Fountainhead, August 28, 1978







Vol. 55 No. 63
EasLQarolina University Greenville, North Carolina lfil 28 August 1978
Thomas B.Brewer
Chancellor assumes duties
ECU
CHANCELLOR
THOMAS
BREWER
3 "LH
New ECU
By JIM BARNES
News Editor
Fa the first time in 31 years,
Leo W. Jenkins will not be at
ECU to welcome new students.
Instead, Dr. Thomas Bowman
Brewer, ECU'S new chancellor,
will begin his first academic
school year as head of the
university.
Brewer, who succeeded
Jenkins on July 3, comes to ECU
with impressive academic and
administrative credentials. A
former dean and vice-chancellor
at Texas Christian University,
Brewer will also occupy the
position of professof of history.
Born in Fort Worth, Texas,
the 45 year old chancellor
received his B.A. in the Liberal
Arts Honors Program at the
University of Texas-Austin in
1957, where he attended on a
Daughters of the Confederacy
Scholarship and was a member
of Phi Alpha Theta, history
honorary
Brewer took the M.A. in
history in 1962. His dissertation
is entitled The Formative Period
of 140 American Manufacturing
Firms, 1800-1936. Brewer also
held an assistantship while at
Pennsylvania.
Prior to assuming his pres-
ent position at ECU, Brewer
taught at Southwest Texas State
University, North Texas State
University, the University of
Kentucky, Iowa State Univers-
ity, and the University of
Toledo, as well as TCU. In
addition to teaching various
courses in United States history,
Brewer has also held key
administrative positions.
While at the University of
Toledo, he helped develop the
curriculum for a new Ph.D.
program in addition to approv-
ing revisions in the college
curriculum. At TCU, Brewei
was doou. of Arts and Sciences,
and served on a committee
which revised the university's
general education require-
ments. He also served on the
university Courses of Study
Committee.
An American historian,
Brewer's academic concentra-
tion is U.S. business history,
particularly transportation hist-
ory. He is currently co-author-
ing a history of the Missouri
Pacific Railway Company. In
addition to authoring books,
Brewer has also served as editor
of The Robber Barons: Saints or
Sinners? and has co-edited two
volumes in the series Views of
American Economic Growth.
He is currently the General
Editor of the Railroads of
America series, a series with a
projection of 20-25 volumes.
Brewer has published arti-
cles in scholarly publications,
including Labor History, South-
western Historical Quarterly,
Southwestern Social Science
Quarterly and eight short bio-
graphies for the Encylopedia of
World Biography.
professors arrive
By KAREN C. BLANSFIELD
News Editor
The arrival of September and fall semester
transforms the sleepy time atmosphere of
Greenville into one charged with excitement and
activity. The multitudes of people who are pouring
into the town include not only the returning
students and the many new freshmen, but also a
arge number of new professors.
The contingent of faculty members, numbering
3ver 70. 'S drawn from various areas of the country.
ranging from New York to California to Florida.
FoHowirfcj is a list of incoming professors and
instructors for fall semester:
SCHOOL OF ALLIED HEALTH :
Madge McGrath. M.A medical technology
Beaufort County Technical Institute Washington
Dr. Mary Ann Stone, speedn, language and
auditory pathology
Lynne Benzing (Occupational Therapy )occupat-
ional therapy courses on development, and
$:
problems in development. M.A. in Gerontology,
University of South Florida
SCHOOL OF ART:
Margaret Brennan, new art librarian MA
Syracuse University. New York.
MathewHolynski, prmtmaking instructor. M.F.A
State University of New York at Buffalo
Jeff McGmnis. communication arts lecturer.
M.F.A ECU
Clarence Morgan. Paintingdrawing instructor.
M.F.A University of Pennsylvania
BIOLOGY
Dr Charles B McDonald, plant taxonomy. F"h.D
N.C. State University. Raleigh.
SCHOOL OF BU3NESS.
Dr Dogan Altuner, accounting and finance. Ph.D
University of North Carolina. Chapel Hill
What's inside
Governor Hunt acts to calm state training schoolsFayetteville
judge and chief of police tangle over prostitutionreduced
aoss-country fares in the futureSee wire report, page 8.
Chancellor Brewer gets involvedECU basketball probed by
NCAAWECU-FM in minor controversy. .See summer news
wrap-up. page 12.
Experiments with solar energy panels are being conducted by the
ECU physics department. For a roof-top report, see page 8.
Jesse Jackson and others will speak at Mendenhall this year.
Details in TRENDS, page 19.
Warren Beatty s Heaven Can Wait is currently playing in
Greenville For a review, see Bachner on film p. 25.
A
WARREN BEATTY
HavvaJ. Altuner, business administration. Ph.D.
candidate. University of North Carolina, Chapel
Hill
Dr. Clarence M. Condon, economics. Ph.D
University of South Carolina
Dr. Harvey J. Hewett, Jr business administration
Ph.D University of Houston
Dr. John D. Longhill, business administration.
D.B.A George Washington University
JamesO. Smith, Jr economics. Ph.D candidate,
University of Mississippi
Kurt L. Baumwart, lecturer, business administra-
tion MB.A ECU
Eugene C Chewning, Jr lecturer, accounting and
finance. M.B.A ECU
James M. Harris, lecturer, business administration
MB.A ECU
Daniel A. Marbell, Jr lecturer, accounting &
finance M.B.A ECU
H. Patrick OgIesby, lecturer, business administra-
tion J.D University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Pamela G. Parrott, lecturer, economics M.B.A
ECU
Kathryn A. Pipkin, lecturer, business administra-
tion M.B.A ECU
James C. Whitley, lecturer, business administra-
tion. M.B.A ECU
CHEMISTRY:
Dr. Betty Moyers, freshman chemistry and
analytical courses. Previously worked at Proctor &
Gamble, Cincinnati.
Barbara Andrews, freshman chemistry. M.A. from
Greenville, temporary substitute for Dr. Warren
McAllister, who is leaving to do analytical chemical
research at Burrough-Welloome in Greenville.
See PROFESSORS, p. 13
m
Mvsterv dumping
PCBs threaten N.C. environment
By JIM BARNES
News Editor
Poiychlorinated biphenols, known as PCB , is
in the news, and North Carolina may never be the
same because of it. Over the last month,
mysterious stains have appeared along some 250
miles or roadway in several N.C. counties. The
stains, it was determined by state chemists, were
caused by the dumping of PCB-laoed liquid along
the roadways.
PCBs are carcinogens (cancer causing
substances), and their ban is being contemplated
by government, but that still leaves a problem for
the disposal of liquids bearing PCBs. And that is
where North Carolina's problems began.
Officials have had a dual headache because of
the PCB spills: how to dispose of the
contaminated ground, and how to detect and
apprehend the individual or individuals respon-
sible for the spills.
Evidence so far indicated that trucks
contracted to haul PCB laden liquids away for
safe disposal have instead been running along
back highways and routes in North Carolina,
letting the liquid trail out in the side of the road,
sometimes fa stretches of up to 20 miles.
REMOVAL OPERATION
The latest PCB strip was found last Monday
along a six-mile stretch of road N.C. 42 near
Sanford. The new spill, about two feet wide, was
found along a strip of road already warning of
chemical contamination, according to Highway
Patrol Capt. O.R. McKinney.
State environmental scientists have proposed
a three-fold removal operation to clean up the
contaminated ground. Engineers are first
spraying activated charcoal over the oily slicks in
an effort to "suspend" the PCB in an effort to
halt its absorption into the ground.
After the charcoal has been placed over the
spills, asphalt will then be poured over the
ground, after which time, the chunks will be dug
up and transferred to an as yet unannounced
burial site somewhere in the state.
Governor Hunt last week, in announcing the
dean-up procedure, stated that the dean-up cost
the tax-payers of the state some $2.5 million.
The extensive oost of the clean-up, in addition
to the possibility of a serious health hazard from
the PCB residue has led to an intensive effort by
the Attorney General, Rufus Edmiston, and the
State Bureau of Investigation (SBI) to apprehend
those responsible for the spills.
N. Y. DUMPING
The SBI investigation has narrowed to an
upstate New York form which contracts to haul
PCB contaminants out of the state for disposal.
Thuisday, Cattaraugua County (N.Y.) officials
ordered the Transformer Sales Company of
Allegany sealed and placed under 24 hour guard
after PCB was found in quantity in that
company's warehouse.
Transformer Sales is also under investigation
for the spills in North Carolina, which officials
have now estimated to be as much as 33,000
gallons of PCBs.
In a seperate incident in New Yak, officials
are investigating the dumping of 100 gallons of
thick black fluid containing PCBs in a junkyard
outside of Salamanca N.Y. The spill allegedly
was from a truck hauling PCBs from North
Carolina to the New Yak area fa disposal.
The PCBs from Transfamer Sales may have
seeped intoa600gailon-a-minute well supplying
water to Allegany, a village of 2,000, said Maya
Nicholas J. Amato. The we! I i s within one block of
Transfamer Sales' shed, according to the maja.
FAIRGROUNDS SITE
John McMahon, regional engineer of New
Yak's Department of Environmental Ccnserva-
tion, said firms must be registered with the state
fa permiSBiai to transpat PCBs. Transfamer
Sales is not registered with the State of New Yak
fa purposes of PCB transpatatiai.
In a development in the PCB stay from
Raleigh, the state is strongly considering
disposing of the contaminated soil in a five-acre
pasture owned by N.C. State University. The site
is located near the State Fairgrounds.
The Raleigh pasture, which is part of N.C.
State research farmland is being carefully
sffutinized, according to state officials. "Right
now it's the leading contender said James F.
Stamey, assistant chief of the state's sanitary
engineering section. "Of course, we're looking at
other sites in case this one doesn't pan out he
SaePCB. p.14
The new chancel la has also
been active in various civic and
communmity activities, includ-
ing the United Way, the Arthrit-
is Foundation, and a nine month
stint as the moderata of
American Issues Faum, a Dall-
as television series. From
1973-76, Brewer served as a
deacon of the South Hills
Christian Church.
Brewer is married and the
father of three children. His
youngest daughter, Linda Susan
Brewer, 16, lost her life in a
tragic automobile accident earl-
ier this month in Fat Wath.
Linda, who had been staying in
Fat Wath with her grandmrth-
er. would have been 17 the week
following the accident. Surviv-
ing are Brewer s wife Betty and
two children, Tom Jr. and
Dianne, who is a recent gradu-
ate of the University of Texas-
-Austin.
Ex-prof wins suit
WILSON, N.C. (AP) - A
federal grand jury awarded a
famer language professa at
ECU $5,000 in punitive dam-
ages Friday in a trial here in
which he claimed that he was
dismissed from his job in 1972
because he criticized the head of
ID validation
"The ECU Student ID Card isan official University document and
niusf be validated annually. 1978-1979 ECU Student ID Card
validation stickers may be picked up at no charge at Wright
Auditaium during Fall Semester Registration and Drop-Add. at
the Mendenhall Student Center Infamation Desk from 4 p.m. until
11 p.m. through Sept. 9, and at Mendenhall Central Ticket Office
from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.
Each individual student must present his a her ECU ID Card
and 1978 Fall Semester Activity Card in ader to receive his a her
current ID Card validation sticker. It is the responsibility of each
student to have his or her ECU ID Card properly validated. The
ECU Student ID Card will not be accepted by University agencies
unless a current validation sticker is affixed to the back.
the ECU language department.
Dr. Robert J. Mayberry, who
taught romance languages fa
five years befae being dismiss-
ed in April 1972. is seeking
reinstatement and back salary.
In hiscomplaint filed in Septem-
ber 1973. Mayberry claimed
that the non-renewal of his
teaching contract violated his
constitutional right of free
speech and denied him due
process
The state has denied the
charges.
Mayberry was told his con-
tract was not renewed because
enrollment in the faeign lang-
uages depart ment had ieci i nee
accading to court recads.
In U.S. District Court testi-
mony here. Mayberry said his
dismissal followed disagree-
ments with department chair-
man Joseph A. Fernandez.
Mayberry said he disagreed
with Fernandez' pcJicv of re-
See LAWSUIT p.5
Succeeds Pignani
Shock heads math dept.
ECU News Bureau
The ECU math department has named Dr.
Robert C. Shock as the new chairman of the
department.
He comes to ECU following nine years on the
faculty at Southern illinois University. As chairman
of the ECU department he succeeds the late Tullio
J. Pignani. Dr. Pignani died n October, 1977.
Dr. Shock holds the Ph.D in mathematics from
the University of Nath Carolina-Chapel Hill. He
recieved a BS degree from Bowling Green State
University and his MA from the University of
Arizona. His research, speaalty is algrbra and
operations research.
As new chairman of the 31-faculty member
ECU mathematics depart ment, Shock noted steady
growth. �'Last year we taught rrxxe than 6,000
students including about 50 undergraduate majas
and about 50 graduate students he said. The
ECU math department offers five maja and four
mina degree programs fa undergraduates and
three graduate degree programs.
New programs in the ECU math department
include a BA in computer science and an MA with
an applied mathematics mina.
"Our activities also extend beyond the ECU
campus Shock said.
Two ECU math students will be presenting
papersat the national convention of Pi Mu Epalon,
the national mathematics hona fraternity. In the
spring, the ECU math department will hold its
Second Annual High School Mathematics Contest
DR. ROBERT C. SHOCK
and will host an NSF-CBMS Regional Research
Conference under a National Science Foundation
grant. This conference will feature J. Dieudonne,
waId famous mathematician, and 10 other invited
notables in the field of mathematics.
Dr. Shock and his family moved to Greenville
this summer. Befae janing the Southern llhnas
faculty in 1969, he taught at Ohio University and
was a teaching assistant bah at UNC-CH and the
Univeraty of Arizona.
I
PHILLIP HA RRIS HAS painted quite a picture of ECU. For details
on this 17x12 foot mural, see stay, page 75.
t
I





