Fountainhead, September 19, 1978






Vol. 55 No. 68
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
19 September 1978
!nMiddleEast
Framework
By BARRY SCHEID
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON (AP)-Pres-
dent Carter announced to
the world Sunday night that
a "framework for peace" in
te Middle East had been
reached at his summit
meeting with Egypt's An-
war Sadat and Prime Min-
�ster of Israel. Menachim
Begin
Planked by President
Sadat and Prime Minister
Begin, he said documents
signed by the two leaders
will provide that Israel
may live in peace within
secure borders
The far-reaching accord
commits Egypt and Israel
to work to conclude a peace
treaty within three
months. The treaty would
be the first formal re-
cognition of the Jewish
state by any of its Arab
neiahbors since the crea-
tion of Israel in 1948.
Begin, in a friendly
challenge to Sadat, urged
that the treaty be concluded
before three months e-
lapse. Sadat applauded the
overture and nodded in
agreement.
Carter said Israel would
withdraw its forces from
the West Bank of the
Jordan River. The agree-
ment allows the Israelis to
maintain a security pre-
sence in specified bases
while ending its military
rule of the territory, taken
m the Six Day War of 1967.
Administration officials,
who declined to be iden-
tified, said no American
troops would be involved in
the security arrangements
negotiated at the summit,
although they did not rule
out American involvement
sometime in the future.
The 1.1 million Pale-
stinian Arabs living on the
West Bank and in the Gaza
Strip on the Sinai "will
have the right to participate
in the determination of
their own future Carter
said.
RELA TIONS
ESTABLISHED
On the Sinai front,
Carter said, Israel would
withdraw its forces quickly,
with the result being es-
tablishment of diplomatic
relations between the two
old foes in a 30-year
conflict.
Carter's appearance
with Sadat and Begin at the
White House was nation-
ally televised. Flags of the
United States, Israel and
Egypt stood behind them.
The U.S. president,
looking back on 13 days of
"long negotiation ac-
knowledged that at times
the talks faltered and it
seemed that the patience of
Sadat and Begin would run
out.
But Carter said
results exceeded all
pectations.
the
ex-
SADAT SPEAKS
Sadat, speaking next at
a ceremony in the White
House East Room, thanked
Carter for fulfilling his
commitment to serving as a
"full partner" in the talks.
Sadat expressed gra-
titude to Carter for his
"spirit and dedication" and
concluded with a prayer
that the "spirit of Camp
David" would mark a new
chapter in Middle East
history.
Begin, in a tribute to
Carter, said"he worked
harder than our forefathers
did in building the pyra-
midsof Egypt
The gentle reference to
the Biblical period of Jew-
ish slavery drew appre-
ciative chuckles from the
dignitaries on hand.
"The president of the
United States won the
day Begin said. "Peace
now celebrates a great
victory for the nations of
Egypt and Israel and for all
mankind
In a dramatic last-
minute breakthrough, the
leaders of Egypt and Israel
commit themselves at the
Camp David summit to
working toward a peace
treaty and eventual autono-
my for Palestinians in the
Gaza Strip and the West
Bank of the Jordan River.
AN ECU STUDENT hits the books to make sure
he stays ahead
Crafts center teaches classes in macrame,
ceramics, jewelry, silkscreen and pottery
THE CRAFT CENTER at Mendenhall offers many opportunities for self
expression.
Internationally known surgeon
joins ECU Med school faculty
ECU News Bureau
An internationally
known surgeon who pione-
ered techniques in vascular
surgery has joined the ECU
School of Medicine
Dr. Charles Rob. a
native of England, will
practice general and vas-
cular surgery at the medical
school and will 3 respon-
sible for the development of
a vascular laboratory.
The lab will provide
consultation services to
area physicians seeing pat-
ients with particular vas-
cular problems.
Rob comes to ECU from
the University of Rochester
School of Medicine and
Dentistry where he was a
professor and chairman of
the Department of Surgery
for 1 7 years He served as
consulting surgeon to the
Genesse. Highland, Roch-
ester General and St.
Marys Hospitals in Roch-
ester.
Rob received his M.D.
from Cambridge University
and completed his post-
graduate traingin at St.
Thomas' Hospital, London.
He served as professor of
surgery at the University of
London before coming to
the United States in 1960 to
accept an appointment as
chairman of surgery at the
University of Rochester.
Now is a good time to
learn that hobby or craft
you've been interested in
but never took the time to
try. Learn how to weave a
pillow or wall hanging
silkscreen your own design
on a T-shirt; make your own
lique baskets at mini-
rrum expense; or make a
lecture frame, bookshelf, or
Vanning planter. All you
ive to do is join the Crafts
�nter at Mendenhall Stud-
It Center and workshops
Jn these crafts and more
�toill be available to you.
All full-time students,
student spouses, faculty,
and staff are eligible to
participate as well as dep-
endents of faculty and staff
who are aged thirteen or
over. Upon payment of a
$10 semester Crafts
Center membership fee, an
individual may register for
any of the available work-
shops without additional
charges, excluding costs of
personal supplies
All persons must
register for workshops at
the Crafts Center during
regular operating hours, 3
p.m. until 10 p.m Mon.
through Fri and 10 a.m.
until 3 p.m Sat. The final
"day to register is Sat Sept.
30 and class space is
limited. Also, no fee re-
funds will be made after the
workshop registration dead
-line.
For those interested in
joining the Crafts Center
without taking advantage of
available workshops, mem-
berships are sold any time
-during regular operating
;hours.
C There will be a work-
;hop in basic darkroom
techniques. Students wil
develop, and print their
own black and white film.
There are two sections,
Section A and Section B.
Section A meets on Tues-
day nights from 6 p.m. to 9
p.m. on Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24,
31, and Nov. 7. Section B
will meet at the same time,
but on Thursday nights,
from Oct. 5 to Nov. 9.
There will also be basic
instruction in pottery. The
instruction will include in-
struction in wheel-throwing
and hand building tech-
niques, glazingand firing
of clay. Again, there are
.two section, one of which
meets on Monday nights
from Oct. 2 through Nov. 6,
and another which meets
on Thursday nights from
Oct. 5 through Nov. 9.
Floor loom weaving 1 is
the subject of another work-
shop. Projects include hand
-bags, pillows and wall-
hangings. Section A will
meet on Monday and Wed-
nesday nights at 6 p.m. on
Oct. 2, 4, and 11. Section B
will meet on Monday and
Wednesday nights from 6
p.m. to 9 p.m. on Oct. 16,
18 and 25.
A basic woodworking
class will be offered from 6
p.m. to 9 p.m. on Wednes-
day nights from Oct. 4
through Nov. 1. Students
will learn techniques in
woodworking, including
staining, finishing, and
completing small projects
such as spice racks, plant-
ers and jewelry boxes.
A good possibility for
those early Christmas shop-
pers would be to take the
quilting class. The class
meets from 7 p.m. to9 p.m.
on Tuesdays from Oct. 3
through Nov. 7. The class
will teach basic techniques
for quilting designs, such
as the cathedral window,
the star, and the mosaic.
A silkscreen will be
offered on Thursday nights
at 6 p.m. It will be held on
Oct. Z, 12, 19, 26 and Nov.
2. The class will cover
different techniques of silk-
screening and block print-
ing. This technique is great
for printing T shirts.
A jewelry making class
will be held from 6 p.m.
until 9 p.m. on Tuesday
nights from Oct. 3 through
Oct. 31. You will learn to
make your own rings, brac-
elets, key chains, neck-
laces and pendants.
A basketry class will be
held Wednesday nights
from Oct. 4 through Nov. 1
at 7 p.m. This class will
teach you how to make your
own baskets.
A macrame class will be
held on Monday nights
from 7 p.m. to9 p.m. A few
of the project possibilities
are handbags and Hanging
planters. The class will
begin on Oct. 2 and run
through the 23rd.
A class will be held for
the making of Christmas
ceramics. In this class, you
can learn how to make tree
ornaments, beads, napkin
rings, jewelry boxes and
much more. This class will
meet on Wednesdays at 7
p.m. from Oct 25 through
Nov. 8.
There will be an inkle
weaving class. In this class,
you will learn how to make
belts, vests, trim, guitar
straps and much more The
class will run from 7 p.m. to
9 p.m. on Tuesdays from
Oct. 24 throuqh Nov. 7
There is a craft fee of
$2 for the Basic Pottery
and silkscreen classes
There is also a lab fee of
$1 for Christmas cer-
amics.
For further information,
please contact Tana Nobles
at Mendenhall. ext. 260 or
the Crafts Center at ext
271.
Home-Ec students ,facuity
back from European tour
ECU News Bureau
A group of child dev-
elopment and family relat-
ions specialists from the
ECU School of Home Ec-
onomics is back on campus,
after a month-iong tour of
Europe.
GROUP INCLUDED
Tne group included Dr.
Nash Love of the ECU
faculty; undergraduate
students Elaine Sasser of of
Kenley, Wanda Stancill of
Greenville, Kathy Thomp-
son of Bailey and Carole
Mayo of Aurora; and grad-
uate students Marilyn Love
of Greenville and Lucy
Marino of Morehead Citv.
The students are cand-
idates for degrees from the
ECU Department of Child
Development and Family
Relations.
Working with profes-
sors at several universities.
the ECU travelers visited
Italy. Switzerland. France.
Great Britain and the
Netherlands. in on-site
studies of the European
family.
FACULTY MEMBERS
FROM VA TECH
Also involved in the
study tour were 35 faculty
members and students
from Virginia Polytechnic
Institute and home econo-
mist Patricia Parker of
Franklin.
A VALUABLE
OPPORTUNITY
The tour was an inval-
uable opportunity to comp-
are first hand various Eur-
opean life styles to which
we in this country owe our
heritage said Dr Love
ACADEMCCREDIT
Most tour participants
earned academic credit,
through a joint arrange-
ment by the ECU School of
Home Economics and thp
VPI Dept of Home Man-
agement and Family Rel-
ations, in cooperation with
the ECU Division of Con-
tinuing Education
gpii
mmmmmm
S
Former prof wins suit against ECUl What's inside
By STEVEN WILSON
Staff Writer
A controversial lawsuit
involving a former ECU
faculty member has been
ruled in favor of the plain-
tiff, according to Dr. David
Stevens, ECU Attorney
Advisor.
According to the plain-
tiff, Dr. Robert Mayberry,
formerly of the Foreign
Language Department, the
jury in District Court in
Wilson, decided in his favor
on five issues:
1) that his freedom of
speech had been violated,
2) that the rules stated in
the Faculty Manual of the
University had not been
followed, 3) that he was not
granted equal protection
under the law, 4) that the
University was liable for
back salary, and 5) that
another member of the
Foreign Language Depart-
ment was liable for punitive
damages.
The suit was brought
about by a series of events
in 1972 that led to the
denial of tenure to Dr.
Mayberry by the Univer-
sity.
Dr. Mayberry alleged
that he was denied tenure
as a result of his outspoken
criticism of University pol-
icy during a University
Re-evaluation Committee
Study.
Dr. Mayberry alleged
that his freedom of speech
had been violated in that
his criticism had affected
the University's decision
not to grant him tenure.
The jury also decided
that Dr. Mayberry should
be awarded back salary
effective since his dis-
missal, and that another
Foreign Language Depart-
ment member was liable for
five thousand dollars in
punitive damages.
The University is seek-
ing a Motion for Directed
Verdict, according to Dr.
Stevens.
Dr. Stevens also added
that, in his opinion, "the
law is on the side of the
University
Dr. Mayberry is also
seeking his reinstatement
in a hearing to be held this
week.
Dr. Mayberry hold his
doctorate from UNC-
Chapel Hill, and also at-
tended Wake Forest Uni-
versity and the University
of Tennessee-Knoxville.
He and his wife, who is
a professor in the Foreign
Language Department, are
currently co-authoring a
book on the works of
Martinez de la Rosa, a
fourteenth-century Spanish
author.
.vvys.
The Pirates totally dominated the
second half of the ECU-UNC game last
Saturday, gaining 13 first downs to the
Tar Heels' two, but a last minute fumble
gave the Heels a 14-10 victory. See p.11.
Get your arse kicked with Tom
Haywood's Self-Kicking MachineSee
P 8.
Thirty million tons of pot goes to
waste in Charleston County, S.C.See
p.10.
The Shrine Club Fish Fry, an annual
benefit for crippled children, is today at
various Greenville locations. Get a good
deal on a good meal and help a good
causeSeep. 5.




















