 off for perntanents j
76-471 or 7St-97SS
ECU News Bureau
Paintings and drawings
by M ichael Brady of Fayet-
teville, senior student in
the ECU School of Art, will
be on display Sept. 24-30 in
the gallery of Mendenhall
Student Center.
The show will include
five paintings in oil and five
drawings in pencil on geos-
sed paper.
Brady is a candidate for
the Bachelor of Fine Arts
degree with a major in
painting, and a member of
Phi Kappa Phi honor
society.
SUPERMARKET
�W
s
Gwalt ney Franks 12 oz. package
$ .89
Frosted Flakes is oz. box
78 (reg. $1.09)
TOTAL iz oz. box
68 (reg. $Oo)
Shasta 2 litre bottle
68
Hi-C (orange flavor only) 46 oz. can
2$l.OO
Welch's Grape Jelly 3 lb. jar
$1.28
Jell-O 3 oz. packages
5Sl.OO
Wiener King
F00TLONG
AND FANCY.
WOO 129 15b 1OT
master charge
TMr INTERBtNK CtPH
FREE cart service
available for students.
The Wiener King footlong Frankfooter is a fancy hot dog.
It's a full 12 inches long with a frankly delicious taste that
really measures up to size. Each Frankfooter is topped
just right with mustard,freshly-chopped onions, and extra
meaty chili. And when you buy one at your
Wiener King� restaurant you'll get the second one free
with this coupon. So come to Wiener King, and bring along
a friend for a footlong and fancy Frankfooter. FREE!
twVfVa�kf"ooters"are
better than one.
ESPECIALLY WHEN ONE IS FREE!
Buy one frankly delicious footlong
Frankfooter and get a second one free.
Please present this coupon before ordering. Limit one coupon
per customer. vbid where prohibited by law. Coupon good
through jpt jq
1011 Charles St.
He has also been art
director for the Tar Heel
Magazine, which is pub-
lished In Greenville.
His parents are Mr. and
M rs. James E. Brady of 695
Wiltshire Drive, Fayet-
teville.
EVENING COURSE IN
WATERCOLOR
A non-credit evening
course in watercolor paint-
ing will be offered this fall
by ECU.
Since the course is
designed to cover the basic
fundamentals of the water-
color medium, no previous
art instruction is necessary
to enroll.
The class will meet on
Tuesdays, Oct. 4 - Dec. 5,
and will be instructed by
artist Warren Chamberlain,
retired faculty member of
the Scool of Art.
Participants will be in-
volved in learning the tools
and equipment of watercol-
or painting, experimentat-
ion with various techni-
ques, the actual painting of
still lifes in class and,
possibly, some outside
painting.
The course is of benefit
to beginners or experienced
painters, and its object is to
encourage students to ex-
press themselves and their
ideas for pleasure.
Information about the
course and about art sup-
plies needed is available
from the Office of Non-
Credit Programs, Division
of Continuing Education
757-6143.
M Riggan Shoe
�P��r Shop
Downtown Greenville
111 W. 4th Street
NKDTOttlAXAFTHl
A DAY IN CLASSES?
THE SUNSET
"t5iST!IKT
? 4
rittllBf' ft ���
stereo

MhMHMu!) � I '��(� rilMHHI
? fl�GP-4.ri
mwin





26 September 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 9
continued from p. 71
!nTaflbnnnralleX,tr.a0rdlnna,re wh,ch ,s �lf � quality
east t'nA9lalofhiorks.ln (oft , he lets no one down
easy, if he lets anyone down at all that is.
is nnt�rJ�HeXFaln UbikWhat tne word actualy ��ns
"�not totally discovered until the closing chapters of the
oook, and even with a tight explanation, still leaves the
reader mystified.
A man by the name of Glen Runciter could be a good
starting point. Mr. Runciter is head of Runciter Associates,
an agency specializing in the training and leasing out of
telepaths.