Pag 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 28 August 1978
ID
The ECU Student ID card is
an official University document
and must be validated annually.
1978-79 ECU Student ID Card
validation stickers may be pick-
ed up at no charge at Wright
Auditorium during Fall Semest-
er Registration and Drop-Add,
at the Mendenhall Information
Desk from 4 p.m. until 11 p.m.
through Sept. 9, and at Mend-
enhall Central Ticket Office
from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.
Each individual student
must present hisher ECU ID
Card anc 1978 Fall Semester
Activity Card in order to receive
hisher current ID Card valida-
tion sticker. It is the responsibi-
lity of each student to have
hisher ECU ID Card properly
dated. The ECU Student ID
Card will not be accepted by
University agencies unless a
current validation sticker is
affixed to the back.
Gymnastics
Plans are being made for the
formation of an age group
competitive gymnastics team for
the Greenville community. The
young people's team will be
sponsored by the Health, Phys-
ical Education, Recreation and
Safety Department of ECU
under the direction of Dr. Edgar
Hooks and Steveie Chepko,
Woman's Gymnastics Coach.
An organizational meeting
will be held on Thurs Aug
31. in Mmges Coliseum, room
142. beginning at 7:30 p.m. All
interested parents are invited to
? he organizational meeting.
Energy
. The N.C. Energy Division
requests information on any
energy conservation or energy
related programs, projects or
research fa its newsletter.
The address is: Sally
LittleN.C. Energy Divwon
P.O. Box 25248, Raleigh, N.C.
27611(733-5078).
Dogs
Residents of Greenville are
reminded that there is a 24 hour
leash law in the city. Further,
every dog that is kept in the city
must at all times have a current
rabies tag on a odlar around
their neck.
Any dog kept in the city fa
mae than 30 days must have a
current city tag attached to
their oollar. City tags may be
obtained at the Tax Coilecta's
Office in the Municipal Building
on the oaner of 5th and
Washington St.
Any dog found running at
large a in violation of the City
of Greenville's Animal Control
Ordinance will result in the
owner being issued a citation fa
said violation.
Vets
Veterans and Chapter 35
dependents are reminded that
the Veterans Administration
requires a 12 semester hour
undergraduate load fa fulltime
benefits. Fulltime fa graduate
students is 8 semester hours.
Call 757-6789 a 757-6524 fa
infamatiai.
Students completing teacher
preparation programs and ad-
vanced degree candidates in
specific fields may take the
National Teachers examinations
on any of three different test
dates in 1978-79.
Educational Testing pro-
gram said that the tests will be
given November 11, February
17, and July 21, at test centers
throughout the U .S.
Results of the National
Teacher Examinations are con-
sidered by many large school
districts as one of several factas
in the selection of new teachers
and used by several states fa
the credentialling of teachers a
licensing of advanced candid-
ates.
�Some oolleges require all
senias preparing to teach to
take the examinations.
On each full day of testing,
registrants may take the Com-
ma! Examination, which mea-
sure their professional prepara-
tion and general educational
background, anda an Area
Examinatioi that measures
their mastery of the subject they
expect to teach.
The Bulletin of Information
contains a list of test centers and
general infamatiai about the
examinations, as well as a
registration fam. Copies may
be obtained from oollege place-
ment officers, school personnel
departments, a directly fran
National Teacher Examinations,
Boc 911, Educational Testing
Service, Princeton, New Jersey
08541.
Guards
Along with your G.I. Bill
checks, you can get around $70
a month fa two days wak in the
Greenville Guard's student
guardsman program. Plus,
$500 a year can be used to pay
tuition and fees. Also you can
apply fa grants up to $500 a
school year. All this plus your
G.I. Bill assistance. While you
are in school, it's the best
part-time job you'll ever find.
Call 752-5693 and ask about the
student guardsman program.
brans
The Crafts Center at Men-
denhall will open on Wed
Aug. 30. Hours are 3 p.m. until
10 p.m Monday through Fri-
day, and from 10 a.m. until 3
p.m Saturday.
The oenter is oomposed of a
darkroom with three enlargers,
a ceramics area, a jewelry met-
als area, a general crafts area,
and a textiles area with floa
looms fa weaving.
All full-time students, facul-
ty, staff, and spouses are
eligible to use these facilities. A
semester membership fee enti-
tles the Crafts Center member
to use the facilities, to check
out tools and equipment, to
check out library materials, to
enlist the aid of aafts supervis-
as, and toenroll in introductay
level wakshop which are offer-
ed throughout the year.
Visit the Crafts Center any
time during operating hours a
call 757-6611, extension 271 fa
mae infamatiai.
Recreation
The Mendenhall reaeatiot
area has a lot to offer you.
Watch fa these great specials
caning scat.
"Rent-A-Lane" begins Sept.
9, Satrurdays fran Noai to 6
p.m. Fa $3 you can rent a
bowling lane fa ate hour.
"Red Pin Bowling" begins
Sun Sept. 16. Every Sunday
from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. you get
the chance to win one free game
with every game bowled. Make
a strike when the head pin is red
and you win.
"Discount Days" are every
Monday from 2 p.m. until 5
p.m.
Prices in bowling, billi-
ards, and table tennis are one
third off beginning Mon. Sept.
18.
Co-op
Hotline
In an attempt to provide
greater service to the univesity
community, Mendenhall recent-
ly installed a program infama-
tiai hotline.
By dialing 757-6004 the
caller will receive the latest
infamatiai ai programs being
presented by Mendenhall and
the Student Union. Infamatiai
will be updated on a daily basis
and will be avialble oi a
24-hours per day basis.
If you desire infamatiai
about movies, oonosrts, lectures
a other Student Union and
Student Center programs dial
757-6004.
In planning your education,
you might like to know about the
advantages of the Cooperative
Education Program offered at
ECU. Cooperative Education is
a program which combines oi
the job experience with academ-
ic study. Cooperative students
alternate semesters at ECU with
semesters of wak experience
which is related to their field of
study.
The benefits from the coop-
erative program are many. You
not only acquire knowledge but
are called upon to use this
knowledge in "real" situations.
You learn valuable lessons in
human relations, in an adult
environment which will mature
and discipline your personality.
You will wak with professionals
in your chosen fiels which will
help you decide whether a not
you have chosen the right
vocation early n your education.
Last but not least, your earnings
will contribute substantially to
your educational expenses.
You may expect to be placed
on a co-op assignment after
establishing yourself in your
academic subjects with a quali-
fying standard of 2.0 a better,
and suitable employer openings
are discussed"with you.
If you are interested in this
program, please stop by the
Offioeof Cooperative Education
in 313 Rawl building.
Concerts
The Student Union Maja
Attractions Committee will meet
Wed Aug. 30, at 3 p.m. in
room 238 Mendenhall.
Bowling
Mixed doubles bowling
leagues will be famed fa Fall
Semester play. Sgn up at the
main bulletin board on the
ground floor of Mendenhall.
Persons interested in fam-
ing a recreatiaiai club to meet
fa weekly oanpetitiai in
bridge, chess, a table tennis
should sign up at the Billiards
Center in Mendenhall.
Also, watch fa the "Ladder
Tournament" in billiards to
begin Wed Sept. 20. Sign up
now in the MSC Billiards
Center. Prizes will be given.
Games
Circle K
Recreational tournaments
sponsaed by Mendenhall will
beheld this semester beginning
Oct. 9 to select representatives
to attend the ACU-I regional
games tournament in Knoxville,
Tenn.
All full-time students regis-
tered and interested in partici-
pating should pick up necessary
infamatiai at the Billiards o
Bowling Centers in Mendenhall.
The competition will involve
billiards, backgammon, table
tennis, bowling, and chess.
Day and Dam student pre-
liminary tournaments will be
held in Oct. to select partici-
pants to compete in the All-
Campus Tournaments to be held
in November. All students must
register by the deadline set up
fa each tournament.
To all fomer KEY and
Keyanette members, also any
Oher interested students who
are interested in aiding hisher
oommunity, the International
Circle K dub of ECU oodially
invites" you to our first club
meeting fa the 1978-79 school
year.
The meeting will be held on
Tues Aug. 29 at 630 p.m. at
213 Wright annex. This is the
same building where the ROTC
is stationed. The meeting will be
proceeded by snacks and re-
freshments. All students are
invited.
Coffeehouse
The Student Union Coffee-
house Committee needs you!
Please apply at the Student
Union office, room 234 Men-
denhall.
MCAT
The Medical College Admis-
sion Test (MCAT) fa 1978 will
be offered on Sat Sept. 30.
Application blanks are to be
completed and mailed to MCAT
Registration, The American Col-
lege Testing Program, P.O. Box
414, Iowa City. Iowa 52240 to
arrive no later than Sept. 1.
These applications are also
available at the Testing Center.
room-105. Speight Building,
ECU.
FOUNTAINHEAD
Like to write? Why no write
fa us? Call FOUNTAINHEAD
at 757-6366. Get involved!
Jippeti
(faxlic Bead��
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Jlntipastofo two 2.25
fo fou 4. 50
Sauteed Hushlooms75
Si
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iSoup du out
3linestone Cleam of ZMushloom
cup. no bowl .60
Salads
Hush tTossed Salad65
Jana c
Salad.
ChefsSalad�,5
2.25 Spinach Salad2.50
Choice of De,sing�&ench. Russian, Station. Oil & Qinegal
Gntiees
Sewed With Qalic Bhead
Spaghetti
�PaiVl Sauce95
Buttet Sauce95
Meat Sauce�
3tushioomsa-5
MeatUls�-S
Sausagea ��5
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Spinach Jtfido.
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Qlain Sauce � 95
Butte Sauce � 95
Meat Sauce2-20
3tushuxms2 � 50
Meathalls h
Sausage 2.65
(-Villa (Roma 's Special � izza Subs$2.75
tolled and SBaKed m oul own flesh pizza dough
1) Cheese, iPeppets, Cnions, .Meatballs, Sauce, Spices
2) Cheese, iPeppeis. Onions, Sausage, Sauce, Spices
3) Cheese, SPeppets, Onions, Cqgplant, Sauce, Spices
n) Cheee, SPeppets, Onions, Spinach, Sauce, Spues
f) Cheese, Peppexs, Onions, Sausage, Meatballs, ileppetoni, Sauce. Spices
6) Cheese, Peppets, Onions, 3iam, Salami, Sauce, Spices
7) Cheese, Peppeis, Onions, Jxoastbeef, Sauce, Spices
8) 3lozzaulla Cheese, Ricotta Cheese, Jomatoes. Onions. iPeppeis, Spices
Subs tt'im mushiooms 35 extta
Jlew QJok Style Bizza
Regulars �el
3iozzaella3-5
&eppes3-95
Onions3-95
Gieen Olives3-95
Sausage3-95
Teppeioni3'?5
Qoundloeef3-95
Cxha Cheese3 95
Special (any fou items)�� W
3iaste (all items)5-75
Oach extia item . . mwmmmm.mmkimom
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Golden egg noodles smotheieJ vtth ou special buttetu cUam sauce and patmesan cheese
�F�A spinach sauteed ij ou special butteiy cUam sauce and paimesan cheese
2.50
Winnels � a la calte
Sewed with Gallic �Bead
Baked Xasagnaa-95
BckedZiti� 95'
3lanicotti�95
Cggplant Q?amiqianaa-95
Baked Zucchim �-W ump
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Page 4 FOUNTAlNHEAD 28 August 1978
Apathy: get involved
Last Friday, CBS presented .a two hour
retrospect of 1968, "the year that changed
America The people and attitudes of that
time contrast markedly with those of today;
whereas the majority of the college age
population of 1968 was politically involved and
united against the war in Viet Nam, today's
student is just the opposite: politically
uninformed, uninvolved, and unwilling to
stand up and fight for a cause. Nineteen-sixty-
-eight showed the world a generation of
inquisitive, informed students unafraid to
challenge existing values; 1978 offers the
world a generation of strangers, a generation
so narcissistic as to be completely ignorant of
what's going on in the world around them, too
lazy to attend a meeting or read a newspaper.
History is said to repeat itself, so here we
are in 1956 with an Eisenhower mentality,
struggling to maintain the status quo. This
malaise is evident in such diverse areas as
entertainment, politics, and campus life. The
Graduate threw back the values of the
establishment" and demanded something
more; Saturday Night Fever invites its
audience to lose itself in the glitter and
superficiality of a disco.
When Jack Anderson, nationally acclaimed
Washington columnist, commentator on
�'Good Morning America" and author of the
most widely syndicated newspaper column in
this country lectured at Mendenhall last
spring, fewer than 40 people showed up.
Almost every organization on this campus
faces the problem of not being able to get
people interested in their activities. Even
worse are the people who join enthusiastically
and then disappear. They simply can't be
bothered with keeping a commitment they
made. After all, in a morally bankrupt society,
promises were made to be broken, right?
People simply refuse to involve themselves
in anything which might interfere in the
unrelenting pursuit of pleasure. An item in
the news recently concerning the drowning of
a seven year old boy while his father (a
non-swimmer) tried in vain to enlist the aid of
several onlookers, (see "Crosswinds" below),
illustrates this disgusting philosophy.
The ultimate victims of apathy, however,
are not the organizations which suffer because
of disinterest; the ultimate victims are those
same apathetic people who, in hoping to
maintain their present status by remaining
uninvolved, unwittingly destine themselves to
a future without such amenities as universal
suffrage, representative government, equal
rights, and cultural enrichment.
Commentary
Women refute 'myths'
By HESTER PETTY
Uppity Women of Greenville
Incident 1: It is winter. A
woman has finished her work at
the art building. She puts on her
goose-down coat. hat. scarf and
gloves, gets on her bike, and
heads home. It is about 11 p.m.
She approaches and passes the
intersection of Jarvis and
Fourth. There is a man in a car
on Fourth. After she passes he
pulls onto Jarvis. He follows
her. He does not pass even
though he has every opportun-
ity. She starts to think about the
ast two dark blocks she must
nde before she reaches her
apartment. She pulls into Over-
ton's Laundramat.
It is well lit and open 24
hours. There are several people
washing their clothes. As she
parks her bike the man drives
past. She enters the laundramat
and calls her roommate asking
her to drive over and follow her
home.
As she is speaking she looks
out the window. The man in the
car has turned around and is
driving past the laundramat
very slowly. He is looking into
the laundramat. She stops rid-
ing her bike at night.
Incident 2: A young woman
is walking home. It is dusk.
There is an old woman in the
middle of the sidewalk watching
the first woman approach. She
stops the young woman. The
only thing that the young
woman can imagine is that she
will be yelled at for walking on
the lady's lawn. The old woman
asks, Where are you going?"
"Home
"How far?"
"A few blocks
"Hurry! It's getting dark
and it's not good to be walking
alone at night
To young woman hurries
home. She knows why the
warning was given.
These unrelated incidents
may seem insignificant to the
reader. They are not. These
events happened to me two
years ago and I still remember
them both very dearly. Neither
incident involved more than 15
minutes of my life but I will
never forget them. Why?
The man in the car did not
attack me but he did remind me
that I, as a woman, am
unequally vulnerable to.violence
by men. I am talking about rape.
And the fact is that a woman has
a better chance of being raped
by an acquaintance than a
stranger.
There are two basic types of
rapists, although each type
exhibits characteristics of the
other. The first group consists of
men who hate ail women and
use rape to express this emot-
ion. These men use rape to
degrade, humiliate, and hurt
women. Sexual desire has absol-
utely nothing to do with the act
of rape. This is in part proven by
the fact that most rapists do not
ejaculate in a rape situation.
"When tee are talking about the
majority of rapists, tee are not talking
about perverts. We are talking about
our fathers, brothers, husbands, and
boyfriends
Rape is any sexual intimacy
forced on one person by another.
Most rape is heterosexual,
forced on women by men. Most
rapists are as normal and
sexually well adjusted as the
non-rapist males in our society.
When we are talking about the
majority of rapists, we are not
talking about perverts. We are
talking about our fathers, bro-
thers, husbands, and boy-
friends.
Have I gone too far? Consid-
er this. In 1973 the FBI reported
51,000 cases of forcible rape.
Considering the fact that most
women don't report rape due to
understandable reasons, let's
be conservative and say one out
of five victims reports the rape.
Then we can say that in 1973
there were 255,000 rapes.
The numbers rise every
year, and will continue to rise
until the myths about rape that
we believe are replaced by facts.
The second group consists of
men who believe that sex on
demand is their right because
they are men and that any
woman must oomply with their
wishes. These men will not
accept "no Most even believe
that "no" really means "yes
Included in this group are men
who, when out on a date, expect
sexual gratification from the
woman they are with and will
use physical or emotional coer-
cion to get it. This group
includes boyfriends and hus-
bands.
Both types of rapists have
one very important thing in
common. They don't value
women equally with men. They
don't like women. They don't
respect women. Whether they
rape a woman with the purpose
of hurting her, or because they
don't respect her right to choose
when and with whom she has
sex with, the ability to abuse a
Fountainhcad
Production Manager
Leigh Coekley
EditorDoug White
� - rrHi hi �
news cultuts
nODOH m. caMMfTl
Trends Editor
Steve Baohner
Karen C. Blanafield
FOUNTAlNHEAD is tf�
by the
woman oomes from a social
atmosphere where woman's ex-
istence is de-valued.
What about the victim of
rape? The myths abound. "She
asked for it "She wanted to be
japed "She oouldn't be raped
�if e resisted
"Sheasked for it Thisisas
ridiculous as saying that blacks
asked to be lynched. I have
never heard a woman request
that she be raped. And, contrary
to masoulist belief, hitchhiking,
bra-lessness, bare legs, walking
in front of windows, or going
into a bar alone do not constitute
such a request.
In my grandmother's gener-
ation women did not wear bras
(they hadn't been introduced as
a fashion accessory yet). Wom-
en were raped. In my mother's
generation women did wear
bras. Women were raped. In my
generation some women do and
some women don't. Women are
raped. Six year old girls don't
ask to raped, but they are.
"She wanted to be raped
No woman wants to be raped.
This myth was invented by men
to excuse their behavior. It is at
this point that most myth-
believers bring up the well-
worn idea that women have
fantasies and therefore they
invite rape so as to fulfill their
fantasies. This is a male fant-
asy.
Most sexual literature up to
now has been written and
published by men or masculist
women (women who accept
male values). It is all from a
male point of view. It is all what
men want. Women accepted
what was given to them (the
Playboy philosophy, etc.). It is
onyl now, with our new aware-
ness of ourselves as women that
we are beginning to define what
we want from our own point of
view.
"She oouldn't he raped if
she resisted Women have
been trained from early child-
hood to be passive, to avoid
argument, to stay out of fights.
When a woman is confronted
with a violent situation she
reacts passively (as she was
trained to do). And if a deadly
weapon a the threat of bodily
injury is introduced, how should
she react? How would a man
react? No one asks a man who
has been robbed at gunpoint
why he didn't resist. It is
assumed that he didn't want to
get his need blown off. Yet
women are held responsible for
their actions and their attacker's
actions.
Women are held responsible
for the act of rape, it is time for
the resoneSbility to be pieced
where it belongs, on the rapist.
Rape will continue on its
present upward rise unless
See RAPE p.S