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Pag 2 FOUNTAINHEAO 19 Sptwnbw 1978
Peace Corps
Peace Corps may be the
toughest job you'll ever
love. For more information,
contact Peace Corps Rep-
resentative, David Jenkins,
Room 425, Flanagan Bldg
vou may call 757-6586 for
an, appointment
All ex-Peace Corps Vol-
unteers please contact
Peace Corps Representat-
ive David Jenkins, room
425, Flanagan Bldg phone
757-6586
Journalism
The Society for Colleg-
iate Journalists will meet
on Tues Sept. 19,
at 7 p.m. All
members must attend and
join in the final planning
stages of that big event
The Journalism Workshop!
Please join the officers at
Austin building, near the
journalism wing, for further
instruction. Looking for-
ward to our first official
meeting of the semester,
We hope you will come.
Phi Sigma
Phi Sigma Pi will hold
its monthly dinner meeting
Wed Sept. 20 at 6 p.m. at
Western Sizzlin. All mem-
bers are urged to attend.
Gamma Beta
Gamma Beta Phi will
meet Thurs Sept. 21 in
Biology 103 at 7 p.m. All
members are urged to
attend.
ILO
The International Lang-
uage Organization will
meet on Tues Sept. 19, in
room 221 Mendenhall at 7
p.m.
INDT
Join the INDT Club and
get involved. The next
meeting is Sept. 21 at 5
p.m. This club is open to
anyone, so come on, this is
your chance to participate.
OfficialECUClassRings
� �- �:

�. '� � "�� '

. �

( Aistum Features
ti�r men
C'h ik i
On sale are our men's
traditional Siladium rings and
selected women's 10-karat
gold rings. These rings are custom-
made individually for you. They are an
exceptional buy at the price of $59.95. You get your
f manv custom features. Come see them today.
Large Selection of Gold Rings Available
Date Sept. 20-22 Place Student Supply Store Lobby
Deposit required Ask about Master Charge or Visa "Savings vary slightly from style to style
3 days only!
IKTQ1RVED
COLLEGE RINGS

STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
Wright Building
Freshmen
The 1978 ECU Fresh-
man Register will be avail-
able for incoming students
on Sept. 22.
The directory of the
class of '82 was published
by College & University
Press of Falls Church, Va
and contains photos and
biographical information of
freshman students. SGA
V ice-President David A.
Cartwright, of Ahoskie, is
the editor.
Entertainers
The Eureka Jaycees are
looking for people who
entertain in the field of
bluegrass, singing, playing
or clogging, etc. Also any
civic organization who may
be interested in renting a
booth of booths during the
First Annual Fall Festival
in Eureka.
If interested please con
-tact Jerry Pelt, Eureka,
242-6641 after 6 p.m.
Crafts
Need a place with the
space, tools and equipment
to worK on your hobby or
latest project?
Visit the Crafts Center
at Mendenhall Student
Center and discover what it
has to offer you. Hours are
3 p.m. until 10 p.m
Monday through Friday,
and from 10 a.m. until 3
p.m Saturday
The center is composed
of a darkroom with three
enlargers, a ceramics area,
a jewelry metals area, a
general crafts area, and a
textiles area with floor
looms for weaving.
R0TC
The Air Force ROTC
corps will be kicking off this
academic year with a corps
picnic. This will be held at
field 1, behind the Allied
Health building.
The corps would like to
welcome some new staff
members to our depart-
ment. Our new FIP and
sophomore instructor is
Major Billy Tudor. Our new
COC and senior instructor
is ' Captain Steven Bien-
stock. Our new NCOIC is
Master Sergent Jim
Daniels. Our new adminis-
tration NCO is Staff Ser-
geant Bruce Barry.
Tests
Four nationally-
standardized tests will be
administered at ECU dur-
ing October.
They are the Dental
Aptitude Test (Oct. 7), the
Graduate Management Ad-
missions Test (Oct. 28), the
Graduate Record Examina-
tion (Oct. 21) and the Law
School Admissions test
(Oct. 14)
Persons who wish to
take the tests, require-
ments for admission to
advanced educational pro-
grams at U.S. campuses,
may write ECU Testing
Center, 105 Speight Build-
ing, ECU, Greenville,
for further information.
Advanced application
must be made to take each
test.
Circle-K
The Circle-K club is
hosting Joe Tripp, Pitt Co.
United Way chairman, and
Paul Breitman, ECU United
Way chairman as our guest
speakers this week.
The Circle-K club also
challenges all ECU stud-
ents to "get involved" with
the world around them.
Circle-K is on an inter-
national organization com-
prised of concerned indiv-
idual students who care
about people in the world
around them. Together we
do make a difference. We
also have a good time doing
it.
Come to our meetings at
213 Wright Annex at 6:30
p.m. every Tuesday night
and get involved. All stud-
ents are invited.
Softball
There will be a mand-
atory softball organization-
al meeting for newcomers
and returnees for all who
wish to try out for women's
intercollegiate team It will
be held on Wed Sept. 20
at 7 p.m. in Room 143
M inges. If unable to attend
please contact Coach Dillon
at 164 M inges or call
757-6161 between 10 and 12
a.m. daily.
Performance
It's a large mandolin
that usually plays Renais-
sance music such as
"Green Sleeves" and
"Kemp's Jig Walter
Wilder, a visiting artist in
Greenville, will give a 40
minute performance spon-
sored by the White-
Clement Complex tonight
at 7:30 p.m. in the back
lobby of Clement.
Phi Alpha
There will be an organ-
izational meeting of Phi
Alpha Theta, national his-
tory honor society, on
Tues Sept. 19, at 7:30
p.m. in the Richard C. Todd
Room in Brewster Bldg.
This will be a very import-
ant meeting in which plans
for the upcoming year will
be discussed. All members
are strongly urged to
attend.
4-H club
There will be a meeting
of the ECU Collegiate 4-H
Club on Sept. 24 at 9 p.m.
in Apt. 1 of Greene Dorm.
All former 4-Hers and
interested persons are en-
couraged to attend. The
ECU Collegiate 4-H Club is
a service organization. For
more information, call John
Ward at 758-9944.
S0CI-ANTK
The Sociology Anthro-
pology Club will hold its
second meeting Wed
Sept. 20at 7:30 p.m. in
BD-302
All majors, minors, and
interested persons are in-
vited to attend. Plans for
the year will be discussed
and preparations for the
retreat will be finalized.
Phi Eta
There will be a meeting
of all Phi Eta Sigma mem-
bers Wed Sept. 20 m
Biology 103 (Auditorium)
Participation in intram-
ural sports and fund raising
projects will be discussed.
Call 756-4178 (ask for
Susan) if you have any
questions, suggestions, or
comments.
FGSF
Are you tired of small
talk? Then come to this
weeks FGSF meeting in
Mendenhall 221, Thurs.
7:30 p.m.
Some of your fellow
students wiH be sharing
what Jesus Christ is doing
in their lives. And this is no
small talk. They will be
sharing how Jesus gives
them answers to their prob-
lems, and with all the
problems that we have
today we need some solid
answers for all our prob-
lems.
He is still saving lives
and healing people, and no
one's life is beyond His
saving grace. "Jesus Christ
the same yesterday, and
today, and forever'
Hebrews 13 8
Beta Kappa
Beta Kappa Alpha, pro-
fessional banking fraternity
will hold its first meeting
Wed , Sept 20 in Room 103
at 3 p.m. All members and
interested School of Bus-
iness students and faculty
are urged to attend.
Designers
Everyone invited M
Young Home Designers
League. Attention especial-
ly to freshmen and senior
housing and management
majors. Meets 3rd Tues
every month in Vaniana
mgham room (Home Econ-
omics bldg) at 5 p m First
meeting is Tues. Sept 19.
at 5 pm Be There!
Alpha Sig
Greek rush begins soon
The fraternity way is a
great mode of life and
offers many new and excit-
ing experiences for the
young man Vou she
check out all the different
fraternities before you
make that crucial first step
Just remembr. that Alpha
Sigma Phi - the newest
fraternity on campus - has
many unexplored horizons
for the perservering young
man who wishes to add a
new dimension to his col-
lege experience.
We. the brothers of
Alpha Sig. ask you to think
about it. Call 756-0893 or
758-8514 or 758-8310
Tutors
AHEA
The Student Section of
the American Home Econo-
mics Association will have a
picnic for prospective mem-
bers at the Home Manage-
ment House, Wed Sept.
20 at 5 p.m. Anyone
interested in the areas of
home economics is encour-
aged to attend and become
involved with this group.
The Student Section of
The American Home
Economics Association will
have a membership drive
Sept. 20-22. Persons inter-
ested in becoming a mem-
ber may do so by signing up
outside room 248 in the
home economics building
from 8 - 5 p.m.
Ping pong
A Table Tennis Ck
organizational meeting will
be held on Tues Sept. 19
at 7 p.m. in the Billiards
Center at Mendenhall. All
persons interested in play-
ing table tennis are invited
to attend.
ThP Center for Student
Op � c immed-
di graduate
anu .� - raduale
tutors to asjio Health
Affiars students m micro-
biology, mathematics, phy-
sics, biology and chemistry
Prospective tutors in
these and other health-
related areas are encourag-
ed to contact Dr. Hensel.
Tutorial Coordinator, now.
Visit 208 Ragsdale Hall, or
call the Cenjer. 757-6122
6081. or 6075�
Crafts
All full-time students,
faculty, staff, and spouses
are eligible to use the
facilities A semester mem-
bershto'ee of $10 entitles
the C-afto Center member
to use the facilities, to
check out tools and equip-
ment, to check ou I 3
materials, to enlisi tr a asd
of crafts supervisors, anc �
enroll in introductory level
workshops which are offer-
ed throughout the year
Visit the Crafts Center
any time during operating
hours or call 757-6611 Ext
271 for more information
FCA
The Family-Child As-
sociation will meet Sept
19. at 5pm in Room 143 m
the Home Economics Bldg
The FCA is open to any
Child development major
or minor
Hew York Ski trip
Student Union Travel
Committee once again of-
fers it's low-priced New
York trip. Applications are
being taken at the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall
The trip is Nov. 22 - 26.
Come and see the core of
the Big Apple.
Student Union Travel
Committee is offering a ski
trip to Snowshoe. West
Virginia. Jan t . Jan 5
Applications taken at Cent-
ral Ticket Office m Mend-
enhall Be sure not to m.ss
the great skiq o�rwtun.Tv
at one of the east coast's
best ski resorts
Classifieds
torrent (jj)
WANTED: Female room-
mate to share 2 bdrm.
townhouse. Most be res-
ponsible! Call 756-8031.
MALE ROOMMATE:
wanted to share townhouse
with two other male stud-
ents. Rent $70.00 per
month, and share expen-
ses. Call W , . .vlike at
758-S908 er 6
p.m.
ROOMMATE WANTED:
for 2 bdrm. apt. at Stratford
Arms. Share rent and ex-
penses. Call now 756-9692.
ONE PERSON: needed to
share apt. on Charles St.
$87.50mo. Free heat. Call
Dave 752-7727.
MALE ROOM ATE: wanted
to share 2 bedroom apt. at
Green Hill Run. $100mo.
and utilities. Call 758-5553
or 758-4591.
rtorsde. @
FOR SALE: Teac Reel to
Reel, Sony 25 watt receiver
and two Horizon speakers.
$800.00. Call Bob at
758-3084.
FOR SALE: Double mat-
tress and box springs $40.
Regular size refrigerator
excellent shape $40. Call
758-5553 Mon-Wed-Sat at
night.
FOR SALE: Marantz Pre-
amp. Model 3800 with
built-in Dolby noise reduc-
tion. One of the world's
best. Owner must sell! New
cost $650, but will sell for
$425. Call 752-7390 after 6
p.m. for further info.
FOR SALE: Gibson Les
Paul Custom, wine red in
excellent oond. $400. Cont-
act Tony at 410 Elizabeth
St.
FOR SALE: Queen size
mattress and box springs.
$30.00 Call 752-0554 after 6
p.m.
FOR SALE: 73 Yamaha
TX500. Just rebuilt. Asking
$650. Must sell soon. Call
Joe Barker at 758-3684.
personal(X)
Little Sisters of Lamboia
Chi Alpha are having a car
wash Saturday Sept. 23
from 10 a.m3 p.m. at
Shell Pitt Plaza. Price is
$1.00 per car.
PERSON NEEDED: Any-
one who knows how to
contact Ron. L. Hughes,
please call Lee 756-8274.
Need typed papers for
summer school credit. $5
reward offered.
WAITRESSHOSTESS:
wanted for new club -
Apply in person at "Peach-
es" in Greenville Square
Shopping Center 756-8060.
Applications are being ac-
cepted daily.
WANTED: Experienced
part-time photographer for
local magazine. Must have
own equipment and do top
quality work. Reply t0
Homes Magazine, P.O. Box
555 New Bern, NC 28560
HELP WANTED: Counse-
lors-year round boy's
camp. Immediate open-
�ngs. Challengms career
opportunities ,n theraput.c
la?eSSampFor
'onaUy prob.emed child-
wMustbewHhngtolive
LLl01 tak� Part in
extended canoe For inter-
view come in the placement
office between a IJ J-LT
to attend interview Z!
�twn. Route 1. Box S8I
BrookeviMe Fla g
4






r '
2,000
�2Pt�xpected
Education conference is next month
1� Spttnbf 1978 FOUNTAiNHEAD Pn 3
ECU N
APProxim
es Bureau
ately
Persons are 2000
a,te the 25th P6Cted t0
study "nff,h an"versary
conference of
1, Assoca(,on for ,he
Education of v. 1
'en ' 0un9 Chd-
57 "�ed here Oct.
Persons with a profes
trough th.rri u'ery
y mird grade i
LuoaC0n0'COn,inUfl
Its sessions are of
special nterest to day care
nursery, Head Start, kind-
ergarten and primary grade
teachers; teacher aides
teachers of exceptional
children; education admin-
istrators; staff training co-
ordinators; parents; and
health care professionals.
Keynote speakers are
Dr. Alice Keliher, noted
teacher, author, lecturer,
and consultant, who has
served as special advisor
to the U S Dept. of Health.
Education and Welfare;
and Dr. James Comer,
professor of psychiatry at
the Yale University Child
Study Center.
TKtre it a difffrtnct
Breakfast
from 7 a.m.
to 11a.m.
specializing
In large
country ham or sausage
biscuit. Hot cakes. Scrambled
eggs with country ham or
sausage. Our 14 lb. beef
burgers are ground from fresh
Western Chuck. We have pure
soft served ice cream. Also
serving ham and cheese,
chicken fillets, hot dogs, chili
and beans, french fries, apple
turnovers, and a variety of soft
drinks. Located on the corner
of 5th and RcadeSt.andon
jiwy. 264 in Washington.
FURNITURE
STRIPPING
Revolutionary Nm
Method
ANY
CHAIR
FROM
ANTIQUES-
wtH� tm wood or m.ij
We also do:
� Furnltur. Rpairtng, Furnltur.
rwlntohlng and Chair Caning
752-5663
The Stripping Workshop
921 Dickinson Avenue
Greenville, N.C.
Not to Shorwtn Williams Paint Storo
Open MonFrt. 9-6
Saturday 9-3
ART & CAMERA
526 S. Cotanche St.
Down Town
COUPON EXPIRES
"LIMITED TIME OFFER
12 Exp. Color Film
Developed and Printed
� Kodacotor
� OAF
� Fugi
(Foreign Film
Not Included
, VALUABLE COUPON
I MUST ACCOMPANY 000 I
COUPON EXPIRES
! LIMITED TIME OFFER
20 Exp. Color Film
Developed and Printed
� Kodaootor
� OAF
� Fugl
(Foreign Film
pfuf tnciuoM
VALUABLE COUPON.
Fmust accompany order 1
COUPON EXPIRES
LIMITED TIME OPPEPj
MOVIE OR SLIDE
Ektechrome or KodKhroftw Proceeding
� Movts
116
I MUST ACCOMPANY ORDC'
PLAZA CAMERA
More than 40 work-
shops and special present-
ations will be open to
participants, focusing on a
variety of topics relevant to
the educational develop-
ment of young children.
They include:
"Strengthening the
Home-School Partner-
ship, " "Discipline: A Posit
ive Approach "Child
Abuse: How to Recognize It
and What to Do about It
Day Care Licensing
Dance for Young Child-
ren.
COUPLE ENJOYS LAST
days of summer
"Creating Non-Sexist En-
vironments "Storytelling
and Folklore and "Crea-
tive Drama for K-3
"Creative Science
"Public Policy and Legisla-
tion "Language Recept-
ion in Three Modes
J 5
Photo by Tim Chalmers)