One of his top preoogs (precognitionists) is seemingly
lost and he decides to consult his dead wife about it. This is
achieved via an example of one of Dick's profound abilities
to stimulate the reader's imagination.
Runciter's dead wife is stored in a kind of suspended
animation called cold-pac; she is clinically dead, but able to
i
communicate with Runciter through the systems built in to
the cold-pac coffin.
Runciter has never fully understood the processes
involved but enjoys and appreciates the contact he makes
with his wife through this method.
And while he doesn't understand how It works, little
does he know what goes on in cold-pac. Think it's just a
talkin coffin, huh?
Enter Joe Chip. He examines the abilities of preoogs
before they enter into the firm.
A young woman named Pat is to be scanned by Chip,
who finds out that she is not an ordinary precog: she can go
back in time and alter parts of the present. After Chip
makes his examination of her, he writes two underlined
crosses under her credits.
The meaning, of the symbols: Hazard. Dangerous. And
the plot thickens.
Chip, Runciter, Pat, and some other employees go to
Luna where there is an accident and Runciter Is killed.
Something strange seems to be happening now.
Pat regresses time and they are mysteriously back on
Earth, and then, and then
What is Ubik?
Ubik is everything. It made the suns, the worlds. It
created life. It is forever, undying. It is Ubik and it shall
always beI think
Dick had written a truly monumental novel. It has so
many plot changes, sub-plots (which all tie in to the original
plot) characters disappearing and reappearing, that it must
be read, for it cannot be told. Read thoroughly.
Now, what next? There'3 plenty, a varied and diverse
selection of interesting titles to choose from: Gateway ,
by Frederik Pohl; 334 by Thomas M. Disch; Stan by
A.E. Van Vogt; DorsaiP. by Gordon R. Dickson;
Norstrilia by Cordwainer Smith and more and more
And all you gotta do is read. Simple.
Who Are You 'captures the turmoil of youth
and relevancy in powerful, violent music'
By EDWARD KALE
Staff Writer
The Who has been a
name synonymous with
rock and roll for over a
decade. Pete Townshend,
spokeman for the Who,
rallied the banners of teen-
age rebellion behind him
with My Generation in
1965. and through the
album The Who By Num-
bers captured the turmoil of
youth and relevancy in his
powerful and violent music.
Never more than rud-
imentary musicians except
maybe Entwhistle, the Who
were always a "live" band.
It was the intensity of
their visual performance,
along with their "power-
chord rock crescendos
that moved audiences'
souls
Having witnessed this
spectacle, who could ever
forget Daltrey's michro
phone-twtrling strut,
Moon's wild, wild wailing,
Entwhistle's classic stoic-
ism, and Townshend's in-
sane leaping.
It was just a fraction of
this unharnessed energy
that carried over onto their
albums and made their
recording successful.
As is often the case in
rock music, however, the
Who are faced with the
difficulty of approaching
middle-age and direction. If
their way of dealing with
that difficulty is their
latest album Who Are You,
then I'm afraid they
haven't found an answer; or
maybe the answer is that all
that previously expended
energy has left them tired.
That is certainly the
feeling you get after listen-
ing to Who Are You. The
songs, indeed the whole
album is tired, not offen-
sive, but very tired.
LYRICS SEEM TO HAVE
BEEN WRITTENSIMPLY
TO FILL SPACE
The lyrics seem to have
been written simply to fill
space. Gone are the hard
hitting, soul searching dec-
larations that Towshend
was once bubbling.
The music itself lacks
energy, enthusiasm,
power. The use of non-rock
instrumentation (the string
arrangements in particular)
is a cop-out and definitely
disappointing from some-
one with the rock and roll
roots of the Who. Three of
the compositions, Had
Enough, 905 and
Trick Of The Light are
John Entwhistle's. They
are passable tunes, but just
aren't the Who and really
don't belong on the album.