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3
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F
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fP
Forum
Fourteen reasons not to mow your lawn
To FOUNTAlNHEAD:
Fourteen reasons to con-
sider not mowing your lawn:
1) Mowing wastes billions of
gallons of fuel.
2) Mowing wastes billions of
hours of human energy.
3) Cutting grass destroys
sapling trees.
4) Cutting grass removes air
purifying greenery.
5) Uncut lawns protect the
water table by storing water.
6) Mowing destroys baby
birds, butterflies, toads, bum-
bietoees, etc and causes suffer-
ing to creatures caught in the
machine.
7) If you did not mow your
lawn, it would beoome a mea-
dow, and then a thicket and then
a forest.
8) When areas are unmow-
ed, it becomes possible to
simply toss fruit seeds through
them and have the seeds grow
into fruit trees through a non-till
energy-saving method of agri-
culture, a source of free food.
9) Unmowed areas beoome a
wildlife habitat.
10) Mowing causes 55,000
human accidents and fatalities
yearly; most common are sever-
ed fingers, toes, and hands.
11) Mowing with fuel sup-
ports big oil companies.
12) Not mowing helps pre-
vent erosion.
13) Not mowing provides a
green buffer of noise prevent-
ion.
14) Unmowed areas provide
more shade in summer and heat
in winter.
Last year, 40 inches of snow
fell on Boston; this spring Italy
had record breaking rains; in
April, Washington had a record
breaking hot day. The weather
patterns around the world are
deteriorating. The Amazon and
Indonesian rainforest is being
cut at the rate of several acres a
minute. The oxygen life belt of
the plant, equatorial trees, are
being destroyed.
Trees act as a oomb retain-
ing moisture when clouds pass
over head. Trees process as
high as 40 gallons of water each
day out of the air. When trees
are cut, deserts advance; in
some places, the Sahara is
advancing at the rate of 12 miles
a year.
Some things you can do to
further the cubic footage of
Reader feels an injustice has
been done to the HERALD staff
To FOUNTAlNHEAD:
Upon reading "Forum '
this past July 19,1 felt I could no
longer refrain from replying.
First of all, who appointed you
"God"? When Mr. Gerlad
Barnes expressed his opinion of
being "attacked by a dose of
good de southern racism you
implied that he had no right to
feel this way.
Does he not have the same
right (as you and the paper you
represent) to have and express
his opinion? Apparently he feels
that an injustice has been done
to the HERALD's staff and
paper; I do too!
Secondly, what evidence
have you that Fashion Shows
are not newsworthy? Prominent
newspapers cover fashion
shows. If the pot wishes to call
the kettle black (no pun intend-
ed), then why print silly pictures
(and I do share other's opinions)
of white students walking in the
rain, sleeping under trees, or
playing with frisbees on the
mall, in the newspaper?
Are these any more news-
worthy than a critical review of
plays, books or fashion shows?
It is the HERALD's Derogative
just as it is FOUNTAlNHEAD's
to print and photograph any-
thing they wish in accordance
with publication standards.
Next, the charge that the
HERALD "merely duplicates
theeffortsof FOUNTAlNHEAD"
is ridiculous. Does
FOUNTAlNHEAD have squat-
ters' rights to the coverage of
certain stories?
Example, does not the
Raleigh News and Observer and
Raleigh Times cover some of the
same stories? Yet, some people
subscribe to both. Where the
Times fails to cover news of
adequate interest to its readers,
the News and Observer does.
In conclusion, I feel insulted
that you resorted to personal
criticism (Ms. Mendoza) in an
attempt to oonvey your point.
Is this the mark of a truly
professional writer? Think about
it.
Sincerely,
Tonya Swinson
greenery in the world:
a) plant fruit and nut trees.
b) stop mowing lawns.
c) eat the products of trees
(apples, oranges, pears, peach-
es, etc.) to help forests grow.
Fruitarian Network
Box 4333
Washington, D.C. 20012
'May the
bells ring
forever'
To FOUNTAlNHEAD:
With a glad and grateful
ear "tuned" each noontime. I
hear a sound that has been
absent from our campus too long
- the cartfion chiming East
Carolina's beautiful "Alma
Mater
During my student years
here, and later as a campus staff
member, I found a bit a peace
each time the bells rang out. no
matter how hurried and frenetic
the pace below. When the
chimes ceased to ring many
months ago, I attributed the
silence to a temporary break-
down and hoped the muse
would soon be restored.
Now the "Alma Mater" is
heard again each midday, and
the thousands of us who live,
study, teach, and work here feei
the impact of its charm. May the
bells ring forever!
Franceine Rees
ECU News Bureau
Crosswinds
Heroism, a lost virtue
.ByJIM BARNES
Every day there are accounts of death reported by the media,
so the reports of the deaths of those who were neither famous nor
sensationally victimized generally sail right past the public
sometimes receiving attention for a day a two. There were two
deaths in the news, however, which need a second look, for each,
in its way, offers commentary on the state of civilized man in the
United States and, one suspects, the state of man in much of
today's technocratic world.
The deaths involved the issue of courage, in the original sense
of the word - of the heart. One offers a positive example of
oourage, while the other case offers, by negative example, the
hideous picture of a society grown callous, filled by people who
decay in total concern for only one's self. Each case needs to be
summarized:
-On a dock in an eastern city, a small boy fell into the water
ami was in danger of drowning. The boy's father, a rwvswimrner,
plead with the small crowd of onlookers to help him save his child.
No one offered assistance to the father who struggled in the water,
unable to save his son.
The child drowned.
The media reported the words of two of the crowd who watched
the drowning. One man offered the sickeningly familiar "I didn't
want to get involved the other was said to reply that he didn't
attempt to help the drowning child because the water looked too
polluted and he didn't want to jump into it.
-In the other case last week, an 82 year-old man was struck
and killed by an automobile as he pushed a six year-old boy out of
the path of the encoming car. Witnesses reported that the boy,
who often came and talked with the man, was beginning to cross
the street to come sit with the old man on the latter's porch.
As he began to cross the street, the boy did not heed the man s
verbal warning concerning the car, whereupon the gentleman
jumped from his rocker, and reached the boy in time to push him
to safety. But there was no safety fa the elderly man; he was
killed when the car hit him.
Police found and charged the man driving the car with
homocide.
These two cases are linked in at least one aspect - that of
heroism. In the instance of the drowning child, the father, quite
naturally, some would say, risked his life in a futile attempt to save
that of hischiid The82 yearn! man who sacrificed his life that
another might live performed, needless to say, a heroic action -
such sacrifice was a founding principle of Christianity amono
other things. ' W
The nauseating lack of response of the crowd to the father' �
pieaataaasiatanotisafwtwasrnmonb '
is true, as some say, that this fear of irwofvonant i7 mnr.
prevainoyetrmmmtnmmk,? Warm
seek answers; fa until wa know the reasaw fa the ocfer
responses to challenge giv�n by the two daaths, we shall know
precious little about out selves as civilized people.
fSat HEROES p. 51
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homa,
28 August 1978 FOUNTA1NHEA0 Pag 5
continued from p. 4)
Essays, articles, and corr
mentaries on heroism are be-
coming increasingly oommon-
plaoe inAmerican society. From
folklorists to psychiatrists, the
question of heroism and its
presence in our society is a
serious one. Have we outlived
the need for heroes? Or, are we
so starved for true heroes that
we will annoint anyone who
comes along with a preposter-
ous stunt a headline grabbing
escapade?
It is dear to this writer that
our society is starved for true
LAWSUIT
Continued from p. 1
quiring students to speak only
Spanish m classrooms while
studying advanced Spanish lit-
erature.
Raleigh attorney Marvin
Schiller, who is representing the
defendants in the case, said
Friday that any decision on the
amount of actual damages
which may be awarded to
Maybeny will be up to U.S.
District Court Judge Franklin T.
DupreeJr. He said Dupree will
also decide if Mayberry should
be reinstated.
heroism; throughout human-
kind's recorded history, it is the
hero who is chronciled - the
hero is the measure of man.
The recent success of Ben
Abruzzo, Max Anderson, and
Larry Newman in being the first
to cross the Atlantic by balloon
(from Presque Island Maine to
Miserey, Franoe in 5 days, 17
hours and 6 minutes) brought
genuine, excitement to the West-
ern world. It allowed us to forget
momentarily the trouble of the
dollar and other day-to-day
concerns; it was a truly heroic
act. Reduced to its basic level,
the balloon crossing symbolized
an eternal theme in human
history - individuals setting out
against great natural (or super-
natural) foroes to do something
which no person has done
before.
Taken in such light, there is
little difference between the
balloonists and their ancestors,
who equally challenged nature
and each other, becoming heroes
in the prooess. Yet the father of
the drowned child and the 82
year-old who died saving a child
are also heroes, for they each
placed value in something
greater than their personal
safety and then acted according-
ly.
"Brave deeds and noble
qualities" are words the dic-
tionary uses in defining hero-
ism. Human history has always
recorded such brave deeds and
noble qualities. Nations from
the Greeks to the Chinese to the
Danes have legendary heroes
The message, then is dear: we
blue attempt to rocket himself
over a vast river canyon, and
then reap oommerdal benefits
from it while pummeling a
skeptic with a baseball bat? Is
this a modern American hero?
Or is this a synthetic creation of
a sodety out of touch with
human history?
"So we drift, some of us, in
f on wtiofT
uncertainty, unsure d�
large part, we produce what we,
at the the deepest level need, if
not what we desire. Perhaps we
should look at heroes of times
past to discover it there is not a
thread which reaches into the
20th century. Homer will not
out-sell Wayne Dyer in our
time, and perhaps that is as it
should be. But men and women
of the past serve to instrud us -
we only have to look into the
past to see that we still "need"
mythology; there is a oommon
need for excellence, for models
on whom we may base our own
of so very little, including
our idenity as individuals
RAPE
Continued from p.4
several things are done to stop
it. Rape must be re-defined to
mdude all forms of sexual
intimacy forced on any person
(male or female) by another
(male or female).
The punishment for rape
must be re-strudured to refled
the level of violence of each
particular rape. For example, a
rape which resulted in no
physical or lasting emotional
damage would carry a lighter
sentence than a rape which did.
And a rape which involved the
use of a weapon would call for a
longer sentence but less than if
the weapon was accompanied by
physical or emotional damage.
Capital punishment for rape
should be completely abolished
and life sentences reserved for
repeat ottendersor brutal rapes.
The logic behind this is that
since most rapes are planned,
the rapist will weigh the conseq-
uences of the amount of violence
used. Juries will turn in a not
guilty verdid presently rather
than sentenoe a man to life
imprisonment or death for the
crime of rape and hopefully a
good re-struduring of rape
penalties will change this.
To bring an end to the
existence of rape it will be
necessary to change the atti-
tudes of the men and women of
our sodety. This change will
only come about when the fads
replace the myths.
For further information,
read: Against Our Will by Susan
Bronmiller, (Bantam Books,
1975, paper $2.75) or Against
Rape by Andra Medea and
Kathleen Thompson, (Farrar,
Straus & Giroux, paper $2.25.)
Uppity Women of Greenville
is a newly formed feminist
awareness and adion group.
need heroes. We always have
and always will. To deny this
commonality is to invite the
mentality capable of the warped
value system of the observer
who feared polluted water over
saving the life of a child.
Hero s have often been semi-
divine to sodety. And, dassical-
ly, no matter how great a hero
was, he or she always gave
homage to some deity, some
value greater than him or
herself. Ulysses sailed with the
grace of the gods, and Galahad
humbled himself that he might
view the Holy Grail. These and
oountless other heroes real or
legendary, have all provided a
human need - to strive beyond
the limits of "normal" humans,
to succeed.
Today there seems to be a
trend to oonsdously deny this
heritage, this subsumption of
ones personal safety or life in
favor of a strong guiding
pridple. One could mention the
Middle East crisis as one of
religious prindple, but a dose
examination will more than
veriftv the fad that true prob-
lems are perpetrated by mind-
less ads of terrorism, which
daily threaten innocent lives in a
nihilistic nightmare.
But what, then nt heroes?
Why is it that we crowoVasee a
down dressed in red, white and
We, as a sodety, appear not
to know exadly who or where
we are. Our age is that of
ioonodast "science We doubt
which was onoe believed as
true. For the Elizabethan, life
was much more simple: man
occupied a link on the Great
Chain of Being, and that was all
there was to it. All was
organized and looking upward
to the ether; everthing was in
order.
We can no longer accept a
Ptolemaic universe, nor can
some of us even seriously
entertain the possibility of a
supreme being. So we drift,
some of us, in a sea of
uncertainty, unsure of so very
little, induding our identity as
individuals. We trade the orade
at Delphi for the belief in
psychoanalysis, and a very real
problem fa Oedipus becomes a
childhood hang-up fa modern
man. The thread of mystidom
persists though, however we
may try to deny it. We shall
believe in something heroic,
even if it is some pitiful
motacydedaredevil. It is in our
blood, so to soeak.
Are our heroes jifferent than
theheroesof other ages? It is
quite possible that they are. As
our age settles for less, It shall
receive accadingly. Fa, in
SUB SHOPS in GREENVILLE and NAGS HEAD, NORTH CAROLINA
Welcome Back Students!
Vi Sub for1.00 with the purchase of any drink
from 6p Jn. till closing
on Mon. Aug. 28, Tues. Aug. 29,
Wed. Aug. 30, and Thurs. Aug. 31.
TELEPHONE 75&-0346
We have two such examples
from last week's news. We do
not know how the 82-year old
man lived his life; we do not
know in what he believed. But
we do have, at the moment of
his death, a heroic adion, a
reminder that one individual of
"brave deeds and noble qualit-
ies" can remind us of what we
oould be. And likewise, the
spedatas who stood gawked
while a father tried in vain to
save his drowning son also give
us an example. They serve to
tell us what we might become if
we oontinue to cut ourselves off
from the oommon humanity
which is sodety, the seed-bed of
heroism.
In his pcen Ulysses, Tenny-
son has the Greek hero address
his men thus:
Tho much is taken, much
abides; and thp' we are ntf now
that strength which in old days.
Moved earth and heaven, that
which we are, we are - One
equal temper of heroic hearts,
made weak by time and fate, but
strong in will to strive, to seek,
to find, and not to yield
If, by some mirade not to be
found in modern sdence a
merchandising, we could agree
with Ulysses that "It is not too
late to seek a newer human
existence. Perhaps instead of
scoffing at mythology, we oould
search there fa diredives, fa
that "temper of heroic hearts
If, somehow, we could bring
ourselves to understand, then
heroic' could connotate striving
fa a greater good in today's
sodety. It is too late of course to
save the boy who drowned with
a aowd of onlookers, but there
will be others; there will moet-
certainly be ahers.
MANDATOR
Fountainhead
staff meeting
Tuesday at 4
If you cannot attend
this meeting but wish
to work for the paper
this year, leave your
name, address, and
especially your phone
number with our
offices, and floor, Old
South Building.
GET
INVOLVED!
uUDj All Subs ticlude: Lettuce Tomatoe Onions & Seasaiings
Special-Cappicola Ham, Salami
Ham Turkey
Roast Beef
Roast Beef, Ham & Turkey
EXTRA
Hot Peppers
American or Provolone
Swiss Cheese
Roast Beef & Ham
Roast Beef & Turkey
Ham & Turkey
Salami
Mixed Cheese
BAGELS
With Creamed Cheese
Meat
ITALIAN SAUSAGE
With Provolone Cheese
STEAK SANDWICH
Tomato Sauce on Request
Onions & Green Pepper
Deluxe
DELI SANDWICHES
Onion Rings
French Fries
On Kaiser RoD a Jewish Rye
Ham&Swiss
Ham Bacon & Swiss
Roast Beef & Provolone
Pastrami
ComedBeef
DRINKS
Pepsi
Dr. Pepper
Mt Dew
7-Up
$
1 �" nrr,jr. � � jae. jg
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6 FOUNTAINHEAO 28 August 1978
CHANELO'S
Pizza & Spaghetti
House
507 EAST 14th STREET
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
DIAL 758-7400
WOULD YOU BELIEVE
SUPER
WELCOME BACK SPECIAL
TWO FREE QUARTS OF COKE
WITH PURCHASE
OF
ANY LARGE PIZZA
ONE FREE QUART
OF
COKE
WrINScOS
rift .
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WITH PURCHASE OF
ANY MEDIUM PIZZA
dm
Lftf'JN&E) S
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ALL WEEK LONG STARTING TODAY
TILL SEPTEMBER 1
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TAKE OUT
AS CLOSE AS YOUR PHONE 758-7400
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NOW USING HOT BOXES IN DELIVERY CARS
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PIZZA-SPAGHETTI
NOTHING BEATS A PIZZA FROM CH ANELO'S
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aaaaitxBuyiiigciub
'Co-
2B Augun 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
op means co-operation
BytAHENCBLANSFtELD
News Editor
nr? -Vf. your food -
more Tl6 m Greenvie fe,t tn t had
baaisof faiTtl cooperative, in which
Todav thl aUXJt ,our-�half years ago.
Today, the organization is still in business.
verv IT . the traCk re00rd for � �� is
�e GrZI; Arnett' �xdinSc?of
eahtrV 6 9rouPMost coops only las.
eighteen months before they foJd"
exJUT30? " Short ,ife an8. Arnett
�TmtTetai,Ureof cooperation that fd.ows
anm,t�. idealism. The only thing that has held us
have waed and worked she said -This is our
enough that we re gang to make it work -
th0HTU"y that Wi" dhan0e � fall, and
there win not be fifteen of us, there will be a
hundred of us. But it needs some more
organization
OPEN WEEKLY
The Greenville coop, which is open every
Wednesday from 4-6:30 p.m. for grocery shopping,
� now located on D.ck.nson Avenue, across from
Home Furn.ture and Western Auto, culminating a
progression of headquarters over the years from an
extra room in somebody's house, to a member's
trailer, and then for over two years to the garage
behind the Greenville Art Center.
It offers food prices which are considerably
lower than those in most grocery stores, although a
few items, such as dog food and tuna fish, are
priced higher than store prices, since the coop
cannot buy them in bulk.
The Greenville co-op is an incorporated
organization, with an official constitution, a board
of officials elected by the members, and committee
chairmen appointed by tr s board. Besides Arnett,
the board consists of an assistant coordinator,
Scott Luce; a secretary, Eleanor Webber; and a
treasurer, Susan Benton.
VOLUNTEER WORK
The various committees form the backbone
of the coop, and each member is asked to
contribute two hours a month on one of these
committees in exchange for the cheaper prices.
The distribution committee is responsible for
putting out the regular foods, and the orders
committee is responsible for ordering those foods.
The natural foods committee fulfills both of these
duties fa the stae's natural foods supply.
A committee fa communications takes care of
publishing a newsletter and contacting various
groups to solicit new members, while a finance
committee runs the cash register and posts the
books. (The coop keeps track of how much money
individual family units spend, and any profit which
is made is turned back to them by percentage,
depending on how much each unit has spent.)
A new committee is also being famed to take
care of cleanup.
FAMILY UNITS
Over the years, the coop has seen a
turnover of about 650 different members, with a
current active membership of about 160 family
units. A family unit in the co-op is defined as a
group of up to four individuals living in the same
household. In a damitay, Arnett explained, this
would be applicable to roommates. New members
pay a refundable deposit of five dollars, and a
membership fee of five dollars. A family unit can
include up to four individuals in one membership;
if there are mae than four, a double membership
can be purchased fa ten dollars.
Arnett is very proud of the fact that the coop
membership reflects a good cross-section of
Greenville citizens.
"We have people who are on welfare, we have
people who are doctas, we've got every race that
is represented in Greenville as part of the
membership; we've ga all age groups. It's a very
hetergeneous group, where it is just good
friendshipAnd I like that. There's no social
classes at all
SENIOR CITIZENS
One group which the co-op is trying to draw
in is the senia citizens, who were recently voted a
special membership discount. There are currently
about fifteen members who are senia citizens, and
Arnett feels that an inaeased number would be a
twoway benefit.
"One, I think we can help them bacause they'll
save money on a very tight budget she
explained. "And second of all, people who are
retired are not passe - they are very much with it
today, and we could use their services
She hopes that the senia citizen enrollment will
rise in the fall, and, indeed, that overall
membership will see an inaease. More people, she
said, and more large-quantity purchasers, will help
to ease the financial strain, which is taxed by the
costs of rent, utilities, and general supplies.
"Right now, it's terribly hard to meet
expenses she said. "We have to bring in about
fifteen hundred dollars a week to make ends meet;
we're bringing in anywhere from eight hundred to
twelve hundred
MUTUAL COOPERATION
A price markup of five per cent on regular
foods and seven per cent on natural foods helps to
defray some of the coop's expenses, and volunteer
wak makes up the other part. There are no paid
employees in the co-op. Mutual oo-operation is the
basis of the organization, fa it is built on the
principle that people feel that they have mae time
THE COMMUNITY BUYING
Club, as the oo-op is known,
stocks a wide array of grocery
items, with most prices consid-
erably lower than those of many
retail stores.
think we promote honesty, fellowship - this type of
thing. We have meetings, and dinners, where
everybody bringsaooverd dish. It snot communal.
yet it's a very friendly, helping situation
Arnett cites as an example of this fellowship a
letter she received recently from a girl who had
once underpaid the stae.
"She didn't have enough money one day, and
she said that a price on an item was seventy-five
cents; it really should have been $1.75 Arnett
explained. "Her conscience was bothering her. So
she sent us two dollars to repay us. Her conscience
was bothering her that it wasna in the concept of
trusting that the co-op was, and she hoped that we
would fagive her. It was unsigned; we have no
idea who is was, but this is the way it is
Arnett cautions, however, that such personal
relationship hinges on a small and intimate
organization. Growth beyond a certain pant would
breed the impersonalization that marks much of
modern society, and this would defeat the whae
purpose of the co-op. However, she does not
�i
Featuring: Breakfast
Lunch and Dinner
Gourmet Salad Bar
Steaks, Seafood
and Oilier Dishes
Brown Bagging Permitted
Fine Wines & Champagne
Banquet Rooms
Open 7 Bays a Week
IPial 756-2414
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Owners - Janie and Woody Smith
i
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PP�8 FOUNTAINHEAO 28 Auou 197B
Up on the rooftop-it's not reindeer
RISING ABOVE THE roof of the
physics building, like a tiny
windmill, this device, called an
Bypass course
anemometer. measures the
force and velocity of the wind.
Staff photos by Karen Blansfield
By KA REN BLA NSFIELD
News Editor
Investigation of sciar energy and its capabilities
is well under way in the ECU physics department,
where studies have led to experimentation,
workshops and one oourse on the graduate level.
Dr. Carl G. Adler, a nuclear physicist professor,
has set up four experimental systems on the roof of
the physics building. One is a commercial solar
collector, which particularly interested him be-
cause it is made with metal rather than plastic.
"We wanted to see how well it worked Adler
explained. "So we're just testing it right now
The other two collectors are modular units with
sliding interchangeable panels, purposely design-
ed so that students can test them in various
combinations and see what works best. The basic
elements of these collectors are the cover - which
comes in different materials such as glass,
plexiglass or fiberglass and the absorbing plate
which can be copper, aluminum, steel or metal.
CLOUD COVERS
Adler has also installed a device known as a
pyranometer on the edge of the tallest part of the
physics building. The pyranometer is a tiny glass
globe, through which the sun strikes a series of
small metal plates whose temperature is then
measured by thermocouples. The pyranometer is
wired down to Adlers office, where a graph
records the temperature fluctuations.
Research is also being conducted on the effect
of cloud ooverson the efficiency of solar cells, and
these findings will be published in journals when
oompelte, Adler said.
SATISFIES CURIOSITY
His purpose fa all of this experimentation Ts
threefold. First, it is a means of collecting data fa
this area, since knowledge of weather conditions
will be necessary fa future solar implementation.
Secondly, it satisfies his own curiosity (after all, he
is a scientist.) Thirdly, it provides an unexpected
community need.
"When the oil aunch came he explained.
Everybody got interested in solar energy and
they started calling me up and asking me lots of
questions, and to answer the questions I had to find
out more information This public interest led to
the initiation of wakshops fa educatas, archit-
ects, heating contractors, and numerous other
occupational groups, as well as the general public.
INCREASING POPULARITY
Earlier this summer a Department of Energy
sponsored wakshop on solar energy was held on
the ECU campus and attended by twenty-five two
year college teachers. The wakshop was aimed
toward educating them sufficiently to institute
solar energy oourses at their own schools
A graduate oourse on solar energy is also
offered in the physics department.
Solar oollectasashot water heatersare gaining
maeased popularity and several homes which
employ themare now being built in the Greenville
area. Adler predicts that they will become even
mae reasaiable in the future. But solar power as a
means of heat is na quite as certain.
"As far as solar energy goes, right now it is
proh.bit.vly expensive he said. Whether it win
become mae economically attractive in the future J
depends to a large degree on how the government
handles it in tarns of underwriting ooets and
offaing tax incentives.
ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS
Adler cautioned against people expecting too
much from solar energy and then being
disappointed when it doesn't produce. He doubts
whether it will ever be suitable fa industna
application.
Adler also pointed out that solar energy may
pose environmental problems which people may
na expect.
One is that it's possible that suniigr
reflecting off of solar panels in a roo
will blind pedestrains, a wase Mind
drivasof cars he said. "Secondly, if you put ,r,
solar panels, what are you going to do about your
neighba' s trees? He s using his trees to oool in the
summer. So who has a right? Your neighba or
you?
FUTURE ENERGY
Solar energy also uses ooppa and alummurr
extensively, which has to be mined and ther
refined and manufactured - all of which art
pollution causing, environmental stresses.
The problems, questions and possibilities of
solar energy will be the focus of much intense
study in the years to oome, and Adler's
experiments and research are geared towards
uncovering such information He believes solar
energy will solve some of the future energy
problems.
I think solar energy should be developed, and
developed heavily he said. "I think
CLEP tests benefit students
ByTERREPIRKEY
Assistant News Editor
John S. Childers. ECU Testing Center directa.
feels that every student should know about College
Level Examination (CLEP) tests. 'CLEP is an
alternate way for students to receive credit fa
some of their oourses. but has received little
publicity here at ECU as to which courses students
may receive academic credit fa Childers said.
The program has been in existence fa two years at
tCU according to Childers.
"The CLEP is offered monthly at East Carolina
usually during the third week of the month. To
-egister for the examinations). a student must
submit a completed registration form and the
approbate check or money ader payable to
College Entrance Examination Board to be
reived prior to the last work day ot the month
Childers said.
When asked if the Placement tests students
take during aientation are categaized with the
CLEP tests, Childer replied, "CLEP tests are
something a student can do on his own. Since each
test costs only $20. there may be a significant
financial and time savings possible
ECU grants credit fa the College Level
Examination Program as follows:
Test 1 English Composition- ECU will allow aedit
fa English 1100 (3) if a students scae is between
the 50th and 61st percent.le. If the student soaes
above the 62nd percentile he could be given aedit
fa English 1100 (3) and English 1200 (3).
Test 2: Social Sciences - History - NO CREDIT
Test 4: Humanities - ECU will allow aedit fa Art
Appreciation 1910(2) and Music Appreciation 2208
(2) if a student's soae is between the 50th and the
61 st peroentile. If the student scores above the
62nd pacentile, he could be given aedit fa Art
Appreciation, Music Appreciation (2), and Wald
Literature (3).
Test 5: ECU will allow aedit fa Mathematics 1065
(3) if a student's scae is between the 50th and the
79th percentile. If the student soaes above the
79th percentile he could be given aedit fa
Mathematics 1065 (3) and Mathematics 1075 (3).
Accounting, Introductory, scaled scae 50 Ac-
counting 2401 (3)
American Government (plusessay): 50th paoa'
ile, Political Science 1010(3).
v
THIS MOD'IIA P SOMfl unit one ot thro i ' i 7 -�t3��S'
�A
warm water that
"N
STOPNGO WELCOMES YOU
ECU STUDENTS
PEPSI COLA 16 oz.
T Ejfi.
BOTTLES
19 each
Come by our
810 E. lot h Street
location and
got your 8TOP-N-GO
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m
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LAYS POTATO CHIPS-
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STROH'S BEER 12-12 o. cans $3.S9
4 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS
810 E. IOth Street
2905 E.
Street
OPEN
HOURS
1401 Dickinson Avenue
3801S. Memorial Drive