t


�S27M00
IN CASH PRIZES!
J2 WAYS
TO WIN!
PRIZE
WINNERS
WIN up T0
fit
12 WAYS TO MATCH & WIN AT A&P! START TODAY!
WHEN
PLAY
CAMES
ThT,90�h?dvn.IS.r-P,0yM' �' P " ' �ub�"1�� m.nuf.ctur.r Ql
' ' m"f �d�'�'ng agenc.as and families of the foregoing
HERE'S ALL YOU DO
ItISJ'aaV concealed $1,000 Cash Cards Playmg Card
Ticket at AAP s checkout counter or serv.ee desk each time
� you vi.il AAP You must be 18 years old or older to Jay
Push out the portions of each ticket to reveal 2 play.no cards
Tou'r CashCamdaiCT rr 'hem 'n,� ��' cof.ePeK nc9,rd 0,
wmner m3y Sh�W y0u are an ,ns,an� � or S5
AUkn y�" A Yo"re a b'9 nner. when you have matched any
IV ,CardS �" y0ur Collector Card You win the cash
prize shown for that game Only one cash prize per game o,
Collector Card is allowed B e �
Turn in your winning Collector Card to your AAP store man
C9aeSh?naCrdS'rf?ned y�U W'M 9e' y0ur P"� -nd a new Sooo
wrintos'l'Afp50 y�U k-P �" "S
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'ODDS CHART EFFECTIVE SEPTEMBER 11
NuMBfR ODDS
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II TIE DEU DEPT.
miaMKETOFKUCIMS
FRIED CHICKEN
"iE0E 1 99
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised Hems is re
quired to be readily available for sale
at or below the advertised price m
each A&P Store. �t�w.p specifi
i ally noted in this At!
US DA. INSPECTED FRESH WHOLE
FRYERS

a


a
a
PRICEo EFFECTIVE THRU SAT SEPT 23 AT AAP IN filf)MYSai
2 TO A BAG
LIMIT 2 BAGS
PLEASE
i AAP QUALITY CORN-FED
PORK
JCHOPS
ASSORTED
PACKAGE

10 LBS. OR
MORE LB
Aa QUALITY TENOCft FULLf COOKED -WHOLE
SMOKED PICNICS l. 88c
� TD7LS.
ECONOMY
CORNER
s�r��iis .
Look For AAP s Economy Corner Where
good products and lowed pncei come together
Pm-�,T.y CO'n ' ' P�C,�' "Con �' �nd.cl Economy
A&P picks the best groceries
A&P QUALITY
SNACK CRACKERS
2 ozOOC
PKGS
JANE PARKER WHEAT � WHITE OR
CRACKED WHEAT BREAD Sg 49c
MARVEL
LUNCHEON NAPKINS 1604a 59c
ANN PAGE GRADE A
MILK
ANN PAGE
BATHROOM TISSUE 4EGL
A&P picks the best fruits & vegetables
NORTH CAROLINA GROWN�U.S. FANCY
RED DELICIOUS
APPLES
jAWUW'J
?W
t22Z�Z22 �e ction price signs-
TMHOUGHOUT YOUR AaP STORE Whan AAP
buyart make a apaclal purchaaa at a lower
, P�ie�. we paat the aavlng on to you. That lower
S tQ9J! �" �����" ��:� And thaea ACTION
PRICES are In addition to our money-eavina
g weakly apeclale
WF catorade
LEMON LIME
OR
ORANGE
SHOP AAP FOR
HEINZ KETCHUP
MAHATMA
RICE 3 .asg 89c
SHOP AAP FOR
Hl-C
FRUIT 46 OZ
DRINKS CAN
ANN PAGE FROEN
mini tCT rQc
PIZZAS pro yo
rntaarr
CRUNCHV
1107 $409
JAR
Rf TER RAN
PEANUT
BUTTER
MINUTE MAID FROZEN
ORANGE
JUICE
12 OZ
CAN
LOG C ASIN - REGULAR
PANCAKE 240.
SYRUP in
49
7Qc
89c
3
WTEIIIZEI
�OMOtfllZEl
.59
filUMJOi
ALL FLAVORS -CAT FOOD
PUSS N BOOTS
KEN-L RATION�DOG FOOO
TENDER CHUNKS
S-J25
$�100
$539
EASTERN GROWN�US 1
WHITE
POTATOES
MILD � TENDER�MEDIUM
YELLOW
ONIONS
CALIFORNIA 8WIIT. PLUMP-THOMPSON
CRAPES
S88�i
.59�l
A&P COUPON
PLAIN OR SELF-RISING
LIMIT ONE WITH THIS
COUPON AND ADDITIONAL
7 SO ORDER
sffiKr FLOUR
5 59�
SAVE 30c
LIMIT ONE COUPON
GOOO THRU SAT SEPT 13 AT AAP IN
A&P CO iPON
15c OFF LABEL
FAB
LAUNDRY
DETERGENT
YOU PAY ONLY
LIMIT ONE WITH THIS
COUPON AND ADDITIONAL
7 JO ORDER
99
LIMIT ONE COUPON
OOOO THRU SAT MPT 23 AT AAP IN
T





' BJfj ' & �
Pag 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 19 September 1978
Deceptive politicians
Next Tuesday students will have an
opportunity to elect representatives to the
Student Government Association (SGA) legis-
lature. As is the case in any election,
candidates will try and sell themselves to their
constituents by means of a popular, often
emotional platform designed to capture as
many votes as possible. Some candidates,
however, seem determined to intentionally
mislead students by championing a volatile
issue which they have no chance of effecting.
These misleading approaches, whether"
intentional or accidental, should make voters
reconsider any candidate who is unaware of the
limitations of the office he is seeking.
For instance, in the fall of 1976 SGA
elections, one candidate was elected on a
platform of "Concerts not Cancellations The
election was held shortly after a concert by the
Average White Band was abruptly cancelled
only a few days before it was to have taken
place so obviously this was an attention getting
issue.
The problem however is that the Student
Union is the sole programming body on
campus and no other organization which
receives student fees can schedule any form of
entertainment on campus. Although politicians
often make campaign promises which are
difficult to keep, they seldom make promises
which are completely out of their jurisdiction
and which they will never be empowered to
fulfill.
Not surprisingly, some candidates have
latched on to the BUCCANEER disaster as a
vote getting issue this year, with cries of "Save
the BUC" being spread throughout campus on
campaign posters. Once again, these
candidates have either forgotten or chosen to
ignore (in hopes of deceiving voters) the fact
that since Jan. 31 the SGA legislature has had
no control or voice over campus media. These
responsibilities are now handled by the Media
Board, on which the SGA president has one
vote.
Students should familiarize themselves
with the limitations and authorities of the
major organizations on campus,
and be wary of any candidate promising things
which he can never deliver. Either that
candidate doesn't know enough about what
responsibilities the office encompasses or he is
deliberately trying to dupe the students with a
sure-fire vote-getter. Either way, that
candidate is a poor choice for office.
Forum
Commentary
Herstory' is left out of history
'Greek life is one of life'� little extras'
By HESTER PETTY
Uppity Women of Greenville
Two weeks ago a
friend of mine, whom I had
not seen in over a year,
stopped by my apartment
on his way through Green-
ville.
Upon surveying my
collection of feminist books
he remarked that if a
person read all those books
she d end up being very
one-sided On the contrary,
dear friend, Id say that it
was by pre-feminist educa-
tion that was one-sided.
When I think back to my
learning experiences dur-
ing grades K through 12 I
can recall studying a large
number of great andor
famous men but only a
handfull of great women.
This inequity applies.to my
studies in college as well
(especially general ,
college).
Even in my major (art) I
learned very little about
women artists (especially
those artists who lived and
worked prior to the twenti-
eth century). What I know
about women artists was
learned on my own, not
through my courses.
Why is herstory not
included in most accounts
of history? it can't be for
the lack of great women
because in my reading I
have found them. It can't
be for the lack of published
material by and about great
women because I have seen
it.
Could it be that the
writers of textbooks have
deliberately excluded
women's achievements
from their pages? This is a
tradition about which I have
no doubt.
I am learning about
herstory on my own. My
reading of feminist books
has given me a more
balanced vision. One that
sees the great men and
women in history. One that
recognizes the great men
and women in the arts and
sciences.
I have prepared a list of
books that correspond with
various fields of study at
ECU. I have arranged the
list in this manner because
I know that most college
students have little time to
devote to non course-work
reading. I hope some of
these books will interest
you.
ANTHROPOLOGY
RELIGION
The First Sex by
Elizabeth Gould Davis
(written in 1971, published
in 1976) is an exciting study
which documents the exis-
tence and scope of God-
dess-worship and matri-
archal culture before the
patriarchal take-over and
Christian dominance. Davis
uses archaeological evi-
dence and theory to prove
that Goddess-worship was
not insignificant and infre-
quent but rather that it was
important and universal.
When God Was A
Woman by Merlin Stone
(1976) also deals with the
subject of Goddess-wor-
ship. Stone comes to much
the same conclusions as
Davis but her theories are
not as radical as Davis
ART HISTORY
Women Artists; Recog-
nition and Reappraisal from
the Early Middle Ages to
the Twentieth Century by
Karen Peterson and J.J.
Wilson (1976) contains the
art herstory you may have
missed. With a format like
most art history texts, it
contains biographical infor-
mation and discussion of
spec&c works of art. It is
rich in reproductions of
women's works.
Our Hidden Heritage:
Five Centuries of Women
Artists by Eleanor Tufts
(1974) is an excellent
source of information about
several great women art-
ists. It is illustrated with
reproductions of the artists'
work.
ENGLISH
The following five books
are all excellent works from
recent British and Ameri-
can writers:
The Women's Room by
Maryln French (1977)
Surfacing by Margaret
Atwood
Kin flicks by Lisa Alther
(1975)
Rubyfruit Jungle by
Rita Mae Brown (1973,
1977)
The Needle's Eye by
Margaret Drabble (1977)
HEALTHMEDICINE
NURSING
The Hidden Malpractice
by Gena Corea (1977) is an
indictment of the medical
profession for its mistreat-
ment of female bodies and
minds. It is an important
book for both the workers in
the health system and the
consumers.
HISTORY
Women Together by
Judith Papachristou (1976)
is a "history in documents
of the women's movement
in the U.S This is
herstory, from the women
who brought us the vote to
Fojntainheod
Production Manager
Leigh Coakley
EditorDoug White
News Editors
Julie Everette
Ricki Giiarmis
Robert M. Sweim
Trends Editor
FOUKTAIHHEADtei
Sam Rogers
the women who will bring
us equal rights, it familiar-
izes the reader with the
great women who are
responsible for our heri-
tage.
POLITICAL SCIENCE
The QJfilectic Qf $ex by
Shulasmith Firestone is a
feminist critique of political
theory, Marx and Freud.
Firestone believes that
sexism, not the class sys-
tem is the root of all social
evils.
PSYCHOLOGY
The Hite Report by
Shere Hite (1977) reports
what women think and feel
about their own sexuality.
No psychologist should
consider dealing with a
woman's sexuality unless
they have read this book.
My Mother, My Self by
Nancy Friday is a revealing
personal and professional
study of the mother-daugh-
ter relationship.
Women and Madness
by Phyllis Chesler (first
printing in 1973) is a close
look at the psychiatric
community's treatment of
women. It answers the
question "Why are some
sane women treated as if
they were insane?"
About Men by Phyllis
Chesler (1977 or 1978) is
about men. It is an
enlightening look at what
makes men tick and why.
SOCIOLOGY
Against Our Will: Men,
Women and Rape by Susan
Brownmiller (1976) is a
study of the institution of
rape and the type of society
that ignores and even
condones it.
The Feminine M ystique
by Betty Friedan is a
feminist classic. It deals
with woman's position in
present-day society and
how we got to that low
position.
Of Woman Born by
Adrienne Rich speaks
about the institution of
motherhood, its place in
society, and its mystifica-
ion.
'Indicates that the book
may not be in paperback
yet.
If you have read a book
' that deals with women (or
men) from a feminist point
of view that you found
valuable to your field of
study, pleaes send the title
ind author io Heater Petty,
Uppity Women of Green-
ville, P.O. Box 137S,
Greenville. I welcome all
comments etc. about this
article or life in general.
To FOUNTAINHEAD:

Your article in the
Trends section of
FOUNTAINHEAD, Aug
28, "Your Adolescense
with a Twist: Four Years of
College shows consider-
able bias on your part
towards Greek life here on
ECU'S campus.
To the uninformed
freshman, your article gave
'apoof (anichthat, sir is a
mtid understatement of
Greek life here on campus.
Why must G.D.Is (and I
do mean g-damn indep-
endents!) like yourself, be
so down on Greeks? I just
can't figure out why you go
out of your way to write
and publish the negative
aspects that Greek life has
to offer. I see no purpose in
it.
As for your erroneous
conclusions and misrepre-
sentation of Greeks I have
this to offer you:
1) Some sororities can
prove to be a cheaper place
to live considering all the
costs a dorm student has
such as: groceries , refrig-
erator rental, phone instal-
lation, eating out, and
laundry expenses.
2) I didn't "need to
join" a sorority to have am
"immediate circle of
friends Need is a sub-
stance required for life,
contrarily,Greek life is one
of life's little extras!
Because of my invol-
vement, offices held, and
the opportunities and the
experiences gained through
the sorority, I will be better
qualified when seeking em-
ployment in the competitive
job market and that's the
reason we send out flyers
and sit in the hot, blazing
sun for two hours at a time
signing up rushees; all in
hopes they'II latch on to the
greatest opportunity that
exists for them.
Greek life does and will
continue to survive at ECU,
regardless of how badly you
represented us in your
article. "Prove the rule"
you say? Whose rule?
I'll be looking forward
to future masterpiece art-
icles, but next time don't
attempt writing on a sub-
ject which you have never
had the pleasure of exper-
iencing.
Carolyn Stahl
Greek and glad of it
Fo
rum
All Forum letters
must be typed and double
spaced or neatly printed
and must contain the name,
address or telephone nurn-
ber, ID number, and the
signature of the author.
Letters must be in the
Forum box in the reception
policy
area of the FOUNTAIN-
HEAD offices, second
floor. Old South Building
Letters are subject to
editing for taste, brevity,
and libelous remarks.
All letters must be
received by noon the day
before publication.
Crosswinds
'Ali is a true champion
militant advocate of a system
Rv IIU DADK1CO . . a
By JIM BARNES
I had been carefully planning this column for a week:
come Friday night, I was going to carefully catalogue my
emotions and note all my reactions to the fight. I was then
going to render on paper, if I could, a part of the
gut-wrenching anxiety I went through wondering about AM,
watching every move as if one in particular could tip me off
that I could relax, that he had done it again.
Hell, once the fight started I forgot all that stuff.
Between the Ali partisans and the beer, my blood pressure
was up 20 points before Rossman TKO'd Galindez in the
preliminary. And once we all saw Ali, cast in the strange
role of challenger, making his way toward the ring, a chaos
broke out in that living room that was not to subside until
some time after the fight.
"Ali, Ali, Ali" went the now legendary cheer as The
Greatest worked his way to the ring, surrounded as always
by an entourage which has been with him during what must
be considered the renaissance of American boxing. The
Superdome was full; boxers always seem to have a hard
time getting to the ring anyway, but this night it was
especially tough. I remember noting that the ex-champ
resembled a cork as he bobbed around in the sea of
humanity slowly pushing him to the ring apron.
I lost it when Ali got into the ring. For years now, I
have been a Cassius ClayMuhammad AH fan all the way
down the line. To me, Ali is a hero, plain and simple. And
Friday night, he was going to try it again; he was going to
try to be the first to win the championship three times.
Somehow.he had to do it.After all, he is a hero, and heroes
always find a way to do heroic things.
In retrospect, AU fought one of the smartest fights of his
career. Gone arelhe days when he as champion could ait
back and coast his way to a decision or a late-round
knockout. Friday night, there could be no �rope-a-dope,�;
and there wasn't.
Ali was the challenger Friday night, end he had to take
the fight to Spinks. In Spinks. Ali faced a formidable
opponent. But Spinks is much like Smokin' Joe Frazier
does in resemblance to a tree, mentally as wen ea
physically.
Spinks was too strong for the rope-a-dope; he would
have punched Ali into submission had Muhammad tried
that again. But Ali fought jJMBiej ftoht; he clinched in the
ropes and forced the action back into the center of the ring
where he could score at will with short left ,abs and
combinations to Spinks" body
I honestly doubt that Ali could have knocked out Sp.nks
he certamly fought as if he could not. Spinks. on theW'
hand, seemed the most incredulous of a the people ,n the
m�?T " TX- W3S aS " " "as WtmB or
Ah to tire to stop dancing, so that he. the champ ccJd
step m and retain his crown with the on.y breno bSna
he has shown - gorilla boxing. 9
way, but our outcome � ha7diTerem EZ
the judges and referee: AH dea.y wciT. T " �'
regained the cown by out-cla hTopSc " "
An important word, class. Whether one likes or m-
AH, one must admit that he has class. BrTsn �on.�,
but the man has class. Throuohout J�1 arr�Qant. yes -
times, AH has stood for XTwhTch hT�
principles which at one time cost him ,� n �
crown. mm the heavyweight
There are many people today for wh�m k
AH. But it was not always that way In faT t8
brief tenureat the top for Spinks reminds o) th!T.tUt
boxing prior to Ali: a world of unsavorv Z 1 � of
well, unsavory things. Hero or ZTaZ nf "�'
gaudy and tasteless manner whirtyp fZZ" m th�
previous champion. Whed the reign of the
Ali is a true champion, a militant adv��.
of a system or, in this case it " Mr��
c�seleeslyactedasifhekrHKvth�4f?wl- A,i �
watching him to see how a charicTaP�P ���
champion dees. And the one mine Wi,TT, 9m "� �
�� that a lif of princ�?e anVt �� ��
aomething stronger and of more velueV �� "
in the end. Woe than ������. Payso?f
��. I racnei? he
atayed that one extra season that tZJ9 " �
en, cereer on � decline. BuWthto � mi ��
�oat Firday night, ahd hiscaceeVeWinf'�? " A�
the heavyweight boxing crown for the thirVn'ml0 "�
have bowed out with class. "� �� ouW
That'adhe eon of thing heroes do beet.





'
To benefit crippled children
1� Sfttmbm 1�7� FOUNTAINHEAO ftm 5
Shrine Club fish fry is today
QUITAR MUSIC ON
a
warm Indian summer day in Greenville.
Elections postponed
By JANE BIDDIX
Staff Writer
Due to disinterest in
several Student Govern-
ment Association Legisla-
tive positions. SGA elec-
tions were postponed from
Sept 13 to Sept. 26.
Also due to lack of
interest, several positions
have been obtained unop-
posed. These include Soph-
omore Class Vice Presi-
dent-Rob Higginbotham
and Senior Class Vice
President-Guy Lucas, as
well as several dorm
legislative positions.
There are also a
slots not filed for.
few
According to David
Cartwright, Elections
Committee Chairman, any
empty seats after the
elections will be filled
through the SGA Screen-
ings and Appointments
committee.
The polls include lob-
bies of all dorms, Allied
Health Building, and
M inges Coliseum-open
from 9 a.m. until 5
p.m.
Students are required to
vote in their respective
precincts during this elec-
tion.
Dorm students must
vote in their respective
dorms and Day students in
any of the locations other
than dorms.
In the mandatory meet-
ing of candidates for SGA
positions Thursday night,
candidates were reminded
of the general election rules
and the $10 clean-up fee
required in order to have
their name listed on the
ballot.
The candidates must
clean up all campaign
materials within 48 hours
after the election.
The $10 is refundable
upon inspection by the
Elections Committee.
ATiTIC
i
� m ��
Wed.andThurs
Sept. 20 and 21
Pegasus with
Warehouse
Friday and Saturday
CHOICE
Is it sick
to low
a pen?
Not if trie pen is a Pilot marker pen
Our Razor Point, at only 69c. gives
the kind of extra-fine delicate line you'll flip
over And for those times you want a little less
line, have a fling with our fine point
59c Fme'mer It has the will and fortitude to
actually wite through carbons
So. don't settle for a casual relationship
Get yourself a lasting one. or two. to have
and to hold at your college book store
Pilot Corp of America, 30 Midland Ave .
Port Chester, New Mark 10573
Do you think M&n j
and Dad mill accept
our relationship?
By MARK BARNES
Assistant News Editor
The annual Shrine Club
Fish Fry will be held today.
The Fish Fry will be held to
benefit the 19 hospitals for
crippled children, as well as
the 3 burn centers.
The hospitals and the
burn centers dispense free
medical attention to crip-
pled children of every creed
and color. The burn centers
provide thereapy for burn
victims.
Last year, the Shrine
club budget was approx-
imately $37 million. This
year, the budget has risen
to$48 million. The Shriners
annually help some 192,000
patients, at an annual cost
of approximately 2,307 dol-
lars.
The nearest Shrine hos-
pital for crippled children is
LftfiN . ;Q 5
PILOT
toelrwrriartttrpens
CHANELO'S
Pizza & Spaghetti
House
Fast Free Delivery
11:30 a.m.
until closing
758-7400
507 EAST 14th STREET
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
located in Greenville, S.C.
The Shrine Club de-
pends on fund-raising
events such as private don-
ations, football games, and
fish fries. The Pitt County
chapter hopes to raise
approximately $15,000.00
in the Greenville-Pitt coun-
ty area.
The cost for the dinner
will be $2.50, which will be
a donation to the Shrine
Club. It will be held from 11
a.m. until 7 p.m. The fish
will be cooked and served
at Harris Super Market on
North Greene Street; Elm
St. Park; Pitt Plaza Shop-
ping Center, Harris Super
Market on S. Memorial Tr
and Harris Super Market in
Bethel.
All proceeds from the
fish fry will go to benefit
the Shrine hospitals for
crippled children.
According to Bill
Whitehurst, who is the
Ambassador to the Pitt
County Shrine Club, the
fund raising efforts for the
crippled children and burn
victims is the reason for the
clubs existence.
Comments Whitehurst,
"This is one of the noblest
efforts to help crippled
children in the world
�?�����?������.�.�?���������������
The U. S. Navy Officer
: Information Team will be
on campus
20 - 22 September, 1978
I Naval Officers will be on
I hand to talk to interested
: persons concerning Officer
Positions in Nuclear Power,
Aviation, Supply Corps
( business management),
; Line, & several scholarship
! programs, Drop by and see
I if the "New Navy" is for you.







?
?












I MM MmrI �
m -





Pages FOUNTAINHEAD 19 Ijgfmfaf 1078
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have
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deiit
worn
from
U.S. Foreign Service
recruiting officers
Photo by Steve Romero
US TABLETS �-�j j j HAIRSPRAY '
s1.63ZT $97 I ;
Biggs Drug Store
300 Evans-On the Mall
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Ph. 752-2136
Hargett's Drug Store
2500 S. Charles St. Ext.
Ph. 756-3344
i t in'twit
r
IT'S CRAZY!
TONITE IT'S CRAZY TUES.
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THE STUDENT
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Wright Building
WASHINGTON, O.C. -
The Foreign Service, whoa
officers are responsible for
maintaining U.S. relations
with more than 130 govern-
ments around the world,
has opened its annual drive
to recruit new junior offic-
ers, the State Department
announced.
The written entrance
exam will be given this year
on Sat Dec 2 in
150 cities across the
country and at Foreign
Service posts abroad.
Applications for the
examination must be file
by interested candidates no
later than Oct. 20.
They may be obtained
by writing to: Board of
Examiners for the Foreign
Serivce, Room 7113, SA-15,
Department of State,
Washington, D.C. 20520.
To build a Foreign
Serivce that is representa-
tive of the population at
large, the Department of
State is emphasizing re-
cruitment of women and
minorities.
The Foreign Service is
also interested in recruiting
persons for work in the
economiccommercial and
administrative fields.
Selection is determined
on a competitive basis by
both written examination
and other assessment tech-
niques.
Foreign Service appli-
cants must be U.S. citizens
and at least 20 years of age.
Although there are no
specific educational re-
quirements, successful
completion of the test re-
quires a broad knowledge
of foreign and domestic
affairs and current events,
as well as U.S.history,
government, and culture.
The examination differs
somewhat depending on
whether the applicant des-
ires to join the Department
of State as a Foreign
Service Officer (FSO), or
the Interantional Com-
munication Agency (ICA)
as a Foreign Service Infor-
mation Officer (FSIO).
There is no foreign
language requirement, but
after appointment an offic-
er must become proficient
in at least one foreign
langauge.
Starting annual salaries
for junior officers range
from approximately
$12,500 to $18,000
On overseas assign-
ments this is supplemented
by housing allowances and
educational allowances for
dependents, and some-
times, depending on loca
conditions, a oost-of-living
and hardship post allow-
ances.
The written exam will
test the candidate's skills
and abilities in the differ-
ent areas of Foreign Service
work � administrative, con
sular, economiccom mer
cial, and political for FSO s
or informationcultural for
FSIO'S.
Sections on English ex-
pression and general back-
ground information, as a
written essay, also are
included.
Those who pass the
written examination are
eligible to participate in the
subsequent assessme1
program.
Appointments are made
according to the needs of
the Foreign Service without
regard to race, creed, sex
ethnic background, or mar-
ital status.
Administrative officers
specialize in management
and budget and supervise
the daily operations of US
embassies and consulates.
Consular officers pro-
vide a broad range of
services to Americans liv-
ing and traveling abroac
and to foreign travelers to
the United States.
In North Carolina tests
w$l be given in Charlotte,
Raleigh, and Winston
Salem.
HOST REVLON
A
Ms. Kathlene Costello will be
holding a beauty clinic in our
store on Wednesday September 20,
to advise you on your beau! needs.
CHANELO'S
Pizza & Spaghetti
House
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Tuesday Night
Spaghetti Special
Large plate of Spaghetti
with Garlic Bread
$1.49
758 7400
507 E. 14th Street
Greenville, N.c. 27834