On only one cut does the
Who come close to captur-
ing their past glory. This is
the title track - Who Are
You. The old Townshend
speaks:
"I woke up in a Soho
doorway, a
policeman knew my name
He said you can go io sleep
at home tonight
if you can get up and walk
away
I staggered back to the
underground and
the breeze blew back my
hair
I remember throwing
punches around
and preaching from my
chair"
Alright! There's the old
Who!
HAT'S ON!
TONITETHE ZN LITTLE 818 PRESENT
A MOST UNUSUAL HAT CONTEST
AND FUND RAISING PARTY.
ALLNITEAT THE
ANDTHUR.NITE ONLY THE MOST
HIGH POWERED ROCK N ROLL
SHOW ON THE EAST COAST.
RAZZMATAZZ
Fri.Endof Week Party 43 7 Sun. Ladies Nlte
It is unfortunate that a
group as great as the Who,
not having toured in over
three years, and lacking the
freshness that playing be-
fore live audiences gives
you, keeps on releasing
records (and the Who was
born playing live). This
album is an example of that
kind of sterility.
And with the tragic
death of drummer Keith
Moon it is doubtful that the
Who will have a chance to
redeem themselves. I doubt
seriously whether, in their
present state of stateness,
the Who will be able to
overcome the loss of some-
one who's been an integral
part of the band for 13
years. (The album cover is
very strange. On it, Moon
is sitting in a chair that has
printed on it - NOT TO BE
TAKEN AWAY - spooky!)
It saddens me to know
that never again will I
experience that supercharg
-ed energy that was the
Who. In the light of the
multitude of their past
achievements, however, I
won't have any trouble
overlooking this past album
and remembering the Who
as one of the greatest ever;
the essence of rock and roll.
lie WafifH
� �
OPEN 24 HOURS 10TH ft EVANS
GREENVILLE'S ONLY
PARTY BEVERAGE STORE
Stroh't
Six Packs
12m. $1J7
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mum �)l���ntoMHMMo'fQMMV &HQM
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SHOWS DAILY 2:00 - 350 - 5:40 - 7:30 - 950
ALL SEATS MON. - FRI. 1.50 TIL 5:30 P.M.
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with purchase
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6:00 p.m. until closing.
MonTnesWed.
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Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 26 September 1978
ECU smashes Cajuns, 38-9
Green, Collins pace Pirates
Hall eludes taehler
iERALD Hall eludes a USL defender in
game in Lafayette La Hall returned four
ds against the Caiuns as the Pirates posted
ve 38-9 victory Photo by John H. Grogan
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
LAFAYETTE, LA. - ECU head coach Pat Dye figured it
was simply a matter of time before the Pirates' sluggish
offense began to jell.
And Saturday night against Southwestern Louisiana,
ECU's rushing and passing attack was near perfect as the
Pirates exploded for 35 first half points to destroy the Ragin
Cajun' 38-9.
What happened in the first half tonight was what I've
been expecting since the first game this year said Dye
after the game. "I'm real proud of our offense. They were
impressive this week during practice and they went out
there and worked hard tonight "
The Pirates sent most of the 14,603 fans in Cajun
Stadium packing after the first half with a 35 point outburst
which gave ECU an insurmountable 35-3 bulge at the
break
With Leander Green at the controls, the Pirates
amassed 371 total yards in the first half including 15 first
downs.
"Leander threw the ball real well praised Dye. "He
was near perfect. Anthony Collins also ran well and the
entire offensive line came off the ball well. You have to do
those type things well to get 38 points against a team which
had given up only 20 points in four halves of play
John Roveto put the Cajuns on the scoreboard first with
a 29 yard field goal which came with 11 :55 remaining in the
first quarter
James Freer set up ECU'S initial touchdown when he
recovered a fumbled punt on the USL 39 yard line. From
there. Green engineered a nifty five play drive capped when
halfback Eddie Hicks went around the left side 15 yards for
ECU's first touchdown. Bill Lamm added the first of five
conversions and the Pirates moved ahead 7-3 with 4:30.