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Hot off the wire.
Governor acts on
training schools
Th f N -C AP - Gov. Jim h took s,eos
Thursday designed to beef up auoervlJoT- �
sex and drinking scandaJ at one mSS 1
slaying at another. a
At a news oonferenoe, the governor announced
hewasadd,ng54cx,taparentstothesT
that better-qualified applicants can be hired
Hunt sad 30 of the new positions would go to
the Juvenile Evaluation Center in SannanoTu
to the Stonewall Jackson Training School in
Concord and the remainder to other facilities
The news conference came two days after a
37-yeard cottage parent at Swannanoa died of a
skull fracture he received in a beating by four
youths who were trying to escape.
Earlier this month about 10 girls at the Jackson
school entered a boys' cottage one night fa a sex
and dr.nk.ng spree that led to the dismissals of two
male cottage parents.
Ycuth services division chief W. R. Windley
said this week it was clear that security was not
tight enough at the schools. Only one unarmed
security guard was patrolling at Swannanoa when
the cottage parent was killed.
Hunt said the new positions should make it
unnecessary for cottage parents to work alone. But
he said he didn't think any additional security
measures would be needed right now.
Hunt also said he was raising the maximum
salary of oottage parents by $1,000 to a new level of
$11,232.
And he said he had consulted with the Criminal
Justice Training and Standards Council before
deciding to drop the requirement that oottage
parents have at least two years of college.
Hunt said applicants with long experience but
little schooling had had to be rejected because of
the requirement. "This is the kind of people who
have done a good job of giving firm and loving care
to their own children Hunt said.
He ated one instance in which an applicant
with 15 years' experience as a cottage parent had
to be turned down.
Salary supplement
proposal criticized
RALEIGH. N.C.APr The president of the state
Association of Educators lashed out Thursday
against a proposal that oounties be denied the right
to add local supplements to the state's base teacher
salaries.
C. Stewart Stafford said the Idea would mean
lower salaries for manv t�r��rR and Ip�r m�
iiiiwiiiiiiiimiiHi�iiii�iiMwiMweiwwiwiaweMwi
control over public schools.
Wake County Commissioner J. T. Knott said
earlier this week he would ask the Association of
County Commissioners at its convention in
Asheville to press the General Assembly for an end
to local salary supplements.
"I find it incredible that a respected county
commissioner who claims to be a fiscal conserva-
tive would seriously propose taking away powers of
local government to further oentralize power in
Raleigh and Washington Stafford said.
"County commissioners now have full taxing
authority for schools and all other county
government operation he added. "What Mr.
Knott proposes will reduce the local control of
schools
Knott had said local teacher salary supplements
gave students in richer oounties an advantage over
those from poor areas.
"I don't think it takes much analyzing to see
that Mr. Knott's proposal will take more money
than the General Assembly can possibly find to
equal ize salaries to the highest now paid Stafford
said. "Only 89 of the state's 145 school systems
pay a supplement. It seems to me that Mr. Knott
proposes to equal ize downward to the lowest or to
none at all �.
FayetteviUe feud
over prostitution
continues
FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. (AP) - District Judge
Joseph Dupree and Police Chief Danny Dixon are
renewing their feud over handling of prostitutions
cases with a flurry of statistics.
Last month Dixon told reporters his officers are
frustrated in their attempts to clear the city of
prostitution by lenient judges who end up
suspending most of the sentences.
Dixon said his vice officers were laughed at
when they strolled along the town's notorious Hay
Street. He proposed that judges be required to give
active one-year prison terms for second con-
victions.
Dupree defended the courts and said judges
should oontinue to be permitted to tailor their
sentenoes to particular cases.
This week Dupree called another news
conference to release statistics which show that of
57 persons facing prostitution charges in his court,
38 were sentenced to prison, 17 got suspended
sentenoes and three were acquitted. Of the 38, by
the time all courts had had their say, 22 actually
served time.
"I just wanted to let the people of the
community and Cumberland County know that I've
done a substantially good job of trying to get the
prostitutes oil the street Dupree said. "What
prompted me was the more or less broadside attack,
on the court system itself
Dixon doesn't plan to take the renewal of
hostilities lying down. His offioe said the
department was preparing its own study of all
prostitution arrests in the city during recent years.
Dixon said he didn't want to get involved in a
personality clash with Dupree, but he said results
of the study would be announced in a few days.
High Point P.D.
subject of SBI
investigation
HIGH POINT, N.C. (AP) - The State Bureau of
Investigation has been asked to probe allegations
of wrongdoing in the High Point Police Depart-
ment.
SBI Director Haywood Starling said he had
talked with High Point Polioe Chief John Faircloth
and was prepared "to begin the investigation as
soon as possible
He said the probe would begin in the next few
days with a "preliminary investigation in order to
determine just how far we will need to go
Faircloth said he asked for the investigation
after talking with two former polioe reserve
officers, George Kosinski and Tom Neighbours,
who told him they had information "which may
have indicated polioe officers were involved in
illegal activities
Faircloth said he had asked for the resignations
of the two man after the conversations because he
didn't think they could function effectively any
longer as polioe reserves.
Neither man will talk about the allegations, and
Faircloth has not said exactly what allegations had
been levelled against the department.
The Greensboro Daily quoting a souros
close to the controversy, said the allegations
involved at least one veteran detective who
supposedly knew about prostitution and drug
trafficking at a High Point establishment.
Amtrak reduces
round-trip fares
Travelers have gotten some good news in the
form of a possible cut in coast-to-coast air fares and
a positive drop in railroad fares.
Amtrak announoed Wednesday that it was
cutting round-trip fares by up to 40 percent. Family
Plan and USA Rail Pass discount ticket sal so will be
cheaper under the reductions which take effect
Sept. 6.
Here's how the round-trip excursion plan will
work: the traveler pays the regular price for the
first leg of hisor her journey, then pays between $5
and $20 for the return trip. The exact price of the
return ticket depends on the cost of the first leg.
Under the program, which will be in effect until
May 25, the New York-Chicago round-
trip fare will be cut from $116 to $73 ($58 pi us $15)
and the Chicago-Los Angeles fare will be reduced
from $242 to $141 ($121 plus $20).
The new excursion round-trip rates applyjto.
trips of at least 250 miles one-way on the same
train, with children under 12 paying one-half the
special rate. Existing excursion fares offering 25
percent discounts will remain in effect fa many
trips under 250 miles and in the Boston-Washing-
ton northeast corridor where the new rates do not
apply.
Amtrak runs most of the nation's passenger
trains and many of them are losing money because
of empty trains.
The senior vice president of the Association of
American Railroads, Carl V. Lyon, told a Senate
committee on Wednesday that the carriers need
billions of dollars in new tax subsidies, both for
safety improvements and for expansion to
transport the increased amount of coal expected to
be produced in coming years.
In another development in the transportation
field, William Dapper, a Civil Aeronautics Board
judge, recommended board approval of a proposal
by World Airways, a California-based charter
airline, for a $99 one-way fare between the East
and West coasts.
One-way transcontinental coach tickets now
oost about $220 and the cheapest advance purchase
round-trip fares range from $24? to $286.
See AMTRAK, p.10
28 August 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 9
A �������l�"���i���W���i��M��B�������l'��"
Jury rejects
claims ofUNC
professor
GREENSBORO, N.C. (AP) - A
federal oourt jury has rejected
claims by a 43-year-old woman
that she was denied reappoint-
ment or promotion at the
University of North Carolina-
Chapel Hill Department of
Religion because of her age.
The jury deliberated for
more than two hours before
reflecting the claims by Dr.
Mary Carroll Smith, a Roman
Catholic, and denying her dam-
ages. She had sought an award
of $2.25 million.
University officials testified
that age, sex and religion did
See JURY, p. 10
JUuxa,
- (Jug,
OPTICIANS
opticians
anoaatKxi
of amenca
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ACCURATELY FILLED
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PHYSICIANS QUADRANGLE
OFFICE HOURS
Berkley Mall t 9 AM -5:30 PM
Goldsboro MON.TUES THURS
aA.UJtVM.
WEDNESDAY
BUILDING A
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FRI
114 E Walnut
Downtown Goldsboro
HmHItlllllllllMlMIUIIMIMMIMtllWlllllllMIIIIIIIHM
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WELCOME STUDENTS
TO THE STUDENTS SUPPLY STORE - WRIGHT BUILDING
WHERE YOUR BUSINESS IS APPRECIATED
shopped for USED Ixxis during the s
May we suggest die followingroom accessories to help you fed at home.

Wehavea full line of calculators and accessories- And offer a 30-day FKEE replacement on defective units.
Browse in our new andenlarged Tradebook department
Shop our full line of School Supplies. Choose your favorite wearing apparel from our laige selection of Soft Goods.
& ,& y
rt
"
av6
GREEKITEMS-ARTSUPPLES- JEWELRY
We have employed extra staff and will operate extra registers so we can better serve you.
SPEOALNCmCE:
The Students Supply Store will remain open until 6 pjn. on August30,3l andSept l,4,and5fayourccnvience.
1
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THE INTERBANK CARD
Master Charge and Visa Cards cards are welcome.
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Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 28 Aunu 1fl7
Hot Off the Wire (Continued)
JURY
continued
from page 9
Ms. Smith, who was retain-
ed in her job as assistant
not enter into Uie decision not to professor of religion under a
reappoint Ms. Smith to the
faculty or to promote her. They
said her performance during
three years as an assistant
professor of religion was the
only factor involved.
'status quo" agreement pend-
ing the outcome of the trial, had
sought promotion to associate
professor. Theoourt is expected
to dissolve the "status quo"
provision, which has been in
AMTRAK
continued from page 9
It will be at least 30 days before the Ca'B takes
up his recommendation. World has been seeking
such a low-cost route fa a decade, and the CAB
has turned down the idea several times.
Two other airlines - Capitol International
Airways and Pan American Wald Airways -
proposed similar plans, but Dapper said the Wald
Airways plan pronised to be most efficient.
effect since the lawsuit was filed
in 1976.
The suit also charged that
university officials denied Ms.
Smith her rights of academic
freedom by failing to reappoint
her tothe teaching position. The
jury also rejected that claim.
She taught Indie religion and
Pan Am got a cautious reception on anaher of
its proposals - an offer to purchase National
Natioial Chairman L.B. Maytag said the
carrier, the 11th largest, would study the Pan Am
offer. Alfred Kahn, chairman of the Civil
Aeronautics Board, which would have to approve
the takeover, said the board, "under its
philosophy, is always ooncerned when it loses a
competita in the free marketplace
Airlines. The purchase would make Pan Am the
nation'sseooid largest carrier. It is now the fourth
literature at UNC. It was
revealed during the trial that
Ms. Smith has been offered a
one-year contract to teach rel-
igion at Vassar College, begin-
ning this fall.
Bar exam results
show NCCU
students off pace
By The A ssociated Press
Barely half of this year's
aop of North Carolina Central
law school graduates passed the
State Bar Examination last
month, despite improvement sat
the school which officials had
said was responsible fa a better
showing last year. Of the 43
N.C. Central graduates who
took the test fa the first time
Last year 82 percent of the
Central grads who took the teat
paaeed it, a substantial im-
provement over the .school's
tradition low perfamance on
the exam. Dean Harry Edwards
Groves attributed the result to
effats to upgrade the school.
Groves was on a faculty
retreat this week and could not
be reached fa oomment.
University of North Carolina
graduates did best on the
examination. Of the 151 UNC
law graduates taking the test fa
the first time, 145 passed. Wake
Faest had 119 out of 124 pass
the test, and Duke had 19 out of
23.
Wake Faest and Duke had
perfect recads in last year's
test, but officials of neither
school seemed alarmed by this
year's handful of failures.
"That's a very good ratio, of
oourse, 96 percent passing
Depressed student shoots wife,
kills self after failing bar exam
Welcome Back Students!
DURHAM, N.C, (AP)-
The wife of a North Carolina
Central University law student
Dean Leon H. Cabett Jr. "That
100 peroent figure is quite rare.
"Of oourse, you always are
hurt when someone doesn't
pass the bar. It is like the
parable of the sheep. You
always ay fa the one is lost
Paul D. Carrington, dean of
Duke law school, said some-
times students didn't prepare
well fa the test.
"It oould just have been two
a three people who weren't
quite up fa it, and they didn't
make it he said. "I'm na
alarmed that a few Duke law
students flunk the law bar every
- wounded by her husband who
later killed himself - was listed
in satisfactory condition late
Friday, acoading to a spokes-
man at Durham County General
Hospital.
Ruth Harris, directa of
public relations, said that as of
�ate Friday afternoon Dais
Alston, nine maiths pregnant
when she was shot, had not
delivered her baby.
Durham polios said Mrs.
Alston was shot early Thursday
by her husband, William Alston
Jr 27, who then shot and killed
himself. Authaitiessaid Alstoi
was depressed about his failure
to pass the state bar examina-
tion. He learned Monday that
he had failed the exam, and an
office asscnate said he was
aushed by ihe news.
Family members in Saxa-
phaw said he talked to them late
Wednesday and told them he
was so depressed he intended to
kill himself, acoading to Dur-
ham police Detective Geage
Hare.
Hare said the family describ-
ed the law board failure as "a
terrific blow to his ego
Hare said the family mem-
bers told him they tried to keep
Alston on the phone until
someone oould get to his
Durham home. But he suddenly
hung up as they were preparing
to make the 40-mile trip to
Durham.
Police said he then shot his
wife and killed himself.
BFGoodrith
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We specialize in tire service,
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WESTERN SIZZLE?
STEAK HOUSE
Welcomes Back
ECU Students
Lunch & Dinner Special
Men. - Thnrs. Aug. 28-31
Kfo. 12 Chopped Sirloin Steak
rithor without gravy, King Baked
Potato or French Fries & Texas
Toast, aU for 81.79
Hunt: tax relief
ASHEVILLE, N.C.(AR - Gov. Jim HUnt pledged Thursday to
oppsoe any move in the next General Assembly f a tax increase,
and said if the revenue picture warrants it, he'll work for some kind
of tax relief for North Carolinians.
Hunt told oounty commissioners from throughout the state at
their 71st annual conference in the Inn on the Plaza in Asheville
that the legislature's occasional habit of ordering them to
implement programs without passing the money along is a thing of
the past.
"We have established as our principle in state government that
never again will we mandate programs for local government
without providing the money you need to pay for them Hunt told
the commissioners.
SBI agent files
discrimination suit
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Also featuring all new Salad Bar
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Fri.&Sat. 11-11
FOR THOSE WHO BELIEVE IN MIRACLES! I
GREENSBORO, N.C. (AP) - A
black State Bureau of Investiga-
tion agent has filed a federal
oourt suit against the SBI,
claiming the agency discrimi-
nates against its black employe-
es
The suit was filed Thursday
in the U.S. Middle District
Court here by Clarenoe Gooche
Jr. of Durham County, an SBI
agent for eight years.
Gooche claims he and other
black agentsare limited in rank,
denied promotions, job assign-
ments, employment benefits
and opportunities because of
their raoe.
The suit asks that it be
considered a class action on
behalf of all back SBI employe-
es and blacks who have applied
for SBI employment.
Gooche is seeking injunction
banning the SBI from discrimi-
natory practices, plus promotion
to a position he says he would
have attained in the absence
of racially discriminatory polic-
ies and practices
The suit also seeks back
wages for Gooche and others as
compensation "for wages lost
because of the defendant's
discriminatory practices
SBI Director Haywood
Starling could not be reached for
comment.
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I
INK
SUPERMARKET
A
AD
S5
Overtoil's welcomes
all ECU students and faculty
28 August 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 11
13
sity
mia
lies
�r-
7
Fifth St