' f r f
U students express views on
new liquor-by-the-drink bill
19 September 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
ByARAHVENABLE
Staff Writer
Several ECU students
expressed their opinions on
the l�quor-by-the-drink bill
recently. '
Paye Bellamy, a grad-
uate student specializing in
busjness administration
said. Considering the rev-
ere that it wi.l bring into
"ie state. I think it should
be passed. I really don't
beheve there'll be a lot of
drunks on the street
Rs Pollard, an emplo-
yee forweyerhausercomp-
any m Greenville, said he
doesn't approve because
he s a Christian. He said
fiquor by the drink is
downgrad.ng America
We should keep it up
Carol Rouse, a student
trom Kinston said it really
doesn't make a lot of
difference There are
Dlaces which already sell
quor by the drink, if I
wanted one "
It does have merit
said Wanda Wiseman, sec-
etary of the ECU Testing
Center. It may put a hut on
ABC stores, and it's prob-
ably all tied up in politics.
3ut. chances are people
wouldn't dnnk as much. If
oeopie have to pay more,
they probably won't buy as
uch Wiseman said if
Drown bagging is allowed,
'quor bv thednnk might as
It might elimi-
ate ovennauiging
People have the right
toliquor by rHe drink said
Robert Franklin, a senior.
Besides, that, he said, it
would provide extra rev-
' the locality.
rtfi Carolina has liq-
our by the gallon. Cheryl
Boe said jokmgly.
Boenm satd she's m. favor
of the bill. "It would be
more expensive" . she said,
but I prefer taxes go up
Bill Swor. a junior,
'rom New Jersey, said he
supports the bill for North
Carolina, it would bring
more business and would
be a change from beer and
music in clubs.
Mitzi Alexander added
that North Carolina is the
only other state that
doesn't have it.
"It would be nice to be
able to go to a club and buy
mixed drinks said Mona
Hodges, a junior from
Payetteville.
She said liquor by the
drink would be nice for
"social drinking "The
government will get their
share she added.
"I'm for it said
Doreathea (Doe Doe) Blunt.
"I believe it will stop some
people from drinking
Liquor should be ban-
ned like guns, Toni Harris,
a senior, remarked. It
shouldn't be sold in large
amounts and it should b
very expensive.
"Alcohol is dangerous
and causes problems just as
drugs do.
The government
shouldn't be a motivating
force, but a hindering
force Harris said.
Marshall Thorpe said
the bill would be good for
business. If it is passed in
Raleigh, a hotel will be
built.
Betsy Johnson, a fresh-
man, maintains that the
passage of the bill will
make it easier to get one
drink at a time. She feels it
will make it harder on
restaurants because they'll
be heavily taxed.
Vicki Sugg compares
the passage of liquor of the
drinks in North Carolina
with South Carolina, and
says it would work out the
better.
"There is only a little
liquor in the drinks she
said.
"They're watered down
with water, soda, fruits,
etc. "I'd like to see it
passed in Greenville, but I
doubt if it's eligible down-
town
Julia Hines said, "I
don't think it will influence
people. People are inclined
to get one more drink if
they have the chance.
Jeff Swisher said he's
worked for the liquor by the
drink passage in the
Winston-Salem and Green-
sboro area. He thinks it's a
better way of controlling
alcohol. "People coming
from different states are
amazed he said.
FOUNTAINHEAD needs news writers.
Call 757-6366.
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THE ECU MARCH.NG U. MM, ,unng anomer ha�,me shomng
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RUSH
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409 Elizabeth St.
Call 752-4379 for rides. 3
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It has kicked the
rears of royalty
By DOUG WHITE
Editor
How often have you felt like kicking
yourself for things you had or had not
done, but never had any way of doing so?
Well, in the summer of 1937, Tom
Haywood, proprietor of "Tom Haywood's
Store" (now Jim's Trading Post), realized
that "if I had a self-kicking machine, I
could inflict this long wished for and
Dromised punishment and so the world
famous "Self-Kicking Machine" was
created.
The machine is located on highway
70, in Croatan, 10 miles east of New
Bern It is housed in a wooden gazebo
and decorated with signs explaining the
history, purpose, and use of the machine.
The machine consists of a wheel with
four spokes; each ends in an old shoe.
The user bends over to turn a large metal
crank, located opposite the wheel, which
turns a belt, causing the wheel to turn.
As the wheel turns, the shoes come up
and strike the user's posterior. The faster
one turns the crank, the harder they hit.
Uncle Tom was a man with a great
sense of humor, and he had often heard
the saying, you know, 'well I could just
kick myself over something somebody
had done said Mrs. Mary Alice Elliott,
niece of the inventor and former owner of
the store and machine.
At first, he kept the machine in his
Dackyard. sorta as a joke, but soon his
fnends heard about it and persuaded him
to move it to the store. After that, it just
swept the country
On July 27, 1937. the first of many
news stories appeared in an area paper,
and on Aug 4. a New York paper
reported the novelty. Finally, a reporter
for UPI sent a story over the wire.
"It was after the UPI story tfeat we
started hearing from relattiveSand"trier�ds
about stories in papers all over the
country. The New York Times even
earned something on it said Bill Elliott,
Mary Elliot's husband.
The Universal News Reel Co. made a
news reel of the inventor and several
others "operating the machine in a
proper manner" as Haywood later wrote.
on Sept. 15. 1937.
Haywood was twice invited to broad-
cast over the radio with his kicking
machine. "For the good of the country
Haywood agreed to appear on the "We
the People" program, on CBS, on Nov.
25, 1937, and later on the "Hobby
Lobby" show, on NBC. on Sept. 20, 1939.
During World War II, "Ripley's
Believe It or Not" contacted Haywood
about appearing on their show, but with
Cherry Point Marine Base being built a
few miles down the highway at Havelock,
and the accompanying influx of both
military and civilian personnel, Haywood
could not leave the store while business
was so brisk, according to Mrs. Elliott.
At one time, memberships in the
"Self-Kicking Club of America" could be
purchased for a nominal fee, according to
Mrs. Elliott. Ten percent of the mem-
bership fee was donated to charity. The
club's purpose was to "produce smiles
and spread good cheer among the 'I
Could Kick Myself Brotherhood' of
America and to remind us that ' If we kick
ourselves more, we will kick others less'
� Above all to preserve our sense of
humor according to the membership
certificate.
The club was discontinued after
Haywood's death in 1955 because the
Elliotts felt the club and membership in it
wouldn't mean as much as it had while
Haywood was living.
In its heyday, the kicking club boasted
members in every state and some foreign
countries. Its roles even included a
soldier in the German army who visited
the machine before World War II.
In the early 1950's, the Baron and
Baroness of Berne. Switzerland, visited
Berne's daughter city. New Bern. They
visited the machine and kicked their titled
tails.
In 1948, when President Truman
vfsifedlfie arajMTs. Elliott recalls that
the motorcade slowed and Truman turned
and looked at the machine, although the
motorcade did not stop.
Over time, the machine's housing fell
into disrepair, including being hit by a
truck last year. Recently, Bill Elliott spent
$150 to repair the housing and have new
signs painted. The machine itself is still
in good condition, despite being broken
THE ORIGINAL KICKING machine,
invented by Tom Haywood in 1937 is
located on highway 70 at Croatan, 10
miles east of New Bern. It became
famous throughout the U. S. through a
series of newspaper articles and radio
talk show appearances by the inventor.
The Self-Kicking Club of America was
discontinued in 1955 Photo by Doug White
twice during itshistory.
Last year, the Elliotts sold the store,
which they took over after Haywood died,
to Jim Kennedy, and leased the machine
to him. "Tom Haywood's Store" is now
"Jim'sTrading Post
Even after 41 years there is still an
interest, according to Bill Elliott, in the
kicking machine.
I did 15 radio talk shows about a year
ago, including one for the BBC, and I still
get a call once in a while from a radio
station in, say, New Orleans, or St. Louis,
asking me if I can go on the air in an hour
or so. I've gotten calls from Boston,
Seattle. Charleston, just all over the
country. One time I did seven shows in
one week he said.
In addition to a pamphlet and color
post cards of the machine which the
Elliotts distribute free of charge, Hay-
wood's invention is mentioned in a
pamphlet tracing the history of Cherry
Point Marine Base which was published
in the late 1940's.
Croatan has lost its train station, post
office, fire tower, and school in recent
years, but it is still the home of the one
and only kicking machine, and that
landmark has probably given the com-
munity more notoriety than all the others
put together.
In One Last Glimpse Aldridge turns Hemingway
and F. Scott Fitzgerald into fictional characters
By JEFF ROLLINS
Assistant Trends Editor
Set in 1929, James
Aldridge's new book, One
Last Glimpse, was inspired
by a car journey made by
Ernest Hemingway and F.
Scott Fitzgerald. Heming-
way described the trip that
the two authors made into
the French countryside in
his memoir, A Moveable
Feast.
One Last Glimpse is a
fictional recreation of the
two authors' relationship
during the trip. It is also a
remarkable and almost
convincing study of the two
literary giants as well as a
brilliant evocation of the
extraordinary richness of
the period � the glamor,
the vitality and the wit �
seen through the eyes of
Kit, the young narrator who
accompanies the two wri-
ters on the sojourn.
Aldridge has written
numerous books. His ex-
periences as a war corre-
spondent provided him
with background material
for writing his novels. For
this reason, his first novel,
Signed With Their Honour,
was compared to Heming-
way' s A Farewell To A rms
and For Whom The Bell
Tolls.
Jeremy Brooks in the
Sunday Times said of Al-
drige's latest endeavor,
"To take, as the main
protagonists of a novel, two
of this century's moat in
foresting and infuriating
writers was a daring and
dangerous conceit. Mr. Al-
drige gets away with ItIt
is like being offered the
"ONE LAST GLIMPSE" is a fictional recreation of the two
authors as they travel on the road through France. It is also
a remarkable and almost convincing study of the two
literary giants.
fruit of intensive biograph-
ical research. I know that in
the future, whenever I read
a book by either Hem-
ingway or Fitzgerald, this
vivid little coda will be part
of the background noise
through which I hear their
voices
Yet, reading the book
leaves one disappointed.
Hemingway and Fitzgerald
never become fully rounded
characters but remain,
rather, obvious mental
constructs designed to pre-
sent Aldrige's view of
them.
Fitzgerald in the novel
is a rather obstreperous
drunk, a decadent who
wonders "What else is
there to do in a dead,
deserted French village at
lunohtime but drink?"
Aldrige sees the journey
through the French coun-
tryside as an effort on the
part of both writers to
shuck the fictionalized im-
ages that they have pre-
sented of themselves in
order to protect their real,
creative psyches.
Fitzgerald shows him-
self to the world as an
urbane enfant terrible, as a
writer of genius, who,
pained by personal griefs,
steeps his mind in alcohol.
Hemingway, on the o-
ther hand, presents a fa-
cade of the macho hunter of
animals. Hemingway would
like for everyone to believe
that he feels nearest the
heart of human drama and
tragedy when he is near
slaughter,or men or game.
The only problem is that
what was once fiction is
slowly becoming fact; the
writers are losing their true
selves and are actually
becoming what was once
just ah act for them.
The journey into the
French countryside is to be
a journey of catharsis,
where the writers, by con-
stant amiable antagonism,
try to find out what is really
them and what is just
fiction.
It's a good idea for a
book but Aldrige stops
short of developing any-
thing truly revealing about
the two American authors.
Buffs of the "Lost Gener-
ation" will find this book
enjoyable, but true stu-
dents of those writers won't
learn much.
One's time would be
better spent reading Hem-
ingway's A Moveable
Feast, where Papa himself
describes their trip to For-
geres, in much tighter,
more exciting prose.
harsh, insensitive and often
self-destructive men.
They are espec-
ially self-destructive, as
James Aldridge makes sure
we see.
One interesting episode
in the book is when Fitz-
gerald, in order to make a
point, goes on a hunt with
Hemingway. The night be-
fore Fitzgerald drunkenly
boasted that he could kill as
many if not more birds than
Hemingway. And Heming-
way took him up on it.
The next morning the
two authors go out into the
woods, divide up, and
begin the days shooting.
Fitzgerald, though, does
not stick only to grouse, but
kills every kind of bird he
possibly can: startlings,
finches, sparrows and rob-
ins.
When the two meet
back at the camp Hem-
ingway is enraged at Fitz-
gerald's little object lesson
about the immorality of
killing. Needless to say,
though, the lesson is lost on
Hemingway who begins to
accuse Fitzgerald of being
drunk with a gun.
That sort of poking goes
on between the authors
Books
Fitzgerald and Hem-
ingway make complimen-
tary and contrasting fri-
ends. They are at once
extremely literary and cre-
ative gentlemen as well as
throughout the book. They
are happiest it seems when
they are cutting each other
to the quick. Yet, there'a
method behind their mad-
ness. Each is trying to help
the other, each is the only
one who could help the
other, to find his true self,
to separate the man from
the myth.
James Aldridge's One
Last Glimpse is more dar-
ing than successful. It
allows us though to enjoy
the fruits of some intensive
literary research. No matter
what one might say about
the lack of true drama in
the book, one must admit
that Aldridge has done his
homework.
SOME APOLOGIES
One Last Glimpse is
best apologized by the
author himseif, though,
who describes the book in
the following way.
"This is the story of a
famous friendship and what
happened to it. I feel that
my version is as valid as the
dozen other explanations of
what happened between
the two men I'm writing
about, only mine is pure
fiction not simulated fact
"Because it is fiction I
have tried not to be cruel to
anyone living or dead, nor
probe my characters more
than is necessary for what I
want from them. But I must
beg the indulgence of a lot
of people who knew the two
men intimately but who
probably don't see the
classical drama in their
friendship the way I do
And with all due re-
spect, there will probably
be a lot of those.
(Many thanks to Penguin
Books for their review copy
of One Last Glimpse)
Student Union
Calender of Events
Sept. 20-Sept. 26
CITIZEN KANE
Sept. 20, Hendrix Theatre � MSC
Show at 8 p.m.
LOOKING FOR MR. GOODBAR
Sept. 22 & 23, Hendrix Theatre � M SC
Showsat 7 p.m. and 9 p.m.
Set against the world of dope, singles bars and discos,
Judith Rossner's best-selling novel is vividly translated to
the screen by director Richard Brooks (In Cold Blood), and
starring Academy Award nominee Diane Keaton as
Theresa Dunn, a young woman breaking from her family
and searching for her identity.
HITCHCOCK FILM FESTIVAL
Sept. 24, Hendrix Theatre � M SC
Showsat 3 p.m.
THE 39 STEPS
Based on John Buchan's novel, this slick and
entertaining 1935 spy thriller established Hitchcock as a
master of suspense and excitement.
FRENZY
Alfred Hitchcock once again proves himself the master
of suspense. This tidy little tidbit of organized perversion
yields a villian who picks his teeth with a diamond stickpin
at one glance and strangles lovely ladies with his necktie at
the next.
PSYCHO
Acclaimed "the master shock film of all time "
Hitchcock's Psycho is the utmost in suspense, drama and
genuine terror. This story is of a young woman. Marion
Crane, who steals a fortune and in her escape encounters a
warped, mother-possessed young man, Norman Bates.
MARNIE
Mamie'si sexual, romantic, and emotional emphasis
give .t a richness and density which set it aoart ff�
Hitchcock's other fi.ms of the 60's. The story concerns
amateur psychologist's obsession with a beautiful
kleptomaniac. oeautiful
THE AMAZING KRESKIN
Sept. 26. Hendrix Theatre � MSC
8 p.m.
Students � St
Public � $3
Tickets.val.ab at the Centra. Ticket Office in
M endenhalI Student Center
Kreskin is the world mnm �
foremost authority 7L' � oTTs FES. T "
"scientifte investigator" of the doLk oi � '
variousareaaof E.S.P. " Wion �nd
COFFEEHOUSE
On Fri Sept. 22 and Sat Sent �-�
Coffeehouse committee m ' � 5 8 p�"�� �
�nd other act. �� encourage to dTL? 'f0
free and there . aiw.yslokJ. �?- Ad"���on la
"Wle you enjoy themuste Ch,tt t0 on
-
I
-w m�mm