Gerald Hall returned a punt 27 yards on ECU's next
possession and the Pirates were knocking on the Cajuns
door again. This time, Steve Greer moved ECU 54 yards in
severla plays and pitched to Mike Hawkins who scooted
around the right side 14 yards for the touchdown. The Bucs
led 14-3 and the real fireworks were yet to come.
Although Bill Lamm missed field goal attempts from 42
and 36 yards early in the second quarter, Green ignited the
Pirates passing attack with two straight touchdown passes
to split end Terry Gallaher.
The first one came with 6:55 to play when Gallaher
made a diving catch near the left sidelines and fell into the
end zone. The Pirates came right back on their next
possession and Green found the shifty Gallaher wide open
over the middle on a post pattern. The two touchdown
receptions, which covered 27 and 26 yards, were Gallaher's
12th and 13th career scoring catches at ECU and the Pirates
opened up a 28-3 lead.
Then with seven seconds remaining ECU's Cliff
Williams recovered a Southwestern Louisiana fumble by
quarterback Ken Matthews and the Pirates had time for
one more play.
Green dropped back and found Billy Ray Washington
over the middle for a 38 yard scoring play and the Cajuns
were all but finished.
Southwestern Louisiana's John Roveto added field goals
of 49 and 44 yards in the second half while Bill Lamm
accounted for ECU's only second half points when he
connected on a 25 yarder late in the third quarter.
"We looked like the old ECU out there tonight said
Dye. "We can take this game and build on it and certainly
develop the team we're capable of having
Anthony Collins was ECU's topgroundgainer picking up
112 yards on 13 carries while fullback Theodore Sutton
added 86 yards on 15 carries. Green finished the night with
seven of ten passes for 169 yards and carried five times for
another 16 yards.
Summer hunts Cajun
LINEBACKER TOMMY SUMMER drops back to help
secondary with pass coverage against the Ragm Cau
Photo by John H Grog
rreen Gallaher ignite Pirates9powder keg
eW ROGERS
� tor
A
oach Pat Dye
eek, the
Mas just
.aiting
3me along
ise
�rback
een provided
� iy night
ffense ex-
touted
se.
icksonv e native
eat 39 yard
e ' rst quarter.
three more
the second
e Pirates cruis-
. ctory over
tern Louisiana at
in Stadium.
played well in the
nd half of the North
game and it gave
offense a start ex-
ed Green. We're fin-
getting things rolling
k after tonight
keep rolling
It was a flawless per-
formance b Green and
certainly his finest effort of
the season. He completed 7
of 10 passes for 169 yards,
carried five times for 16
yards and accounted for 185
total yards.
"They left the seams
and the post and gave our
receivers the advantage
a th their one-on-one cov-
erage, observed Green.
The offensive line came
off the ball well and gave
me good protection They
really got the job done
tonight
Like Green, split end
Terry Gallaher also had his
share of problems in the
first three games, but his
two touchdown recpetions
against the Cajuns clearly
overshadowed his previous
performances this season.
"Everything was just
clicking tonight said
Gallaher "We threw a lot
more in practice this week.
We've known all along
we're capable of having a
game like this. It's just
been one or two little things
that have stopped our ex-
ecution
Gallaher s first touch-
down broke the ECU record
for the most number of
career TD catches. And his
second touchdown grab
gave the Warner Robbins,
Ga. native 13 career scores.
"Leander threw the ball
well noted Gallaher. "I
don't think he threw the
ball poorly in our other
games, it was just our
timing was better tonight.
He seemed more confident
out there
Pirate halfback Anthony
Collins also turned in his
top performance of the
season He ran over and
around Cajun defenders for
112 yards on 13 carries and
also grabbed two passes for
another 12 yards.