OB
5
Overton'
AFREET shirt
to the first 1,000 Students W
with a $20 food order,
also FREE desk Blotters.
i
Located just 2 blocks from ECU at the corner of 3rd & Jarvis.
We have everyday low prices that are more than competitive with any
other store, large or small. A free cart service is available to push your
groceries home. We accept Master Charge and Visa. We are your
hometown food store away from home. We appreciate your business
and Strive to please in every way possible.
Thank you for shopping at Overtones.
w
W-i
m ; -�
Overtones,
the home of Greenville's
best meats, just ask anyone
Overtones, is Greenville's
headquarters for ground
beef patties, no order
to large or to small.
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$
mm emmmmM
i1' "� � �"� Tin mm inn





12 FOUNTAINHEAD 28 August 1978
Were you gone this summer ?Here's what happened
By JIM BARNES
News Editor
With' a this feature,
FOUNTAINHEAD presents a
summary of the leading news
stories to affect ECU this
summer. While many news-
worthy events such as promot-
ions, grants, summer campus,
etc. are not mentioned, the staff
of FOUNTAINHEAD hopes that
the following summary will
.acquaint ECU students with
what has happened in part on
the ECU campus during the
summer recess.
OUT WITH THE OLD
IN WITH THE NEW
The main story of the
summer of '78 would have to be
the retirement of former Chanc-
ellor Leo Jenkins and the
sb sequent takeover by the new
ECU chancellor Thomas Brewer.
Jenkins, who retired after 31
years at East Carolina, was
honored in a special edition of
FOUNTAINHEAD for June 30,
1978. In that edition, several
prominent political and educat-
ional leaders spoke warmly of
the former chancellor. A select-
ion of comments is presented
here: N.C. Governor James
Hunt: "Leo Jenkins is a man
who came amongst us and
adopted this state, came to love
it and has given his life and his
great energies in a way that has
little parallel in ou. history, to
make us the land of opportunity
that we are today
Senator Jesse Helms R-N.C
"He is an eloquent man. He is a
man of high principle and sound
judgement. He is a no-nonsense
educator. He understands the
free enterprise system and he
has been one of its most
dedicated supporters. He has a
WELCOME BACK
ECU STUDENTS
University Exxon specializes
in complete auto care
lubrication tune-ups
gas and oil brake service
tires-new and recaps
minor auto repairs
WE HAVE 24 HOUR ROAD SERVICE
day-752-0455
night-752-5756
EXON
:i2nlfc�
.A '
"Thanks for coining by"
located on 5th street
across from campus
message for America, and
America would do well to listen
to it
Senator Robert Morgan D-N. C.
"Leo could have had all the
prestige he wanted. He could
have sat down there in the
President's house and said 'yes
sir' and 'no sir but he decided
to take them on in behalf of ECU
and the people of North
Carolina. He suffered a lot of
grief because of this from the
educational establishment, but
he fought them and won. He
deserves all the credit in the
world.
William C. Friday, President of
the Consolidated University of
North Carolina He has put his
stamp upon an entire region of
our state. When historians of the
future evaluate the impact of
this energetic individual, they
should look beyond the bricks-
and-mortar testimony to his
drive and vision and conclude
that a major contribution of Leo
Jenkins was his ability to renew
in the people of Eastern North
Carolina a sense of confidence
and of pride.
Dr. Jenkins shall not be idle
in retirement. He will serve as a
part-time advisor to Gov. Hunt
in the area of economic develop-
ment and commerce in eastern
North Carolina. Jenkins and his
wife have established residence
in Atlantic Beach, but they are
expected to maintain an apart-
ment in Raleigh for Jenkins'
work with the governor.
NEW CHANCELLOR
Dr. Thomas Bowman Brewer
succeeded Jenkins as chancellor
of ECU on July 3, 1978. Brewer,
who is 45, comes to Greenville
from Texas Christian University
where he served as vioe-
chancellor and dean.
Brewer's appointment was
approved by the North Carolina
Board of Governors on March 10
of this year. He was screened
from hundreds of applicants for
the position. Brewer, who holds
the Ph.D. in American History
from Pennsylvania, had various
teaching positions prior to as-
nmnfl, h.s duties ffgggftlor
Since 1971, Brewer had
been a professor and Dean of
Arts and Sciences at TCU. Prior
to his tenure at Texas Christian,
Brewer held teaching positions
in Pennsylvania, Texas, Iowa,
Ohio and Kentucky.
Athletics:
The athletic department
was quite involved this summer,
but it was not in competition on
the playing field. Two actions,
the continuation of the woman's
grievance procedure against al-
leged Title IX violations and
alleged basketball recruiting vio-
lations promise to have a wide-
ranging effect on ECU athletics
this year and in the future.
On May 2, 1978, a letter of
protest was sent to then-
Chancellor Leo Jenkins concern-
ing possible Title IX violations in
the ECU women's athletic pro-
gram. The letter concerned
areas wherein the studnets felt
that women athletes were not
being treated equally with the
male athletes, as stipulated in
Title IX of the Educational
Amendments Act which took
effect in July of 1975.
A RE AS OF CONCERN
Areas of concern to the
committee which is made up of
students and represented by
attorney Charles McLawhorn,
Jr included:provision of equip-
ment and supplies; scheduling
of games and practice times;
travel and per diem allowance;
locker rooms, practice, and
competitive facilities; assign-
ment and pay of coaches;
publicity; and athletic scholar-
ships.
Jenkins appointed a commit-
tee of three members to study
Jiie problem and to receive
Testimony on the above seven
points of grievanoe. The commit-
tee is chaired by Dr. Artemus
Kares. Dr. lone Ryan was
chosen by the students as their
representative on the commit-
tee, while the university was
represented by Dr. Robert
Barnes.
On June 12 and 13, the
committee met to hear the
grievants testify as to theparity
e athletic
fefljajea
i miuocotw - rorv-
resentative asked for a 20 day
continuance at that time, with
one being granted. The commit-
tee was next to convene July 6,
at which time it would hear the
university's response to the
complaints raised by the student
committee.
A NOTHER CONFERENCE
After another continuance,
the committee met again July
21. At That meeting, the com-
mittee was told that due to the
changeover in the chancellor's
office, the university was asking
for another extension, this one
until 10 August. Dr. David
Stevens, Equal Opportunity Dir-
ector and spokesman for the
chancellor, said that the presen-
tation of August 10 "will be a
fair, a just, and equitable
package that legally is going to
be in compliance with the HEW
regulations
The package is ready to be
delivered to the committee, but
it cannot be submitted prior to
August 28. Due to a private
tragedy, Chancellor Brewer will
not be in Greenville until that
time. Stevens told
FOUNTAINHEAD that he was
oonfident that tne package was
drawn up to be approved by the
chancellor, it cannot be offered
until it is approved by the
chancellor, which is expected
soon after his return to duties on
the 28th of August.
Stevens also told
FOUNTAINHEAD that the
chancellor will meet at 1 p.m. on
August 29 to present the comp-
laints with the university's res-
ponse to their Title IX grievanoe.
NCAA INVESTIGATION
It was also learned this
summer that the NCAA has
investigated the ECU basketball
program in relation to its
recruitment of prep standout Al
Tyson of D.H. Conley High
School. Tommy Yagers, a NCAA
investigator, spent five days in
Greenville in early July but
refused to comment on the
nature of his investigation or the
source of information regarding
the investigation.
"There is some feel i rift-lfc.afc
? ho lm�4ination was nrornnted
by complaints made against the
ECU reauting by Mississippi
head coach Bob Weitlich.
WEI TUCH WON'T DENY IT
Asked to oomment concerning
the allegation that he might have
been involved in the complaint
to the NCAA, Weitlich stated
that "I'm not going to deny it,
but I can't elaborate wnen
there's an investigation going
on. It's common knowledge we
were recruiting Tyson as were a
lot of other people
Weiiich also added that "It's
also common knowledge that
most of us had a hard time doing
so (recruiting Tyson). There
were a lot of difficulties.
TYSON'S ECONOMIC ST A TUS
The NCAA was investigating
Tyson's economic status during
the past year, according to
Conley coach Shelly Marsh, who
was questioned by Yeagers.
"He(Yeagers) asked about Al's
spending money, housing,
clothes and his grades. He
certainly knew what he was
talking about and was very
familiar with the Greenville
area" according to Marsh.
Marsh oontinued that the
controversy oentered around Old
Miss and ECU and the battle the
schools had for the highly-touted
Tyson. Some feel that the
troubles arose when Tyson led
officials at each university to
believe that he would attend
their school. Tyson, who had
signed a grant-in-aid this year
with ECU, purportedly gave a
verbal oommitment to ECU and
to Mississippi before signing
with ECU.
ECU coach Larry Gillman
went on the record as having no
oomment concerning either the
recruitment of Tyson or the
NCAA probe. He refered all
questions to ECU Chancellor
Brewer or athletic director Bill
Cain. In a meeting with the ECU
Board of Trustees July 31,
Brewer made no oomment other
than the fact that the university
was aware of the NCAA invest-
igation and that ECU would have
"the most competitive athletic
program possible" within NCAA
rpcimat 100.1
WECU-FM
ECU'S new radio station.
WECU-FM, which will begm
test operations in late October or
o-ly November, was in the
midst of several meetings and
discussions this summer. Cont-
roversy over the station centerec
around the ultimate power of the
station and the approach and
philosophy of the station, whet
her it isto be a public FM station
or a student-oriented station
John Jeter, general manager
of WECU, at one point this
summer appeared before the
Media Board to complain that
faculty outside of station operat
ions were trying to influence
programming and other aspects
of the station management A'
the Media Board meeting o
June 20, Jeter filed a formal
oomplaint before the board
oomplaining that that gruop had
held a meeting with Dr. Cariton
Benz and Mr. Jim Rees of the
drama and speech department
At that meeting, Dear
Tucker indicated later to
FOUNTAINHEAD, the boarc
members present listened to
suggestions of Benz and Rees
oonoerning station operation and
management. After receiving
Jeter's complaint at the June 20
meeting, Tucker expressed the
hope that the students working
with the station would pool their
talents with interested faculty
members to make WECU-FM a
successful station.
The station attracted little
attention until Chancellor
Brewer called a meeting with the
Media Board and Jeter for July
18 in the chancellor's office. At
that meeting, Brewer indicated
that he had significant doubts
that students oould run a
full-power station without the
assistance and guidance of a
professional staff member to
oo-ordinate management.
Brewer expressed conoern
over "a station which has as its
call letters WECU and over
which the university has no
control. Under the current const
itution of the Media Board,
student media are to be student
controlled, as they as financed
by student fees.
See WRAPUP n in
THE TREE PEOPLE WELCOME ALL OF OUR FRIENDS, OLD AND NEW
lhe lree House is the
center of Greenville's night life.
Featuring the finest in entertainments
Every Tuesday night is ladies nhe
Featuring the ever popular Chris Farren
and reduced prices on beverages for ladies.
SALADS
Tossed Salad Garden Fresh 75
Tuna Salad Made Fresh Daily 1.75
Fruit & Yogurt A Natural Combo 1.75
One Trip to Our Salad Bar 1.40
TOP OF THE TREES Salad Bar
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Ham American 6 Swiss Cheese1.95
Roast Beef - Sliced Thin 6 Piled High1.75
Ham & Swiss on Rye - with Spicy Mustard 1.75
on request
Turkey - Tender White Meat 1.75
Tuna Salad - Made Fresh Daily' 1.75
Three Cheese Combo 1.75
Melted American. Swiss 6 Mozzarella Cheese
on Toasted Grecian Bread
CHICKEN FILLET 1.85
Tasty White Meat with a Crisp Bread Coating
JUMBO FRANK 1.25
Served All the Way" with Mustard Ketchup.
Onions. Homemade Chili and Cole Slaw (French
Fries included).
TREE BURGER 1.49
Our Fatuous ' ilb. All-Beef Burger smothered
with American Cheese (French Fries included)
ToppingSmallLarge Giant
Cheese2.253.25 4.25
Green Pepper2.353.35 4.35
Black Olives2.503.50 4.50
Pepperoni2.753.75 4.75
Sausage2.753.75 4.75
Hamburger2.803.80 4.80
Ham (with Cheddar Cheese)2.853.85 4.85
Mushroom2.953.95 4.95
Extra Toppings.50.60 .70
DELUXE Small 3.95Large 4.95Giant 5.95
A delicious combination of Cheese. GreenPeppers Pep-
peroni. Sausage Onion Hamburger. Ham & Mushrooms
VEGY SPECIAL Small 3.95 Large 4.95 Giant 5.95
A very special experience - Tasty Cheese. Fresh Tomato
Slices Green Peppers. Black Olives. Mushrooms, and Onion
Beverages
Iced Tea35
Pepsi35
Mt. Dew35
Teem 35
Diet Pepsi35
Apple Juice35
Milk35
Coffee35
Tea35
Desserts
Apple Pie60
Cheese Cake 60
Pecan Pie60
Strawberry Shortcake 60
EXTRAS
Blueberry Topping15
Whipped Cream15
D
I
N
N
E
R
S
Pizza special Every Men. 5-8 pjn.
OPEN
MenSat 11:30am IrOOajn,
Sundays4KX)pjn I2midnhe
THETREEHCXJBERESTAURANT
TheTreeHouse 123E.5thSt Greenville phone 752-7483 'GoodFood 'GoodDrink' 'GoodMurictJGcodPeople'
.��� V0r'r We Cook our Spaghetti
- IV.fcl GV lust Right Every Time
Smothered in our Homemade "Vegetarian" Sauce
and Melted Mozzarella Cheese 2 25
with Meat Sauce ,50
with Meatballs 2 75
Served with Garlic Bread and Tossed Salad
FAMOUS ROAST BEEF DINNER 2 ?s
We start with US DA Choice Beef, slice it thm and pile it high
Then we add tasty Brown Grainy and Tender Mushrooms.
Soved with French Fries and Tossed Salad
WWMWWn&mm
Wli.lWIH�lWllW
r





PROFESSORS
, continued from
26 August 1978 rOUNTAINHEAD Page 13
DRAM A SPEECH:
Gen Hask.ns, Speech and broadcast
D Florida State University.
ing.
new technical director. BA ECU
Smith College. Prev.ously staff theatre
'�can, Oberlm College
Dance has not yet been filled.
OCX OF EDUCATION
I ik� (Special Education), Learning
University of North Colorado at Greely
II SH:
Sillikin, lecturer. MA Greenville
Nina E Mikkelsen, lecturer M.A Greenville.
John Pauly, Journalism. M.A Univeristy of
MlincHS
Mary K. Thornton, lecturer. M.A Greenville.
John Warren, Journalism. M.A Ohio State
University.
Dr. Collett B Dilworth, Jr English education.
Fayetteville City Schools.
FOREIGN LANGUAGES: None
GEOGRAPHY:
Charles Ziehr, Economic and quantitative geo-
grpahy.
Dr. Simon Baker, Cartography. Ph.D N.C. State
University. Joint appointment with Institute for
Coastal and Marine Research.
GEOLOGY:
Dr. Gale Billings, new chairman. Previously
worked for oil company in Denver, Colorado.
HEALTH AFFAIRS:
Dr. G. Richard Athey, assistant professor,
Physiology. University of Kansas Medical Center
HEALTHPHYSICAL EDUCATION:
Nancy Mize, assistant intramural director. M.A
Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, Texas.
Eight years intramural work, experienced in public
recreation.
Alan Stutts, community recreation profession-
al ;ooursesinoommunityand municipal recreation.
Western Illinois University, Maoomb, Illinois. Ten
years of directing park programs in Arizona,
Virginia, Pennsylvania.
Frank Saville, M.A Theraputic recreation.
Rehabilitation therapy director, Logansport State
Hospital. Indiana.
Dr. Bonita Lookwcod, specialization in physical
education for handicapped. Nashville, Tennessee
city schools, ten years of work in California and
Tennessee.
Bob Fox, intramural program. MA, University of
Wisconsin, Madison
HISTORY: None
HOME ECONOMICS:
Linda A. Snyder (Gothi ig and Textiles) University
of N.C, Greensboro
Janet DePue, (Foods; M S ECU
Francis P. Grain- (f ods) MS Virginia
Polytechnical Institirti
Mary C. Wyatt (I g, Home Economics
Education). Ph.D. as ' late Florida State Univer-
sity.
See PROFESSOR, p 17
with supermarket prices.
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re
quired to be readily available for sale
at or below the advertised price in
each AtfP Store except as specifi
callv noted in this ad
PRICES GOOD THROUGH SAT SEPT 2 AT ASP IN
Greenville
WELCOME
BACK
PIRATES!
SIRLOIN
STEAKS
YWJ
MARVEL SANDWICH SLICED
WHITE BREAD
3
24 OZ.
LOAVES
JANE PARKER
HAMBURGER OR
lit
HOT uvvi
ROLLS
.OOK FOR THE ACTION PRICE SIGN - THROUGHOUT YOUR UP STORE Whan AAP bvyar maka a
tpeciai purchaaa at a loarar prtca � paaa tha ningi on to you. Tha towar prtca la an action prica And
thaaa Action Prica ara in addition to our monay-aavlng waakty apaclala
KEEBLER
HONEY GRAHAMS
NABISCO
SNACK CRACKERS
TRISCUITS � WHEAT THINS � SOCIABLES
16 OZ
OR 140Z CINNAMON CRISP
14-OZ COCONUT CRISP
16 OZ CLUB CRACKERS
79�
79
OfFEt MATE
NON-DAIRY CREAMER 99�
HEINZ KETCHUP 2 79c
,�N CAMP
BEANEE WEENEES3c$100
STEAK SAUCE '2? 99c
BALLAUD SWCETMILK OR �UTTfRaiILK
BISCUITS
iMMILK
6 cVS. 99c
HMCOt
GRAPE JELLY nJS 99'
M AH AT MA
LONG GRAIN RICE 89c
BUFflT STYLf (ALL VARIETIES;
FRISKIES cat
4i w oz $i 00
CAN
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO
OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
40 TO 50 LB. AVQ.
CUT FREE INTO
T-SONE. SIRLOIN STEAKS
AND TRIMMINGS
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED FRESH FRYER
A&P QUALITY
BOX-O-
CHICKEN
iQC P0RK
R7V CHOPS
ASSORTED
PACKAGE
10 LBS. OR
MORE
We pick the best vegetables
PLUM P TASTY THOMPSON �&29K SOUTI
A SUPERB BLEND. RICH IN BRAZILIAN COFFEES
EIGHT 0 CLOCK COFFEE
$589 �$99
FULL OF JUICE
RED RIPE
WATERMELON
$I9
saK sou
GOLDEN DELICIOUS
GRAPES 1 APPLES
59ck, 3 99
HALF
MELON
CRISP & TASTY
88C CABBAGE
CUSTOM GROUND
MAXWELL HOUSE
COFFEE
Look For AAPs Economy Corner
Where good products and lowest
prices come together!
Economy Corner Is a special section
of unbranded Economy Products priced
as much as 30� below national
Ibrands tor ,ala at AAP
$3.S7
A&P picks the best
health A beauty aids
AAP QUALITY
BABY It?
SHAMPOO
(REG. PRICE 99c)
89�
AAP SUPER DRY
ROLL-ON
� It-
ANT
2.5 OZ. SIZE
69
AAP picks th� �"��!
frozen iooos
AAP LOOK-FIT
ICE
MILK
79
Vt GAL.
CTN.
FROZEN
C&W
PIZZA
79C
HAMBURGER
PEPRERONI
SAUBAOe
11 OZ.
PKG.
U3
AAP COUPON
5c OFF LABEL
� i
LIQUID
BLEACH
YOU PAY ONLY
SAVE 30'
LIMIT ONE WITH THIS
j COUPON AND ADDITIONAL
SO ORDER
48�
Lga�
GALLON
JUG
LIMIT ONE COUPON A�MBMftMftWf 11 a�
GOOD THRU SAT, SEPT 2 AT ASP IN WaTffffffM1UV
AAP COUPON
DUKE'S
MAYONNAISE
SAVE �Ot
LIMIT ONE WITH THIS
COUPON AND ADDITIONAL
! 7 50 ORDER
QUART
JAR
LIMIT ONE COUPON
GOOD THRU SAT, SEPT 2 AT ASP IN
79
Greenville
Eastern Carolina
Family Practice
Center serv s area
residents
By GEORGETTE HEQRJCK
ECU Medical Writer
"We are here to provide
quality care to families who
choose the Eastern Carolina
Family Practice Center as their
primary center for health care.
And in offering that service
we're providing quality medical
education to students and resi-
dents
So says Dr. Jarns G. Jones,
director of the center and
chairman of the Department of
Family Medicine at the ECU
School of Mediane
Opened last spring, the
Family Practice Center is serv-
ing patients from within a
50-mile radius of Greenville.
Patients are charged fees
comparable to those found in
private practice, and the design
of the offices is similar to those
used by private practioners.
However, when a patient regis-
ters for the first time, he or she
is asked to give permission for
the treatment to be observed for
instructional purposes.
"Cooperation from the
patients is essential fa the
education of our family practice
residents. And actually our
'center can assure patients of the
highest quality care because of
the caliber of our residents and
faculty members Jones said.
A team approach 10 nealth
care is also emphasized at the
center. Jones describes the
. i actioner as a oentral
which U k ikes of
hea " . je revolve.
� � : ! area in wl tl � i
r ��-� and to that role is
plan to investigate
dru't I -action and teach the
concept thai the pharmacist is a
ember of the health care
lones said The reia-
� ween the pharma-
� physiaan is very
ospeaally in the area
� omphance with pre-
ent � cations
�� says a good working
�is also neede:
r "e dentist and phy;