I9 8�pffflbf 1978 FOUNTAINHEAO Pi
ECU Manuscript Collection possesses the document of
a unique correspondence between religious
director and Carver back in 1933
DR. GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER
By DENNIS R. LAWSON
ECU Manuscript Curator
On a vibrant spring day
in May, 1933, Dr. George
Washington Carver del-
ivered his famous lecture
on the wonders of the
peanut to students at the
University of North
Carolina at Greensboro.
Lucy Cherry Crisp, then
director of student religious
activities and later director
of the North Carolina Mus-
eum of Art, had invited the
renowned Tuskegee chem-
urgist to speak.
Their meeting immed-
iately before that lecture
led to a close-knit, decade-
long friendship in which
Miss Crisp became one of
the circle of close friends
called by Carver his "little
family The papers of
Miss Crisp, in the ECU
Manuscript Collection doc-
ument the unique relation-
ship between them.
Their correspondence
began during one of the
busiest periods of Profes-
sor Carver's extraordinary
life. As director of the
Research and Experiment
Station of Tuskegee Insti-
tute, he acquired fame and
he forged a profusion of
products from peanuts and
sweet potatoes.
A more powerful boost
to his fame developed when
he discovered a peanut-
derived massage oil that
was effective in the treat-
ment of infantile paralysis,
then raging across the
nation.
Great piles of letters,
from 'suffering humanity'
arrived daily at his desk;
paralysis-striken victims
traveled thousands of miles
seeking aid from Carver.
And Carver gave relief.
"This work he write
to Lucy Crisp, "is almost
uncanny as you can actually
see how God is causing the
wither'd limbs to begin to
take on new life
Dr. Carver never credit-
ed himself with his discov-
ery. He felt that "God
through the Peanut Oil is
doing wonderful thingsand,
even I am surprised
The remarkable person-
ality of Carver - "Frailty -
quietness - gentleness - A
sense of Inner Immediate
Companionship" - drew
Crisp and Carver together
as close friends. Miss Crisp
felt compelled to write a
biography of Carver, to
which he acceded, largely
because of his respect for
the North Carolina artist's
"great spirit, his creative
mind, his artistic
vision which Carver felt
should be developed.
A short time later, when
M iss Crisp presented it to
Carver for editing a chapter
dealing with the astonish-
ing story of his youth, he
humorously replied, "As
long as one don't know the
real little wonder boy,
grown up, I believe it is
going to one of the most
inspirational books, (True
Stories) that has appeared
for decades This plant
wizard, characteristically
self-effacing, could never
understand why "a notor-
ious chemist would attract
so much attention
Asked by Lucy Crisp
See CRISP, p. 10
Mitchell's Hair Styling
3f
Pitt Plaza Shopping Centet
Crcenv.llc North Carolina 37&M
7562050
onservation:
An important topic, needing attention
.�.
r
ICHAEL CROFOOT
Special to
MJNTAINHEAD
Among the many
arts of national sign-
e Ahich have recent-
ir brought to the
attention, there are
"lien compare in im-
05 with that of con-
Or
Ot many thoughtful
38ns will deny that
ipaice is one of our
itsonal faults.
first thought, it may
fange that the nation
has ;prung from the
s s who founded
f and Jamestown.
n the
an
i . strenuous pione-
uld have devel-
la � i inprofideoce
e circumstances
g the life of the
se ers strictly for-
aione in the begin-
f that nation, but for
fere school
adversities of
many a decade of its early
existence, the conditions of
life were exceedingly hard.
Never, surely, did a race of
men so literally earn its
bread by the sweat of its
brow as those resilute
pioneers, who had to coax
the means of life from the
rock-encombered hills and
valleysof New England, or
endure the prodigious toil
of clearing away primeval
forests before they could
lay bare a patch of arable
land from which to raise
the food and feed for and
beast.
"It was in later years,
when the van of pioneer
conquest had been pushed
out into the rich and
unobstructed prairie lands
of the West, that the
AnQerjgao pegpiebegan to
realize with what lavish
abundance nature stood
ready to pour forth her
treasures.
When the cattle multip-
lied upon a thousand hills
and the crops burst forth in
luxurious abundance from
the virgin soil, the pressing
need for careful husbandry
of resources was no longer
felt.
Hence it has come about
that nature herself is lar-
gely responsible for that
later extravagance, which
led the American people to
aquander resources which
they have come to regard
and speak of as 'practically
inexaustible.
"Unfortunately, the
habits learned on the farm
have been carried into
those great industrial act-
ivities, whose magnitude
is one of the wonders of our
modern life. If the riches of
the soil were 'inexhaust-
ible so also seemed to be
those of the forest, of the
mine, and ot the rivers and
lakes and seas with their
teeming millions.
H ence it has come about
that in our effort to gather
only the riches which are
immediately and easily ac-
cessible, we have been
using up nature's store-
house of raw materials,
ruthlessly destroying or let-
ting go to wasted thousands
of sqaure miles of forest
and millions of tons of coal
and precious minerals.
Year after year crops
have been sown upon the
once virgin land, until, in
sheer exhaustion, they
have refused to render the
plenteous yield of former
years, or even to yield any
crops whatsoever - at least
until the husbandman shall
have restored some portion
of those nutritive elements
which are necessary to
germination, growth and
full fruitation.
"We have ail heard and
read a great deal during the
past few years about this
subject of conservation; but
it is a question whether
many people have any just
conception of how great has
been the wicked waste of
the body shoppe
located on the corner of
14th St. and Greenville Blvd.
the figure and fitness-minded woman
rganized group exercise
individualized conditioning program
exercise apparel available
Manager: Theresa Holley, B.S. Health
andP.E. ECU Phone 758-7564
Student specials for limited time
HAVE A "BOTTOMLESS" CUP OF
PEPSI FREE
ENJOY A FREE
PEPSI WITH THE
PURCHASE OF
ANY PLATTER,
QUARTER
CHICKEN OR
SANDWICH.
1 Oth and Charles Streets-Greenville
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the past and how pressing
is the need for future
economy.
The present issue of the
Scientific A merican is pub-
lished in the hope that it
may put this whole quest-
ion in its true light
The title and the pre-
ceeding essay are quotes
verbatim from an editorial
in the Aug 12, 1911
issue of Scientific
American, about the same
time that Liberty Hyde
Bailey was writing The
Holy Earth . Parts of the
editorial have since been
used very recently to sup-
port the proposition that
the United States should
implement a permanent oil
rationing system in which
rights to oil consumption
See CONSERVATION,
P 10)
X
-T
V
mmi $
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regular price $35.00
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including uni perm I
Offer good each Wednesday I
through Oct. 25,1978
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wmmmm
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Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 19 September 1978
Marijuana traffickers get stuck
EDISTO ISLAND, S.C.
(AP) - Nathaniel Parker was
sure the three armed men
who accosted him as he
drove home from a night
out with friends would kill
him.
The three men stopped
his car about 2.30 a.m.
where two trucks were
parked on the roadside.
Bales of marijuana were
strewn behind one of the
trucks, a tractor-trailer rig.
Parker, 34, of Charles-
ton County, said in an
interview Sunday that he
was "frightened and freak-
ed out
The three men and six
others were arrested later
and about 30 tons of
marijuana was seized in
what authorities said is the
biggest drug confiscation in
Charleston County.
Lt. James H. Goss of
the Charleston County
Metro Drug Enforcement
Unit said the men must
have become stuck in a
ditch and then tried to get
the truck out by throwing
some of the bales out.
The three men who
stopped Parker forced him
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The Wiener King footlong Frankfooter is a fancy hot dog.
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King
1
to drive at gunpoint to find
help. "I knew they were
desperate and nervous.
They stuck the guns in my
side and told me to drive off
and find help Parker said
Sunday
Unsuccessful in find-
ing aid, they returned and
tried digging the truck out.
Parker managed to es-
cape about 5 a.m he said,
when an approaching car
scared his captors into the
woods.
The marijuania is worth
about $30 million in street
sales, officers said.
Mendenhall Student Center
College Bowl intramurals
begin third season
Ms. Crisp wrote a
Carver biography
continued from p.9
how he had not become
embittered at the shabby
treatment he often encoun-
tered because of his race,
he poignantly replied,
"Had you been Colored,
you could so thoroughly
understand how important
it was to forget many things
and to study how to ac-
complish what you started
to do
The feverish pace of
his life demanded all of
Carver's energies. "At
times he complained, "I
have been unable to see
people at all, as my stren-
gth absolutely gives out
His mail continued to
increase daily, and curious
visitors came from every
quarter to steal a peep at
the famous scientist. By
1938, he suffered a break-
down, and from this point
his health gradually deter-
iorated until his death in
1943.
The state of Carver's
health and the outbreak of
World War II forced Miss
Crisp to postpone the bio-
graphy. In the meantime,
she decided to study Carver
in clay, which she dug
from the North Carolina
creekbanks.
Professor Carver never
saw the completed bust,
but when requested to
critique the sculpture by
photography, he typically
replied, "I don't know what
About the only thing
College Bowl players have
in common is their intel-
ligence. A more diverse
group of people would be
hard to find; players on last
year's teams were of all
classifications and depart-
ments.
The History Depart-
ment, English Department,
Student Union, the Baptist
Union, Phi Sigma Pi, the
Philosophy Department,
the Sociology-Anthropology
Department, the Newman
Club, AFROTC, the
MSCSU Techincal Crew
each had a team (or two) in
last year's competition.
The winning team from
the History Department
went on to the Regional
tournament after their int-
ramural victory.
College Bowl is a game
of academic competition.
The moderator asks a
Registration
ends
Thurs. ,
Sept. 21
toss-up question worth 10
points; the first player to
answer correctly earns a
bonus question for hisher
team. The largest point
total wins the game.
Many remember
College Bowl from televi-
sion (to which it will soon
return).
Some started playing
simply to add an additional
activity for their group and
discovered they really had
fun.
A few are trying to
prove something to them-
selves or someone else.
All are engaged in the
spirit of competition which
rests on the quickness of
one's brain and reflexes
All soon discover that
College Bowl is both an
individual and a team
sport.
Team registration for
College Bowl began Moo .
Aug. 28, 1978 and will end
Thurs Sept. 21, 1978.
College Bowl is spon-
sored by Mendenhall Stud-
ent Center, and all matches
are played there.
Any four full-time stud-
ents graduate or under-
graduate, may form a team
Each team must have an
alternate and a coach.
For further information
contact Wanda Yuhas at
Mendenhall Student Center
757-6611, ext 213
-sea, '& loaaAu
203 South Evans St.
Greenville, N.C. 27834
Phone: 752-3980 Monday-Friday
Other hours by appointment
I look hke, so I am no judge
of this. Somebody else can
tell better than I can
Shortly after his death, a
North Carolina high school
principal purchased the
first copy of the bust for his
school. A two dollar royalty
went into the Carver Trust
Fund at Tuskegee.
The biography planned
and written by Ms. Crisp
was never published. Her
manuscript and related
correspondence may be
seen by the public at the
ECU Manuscript Collection
in the Joyner Library on the
ECU campus. The collect-
ion is open Mon. through
Fri. 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Hjoux Jlife.
201 Sa�k 5&. �bi��.t
X��.n.ui�e JM.C. 27S34
CONSERVATION
continued from p. 9
are bought and sold in a
"white market" as an
integral feature of Presi-
dent Carter's "moral equ-
ivalent of war" on energy
use.
This essay raises many
questions, some of which
are: why didn't the conser-
vation ethic take hold in
1911 (or since the begin-
ning of recorded history for
that matter) and how does
its failure reflect upon our
present predicament?
What are the relationships
between public option and
resource availability9 What
lessons are to be learned9
Qoute of the Week from
a Book of the Century.
Beyond The Crisis, edited
by Norman Birnhaum. Ox-
ford University Press, 1977
"An eclipse has covered
modern society, its hori-
zon is darkened, and its
shadows are more visible
than its light By dint of
burrowing as if it were not
there, we have reached the
bedrock of nature And we
ask: Is it true trial nature is
not unlimited9 Is there
really a human nature9'
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il
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J