"We had a good pract-
ice this week and every-
one's concentration seemd
much better tonight said
Collins who's longest run of
the game was a 39 yarder
Leander Green
which came early in the
second qaurter "After
those two losses to North
Carolina and N.C. State we
felt like this was a must
game for us. We really
needed to have this one
Collins along with his run-
ning mates Theodore Sut-
ton and Eddie Hicks ripped
off huge chunks of yardage
against the Southwestern
Louisiana defense which
had allowed only 20 points
in its first two games of the
season. Sutton picked up 86
yards on 15 tries while
Hicks added 23 yards on
five carries including a 15
yard touchdown run.
"The offensive line was
really blowing them off the
field said Collins. "You
couldn't ask for any finer
effort from them It helps
the whole team's confid-
ence to have a game like
this, but from now on we've
jist to play games like this if
we expect to win
Even Pat Dye was
pleased with the offensive
line and admitted the
Pirates looked more like
ECU teams he remembered
from previous years
"We were a lot more
aggressive offensively
said Dye. The backs ran
well and the line came off
the ball well. We hadn't
had our old personality and
we weren't knocking people
down coming off the ball
But tonight we looked like
th old ECU to me. We came
and did what we had to
do
ECU-USL Stats
ECU 14 21 3 0 -38
USL 3 0 3 3-9
ECU-Hicks 15 run (Lamm
kick1
ECU-Hawkins 14 run
(Lamm kick)
ECU-Gallaher 27 pass from
Green (Lamm kick)
ECU-Gallaher 26 pass from
Green (Lamm kick)
ECU-Washington 38 pass
from Green (Lamm kick)
RUSHiNG
ECU-Sutton 15-86. Collins
13-112. Green 5-16. Hicks
6-23. Greer 6-12 - iwkins
3-16. Harreli 2-14. Cobb
4-18. Wiley 4-17. Wash
ton 1-12. Bently 1-0. Treva-
than l-(-1). USL-Pmkston
10-40. Pnce 8-19. Durant
7-16
PASSING
ECU -Green 7-10-1-169,
Trevathan 1-2-0-2. USL-
Matthews 3-15-1-43, P �
ston 3-4-0-22. Guidry 0-2-0-
0
RECEIVING
ECU-Washingt 4-1
Gallaher 2-53. Collins 2
USL-Smith 4-31. Reia
1-27. Grav 1-7
Simon new food manager
Pirates praise dining room
1
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Assistant Sports Editor
rootbali players seem to have the reputation of having
� . arge appetites. The ECU Pirates are no
And the players are displaying that more this
than ever before.
he Coaches Corner, or training room, has long been
the dming room for all Pirate meals. But the training room
has taken on a completely new look this year Head coach
Pat Dye and Sports Promotions Director Wayne Newman
designed plans to revise the room last year.
Located in the basement of Jones Dormitory, the room
was transformed this summer from what linebacker Tommy
Summer called "just plain sloppy" to what is now a very
nice, comfortable place to eat The walls are trimmed
around the room with a purple and gold stripe. The room,
that once brought horror to the minds of some players, now
gives them a special feeling.
"I don't feel like I'm eating in a hole anymore said
split end Terry Gallaher "I feel like I'm working for
something now. When I leave practice, this is a rewarding
place to come
The room is not all that has changed added
Gallaher. "The food is much much better. They
(Servomation Food Corporation) seem to take more care in
preparing our meals. Last year the situation was obvious.
The food was really not good
It was almost unbearable quipped quarterback
Leander Green. "I'm very impressed with the room and the
food
With everyone complaining, Servomation, which
prepares meals for students at Jones Cafeteria and several
other locations on campus, decided to make some changes
after last year Servomation brought In an entirely new
staff, headed by meal coordinate a Simon.
"Servomation has really done a tremendous job noted
Dye. The effort they have put forth is really great
Dye's players are equally impressed. "There is a lot
more variety said Green. "I had no idea we would be so
much better off this year than we were before
Several players had praise for meal coordinator Ira
Simon. "Ira really cares about what we eat said Summer.