on to teaching stu
ae center also has a
resf �ty to practicing phy-
:In conjunction with
Vfered by the Easterr
Ath Education Center.
t h 9. practice staff is
rg on plans to offer
pra physicians in eastern
ISk � �it Jtna the opportunity
�it the center for up to
on-� ,
uso expects the center
to become involved in patient
Family physiaans
can.� - at ordinary people with
or 'ary diseases and analyze
the :s of Oesease process-
es�-xist on a .
� . j it is in this area tl it
fandicine will maki
�n mark.
WRAP-UP
continued from p. 12

At that meeting Brewer
questioned Jeter concerning the
responsibilities inherent to the
operation of a 50,000 watt radio
station. A station of 50,000 watts
is consiaerea to he a regional
station, and a signal of that
strength from ECU could reach
as far as Raleigh.
Brewer felt that the respon-
sibilities inherent to such a
station might better be co-
ordinated by a professional.
"We're not talking about the
students (listening) Brewer
continued. 'With a 50,000 watt
station, we're talking about the
entire area of eastern North
Carolina
The new chancellor also felt
that the role of the station should
not be simply to provide the
students with music they want to
hear, but the station �houid
also expose the audience to what
the- 'to near, as wen as act
as a recruiting tool 'or the
ty
If � tc tie cail for
professional management. Jeter

i�tOw ui ine -� i on the rC
� t xi which has beer
� and is now being
n Washington. D C
Jetei the general nianager of
the station, is a junior drama.
Bid broadcasting major.
the last meeting of the
Me i Board, July 19. the board
agair wussed the question of
CU-FM, with most discus-
son centered around the ui-
t power of the station. The
Board was unanimous in its
he . . to go a full power
Sigr ' 50.000 watts without
some rm of full-time manage-
mer The Board closed the
cum consideration of the
statio with a resolution to
Brewe- indicating support for
the � 000-10,000 watt "local"
station concept for WECU-FM.
MURAL
continued fro
'51
to the gallery.
The sheer size of the painting posed a
problem, he recalls.
He had to mount a huge scaffold to reach
most of the area, which made frecuent surveys of
his progress difficult.
"I couldn't see at a distance to imagine and
understand how the parts wc . 'unction as a
whole. Having never worked on a nainting this
size, I had to learn that you treat the surface not
as a montage of different elements but as a
functioning two-dimensional design "
For several months, Harris worked far into
the night, sometimes all night long, to complete
the painting.
Often, awed by the magnitude of his task, he
deliberately took time out to study his unfinished
work and just think about it
"I had to do some kind of initial action, like
cleaning brushes or d-awmg, just any kind of
busy work to get some ideas Flowing he sa I
The completed mural will remain in ECU s
rjermanentcdlectionasamem. to people and
events of the campus' past.
1





Page 14 FOUNTAINHEAD 26 Auaust 1978
T�E
continued from
page 1
The proposalhasN.C. State somewhat upset.
E.R. Barriok, an Animal Husbandry professor at
State, said that Our people are upset; we' re not
too pleased about it The disposal would consist
of burying more than 40,000 cubic yards of the
PCB contaminated soil in the pasture.
The site, which is located on the Crabtree
watershed, does not meet all federal standards
fa PCB burial, because the pasture would have
to be excavated to within closer than 50 feet of
the underground water table.
In spite of that reservation, Stamey indicated
that if no other site was found to be more suitable
for the PCB disposal, the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency would be asked to waive the
portion of the burial standards which would
eliminate the pasture site from consideration fa
the disposal.
N. Y. company suspect ed in dumpings
ALLEGANY N.Y. 4AP)-Robsrt J. Burns, president of the
Transformer Sales Co declined to comment Friday on suspicions
his company dumped 3(1,000 gallons of toxic PCBs along North
Carolina highways, but said his firm, had done nothing illegal by
staing the chemical in a warehouse here.
"This thing is so twisted and screwed up it is unreal Burns
said from his home in Lakewood, N.Y. "I get it (PCBs) from ail
over the country, and it is perfectly legal
OFFICIALS PUZZLED
Burns, who was served Friday with Cattaraugus County Health
Department papers adering him to remove 45,56-gallon drums of
PCB-laoed oil from a warehouse here within 48 hours of being
notified of a disposal site, said federal Environmental Protection
Agency officials told him they were puzzled by the county's move.
"They told me, 'Ask them what the hell you're supposed to do
with itBurnssaid.
EPA officials oould not be reached fa confirmation.
State police meanwhile confiscated a tank truck they said
belonged to Burns and oontained PCBs residues, and authorities
also were investigating the possibility that another 28,000 gallons
of PCBs were staed by Burns in Youngsville, Pa.

FIRM NOT LICENSED
State environmental officials, meanwhile, estimated it would
take $100,000 to cleanup the contaminated oil that leaked in the
warehouse and that was used to pave a driveway of the
Salamance, N.Y scrapyard where the tank-truck was found.
William Friedman, regional directa of the state's Department
of Environmental Conservation, who made the estimate, had
earlier said Burns' firm was not licensed to carry PCBs within New
Yak, and so it was not clear how Burns was expected to move the
material out.
Maya Nicholas Amato of the Village of Allegany, who also
adered a oommunity well near the warehouse dosed pending
chemical tests being done in Albany, said the Health Department
ader would require Burns to destroy the PCBs. DEC s Friedman
said Friday that "It's a dilemma because right now there is no
place in the United Statesa Canade licensed to incinerate PCBs at
the high temperatures needed to destroy the material
�TOXIC CONTAMINANT
Nath Carolina investigatas, meanwhile, were in nearby
Falconer, looking over the impounded tank truck at state polios
barracks there to determine if it is the same truck witnesses said
sprayed the PCBs along 270 miles of highways in Nath Carolina
PCBs, a poJychlainated biphenyls, are called by the federal
EPA a "toxic environmental contaminant requiring special
handling and disposal were favaed as oil additives because of
their stability, but that also makes the toxic chemicals hard to
break down once they are realeased into the environment.
r
JOVAN
muskoi
fiuskoii is tlj
exciting scent
has stimulate
passion since
began.
A drop behi
the ear, at the
of the neck.b
of the knee w
Musk on
VSP
(Store Name)
makes it easy to start your j
own fragrance collection. Real
perfumes. As little as s2.00 each
Mink & Pearls
Our purse-size treasures of real perfume
by Jovan Now priced so provocatively that
you can have them all Come choose from our
- fl oz collection of Mink & Pearls�.
Jovan Musk Oil. VSP. Grass Oil. Frankincense & Myrrh, Ginseng,
Belle de Jovan. Sex Appeal Perfumes. Madame Jovan, too. Each for only
$2 00 There's never been a better time to be a little different, any time you want.
ECUstuihmts
Residency poses registration problem
Quality � Competitive Pricmt � Service
IS Tors Emyfej If Tm 1m"
No. 2
m St. 4 Memorial Drive
Phon� 7514104
8 a.m10 p.m.
String (rmviflt Fa
No. 1
911 Dickinson Av.
Phono 752-7105
8 a.rr730 p.m.
By JIM BARNES
News Editor
If you are an ECU student
planning to register and vote in
Pitt County, your main problem
in registration may be your
declaration of permanent resi-
dency in Pitt County. Although
all students are different cases,
most have a place thay can
return to and thus would not be
considered permanent residents
of Pitt County, acoadingto
Margaret Register, supervisa of
elections fa Pitt County.
Aocading to the election
laws, in ader to regisf- fa the
vote, a person must be a citizen
of the United States, 18 years of
age by the day of the election,
and a permanent resident of the
county in which he a she is
voting. The residency, the law
states, is that the prospective
XOter be a person of a permanent
nature which is 30 days pria
to the election.
But students can be different
aocading to Register. "In resid-
ency, you can be a resident of a
place and it still not be your
permanent domicile said Reg-
ister. "When a person goes to a
place fa temporary purposes,
even though they might rent an
apartment and pay taxes on their
personal property, they are
there fa a specific reason and
tea specific time. When that
COLLEGE REGISTRATION
Even if You Spend All Day In The Wrong Line.
Take Five Minutes to Get the Right Bank.
No-Service-Charge checking for students at First
State makes school days better.
College registration is frustrating.
Especially if you're new. It seems like you're expected
to know what you don't know at all.
But, at First State, we know about college. We're
Greenville's hometown bank. Many of us went to ECU.
So, we know what you're going through.
That's why we make it easy to open a free checking ac-
count at First State. About all you have to do is make a
deposit, give us your new address and pick out the style
of checks you want. And, no-service-charge checking
makes getting adjusted easier.
Your checkbook is the easiest book you'll get.
A checking account is especially important to college
students.
Because college is expensive. You've got books to buy.
Fees and tuition to pay. Then, there's food, laundry, and
clothes.
And, the money you spend must be accounted for.
Because most college students are on a budget.
At First State, we know the problems of college
students So, come see us if you need help. We'll under-
stand.
We're at home in a college town.
Welcome to Greenville. We hope you'll feel at
home.
It's easier to bank in your hometown. And since Green-
ville is your new hometown, start a checking account at
First State Bank.
You'll find our three Greenville branches convenient.
And, and if you forget to make a deposit or cash a check
some Friday, our Winterville branch is open Saturday
mornings from 9-12.
We offer Master Charge and Visa, too. So, come into
First State Bank and open a checking account. We'll
make you feel right at home.
Se� Jerry Jones. ECU 77; P�m Kachmer, ECU 68;
or Jerry Powell. ECU 61
F S
FIRST STATE BANK
Call 756-2427
Greenville Is Your Hew Hometown.
First State Benk to
Your Hometown Bank.
I� Branch- Comtr af �� antf Cvara. 3 Mwfct tram mmjm
nonnwi Dwncn nemonoi wnw, across rrwn noaaiiti GOfnpMX
QfsenvtHs aVanctv nenenef Drive, psoMs rtttutf aVoa.
time is up, they oould stay here
or they oould leave; so in the
meantime, one would properly
register to vote in their place of
permanent domicile, the place
where they can always return.
Election officials are mainly
interested in registering every-
one to vote in his proper oounty
or precinct. Althouhg most
students would apparently be
oonsidered temporary residents
of the campus town, Register
noted that each individual must
be considered separately. It
could be, said Register, that a
student "is eligible, that he is a
person who has no other place to
vote and he is free and indepen-
dent and would be as permanent
here as anywhere else
Does the payment of proper-
ty and sales taxes give one the
right to vote in a county?
Possibly so, stated Register,
"but you have to take it another
way, too. When you bring your
car here, when you bring
furniture and your belongings,
that is under the protection of
the local facilitiesIf somebody
steals your car, who're you
going to call? If someone sets it
on fire, who're you going to call?
"So you're under police
protection. If somebody breaks
in, he (police) is going to look
after you, it'jrejqanafle
that temporary residents go into
a oommunity and vote for the
local issues when they're not
going to be there and be
responsible for the voting of
them
Register urges all students
and faculty to register to vote in
time for the upcoming election in
November. "I would like for all
the students that can and will to
try to get registered at their
proper plaoe so that they can
vote in the upooming election
Nov. 7, and the deadline on that
is October 9
Register noted that those
students who are unable to
return to their home counties to
vote may request absentee bal-
lots. These ballots are available
from the period of 60 days prior
to an election until the Wednes-
day preceding the election day.
A student may request an
absentee ballot by mail from his
ir her election board, or a
relative may go into the board
and sign the application for the
student.
CLEP
continued from page 8
Hematology (plus departmental exam): 50th
percentile, MedicaJ Technology 3020, 3021 (4).
Biology:50th peroentile, Biology 1060(3), 1011 (1).
Business Law, Introduction to: Scaled score 51,
Business Administration 2242 (3).
Business Management, Introduction to: Scaled
score 47, Business Administration 2002 (3).
Chemistry, General: 50th peroentile, Chemistry
1150, 1160, 1151, 1161 (8).
College Algebra: 50th peroentile, Math 1065 (3).
Computer Programming, Elementary-Fortran IV:
scaled score 48, Economics 2223 (3).
Economics, lntroductory( scaled score 48, Econo-
mics 2113, 2133(6).
English Composition (plus essay): 50th peroentile,
English 1100, 1200(6).
Geology: 50th peroentile, Geology 1500, 1501,
1600, 1601 (8).
History, American: Part l-scaled score 55, History
1050(3). Part ll-scaJed score 55. History 1051 (3).
Immunohematology and Blood Banking (plus
departmental exam): 50th peroentile. Medical
Technology 4010, 4011 (4).
Literature, Analysis and Interpretation of: 50th
peroentile, English 2100, 2200 (6).
Marketing, Introductory:scaled score 48, Business
3832(3).
Psychology, Genera 50th peroentile, Sociology
2110(3).
Statistics: scaled score 49, Economics 2283 (3).
Tests and Measurements 50th peroentile, Coed
5358(3).
Students interested in registering for any of the
above CLEP tests should contact the Testing
Center at 105-106 Speight Building or cal'
757-6811.
S6A
Refrigerator Rentals
"Make Life Easier"
Get your Refrigerator Now
3 locations to serve yon:
X) On the Hill
2) At the girl's high rise dorms
3) On the Mall
Prices:
$38.00 Rent
$10.00 deposit
$48.00
per year
OR
$2i.oo Rent
$10.00 Deposit
$3X.OO
per semester
You can't beat
this price anywhere!