19 September 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 11
North Carolina sneaks past Pirates, 14-10
R
the
Fourth quarter rally-
ends with fumble
liig day for the Pirate defense
DEFENSIVE BACK Thomas M c-
ng and two other Pirate defenders
. tackle a North Carolina run-
back m Saturday's contest against the Tar
Heels The Pirate defense limited the
Heels to just six yards rushing and two
1bad a � : had
team out there
�� as a team
said Pirate backui
� - Si
st simply ran out
The defense was
Eddie (Hicks) a
" s; did a
d the substi-
T"his is an
iwf u I igt ss
should
. . . : ed p rate star
�� ks. who
along wsth Collins missed
entire game with the
�. ' we put a lot of
rV mto this We just
need to hold on to the ball
It was . hot and humid
out there That must have
It hurt, but not as much
as the loss did Pirate
defensive end Zack
Valentine. "I know we're
better than they are. Time
' ran out We had good
practices all week. The
offense really did a lot
better Time just ran out.
that s all it is to it
Hagans was not very
� sed with the Tar
Heei defensive front "We
ran ail over them I've seen
a lot better than they
showed us today '
The Tar Heels could not
make that claim of the
Pirates East Carolina
came to play today said
UNC head coach Dick
Crum They had their
backs to the wall in the first
half, but they didn't quit
The fact that the Pirates
refused to quit seemed to
be somewhat of an inspira-
tion for Dye "I would have
to say that the big thing
arrived this afternoon he
noted. What Dye is refer-
ring toas the 'big thing' is
effort He complained that
his team was desperately
lacking in effort after the
State game He seemed
much more pleased after
Saturday's match up with
the Tar Heels.
first downs in the second half A record
crowd of 51,150 watched the Pirates and
North Carolina which marked the fifth
meeting between the two schools. Photo by John H Grogan
RUSHING
ECU-Green 10-42,
12-52. Suttom
Dye did not say much
but he must have felt the
same way Zack Valentine
did after Saturday's heart-
breaking loss. Zack' s work
will echo in the minds of all
Pirates for a long time
Time just ran out. that's
all it is to it
ECU-UNC Stats
ECU 0 0 7 3-10
UNC 7 0 7 0-14
UNC- Burrell 1 run (Hayes
kick)
ECU-Sutton 5 run (Lamm
kick)
UNC-Loomis 28 pass from
K upec (Hayes kick)
ECU-Lamrn 39 FG
Hicks
19-80,
Harrell 3-2, Collins 7-41.
Hawkins 10-50. Greer 1-5,
Cobb 1-(-1), Washington
1-5. UNC-Lawrence 11-44.
Paschal 9-91. Kupec 6-(-7).
Chnstensen 8-8. Mack
3-11. Sturdivant 10-14, Bur-
rell 7-1 3
PASSING
ECU-Green 3-10-0-51, UNC
-Kupec 6-8-0-60. Christen-
sen 2-4-0-36
RECEIVING
ECU-Washmgton 2-47,
Hawkins 1-4. UNC-Loomis
2-59. Stundvant 3-10,
Rouse 1-18, Paschal 1-8,
Burrell 1-1.
Vife&?x ECUdefense sparkles again
i JSV?

�fj FULLBACK THEODORE Sutton goes in standing up
the Pirates only touchdown against North Carolina in
Zturdays contest PnotobyJohn H. Grogan)
Bv SAM ROGERS �
Sports Editor
CHAPEL HILL - Even
after North Carolina's nar-
row 14-10 victory over
ECU not one player was
a Ming to admit the favored
Tar Heels were the better
team Saturday afternoon
before a record Kenan
Stadium crowd of 51.150
The Pirates had clearly
dominated play in the
second half, both offensive-
ly and defensively But
much like ECU'S 12-10 loss
to UNC m 1976. the Pirates
failed to produce the win-
ning touchdown on a late
fourth quarter drive
Basically, we played
like a unit today said
linebacker Tommy
Summer, who was credited
with all tackles against the
Tar Heels "We played
hard and fought all day
long We didn t lose, time
just ran out on us
Summer's cohorts at
linebacker Mike Brewing-
ton and reserve Jeffery
Warren limited the Tar
Heel rushing attack to just
six yards and two first
downs in the second half
"We had a few prob-
lems in the first half, but
we made some adjusiments
at halftime and it really
made a difference ex-
plained Brewington who
had six solo tackles and a
fumble recovery I knew
we could win this game
Coach Dye just told us to hit
hard and play aggressively
We just came up a little
short
North Carolina's win-
ning touchdown in the
second half came when
quarterback Matt Kupec
barely eluded several ECU
defenders in the backfield
and lofted a 28 yard pass to
fullback Bob Loomis who
feel into the end zone for
the score
"We were in man-to-
man coverage said def-
ensive back Wayne Perry.
I was on Loomis but then
he slowed up and broke his
pattern when he saw K upec
scrambling. I turned around
to go after him and I lost
the ball but I still should
have been behind him
"North Carolina seem-
ed to get the big plays
today We showed a lot of
class out there, and I really
think we should have won
the game
ECU head coach pat
Dye also admitted the Tar
Heels ability to come up
with the big plays was
instrumental in UNC s vic-
tory
"We gave them too
many big plays, defensive-
ly noted Dye We play-
ed hard all day and never
quit I'm proud of our
team
Even though the Pirates
are now 1-2 and have
another difficult road test
against Southwestern
Louisiana this week, not
one of the players are ready
to throw in the towel yet.
"I don'tthinkthis loss is
going to hurt us any next
week. said Perry "We
worked hard in practice last
week and I think we found
out today we can play and
more importantly that we
want to We won't let up
next week against South-
western Louisiana We'll
be ready
ECU defensive end Zack
Valentine hit home with a
philosophical idea most of
the players as well as fans
earned home with them
after the game
It was a close game
and we did everything we
were supposed to ex-
plained Valentine. "As
long as you lose you always
learn something from it
We' II certainly get better as
the year goes on
But today, we didn't
have anything to be asham-
ed about
The Pirates face South-
western Louisiana Saturday
night in Lafayette and then
return home for their sec-
ond home game of the
season against the Uni-
versity of Texas-Arlington.
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
CHAPEL HILL - ECU
head coach Pat Dye said it
and and not one of the
51.000 plus fans in Kenan
Stadium Saturday after-
noon would have disagreed
with htm
The big thing about
the game this afternoon
was that we arrived said
Dye We stayed in there
and fought all afternoon
We played hard and we
never gave up
Even though the Pirates
dropped a hard fought
14-10 decision to the heav-
ily favored Tar Heels. ECU
played by far its finest
game of the season and
totally dominated North
Carolina in the second half
However as the final
seconds ticked off the
Kenan Stadium scoreboard
clock, the Pirates had once
again come up on the short
end for the second time m
three starts this season
ECU is now 1 -2 on the yea;
while the Heels were victor-
ious in Dick Crum'sdebute.
I thought we really
dominated them m the
second half observed
Dye. but once again we
put ourselves m a lot of
adversity with the turn-
overs we made But I've got
to be proud of our team I
still think we have a chance
to have a 'me football tea-
this year
Despite the Pirates six
fumbles. Norf1 Carona
failed to capitalize on any of
them, although the ECU
defense was backed up
agamst its own goal line
most of the afternoon
North Carolina had
numerous scoring oppor-
tunities in the first half, but
each time the defense held
while highly touted UNC
freshman piacekicker Jeff
Hayes aided the Pirates
with three missed field
goals, all within easy
range.
After a big 42 yard run
by Greenville's own Doug
Paschal on North Carolina's
first possession, the Tar
Heels missed their first
scoring opportunity when
Hayes missed his first field
goal attempt from just 26
yards out.
But on the Tar Heels
third possession of the
game, North Carolina mov-
ed 62 yards in 13 plays for
its first touchdown. After
halfback Terence Burrell
and quarterback Matt
Kupec were both stacked
up for no gam at the ECU
one yard line. Burrell went
over on fourth and one for
the score Hayes first con-
version was good and North
Carolina led 7-0 with 2 13 to
play in the first quarter
ECU'S only serious
threat m the first half came
midway through the second
quarter when the Pirates
drove from the ECU 36 to
its own 31 after John
Hallow recovered an Amos
Lawrence fumble
But once again, the
drive ended when ECU
halfback Eddie Hicks fum-
bled a four?" ai d two
gamble which was recover-
ed by linebacker Y K
McDameis
On North Carolina's fin-
al possession of the I
half, quarterback Clyde
Chnstenson hit ' , back
Bob Loomis for 36 yards
which earned to the ECU 18
yard line But. three plays
later. Hayes missed his
third field goal
when his short 26 yard
attempt was wide to tl e
left
The Pirates quickly I jr-
ned things arour I the
second half as ECU n -��
hodicaliy moved 7
Six plays tS ' .
touchdown of the
noon Both plays
drive were Leander Gree
30 yard pass to sc t �
Bill Ray Washington
quarterback Steve Greer s
22 yard carr. ar )ur :
right side Fulibac Teo-
dore Sutton went in stai
mg up for ,He score "
five yards out and B I
Lamm s converse
score at 7-7
But the He
most of then
sfui dr . - the se
when Kupec jbbed a 28
ard cass tc Loon s
bereo into the er : : i
for the score The .
m the drwe a as Kupec s 18
yard pass W 'lawe'
Rouse on third and 15
Hayes second
sion put the Tar Hee s : -
on top at 14-7 and Surpr's-
mgly. it was a: the sco�
UNC needed the rema - 1
of the game
Lamm missec a 4
field goal midway through
the fourth pence bul came
right back on the nexl
series and sent one through
the uprights from 38 yards
wih 5 3" re"ac The
� eld goa narrowed UNC s
margin to four points and
the Pirates regamed ros-
session with 4 08 for the r
final dre
ECU took ove- at ts
own 31 and quick . moved
rJownfield M �e Hawk ns
got the big ga er n the
series with a 19 yard bt
over the middle And
first and ten from the UNC
21 Green had split ej
Terry Gaiiahe- wide open
on the right side but ust
overthrew the ba
Anthony Co ns f. -
up five vards on the n
play but with time ru
out Green roneo out 1 I
left side ana was spun
around by Bunn Rhanes
who popped the ban loose
and David Simmons recov-
ered
"it was a loadea option
totheie't explained Dye
Leander was forced to
come back inside and just
got spun around and lost
the ban
ECU hooters win
By TERRY Y.�ARGAN
Staff Writer
The ECU soccer team
produced an offensive ex-
plosion this past Saturday
that left Catawba College
mesmerized The Pirates
led at half-
time 3-1, then returned to
add six more yoals with
Catawba socring only
twice The 9-3 victory lifts
East Carolina's record to
1-2 overall.
It turned out to be a
record setting day for the
Pirates with an amazing 9
goals in any one game to
date Also, Freshman Brad
Wincffeil earned admission
to the record books in the
category of most goals per
game by an individual at
� East Carolina with 4
Other scorers were Bill
Teter Brian Parrot, Sean
Berry. Eric Tucker and Phil
Martin each getting one In
the assist department Brad
Wincheii had two, Eric
Tucker had one. and Phil
MarLn has one
Co-captain Phil Martin
felt the team was much
improved from the previous
week We looked much
better against Catawba
explainea Martin "We
passed the ball, trapped,
�and kept it on the ground
well
East Carolina travels to
Burlington on Tues , Sept
19 to meet with Elon
College
t





Pag 12 FOUMTAINHtAO It
1978
YOUR
UP
.0
�&
PIRATES
LET'S GO 9 AND 2
PLAY HARD FOR 8 IN A ROW
WE'RE BEHIND YOU
ALL THE WAY!
APPLE RECORDS
UNIVERSITY BOOK EXCHANGE
THE GAZEBO
NEWBY'S
THE ATTIC
THE TREE HOUSE
RATHSKELLER
PANT AN A BOBS
SCRAPS
STOP SHOP
BEEF AND SHAKES
ELBO ROOM
ART AND CAMERA
P TO SUN-DOWN WATERBEDS
HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH
H.L. HODGES
D G. ROBINSON'S JEWELERS
THE BICYCLE SHOP
RICKS GUITAR SHOP
STUFFY'S
JOLLY ROGER
WEINER KING
DAK'S
PIRATE
1





Pa� 12 FOUMTAtWHtAD 1t SiHotiUi 1978
YOUR
UP
PIRATES
LET'S GO 9 AND 2
PLAY HARD FOR 8 IN A ROW
WE'RE BEHIND YOU
ALL THE WAY!
APPLE RECORDS
UNIVERSITY BOOK EXCHANGE
THE GAZEBO
NEWBY'S
THE ATTIC
THE TREE HOUSE
RATHSKELLER
PANT AN A BOBS
SCRAPS
STOP SHOP
BEEF AND SHAKES
ELBO R

ART AND CAMERA
P TO SUN-DOWN WATERBEDS
HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH
H.L. HODGES
D G. ROBINSON'S JEWELERS
THE BICYCLE SHOP
RICKS GUITAR SHOP
STUFFY'S
JOLLY ROGER
WEINER KING
DAK'S
1
WIMMj
3