Summer's counterpart at linebacker, Mike Brewington,
also praised Simon. "He is the main reason things are
better this year
Pirate assistant coach Wayne Hall, who is in charge of
the players at the meals, also felt Simon had exceeded all
expectations. Before we never saw the manager. I got the
impression that he didn't care. But Ira is out here everyday.
He wants to know what we think. He seems to put a
personal touch in everything he does
Simon says he makes himself available to theiplayers
because he wants to do the best job he can. "Successful
business depends upon the happiness of the client said
Simon. "These players and the students are my clients. I
try to put forth a personal effort to talk to them all. I try to
be responsive to all their suggestions, ideas, and
complaints. I want to make everything as right as
possible
Simon said that Servamation was also purchasing better
food than last year. "We try to buy the very best food we
can on our budget. The students and the players felt we
weren't doing this before. Now we're working with them
and hopefully they are more satisfied.
Even though the room and the meals have changed
Tommy Summer says he likes another item which was
added to the training room. "I love that ice cream bar. It's
all you can eat. It's popular with all the players.
Surely all the players like the new Coaches Corner. It's
just another one of many steps towards the big time.
UNC-Charlotte downs ECU
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Assistant Sports Editor
"We had four or five
golden opportunities we
just didn't cash in on
This was the assess-
ment of ECU soccer coach
Brad Smith after the Pir-
ates suffered a 3-2 overtime
loss at the hands of UNC-
Charlotte last Sunday.
"The game was very close
throughout said Smith.
"We played pretty good,
but we still have not come
together yet
The Pirates were led by
goalie Kevin Tyus, who was
highly praised by Smith for
several excellent saves, a-
long with Duane Bailey.
"Duane played a strong,
aggressive game said
Smith. "I couldn't have
asked much more from
him
The match was very
intense throughtout. By the
end of the contest, both
teams were playing minus
one player, as each team
suffered an ejection.
Jimmy Kautsacalis o-
pened the scoring for UNC-
Charlotte with 14:02 gone
in the first half. Phil Martin
scored half, Steve Shack-
leford scored for the 49ers
and
Jimmy Kautsacalis o-
pened the scoring for UNC-
Charlotte with 14:02 gone
in the fiorst half. Phil
Martin scored for the Pir-
ates at 41:35 to even the
score 1-1 at halftime.
In the second half,
Steve Shackleford scored
for the 49ers and Jeff
Karpovich countered for
the Pirates, ending all
regulation time scoring.
The two teams agreed
to play two ten minute
overtime periods when time
expired and with the score
still tied at 2-2. Ahmen
Fashola scored for the
49ers with only 4 24 gone in
the first overtime period to
give the 49ers a 3-2 lead.
The two teams then went
scoreless for the final 15:36
of the match.
"We controlled the en-
tire second overtime per-
iod said Smith. In the last
two or three minutes, we
missed out on at least three
opportunities
Smith says the reason
the Pirates failed to score at
the end of the match was
because they are still un-
familiar with each other.
"We have about ten fresh-
men that get a great deal of
playing time said Smith.
"The college game is an all
Pirate soccer action
new experience for the
And our older guys aren't
used to having so many
mobile people to pass off
to.
"We're creating the
opportunities; we're just
not taking advantage of
them continued Smith
"But things will get better
as we go along. see
improvement every game.
Later in the year we'll pick
these things up





f t
T f
fflHaUctivities continue
Smith captures golf title
By JOHN EVANS
Staff Writer
Trailing by two strokes
at the halfway point, Mark
Smith fired the best round
of the tournament on Fri-
day and won the intramural
golf championship with a
36-hole total of 151, seven
over par.
Smith had been tied for
second after firing a five
over-par 77 In his first
round, but passed first
round leader Chris Joseph
and edged Joseph by one
stroke. Joseph fired a sec-
ond round 77 to go with his
opening round of 77, to
finish at right over par 152.
Smith and Joseph ran
away with the tournament
as four strokes separated
Intramural football action
College
Graduates
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SPAING DAY
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A Representative from The National Center tor Paralegal Training s
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Suite 430 Atlanta. Georgia 30326. (404) 266-1060.