Mural depicts ECU's history
28 Auguat 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 15
By FRANCEINE PERRY
ECU News Bureau
'faP'�ureISworthathousandwords,the17
SJlfO0t mUra' ��Vefin9 one interi l of
Whichard Bu.lding must be worth a million
The mural, painted by recent art graduate
PhHl.p Harr.sof Hamlet and mounted on a wall of
Kate Lewis Gallery, illustrates important hiqh-
ughts of ECU's history.
N.C. Governor Thomas Jarvis is depicted in
the lower foreground of the imposing mural
molding the shovel with which he formally broke
ground in 1907 fa what was to become East
Carolina Teacher's Training School.
Behind him, less definitely portrayed, are
ranged shapes of persons present at that
occasion
Harris describes his work as a blend of
realistic and minimal abstract" styles, with
some people and events brought into sharper
is than others.
Those individuals who "played a significant
role" in the formation of ECU - Gov. Jarvis; the
schools first president, Robert Wright; and early
professors Kate Lewis, Herbert Austin and W.H.
Ragsdale - are painted in a realistic portrait style
and are readily recognizable by Harris' use of
oolor and delineation.
"Where figures were important as a group,
emphasis was given to the group as a whole, and
the individual figures are merely implied
explained Harris.
Such groups, significant as milestones,
include the first graduating dass, a row of young
ladies with pompadour hairstyles holding their
dass banner. East Carolina's first athletic team,
the "Goblins is present also.
Harris has relied upon architedural details as
well as faces and figures in his work.
Two early buildings appear in detail, the Old
Austin dassroom building, now demolished, and
Wright Building.
Horizontal and vertical arrangements of
balust rated stairs draw the eye upward to the top
of the mural, where he has combined important
architectural details of the gallery's interior.
Since the mural is hung near the ceiling, the
interior crown moulding are repeated at the top
of the painting.
A series of large rectangular side windows,
ranged along the walls at right angles to the
mural, are oontinued in perspective in the mural
itself.
Harris undertook the mural as a senior project
while he was finishing his studies toward the
Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in painting from the
ECU School of Art.
His goals were to oombine various approaches
to painting and to involve elements of people and
-xits in ECU'shistory in the large mural, which
was painted on four large canvasses for
aonvenienoe in moving from the rjaintina studio
See MURAL, p. 13
TOW,
TOW,
TOW
The Traffic Department at ECU regulates the
registration of student cars and is an omnipresent
watchdog over campus parking.
Students must go to hte Traffic Office, located
across from the old heating plant on main
camous, to register their cars for the academic
year. Freshen students are not allowed to have
cars on campus, but may register their velides as
a freshman driven car. The purpose of freshman
registration is to allow freshmen to park on
campus during the weekends and to notify the
Greenvilie Polioe Department that and ECU
student is driving that particular car.
Students having 48 hours or more are termed
sophomores and are eligible for obtaining either
a Dorm or Day student parking permit. There are
restrided areas on campus that the Day and
Dorm students are not weloome and it is in these
area that the towing business of Greenville
thrives on. All staff parking places are forbidden
for students to park in, and dorm students are not
allowed to park in the day student parking lot at
the bottom of College Hill Dr. There are various
university rigistered parking areas on campus
that are open for anyone who gets there first. It is
very important to note that all students must
have their cars registered on campus or you will
surely face a parking fine, plus a towing charge.
The towing charges range from $20 to $25,
depending on the time of day the vehide was
towed.
The Traffic Department also handles the
registration of bicydeson campus and if students
are fond of their two-wheelers, they should have
their bikes registered. The registration requires a
small fee, plusthe description of the bike and the
serial number. There have been many bike thefts
Pick up a copy of the ECU Traffic Regulations
pamphlet so that they can become better
acquainted with traffic violations, regulations,
and penalties at ECU. If you make the effort to
drop by for a oopy, you may save yourself time
and money in the future.
There are numerous traffic violations on
campus for moving vehides, both motorized and
people-powered. Students should go to the
Traffic Office.
War declared on
campus roaches
By TERRE PIRKEY
Assistant News Editor
Bill Whichard. director of
gekeeping at ECU urges
student and faculty to guard
4s and rodents. "It
take 100 percent from
ryone housekeeping, stu-
vending people, and
�ibers to conquer
Whichard said.
On each floor in each
nil " . 'hereisa form on "th
noticed bulletin board"
;dents may sign if they
e a pest problem. Each
month. Southern Pest Control
answers complaints listed on
those tarns according to persn
and room number.
shard added that if the
je is tan down, a student
may submit his a her canplaint
to the Housekeeping Office a
the mail slot near the west-end
water cooler in Aycock dormi-
. basement. "We can only
e rooms that report trouble.
ego in your room when you
� there without author iza-
"ie law. If
as a problem in be-
Pest Control's
� '69 and
Each � the emj
dams are fumigated or
ed The potsoi is left
out until just befae students
return. "Although fumigation
leaves an oda. the fumes are
unharmful
Whichard pinpointed cook-
ing as the basis of the pest
problem. "If students would
use containers fa fruit and
vegetables-a fa any foa that
collects moisture - most of the
problems could be eliminated.
However, dirty dishes are also
an attraction fa pests
The academic buildings are
never fully fumigated because
no cooking goes on there. Some
roaches, a la of ants, and some
mice are found in them, though.
If people would be mae careful
when eating sweets and putting
sugar in coffee, etc this
problem could be reduced
At times fleas are a problem
in the dam when students bring
stray dogs a cats into their
rooms. Fleas are probably the
hardest to get rid of . Once they
get in the carpet, we must use a
poison so strong that the
student would not be able to
stay in the room
Whichard requested that
"When a person signs the sheet
he or she should seal all edible
foa. move things away from the
walls and off the floors.
Students just do not realize the
liability" giJlxxijaekeeping it's-
tremendous.
"We like to serve you ?
Conveniently located next to
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We still know
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PLANTERS
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Locations at Pitt Plaza
and the corner of
3rd & Washington
(Downtown).
WELCOME TO
GREENVILLE
STUDENTS
For Your Convenience The ECU Liaison
Committee of The Greenville Area Chamber of
Commerce is sposoring a Bus Tour of Campus
and Greenville for All New Freshmen, Transfer
and Graduate Students.
When? Thursday, August 31 10 a.m. 4 p.m.
Where? Mendenhall Student Center
and Corner of Tenth St and College Hill Dr.
h FREE REFRESHMENTS
Depart Arrive
10:oo
11:00
12:00
1:00
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10:45
11:45
12:45
1:45
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Greenville Area Chamber of Commerce
1209 W. 14th St Greenville, N.C. 27834 Phone 752 4101





Page 16 FOUNTAINHEAD � A.y iqt�
Uxsutwaamats
Writings chronicle conflict
GEORGE LELAND DYER, "an admirable linguist, a cultivated
gentleman, a trained officer and a most thoughtful and wise
man. ' distinguished himself as a naval officer from 1870-1908. A
collection of over 2,400 letters, diaries, and photographs
chronicling his career are now part of the ECU Manuscript
Collection in Joyner Library.
By DONALD LENNON
Curator, ECU Manuscript Collection
Snow covered the landscape of Spain and
France. On the morning of March 25,1898, a train
carrying American dependents crossed the
Pyrenees and headed toward Biarritz, France.
Among the refugees departing Spain on the eve of
the Spanish-American War was the family of
American naval attache to Madrid George Letand
Dyer.
Susan Dyer, a teenage daughter of the attache
recorded in her diary the frustration of that
departure. "The truth is that Father lost his nerve
and hustled us out of Madrid and across the border
into France, when, tho' things were looking grave,
there was absolutely no need for our departure
earnestly believe that he thought an enraged
Spanish mob was lying in wait for us around every
street corner
From Susan s diary and from the letters of her
father, which are preserved in the ECU Manuscript
Collection, it is possible to reconstruct the strain
and emotion of Americans in Madrid during the
month preceding thisconflict between the U.S. and
Spain over the Caribbean island of Cuba.
'NEED MORE TIME'
Almost daily letters record the growing
desperation during late March and April. On
March 25 Dyer took time from his diplomatic
chores to note "the ministers are very gloomy. The
atmosphere is heavyI am trusting that this storm
will blow over
On March 27 Dyer wrote: "General Woodford
(U.S. ambassador to Spain) had a grand interview
with Gullon. He (Guilon) actually begged for more
timeall they needed was more time. Woodford
said the President would and could not give them
more time And on march 28 he wrote
"Telegramshave been flying back and forthThe
Maine report has been sent to us in cipher
PREPARED TO LEAVE
On April 1 Dyer commented that "We are
awaiting the President's next telegram. Can he
accept what has been offered or can be make and
offer a modification? Dees he hold the balance of
power in Congress?The Cabinet here did all they
oould in their replyThey are trying to save their
unhappy country from war and their ignorant
subjects from horrors which they don't comp-
rehend
Certain of an ultimate break, Dyer noted on
April 5 that he had packed his trunks in preparation
for departure from Madrid. Yet negotiations
oontinued at a feverish pace.
'IN CONFUSION HERE'
By April 19 all hope was gone. "The two
Houses (of Congress) reached an agreement this
morning at one o'clock a.m. agreeing to the
Senate Resolution with the independence left out.
That if true, settles it for it imposes on the
President the duty, giving him no latitude,
whatever, of demanding the withdrawal of the
Spanish flag from Cuba.
"We are in more or less confusion here but
expect really to leave tomorrow night or the latest
Thursday. It is a sad sad ending to well meant
effortsA mirade may be performed. That is the
only chance nowI haven't the remotest idea what
will be done with me. Not the faintest
As a result of this action by the American
Congress, diplomatic relations between the two
countries were severed. Spain declared war on
April 24 and the U.S. followed suit the following
day, making the declaration retroactive to April 21
Dyer and the American delegation departed Spain
and made their way back to the United States for
reassignment.
CUBAN BLOCKADE
George Leland Dyer, whom Ambassador
Woodford had described as an admirable
linguist, a cultivated gentleman, a trained officer
and a most thoughtful and wise man sunsequent-
ly rose to the rank of oomrnodore in what must be
described as a distinguished naval career
He commanded gunboats in the blockade of
Cuba and took part in the occupation of that island
at the war s end. He tnen served in the Asiatic
squadron and in 1904 became the first nava officer
ever appointed governor general of Guam. Kis
final duty station before retirement was as
oommandant of the Charleston, S.C. Navy Yafd
and the 6th Naval District.
COLLECTION DONA TED
-
Commodore Dyer's career from his U.S. Navai
Academy graduation in 1870 until his retirements
1908 is fully reflected in his personal papers. More
than 2,400 letters, diaries, and photographs
pertaining to Dyer were donated to the Collectier
in ECU'S Joyner Library by Mrs. Janas Seliersirf
Kinston, N.C from the estate of her uncle Marier
A. Eason of Greene County, N.C. I
Eason, a professor at the Naval Academy and at
St. JohnsCollege in Annapolis, was the son-in-law
of Commodore Dyer. ;
The collection is open to the public Monday
through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The George Leladd
Dyer Papersare available to researchers interested
in American naval and diplomatic history.
'Beat the peak' beats high costs
12x12" DECOR
CARPET TILES
OUR 62 �J32 Box
o of 12
Stain-resistant olefin tiles
with foam-rubber backing.
By KAREN C BLANSFIELD
News Editor
The city of Greenville holdsa
unique position in the state of
North Carolina, having the only
public utilities company to offer
a peak-load pricmg system. The
only other town with such a
system-wide basis is Lumbee,
where utilities are under a
public co-op.
The system in Greenville
was initiated on June 28,
according to Reese Helms,
manager of the Energy Conser-
vation and Management De-
partment of Greenville Utilities,
and has been used only one
other time since then.
"I'ts working beautifully fa
us Helms acknowledged. "In
one month's time, it has saved
us thousands of dollars
BEAT THE PEAK
The "beat the peak"
system, as it is called, is geared
40JM�dspjyjng the. probjem V
high electrical costs which result
from unusually high demands
for electricity. Such demands
are most intense during the
summer months, leading to
peak usage between the hours
of about 3 or 4 in the afternoon
until arounf 8 at night.
The load management in the
project centers on radio control.
When electrical demand reach-
es a peak, radio signals are sent
out to switches installed on air
conditioners and water heaters
. in the. community jurnmg Jhem
off automatically. The air cond-
itioners remain off for seven
minutes, and then automatically
resume power. The cycle is
repeated every thirty minutes.
The water heater is cyded
off for periods of thirty minutes
to two hours.
NO COM PLAINTS
When the peak periods
has passed, the signals cease
See UTILITIES p. 17.
S
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PROFESSORS
continued from page 13
LIBRARY SCIENCE"
Dr. William Buchanan. Conway, Arkansas.
Dr Carol Veitch. Ph.D University of Pittsburgh
Coming from Kentucky. ��yn.
MATH Not available
SCHOOL OF M EDI ONE:
Carl Robert Morgan, new chairman, Anatomy
department. Indiana University.
Dr. Paul Strausbauch. M.D Ph.D Pathology and
laboratory medicine. Dartmouth Affiliated Hospit-
als.
Dr. A.H. Woodworm, M.D Director of Eastern
Carolina Family Practice Center. Formerly in
private practice in Geenville.
Dr. Lane Jennings, M.D Department of Family
Practice. Duke-Watts family medicine program,
Durham.
Dr. Loretta Kopelman, Ph.D Pediatrics. Univer-
sity of Rochester School of Medicine, New Yak.
Dr. ThomasF. O'Brien, Jr M.D Department of
Medicine. Bowman-Gray School of Medicine of
Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem
Dr. Jarlath MacKenna, M.D ObstetricsGyneco-
logy. Eastern Virginia Medical School.
Dr. Charles Rob, M.D Surgery. University of
Rochester School of Medicine, New York.
MUSIC:
Dr. Alan Leichtling, Composition and music
theory. D.M.A Julliard School of Music, New
Yak. Coming fran Grinnell College, Iowa.
Dr. Rhonda Fleming, music education. Ph.D fran
Flaida State University. Caning fran Syracuse
Univasity, New Yak.
Dennis Reaser, marching band director. M.A
Radfad College, Virginia. Coming from Salem,
Va. Public School System.
Donna Coleman, piano. M.M Eastman School of
Music, University of Rochester, New Yak.
NURSING:
Susan Felton, medical surgical nursing. M.A
Atlantic Christain College, Wilson.
Helen Evaett, medical surgical nursing. M.A
Emory Univasity, Atlanta, Georgia.
TACO CID
GREAT
MEXICAN
EATERY
Pat Dix, advanced medical surgical nursing.
M.A.Univasity of Kansas.
Robby Manning, advanced medical surgical
nursing. M.A Univasity of North Carolina,
Greensbao. Caning fran Atlantic Christain
College, Wilson.
Cynthia Bailey, Parent child nursing. M.A
Univasity of Alabama.
Rita Finnen, community mental health nursing.
M.A Catholic Univasity, Washington, D.C.
Coming from Bluefieid State College, Biuefield,
West Virginia.
Barbara Bain, medical surgical nursing and
graduate programs. M.A. Duke Univasity.
Coming from Carteret Technical Institute.
Jean Maris , medical surgical nursing. M.A
ECU.
i i
28 August 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Pag 17
POLITICAL SCIENCE: David Speak, govanment,
cavil liberties and judiciary courses. M.A
Univasity of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
Dr. Waitraud Maales, freshman-sophomae gov-
anment ; graduate level course. Ph.D Univasity
of Denva, Colaado.
PSYCHOLOGY:
Gharla Davis, genaal and developmental &
adolescent psychology. Ph.D candidate, Cincin-
nati, Ohio.
SCIENCE EDUCATION: None
SOCIOLOGY ANTHROPOLOGY:
Dr. James Young, Introductay Anthropology;
Religion of non-litaate people. Ph.D Rivaside,
Califania.
SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY : Note
EVERYDAY SPECIAL
4 Tacos for $1.50
Quick Service
Take Out Orders
Open- MonThurs.
il:OOam-ll:OOpm
Fri.& Sat.
11:00-12:00 midnite
Sun. 12 noon-1 1:00pm
512 Greenville Blvd.
(next to Tarheel Toyota)
KOREO-MAT
Attention ECU men on the the hill:
If you want to know where the
girls do their wash, then come to
KORE-O-Mat on E. 14th Street
(bottom of the hill across from
Chanelo's) You'll be glad you did!
In addition to girls we offer the
following:

fluff and fold service drinks and snacks
New procedure for lost
and found now in effect
By KAREN C. BLANSFIELD
News Edita
A new procedure fa hand-
ling lost and fount services is
being put into effect this year on
the ECU campus.
Joseph Calda, Directa of
Security at ECU, said that all
items found on campus should
be turned into Univasity Police
Dispatcha at the Univasity
Polioe Department, which will
be open 24 hours a day, seven
days a week. CaJder said that
lost and found services will no
decolor TV
attendant
Hf: professional dry-cleaning pick-up station
jc pinball
r��������1
Bring this coupon in for
one free wash 8am-4pm daily!
I
offer good thru Sept 30, 1978 I
Si
UTTLrnES
continued from p. 16
Thus far, five thousands units
have been installed in about
2700 homes, and Helms said
that no oomplaints have been
received yet.
"Most people didn't even
know it had happened he
said. "They couldn't tell any
diffaence
Helms said that people were
reluctant to volunteer fa the
system at first, but that there is
now a waiting list. The utilities
commission absabs the cost of
paying fa and installing the
sixty-seven dollar units, and the
customer received a benef it of a
longa be handled by the
student union and the various
departments on campus. Hav-
ing one central clearinghouse
falost and found will, he hopes,
eliminate confusion and make it
easia fa students to locate lost
possessions.
Calder urged that particular
attention be paid to keys,
requesting that anyone finding
keys turn them in to the polioe
dispatcher immediately.
The University police de-
partment is located behind
Flanagan building.
$7.50 deduction from his month-
ly utility bills from June through
September.
SELF SUSTAINING PROGRAM
Savings reaped by the
system are dispersed in part to
these customer rebates, with
the remainder cycled back into
the system to cover costs, and to
purchase and install additional
units.
Eventually the program will
become self-sustaining, Helms
explained. it has a very
positive future he said.
There are no plans now to
employ the system in the
winter, he added, sinoe the
electrical demand is not as high
cr
O uj
Zj uj
N m
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X z
o CO
io d
O
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SCHLITZ and SCHLITZ LIGHT
NATURAL PILSNER BEER
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Dates � August 28,1978 to November 21,1978
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Retail Value Of Each Prize Over $1,000.00
Turned In Cans To Be Re-cycled
All Monies From Re-cycled Cans Donated To
Winners' Favorite E. C. U. Activity
For Details Contact:
Kim Waters
Apt. 26 � Langston Apts.
Telephone 758-0109
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�v V X"
L
1
Stfrfil
18 FOUNTAINHEAD 2B Auguat 1978
OPEN DAILY 9:30- 9:00
CLOSED SUNDAY
PHARMACY SPECIALS
� ULTRA MAX
138
Each
Dry-normal or oily
shampoo. 15 oz.
�Fl. 01
r
BAYER ASPIRIN
68�
100 tablets for fasf
pam relief. Stock up
BATH BAR
100
4 1.
10 FOR T
Bath size
LimftIO
Ya oz.
1� -m
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Will AM 3 m
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shave
PIIOUS. �
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Regular or
menthol pre
electric shave
�fl.oz.
ZEST BEAUTY BAR
27�
4 oz. Limit 4
SECRET
FOR WOMEN
2 5-oz "Roll-on
Anti-perspirant.
wt "Fl oz
170 Q-TIPS"
COTTON SWABS
Double-tipped swabs.