' ' � rr��
lrKr�rrrfr,
i � � r
t t r r
i t
I 0
' � r '
fS Kevin Thomas
Outs to 76-14
twnbf 1978 FOUNTAIWHEAD Pay 13
Time
� ECU f,eld hockey team begins their
1978 season Thursday
against Old Dominion.
with a match
Zwigard, Jones
pace Pirates
By JOHN EVANS
Staff Writer
The Scott Time Outs
continue to lead the men's
intramuralfootball teams as
they swept to a pair of
lopsided wins last week. In
two games last week, the
Time Outs scored 130
points and allowed only 36
points, beating the Foot-
ballers 54-22 and the Jones
Bucks 76-14.
The defending campus
champions ran their record
to 3-0 on the season and
stand as one of only seven
undefeated dormitory
teams. In their 76-14 past-
ing of the Bucks, the Time
Outs were led by Kevin
Thomas with four touch-
downs and five pass inter-
ceptions.
Other dormitory teams
remaining undefeated were
the Aycock Aerials, Aycock
Top of the Roost, Jones
Studs, Belk Crabs, Scott
Stooges, and Scott Mean-
ies.
As usual the fraternity
league has had the tightest
race so far with the Phi
Kappa Taus leading the
way with a 4-0 mark. In
second place stands Lam-
bda Chi Alpha.
The Phi Taus took sev-
eral wins last week, topping
their arch-rivals. They beat
Kappa Sigma, 30-22, Tau
Kappa Epsilon 32-8, and
Kappa Alpha 32-30; as
most of the top teams seem
to be squaring off early in
the season. The Pi Kappa
Phis, tied for first a week
ago, dropped two heart-
breakers by losing to Lam-
bda Chi by a 12-6 score and
victory, 3-0 record
i the KAs bv a ?9.1�
to the KAs by a 22-18
count.
Leading the indepen-
dent league teams are the
Sadahary Ohs and the
Sociology - Anthropology
Club. Both have 3-0 marks.
The Ohs lead the Tracker
League and the S-A foot-
baller lead the Cosmos
league. On Your Back also
stands undefeated with a
2-0 mark.
Over in the women's
leagues, two teams hold 3-0
marks after the second
week of play, while three
teams stand at 2-0. For-
feiting out of play in only
the second week were last
year's all-campus women's
champions, the Cotton
Bunnies.
The Tyler Tear Jerkers
seem to be the class of the
two dormitory leagues with
By BETSY McDAVID
Staff Writer
Te new field hockey
season fmds an experienc-
�' weather-wise" team
ready to take on all chal-
lengers. Kathy Zwigard
and Sue Jones will most
ke,y be leading the
charge.
ve been playing hoc-
key for six years now said
right inner Kathy Zwigard.
a junior special education
major. "Where I come from
(New Jersey), field hockey
tor girls if like football for
boys. It's a big thing.
Zwigard beginning
her third year of hockey
"down South' She chose
ECU over northern schools
because she wanted a
change of atmosphere and
because "I knew they had
field hockey "Hockey is a
beatifui game' according
to Zwigard. "tf all your
plays are clicking its very
exciting she said. She
declares the only part she
dislikes is getting in
shape But of course it's
worth it
Although Zwigard was
good enough to see action
on the all-county team in
high school, she claims she
has improved immensely
since her arrival in Green-
ville "I've learned how to
be a team player - how to
communicate on the front
line and where to move at
tne nght time
"It takes a very alert
person to play this game
said Zwigard. "You have to
be constantly thinking.
Even though you might not
touch the ball, you're still
adding aiot to the team
effort. Zwigard herself
certainly fits that descrip-
tion Her teammate Sue
Jones described her as a
very aggressive player with
an excellent team and a
"gung-ho" attitude. Dur-
ing her freshman year the
Pirates went to the Deep
South Tournament where
she made the 3 All-Star
team.
Also hustling on the
hockey field is sophomore
Sue Jones. She is noted by
her teammates as being "a
skillfull stick player exhi-
biting excellent speed
She's really dedicated to
hockey said Kathy
Zwigard.
'ike the type of
people involved in this
game. Jones said.
They are very out going, t's
supposed to be a rough
game involving brute
strength. Its a game of
skill
"The only bad thing
about it is Coach Arrants,
happiness' (running)
drills she laughs.
Jones stressed the im-
portance of team spirit in
field hockey. "You can't
win individually, " said
Jones. "There's alot of
interaction between play-
ers. How well they work as
a whole decides the out-
come of the games A
physical therapy major
Jones does not have much
time for outside activities,
but she, is also an honor
roll student. Jones thinks
all the ingredients are
present for a high scoring
team this year. They will be
given a chance to prove
themselves this Thursday
when the Bucs take on Old
Dominion University in
their home game.
"It'll be a tough game.
Old Dominion beat us 3-1
last year, but we've im-
proved alot. All our girls
have experience now. I
think we'll win said
Jones.
The Pirates opener
against Old Dominion be-
gins at 3:30 p.m.
SALE
Closing out all used golf clubs at
12 price. Golf balls all brands
$10.99 per dozen. All
new golf clubs in
stock cost plus 10.
Must clear out to
make room for new
ki merchandise. Tennis balls
$2.50 per can.
Sale ends Oct. 1,1978.
GORDON D FULP
GOLF PROFESSIONAL
a pair of lopsided victories.
The Jerkers routed both
opponents, whipping the
Fleming Flashes, 60-0, and
the White Whizzers, 42-0.
Tri Sigma is handling
the sorority division at
3-0. Last week, they
downed Delta Zeta (2-1) by
a 20-16 score.
Outstanding perform-
ances were numbered this
week, but there were a few.
Keith Walker threw for four
touchdowns and an extra
point to lead the Belk Crabs
to a 26-18 win over the
Aycock All-Stars and then
turned around and led the
Crabs to a 38-20 win over
Aldo Moro's Bodyguards
with five more touchdown
passes.
Lorenzo Morgan tallied
20 points in his team's
42-16 win over the Village
CUFFS
People, keeping Sociology-
Anthropology undefeated
at 3-0. The 8000' s were led
by Morgan in their other
win, a 24-12 win over the
InoognHos.
ftidky Richter trew for
five touchdowns in a 46-20
win as he led the Rugby
Leathernecks to victory
over the Incognitos. Greg
Barrow threw for three
scores to David McMiilian
as the duo led the Belk
Raiders to a 36-29 win over
the Aycock Giants. John
Pritchard caught four
touchdowns in a 42-14 win
for Belk 206 Saucers, over
the Aycock Kamikazes.
The leading perform-
ance by a woman was
Minnie McPhatter's three
touchdowns and an inter-
ception in the Tyler Tear
Jerkers 60-0 win over the
rleming Flashers
WEEKLY JPECIflLJ
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LOCATED AT GREENVLLE COUNTRY CLUB If"1" ����
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The ECU man is a rugged individual.
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We have a fine selection of outdoor
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Fri. & Set. 11 a.m10p.m.
?��? �� ?� � �Wa '�V "I 9 9�-(?





1 �
Page 14 FOUNTAINHEAD 19 Sepfmbr 1978
This week in college football
Penn State upends Buckeyes, Alabama nips Missouri
� & �� ivHan firftri thre�
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in our expanded
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at
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At Harmony House South, we have
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Si H We are now expanding this service
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S�ort� Johnson
THE FIX-IT SHOP
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Downtown, on the Mall Greenville
752-3661
ByHERSCHEL NISSENSON
AP Sports Writer
"A blocked punt is one
of the worst things that can
happen to you in football
says Bear Bryant, who
ought to know. After all, it
was just six years ago that
Auburn clocked two punts
in the fourth period against
Bryant, and Alabama ran
them both in for touch-
downs and nipped the
Crimson Tide 17-16.
On Saturday, though, a
blocked punt turned the
tide top-rated Alabama's
way against No. 11 Mis-
souri after the Tide had
turned crimson with em-
barrassment by blowing a
17-0 lead in the second
period.
Alabama trailed 20-17
at half-time � the most
points in one period against
Bama in nine years � but
E.J. Junior blocked Monte
Montgomery's punt earlier
in the third quarter and
Rickey Gilliland lugged it
35 yards for the go-ahead
score. Tony Nathan tallied
from a yard out later in the
period and Lou Ikner
caught a 23-yard scoring
pass from Jeff Tutledge in
the final quarter as Ala-
bama pulled out a 38-20.
victory.
In the only other pairing
of members of The Asso-
ciated Press Top Twenty,
fifth-ranked Penn State
embarrassed No. 6 Ohio
State 19-0, intercepting Art
Schilichter, the Buckeyes'
heralded freshman, five
times and recovering three
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of the losers' five fumbles.
The only other ranked
team to stumble was No. 17
Kentucky, which was held
to a 14-all standoff by South
Carolina.
Elsewhere, runner-up
Arkansas pounded Vander-
bilt 48-17, third-ranked O-
klahoma destroyed West
Virginia 52-10, No. 4 Mich-
igan drubbed Illinois 31-0,
seventeenth-ranked Texas
blanked Rice 34-0, No. 8
Southern California whip-
ped Oregon 37-10 and No. 9
UCLA turned back Tenne-
ssee 13-0. Texas A&M,
ranked 10th, was idle.
In the Second Ten, No.
12 Nebraska swamped Ha-
waii 56-10, No. 13 Loui-
siana State shaded Indiana
34-17, No. 14 Pitt ham-
mered Tulane 28-6, No. 16
Florida State belted Okla-
homa State 38-20, No. 18
Washington shelled Kan-
sas 31-2, No. 19 Iowa State
edged San Diego State
14-13 and No. 20 Maryland
downed Louisville 24-17.
No. 15 Notre Dame had the
week off.
With the highly touted
Schlichter in his recruiting
bag, Ohio State's Woody
Hayes decided to put the
ball in the air, something
he had successfully avoided
for the most part of during
his previous 32 years as a
head coach. Unfortunately,
the talented Schlichter put
it up for grabs and Penn
State grabbed it five times.
The Buckeyes also left the
ball on the ground five
times and three of the
bobbles wound up in the
handsof the Nittany Lions.
Kevin Scanlon, Arkan-
sas, backup quarterback,
scored once and threw
touchdown passes to Bobby
Duckworth and Robert Far-
rell while freshman Thomas
Brown scooted 96 yards
with a kickoff as the
Razorbacks trimmed Van-
Riggan Shoe
? Repair Shop W
Downtown Greenville
111 W. 4th Street
derbilt.
Oklahoma fot 114 yards
on just eight carries, one a
41-yard TD, from Billy Sims
in smashing West Virginia.
Rick Leach scored twice to
lead Michigan past Illinois
and Olympic sprinter John-
ny "Lam" Jones hauled in
two long scoring passes as
Texas crushed Rice. South-
ern Cal's Charles White
ripped Oregon for 173
rushing yards and two
touchdowns while a 54-yard
gallop by Theotis Brown
helped UCLA fend off
Tennessee.
Tom Sorley ran for one
touchdown and passed for
another as Nebraska rolled
to a 35-0 halftime lead
against out-manned Hawaii
while Charles Alexander
sparked LSU over Indiana
by rushing for 144 yards
and twoTDs.
Pitt's Larry Sims touch-
ed the ball twice in the first
half and turned them into
touchdown runs of 35 and 4
yards against Tulane. Jim-
my Jordan fired three
touchdown passes, two to
Homes Johnson, in Florida
State's triumph over O-
klahoma State. Johnson
also ran 8 yards for a third
score.
Kentucky needed Ran-
dy Brooks' 1-yard run in the
final period to tie South
Carolina and Joe Steele
rushed for 102 yards and
two touchdowns as Wash-
ington flattened Kansas
lowas State needed Victor
Mack's 4-yard run and
Terry Rubley's 2-point con-
version pass to Guy Preston
with 6V2 minutes left to nip
San Diego State. And Mar
land overtook Louisville on
short touchdown runs by
Dean Richards and Aivm
Maddox in the final period
In the weekend s top
individual performances.
Auburn's James Brooks
earned 30 times for 226
yards, including touchdOA-
runs of 2.68 and 72 yards
as the Tigers outlasted
Kansas State 45-32
Pirate volleyball
season begins
Board your hose at
Forrest Acres Stables
Excellent care and conditions
$85 a month 3miles from town call 752-1823
By DAVE MERRIMAM
Staff Writer
With the season opener
just ahead ECU head coach
Alita Dillion and the
women's volleyball team
are prepared to start the
year on a winning note.
Dillion, who begins her
second year as coach of the
Lady Pirate volleyball
team, sees this season as a
definite step in the right
direction for a successful
year.
"For one thing, we have
five returners said
Dillion. "We have a couple
of junior college transfers
with volleyball experience,
and we have good depth on
the bench
However Dillion was
also quick to note that
although ECU has won two
out of three exhibition
matches this year, her team
is not quite at the level she
had hoped for at this time.
"We have only been
practicing for about two
and a half weeks said
Dillion. "and prior to our
three scrimmages we really
weren't playing well as a
team. However the team
has started to jell and we' re
starting to look real good
Possible starters listed
for tonight's tri-match
opener against Louisburg
at 7:00 includes, Rosie
Thompson. La Vonda
Duncan, Joy Forbes. Linda
McClellan. Virginia
Rodgers. and Rebecca
Beauchamp Sandy Samp-
son could also break into
the starting line-up with
some seasoning.
"The girls are starting
to get fired up about the
opener and I am too.
smiled Dillion. "It s sorta
hard not to. thinking about
how well we will fare
against a team that usually
represents the state in
volleyball. Preparation has
had its low points but the
excitement is here. We'll
go out to win
After watching the girls
go through 45 minutes of
drills and then an hour of
scrimmage, one is inclined
to believe there is excite-
ment on the team.
As the season opens for
the Lady Pirates, a full
week of work and tough
matches faces the young
squad In addition to the
Louisburg opener at 7:00.
ECU plays host to UNC-
Wilmington at 9:00. Then
the Lady Pirates travel to
Duke on Thursday to play a
tri-match against Duke and
Wake Forest
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education that would cost thousands in a civilian school, but in the Navy we pay you.
? And at the end of the year's training, you'11 receive a $3,000 cash bonus.
It isn't easy. Only one of every six applicants will be selected, and there are fewer than j
300 openings. But those who make it find themselves in one of the most elite
engineering jobs training programs anywhere.With unequalled hands-on responsibility,
a $24,000 salary in four years, plus travel, medical benefits and education opportunities.
? For more details on this program, ask your placement officer when a Navy representative:
J will be on campus, or call the Officer program office listed below; or send your resume
to Navy Nuclear Officer Program, Bill Staroes, P.O. Box 18568, Raleigh, N.C
27609. TheNUPOC�Collegiate Program. It can do more than help you finish
college; it can lead to an exciting opportunity. OFFICER PROGRAMS OFFICE
Local Raleigh 827-2547 toll free 1 -800-662-7568
OFFICER TEAM WILL BE ON CAMPUS SEPT. 20-22
NAVY OFFICER
IT'S NOT JUST A JOB,
IT'S AN ADVENTURE.












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Title
Fountainhead, September 19, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 19, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.510
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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