FOREST VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
IN FARM VILLE
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Joseph and the third-place
finisher, Lee Fuicher. Ful-
cher shot a pair of 78s for a
156 total for the tourn-
ament. In fourth place was
Cam Dudley at 158. In fifth
place finished Bill Bugbee
at 159.
Bill Greene finished
sixth at 160, but only after
firing a second round, he
ballooned to an 84 and all
but eliminated himself from
a crack at the individual
title. There was a four-way
tie for seventh place at 161;
with Kevin Cameron, Ed
Clark, Phil Hunt and Barry
McCarthy finishing in the
tie.
The team championship
was won by Tau Kappa
Epsilon fraternity with a
team total of 654 strokes.
The Tekes were three
strokes back after the first
round, but fired a final
round team score of 312 to
run away with the title. Phi
Kappa Tau, at 668, finished
in second place. The Phi
Taus led after the first
round with a 339 total and
had a team total of 329 for
the second round. Kappa
Sigma was third at 678 and
Kappa Alpha finished in
fourth with a 687 team
total. Only nine teams had
four players qualify and
were eligible for the team
title.
Awards were also pre-
sented to golfers with the
low net, longest drive and
closest to the pin.
Lee Fuicher won low net
with a 142 total.
The closest to the pin
contest was won by Kevin
Cameron with a shot that
finished 12 feet from the
pin on the ninth hole. Cralg
Coleman had the longest
drive on the second hole,
whopping his drive 298
yards.
The winning Teke team
was made up of Joseph,
Don Troutman, who fired
163 for 36 holes; Mike
Acrbe, with 166; and Mike
Mohr, with 173.
Last Wednesday's Fris-
bee contest was won by
John Beavins of Jones
dormitory. Paul Bulluck of
Scott finished second, in-
dependent Paul Cassidy
finished third and Scott
participant Bobby Moore
was fourth.
Beavins won only one
of the five individual cat-
egories, winning the dist-
ance throw with a throw of
201 feet. He finished sec-
ond in the competition for
the hang time with a time of
7.61 seconds.
Other winners of the
individual events were
Randy Stallings (Curve
Throw), Doug Myers (Bui-
Iseye Throw), Robert Barn-
hill (Hula Hoop), and
Charles Winker (Hang
Time).
A total of 79 students
participated in the Frisbee
tournament.
In co-rec softball action,
the H.D. Studs, the Pep-
pers and the Time Outs all
stand undefeated with 3-0
marks after three weeks of
action.
ECU uomen98 volleyball team in action
Lady Bucs defeated UlNC-Greensboro 3-1
State women
top Pirates
in tennis
N.C. State's women's
tennis team rolled over
EastCaroiina last Thursday
for a 9-0 victory.
The Lady Wolfpack won
every set, most by a sub-
stantial margin. The match
was ECU'S first of the
season, while State is 1-1.
The Lady Buc's next
match is this Friday at the
Methodist Invitational in
Fayetteviile.
TUESDAY
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Special NY Strip Steak Dinner
Just
(Reg 12.99)
Includes steak, large baked potato, roll, and
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INCLUDES FREE SALAD BAR
Phone: 756-5788
264 By Pass
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Peqo 12 FOUNTAINHEAD 26 September 1978
Upsets highlight NCAA action
Tide, Irish, Bruins fall
By
HERSCHEL NISSENSON
A P Sports Writer
The luck of the Irish
appears to be changing
for the worse.
For the first time in 15
years, the Fighting Irish of
Notre Dame have a two-
game losing streak. They
suffered a 28-14 loss to
fifth-ranked Michigan Sat-
urday after a 3-0 set back to
Missouri in their own
opener.
There also is the possi-
bility of Notre Dame falling
out of the Top Twenty in
the next Associated Press
college football poll and
little chance of the Irish
defending last year's na-
tional championship.
And with Purdue, Mi-
chigan State and Pitt as the
next three opponents, an
0-5 record isn't that far-
fetched.
In the first meeting
between the two Midwest-
ern powers In 35 years,
Notre Dame took a 14-7
halftime lead against Mi-
chigan on a 6-yard touch-
down pass from Joe Mon-
tana to Dennis Grindinger
and Vagas Ferguson's 4-
yard TD run. But Rick
Leach, who scored Mi-
chigan's first touchdown,
fired second-half touch-
down passes of 5 and 17
yards to Doug Marsh and a
40-yarder to Ralph Clayton.
"The story of the game
was the second half said
Michigan Coach Bo Schem-
bechler. "Rick was a little
tight in the first half 3 of 14
for 21 yards and I told him,
'Loosen up; we'll keep
coming to you
Leach's first touchdown
pass followed a Notre Dame
fumble and the other two
came after interceptions.
Notre Dame was ac-
companied to the loser's
circle by Alabama, which
finished second to the Irish
last season in the ratings
and had been ranked No. 1
this year. The Crimson Tide
were beaten by seventh-
ranked Southern California
24-14 as Charles White
rushed for 199 yards � a
record against Bear Bryant
at Alabama � and one
touchdown and Paul Mc-
Donald threw two scoring
passes to K evin W illiams.
The five teams directly
behind Alabama in last
weeks ratings � Arkan-
sas, Oklahoma, Penn State,
Michigan and Texas � all
won, but only Oklahoma
had an easy time.
The Sooners, tied for
third with Penn State,
rambled for 560 yards on
the ground and crushed
Rice 66-7 as Thomas Lott
and J.O. Watts each scored
twice.
Meanwhile, runner-up
Arkansas needed second-
half touchdown runs by Ben
Cowinsand Ron Calcagni to
shake off stubborn Okla-
homa State 19-7, Penn
State made up a 9-point
third-period deficit on
Chuck Fusina's 16-yard
scoring pass to Scott Fizt-
kee and Matt Suhey's
3-yard TD run and downed
Southern Methodist 26-21,
and No. 6 Texas held off
Wyoming 17-3 despite an
offense that managed just
187 yards.
Rounding out the Top
Ten Kansas upset eighth-
ranked UCLA 23-24. No. 9
Texas A&M hammered
Boston College 37-2, and
No. 10 Louisiana State
edged big underdog Wake
Forest 13-11.
In the Second Ten,
11th-ranked Pitt rallied to
beat Temple 20-12, No. 13
Florida State trimmed Mi-
ami, Fla. 31-21, Indiana
upset No. 15 Washington
14-7, No. 16 Ohio State
trounced Minnesota 27-10,
No. 17 Missouri drubbed
Mississippi 45-14,
Anthony Collins heads downfield for big gain
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BOB THALMAN
Thalman
suffers
chest pains
LEXINGTON. Va. AP
After a three-day ab-
sence due to chest pains,
feisty Bob Thalman expects
to be back on the field
Tuesday in his job as
football coach at Virginia
M ihtary Institute.
The 54-year-old Thal-
ma, m his eighth season as
coach of the Keydets. was
hospitalized about 1 .30
a.m. Saturday m Charle-
ston, S.C
Thalman was forced to
listen to the radio Saturda,
night as VMI dropped a
14-3 Southern Conference
decision to The Citadel tl
offensive coordinator Joe
Bush in charge of the team
But a VMI spokesman
said all results were neg-
ative when Thalman was
put through a series of 'ests
as Roper Hospital in Char-
leston. and he was allowed
to fly home late Sunday
Imagine a world
without
WHALES
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Only GREENPEACE
Hands between
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the harpoonerfs cannon.
Entire whale species
are threatened
with extinction, but
we cent save them.
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to:
Greenpeace Foundation
240 Fort Mason
San Francisco, CA
94123
Imagine a world without
GREENPEACE
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Title
Fountainhead, September 26, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 26, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.512
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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