Limit 4
11 - 02S.
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40 TAMPAX
40 reg. or super
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PRICES GOOD THRU SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 2,1978
3-OZ CREST
3 -�o
Save
Regular- or mint-fla-
vor toothpaste. Save!
Limit 3
-Net wt.
OIL OF OUT�
MOISTURIZER
LIMIT 2
For soft skin.
4 fluid ozs.
Herbal
Regular
VASELINE
DRY SKIN
LOTIONS
73$
Ee.
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10-oz. lotions
to help soften
dry skin.
�Fl. 01.
PRELL SHAMPOO
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7-oz concentrate or
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PRESCRIPTION COUPON
m
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KMART ONLY
Telephone 756-1993
PRESENT THIS COUPON AND
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WORTH TO
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LIMIT ONE PRESCRIPTION PER COUPON
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Section B
28 August 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD
19
Section B
Your adolescense with
twist: four vears of coll
By DA VID R. BOSNICK
Special to FOUNTAINHEAD
Unpack, do it all quickly, take the side of
the room that one sees when one first enters the
room. Then you don't contend with the open
door You will feel better about campus if you are
able to come back to a room that is recognizable.
It rams alot in Greenville, one cannot allow
the ram to signal a despondency. You will find
most of the early days here at school unbearably
hot and humid, (especially if you shower from the
North) and you might take as many as four or five
showers a day.
You will buy a fan. and buy a couple of new
albums, give yourself a treat.
Do not sign up for early classes unless you are
well disciplined. The people who take early
maning classes are almost invariably elementary
education majors who are ooming back to school
fa a second degree and have nothing to say
beyond "Will that be on the midterm" a "Could
you spell that again They never speak in class
and if they do they hold opinions you would be
embarrassed to attribute to your little sister.
They never miss class and are always engaged,
seperated a just married.
There is not much difference between the
beauaacies at your old school and the ones you
will cane aaoss here. The center of all
administrative activity centers around the
provost. She is a woman, and while she is
generally fair and open-minded, she is humaless
and a company man. Play it straight with her all
the time.
you have already registered, when you
receive your schedule, walk around campus and
see where all the buildings are. It is easier than
rushing abajt that first maning. The campus is
samll and all of the buildings are marked with
signs and faces of pirates.
You will receive an inaedible amount of
garbage from companies and student interest
groups. They will give you anything from
petitions to small bottles of shampoo. The
petitions are useless, and the shat explanation at
the top gives you no idea of what the problem is.
If it makes you feel moe a radical young college
student to sign it, then do. Keep the shampoo
and give it to your roommate. Youboughtall that
stuff while you were home anyhow, and it's nice
to get on good terms with your roommate fa the
first few days.
This is what to about your roommate. If you
generally get along well with people, do not have
a histay of violent a sexual aimes and the
person in the bed aaoss the floo annoys you, it
is his fault, and move out. There is no need to
make desperate effats to get along with
anybody. There is a housing shotage on the
campus and changing rooms would not be
difficult. Live off-campus if you have to. Any
docta's note will give you university permission
to live off campus as a freshman a transfer
student.
Moving off campus can be expensive, moving
too far from the campus will isolate you more
than one needs. It multiplies the difficult problem
of early classes, rainy days, cold weather, ill
health, laziness. You will see people in your
classes who are in your dam, and will talk to
them on the walk from class. These are other
possible roommates; check the classified adds in
the school newspaper.
And now a wad about Greek life here at
ECU.
They are like g-damn locusts on this campus.
They will be putting notices on a under your
doa fran the manent you move in, until the end
of first semester. They are fraternities (saai-
ties), they are exactly alike in their structure and
generally alike in philosophy. People need
oganization, there isstrengh in numbers, a flag
to fly under. It is an immediate circle of
'friends It is also fairly expensive (20-30
dollars a month) and anywhere from 400-700
dollars a year to live at the house.
They will attack you with parties and
oompany. They will call you "brother" and
"sister The number of good, intelligent,
responsive individuals is exactly propatiaiate
to the number outside of aganizatiai. Except
those in the group needed to join. There are
exceptions on both sides of this generality, but
they prove the rule.
There are other aganizatiois you are
automatically a member of a class, the Men's
Residence Council (Women's) a you are a "Day
Student You will have representatives, who
were your homeroom delegates in high school.
There are occasional group outings where they
give you beer, which they feel is enamously
liberal at this institution. They are chaperoned,
by the heads, o the employees of the sponsoing
aganizatiai. You can judge the entire program
by the administratas they present to the public.
There are very few angry young men at this
University.
There is noting I can say on drugs a sex that
would not sound ridiculously pompous and
oatoical. There is a sufficient amojnt of both
"Downtown" where the quality of both fluct-
uates, but does not cease.
You meet the people there, they are attracted
to popular music, various fams of dance, and
each other. There is,almost vengeful disco, the
same caliber rock and there used to be a jazz
place. They are all somewhat nosy and easy to
get lost in.
You will have instructos that are extraadi-
nary. They will be viable scholars, interested in
their subject. They will be unintimidated by
genius, and undiscouraged by apathetic and dull
audiences. They will be infrequent, but regular.
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The others will demand attendance upon
punishment, read from the text, let you leave
early and credit you with merely the ability to
understand what is taught. There is a way to
successfully deal with this type of instructa, but
I don't know it.
Perhaps death by depilitoy.
There is a woman in the Admissions offioe
named Mrs. Whiteside. She is a saint. She is
sincere and intelligent and impatant. She can
answer any of your questions herself, a will send
you to someone of equal sincerity who can.
These things are impossible to do anything
about.
1) Bad food in the cafeteria
2) Math 65Required courses
3) Parking problems
4) Dam Counselas who take their job too
seriously
5) The heat
6) The rain
7) The inability of campus cops to be everywhere
at onoe.
There are literally hundred of clubs on this
campus. There are cheap private music lessons
available, and the music building remains open
late everynight.
There are student art shows and recitals and
the departments are strong.
This college can be mae than a place to wait
out the final years of your adolescense. It is not
the Harvard of the South, but there are programs
and resources at this university that will enable
one to learn a great deal. One can grow beyond
the scope and emphasis of this university, but
merits of this institution -are varied and can
inspire a sense of the wath of intellectual
development.
The "E.Z.U concept is an attitude, not an
absolute.
IN THE SPRING, Anthony Zerbe and Valerie Harper will appear
here in "Dear Liar which is a portrayal of Mrs. Patrick Campbell
and George Bernard Shaw. Concerts, lectures, films and trips to
the Bahamas are just a few of the opportunities the Student Union
and the Mendenhall Student Center will provide this year.
Keith Berger highlights Theatre Arts
Esther Roile, "Flaida" of "Good
Times" fame, and Valerie Harper, "Rhoda
Magenstem" of "Rhoda along with mime
Keith Berger and plays by Edward Albee
comprise a season of great theatre entertain-
ment from the Studnet Union Theatre Arts
Committee.
The Theatre Arts Committee also offers a
dance series.
The theatre season opens Oct. 4, with
Keith Berger. Berger's performance last year
was so popular that the committee decided on
a return engagement.
As well as presenting a fine perfamance,
the talented and personable Berger conducted
a fine wakshop- which is still being praised by
those involved.
The same format, with a different
program, will be used for this year's
performance. The program will be held at 8
p.m. in the Mendenhall Student Center
Theatre.
See ARTS p. 27
Student Union entertains
By JEFF ROLLINS
Assistant Trends Edita
The Student Union and the Mendenhall
Student Center offer much fascinating enter-
tainment throughout the school year.
Concerts and lectures, films and trips to
the Bahamas are just a few of the
opportunities the Student Union and the
Mendenhall Student Center provide fa the
student's own enrichment.
The Student Union Artists Series brings
the finest in classical music and perfamers to
ECU. This year, Jorge Bolet, the acclaimed
pianist will appear Oct. 11 as well as the
quintet, Tashi (Tibetan fa "good fatune"),
on Nov. 1.
The Gregg Smith Singers, the world-re-
nown violinist Eugene Foda, Christopher
Parkening, who amazed audiences here year
befae last with his virtuosic guitar playing,
and the Piedmont Chamber Orchestra will all
appear at ECU under the auspices of the
Artists Series. These concerts are comparable
in quality and entertainment to any in the
United States.
Along with classical musicians, the Student
Union also presents fine drama through its
Theatre Arts Committee. This year Keith
Berger, the popular mime who appeared here
last year, will begin the season.
Later on, The Zoo Story and The American
Dream, two plays written and now directed by
Edward Albee, will be on stage here. Esther
Roile, star of "Good Times will do a
one-woman show, Sojourner Truth and Susan
B. Anthony. These plays are an inspiring
statement for freedom and dignity.
In the spring, Valerie Harper and Anthony
Zerbe will appear here in Dear Liar which is a
portrayal of Mrs. Patrick Campbell and
George Bernard Shaw.
Two dance companies will appear this
year. The Nancy Hauser Dance Company is
one of the country's most innovative and
dynamic dance companies. This group
specializes in modern dance while the North
Carolina Dance Theatre perfams a repertoire
of classical and contemporary ballet and
modern waks. The NCDT is an affiliate of the
Nath Carolina School fa the Arts and will
perfam here April 23.
The Student Union Lecture Series will
begin its season with Jeremy Rifkin, co-autha
of the best seller Who Should Play God? He
will speak on the artificial aeation of life,
genetic engineering and what developments in
these areas will mean fa the future.
Playboy columnist Arthur C. Knight will
present us with a histay of sex in films, from
Edison's The Kiss to Lovelace's Deep Throat.
Ed Bradley will lecture on another medium,
television, and how it has begun to affect our
lives.
The well-known black civil rights leader the
Reverend Jesse Jackson is an inaedible
speaker, and will arrive in Greenville at a date
to be announced. Women, as well as blacks,
will be pleased to hear that the noted
television journalist, Shana Alexander will
discuss"thelegaJrightscwomen Modern,
infamed women will not want to miss her
stimulating lecture.
Each year, the Student Union Travel
Committee arranges for individuals to travel
with groups at low cost to various cities and
locations aaoss the world.
This year, you can go to New York City,
Hawaii, on a New England Ski Trip, to New
Orleans-Atlanta, on a Bahamas Cruise and
even to England at a cost much lower than
what you would normally pay and with other
enthusiastic ECU students.
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4
Page 20 FOUNTAINHEAO 28 August 1978
(T
Horoscope advises to 'stay off the streets9
By HYMEN OBERON
The stars hav- aiways been an important
influence in the history of man. From the dawn of
time, humans have looked heavenward and, in
spare time, might often have wondered to
themselves or perhaps aloud "What does it all
mean?" Today, in the age of PCP, PCS, PPB,
and PP (not to mention the PVC m inflatable
dolls), we still ask that same question, "What'sit
all about?"
Astrology tells us the answer. This is true.
Everything you may have read in time past about
astrology matters not. Listen to this: the stars
know. How about that? Day in and day out,
whether we think about it or not the stars are in
the sky, somewhere So there: you have an
astological sign that will give you the information
you need to know in order to comprehend The Big
Picture.
FOUNTAINHEAD presents a rather general
but none the less personal) astrology forecast for
the week ending September 2, 1978 (and 1988
1999, and 2022).
GENERAL. Things are not as bad as they seem.
For example, the moon is in Saturn jeopradized
by Pluto. This is well, for they all ' get along.
Buy diamonds. Speak twice to the hard of
hearing Borrow money from people who are
willing io lend it. That special someone might
speak to you in the hall, or the market, or not at
allit just depends. Carry on.
VIRGO: (Aug. 23 - Sept. 22) This is going to be
some week for you. Things are going to be great;
wait and see-you'll hardly believe it. Buy things
which contain lead . ROMANCE: Looks pretty
good. Leave Wednesday open. Look through the
door: observe. There will be a quiet occasion
which you may overlook: don't. FINANCE: Look
down when you walk. Review your securities
portfolio, with a strong eye towards rails. Seek
shelter.
UBRAiSepx. 23 - Oct. 23) Stay off of the streets.
Build a shelter of reasonable resistance. Try not
to dim stairs or walk around in the dark. Avoid
anyone who looks your way � The star6 are not
favorahie to your sign. Hurricane season is no
joke. Relax. ROMANCE: A totally insincere
person who wishes only to jolt your psyche is
near. Heshe may be standing next to you right
new. Mcwe away gracefully.FiNANCE: Be wary
castf ?S&�tS; ctxint' your OR Step
lightly. Most of all. do not buy avocado futures.
SCORPIO: (Oct. 24- Nov. 22) This week depends
upon how you take certain signs, such as 'yield
and "Shoplifters will be prosecuted to the full
extent of the law Look away, look away.
ROMANCE: Seek that special someone in a
doughnut shop; look out for the blueberry and
creme filled. Don't make jokes about John
Travolta. FINANCE: If you meet anyone at the
doughnut shop, go dutch. Try to cut down on
expenses which you can trim, such as rawhide
and candles.
SAGITTARIUS:(Nov. 23- Dec. 21) You will have
a nervous breakdown if you don't take it easy.
You can't go on like this; you just can't. Some
days will be bad; others will be worse. It doesn't
matter actually � you will probably die by
Christmas, anyway. ROMA NCE: You' ve got to be
kidding. You can hardly keep yourself together,
and here you are looking for an interpersonal
relationship; you've got to be kidding! Wait one
week - people of all sorts will oome your way.
FINANCE: Look fa food ooupons in the paper;
then eat them. Seek out advice from anyone
dumb enough to listen to you. Lay low.
CAPRICORN: (Dec. 22 - Jan. 19) Avoid
Sagittarians. Sew your own clothing a else you
will have to have someone else do it. There will
be a whole lot of people in Houston if you go
there now. Your moon is ascending; see a
physician. ROMANCE: Everybody loves some-
body sometime. It just so happens that your
number is coming up. Look sharp; you never
know who's looking, unless if s a Sagittarian who
ignores the stars.
AQUARUIS: (Jan. 20- Feb. 19) Your ascendant
plant Jupiter ,s moping. The moon is in Pisces -
eat tuna. The orbital cusp is wandering ether but
appears to favor your attendant sign, unless it is
Virgo, Capricorn, Libra, Cancer, or Leo. And
Aries, Gemini and Scorpio. ROMANCE: You
seek too much; be satisfied with what is in your
own backyard, especially if it is fenced in. Eat
oysters. Get plenty of sleep and cut down on your
smoking. FINANCE: You said it. Get something
else on your mind, or else your romance outlook
shall never improve. Use the telephone on
Sundays after 5 p.m. Order C.O.D.
PISCES: (Feb. 20 - March 20) You're probably
sick by now of all those Piscean jokes, so we
won't go into them. You know, like "What is the
difference between a Piscean and a cow pie? The
pie pan But that's all behind you now. Flying
lessons are in your future. Be true to yourself; it
will last. ROMANCE. Queleg of Manoacaptured
the heart of Guiac under the sign of Pisces.
Reside and conquer, cheerfully. FINANCE:
Guilders your way. Don't be dumb; take the
opportunity which will present itself on Tuesday
at 330, a some other time soon.
ARES. (March 21- April 19) Lust after life. Go
out and grab with all the intensity you can
muster. Look out for balls rolling out between
cars. Meet your fellows half-way, then talk it out.
No�now. ROMANCE: Outdoor events will be
good for your moon, which is craning beyond
Saturn tooomtemplate Mercury in the ascendant.
If that doesn't work out, hang downtown.
FINANCE: record albums you buy today will be
yours tomorrow. Cash a check. Save all 1912-D
nickels; you never know. Shop the specials.
TAURUS: (April 20- May 20) Seventy one people
looked at you yesterday, and you didn't even
notice. Pay attention; you probably sleep too
much, anyway. Roman history has a message for
you this week - read Suetonius. Shell-shock is not
out of the picture. ROMANCE: You love yourself
and you know it. Realize that, and you shall be
ready to love another. Hang out at doughnut
shops. Don't order blueberry or creme filled; you
might meet a Scorpio (or, God forbid, a
Sagittarian).
GEMINI: (May 21 - June 20) Apply yourself to
your studies - you oould use it, to say the least.
Everything you know is open to question; believe
it and doors will open to you. Skip T.V. for the
rest of your life. Vibrant colors retted your mood
this week. Certain ideas which may appear
See LEO'S p.27
David Bowie: narrator
of Peter and the Wolf
ByJEFFROLUNS
Assistant Trends Editor
Prokofiev's classic for children of all ages,
Peter and the Wolf, has been newly recorded by
Eugene Ormandy and the Philadelphia Orches-
tra.
It's a pleasure to hear a new recording to any
piece as charming as Peter, but this version is
even more interesting since David Bowie is the
narrator.
Bowie narrates the story about Peter
capturing the wolf with a child-like sangfroid that
gently underscores his ability as raconteur.
He infuses the short lines that the animals say
with their own personality. His bird is happily
dauntless; his cat is a velvet predatress.
His interpretation isof course without a speck
of irony; thus the moments of (for adults)
mock-suspense possess an excitement fa older
Iisteners that must be something like that felt by
children.
In addition to his very expressive inflections,
which communicate excellently the various
moods in the stay, Bowie's voice itself has a
child-like purity. He approaches the stay with a
tone mixed of naivete and innocence.
As good as Bowie is, the stay of Peter and
the Wolf is mae magically told by tiie
instruments. As usual, Eugene Ormandy has his
ubiquitous recorded orchestra under exact and
sensitive centre
The tone of the instruments lets us know
fully, fa instance, Peter's different moods befae
and after he has caught the wolf. It lets us hear
the bird's cheerful insouciance, as well as the
noble ferocity of the wolf.
As one would expect, the soloists in the
nationally recognized Philadelphia Orchestra
play with exciting verve and finesse But not one
of them is mentioned in the liner notes, an
omission we assume was intended to emphasize
the equal importance of all the instruments in
telling the stay.
Sill, ate would like to know who is playing
the superbly feline clarinet, and the soaring,
diving, flittering flute.
The stay to this mastapiece of program
music is very simple. Peter (represented by the
strings) goes out into the meadow, even though
his grandfather (the Bassoon) has warned him
there is a dangerous wolf (French Hans) out
there.
Seeing his friends the bird (flute) and the
duck (oboe), he alerts them to the presence erf the
cat (clarinet).
Peter's grandfather gets him back into his
own yard just as the wolf comes out of the faest.
Peta watches. The wolf tries to capture the bird
and does capture the duck, swallowing her in one
gulp.
However. Peter, with the help of the bird,
captures the wolf by climbing a tree near the
gate, dropping a lasso around the animal's tail
and drawing it tight.
Just then'some hunters kettle drums come
aJoig. Peter pleads with them not to shoot - he
wants to give the wolf to the zoo. The hunters
agree, and they, Peter, his grandfather and all
the animals march off in triumph - the duck
quacking away inside the wolf.
On the flip-side is another piece constructed
in ader to reach young people about the
symphony achestra. Whereas Prokofiev uses
different instruments to represent different
characters in his stay, Benjamin Britten employs
a different tact.
"Bowie infuses the short
lines that the animals say
with thier own personality.
His bird is happily
dauntless: his cat is a
velvet predatress.n
Britten subtitled The Young Person's Guide
to the Orchestra "Variations and Fugue on a
Theme by Purcell using a melody the Baroque
oomposer wrrte fa a play.
First the entire achestra plays the Purcell
tune. Then the woodwinds - piocoio. flutes,
oboes, darinetsand bassoons-play it. Then ihe
brasses - nans, trumpets and tuba. Then the
strings - violins, violas, osilos and basses - and
harp. Then percussion - drums, cymbaJs.
tambourine, triangle, woodblocks, xylophone,
castanets gong and whip. The achestra plays
the theme again, afta which are 13 variations of
that theme Then each family of instruments
plays the themes solo again
In the fugue, the instruments oome in one by
one, beginning with the piooolo, and then in the
same ader as they did in the variations, playing
the theme, answering it until the stirring finale.
Bowie has been a well-established, innovative
rock composer fa the last decade. His venture
into classical music is a tasteful and revealing
one.
Most lately, Bowie starred in the science-fic-
tion movie, The Man Who Fell to Earth. He has
also sung with Bing Crosjy on Bing's Christmas
television special. What? Bing and Bowie on the
same special? Only in America.
And now he has narrated, to Ormandy's
Philadelphia, that neat little piece by Prokofiev,
Peter and the Wolf. It is rumaed among the big
magazines that Bowie would like to become
known as a "diversionist we, as his observant
public hope he doesn't spread himself too thinly.
So far he hasn't.
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28 Augurt Igm FOUKTAiNHEAD Hm 21
Costello: 6at heart a romantic'
EL VIS COSTELLO IS' A sixties voice singing to "to look at the mess society is in
and about a seventies audience he entreats us
Jarrett is refining style
By JEFF ROLLINS
Assistant Trends Editor
Keith Jarret is one of the
most prolific, and most produc-
ed jazz composers around today.
He's averaged almost two al-
bums a year since he first
showed jazz audiences his talent
in the solo Bremmen and Koln
Concerts.
His latest endeavor is My
Song, an album of original
compositions by him arranged
for piano, percussion, tenor and
soprano sax and bass. My Song
shows that Jarrett is refining his
style.
With the Bremmen and Koln
Concerts. Jarrett depends on his
own lyrical gifts along with an
intensely rhythmic approach to
the piano. The jazz on these
albums is what you could call a
very Romantic" style of jazz.
Like Schubert at the Village
Gate.
On successive albums
Jarrett emphasized a progres-
sive side of his jazz. Myster-
ies" was an endeavor in third-
stream composition that, along
with avant-gard writing for
piano and sax. included a very
interesting cut where he used
little known Indian (Eastern)
musical instruments. Indian in-
fluence is to be seen in much of
Jarrett's work.
Due to its exotic character,
"Mysteries" was rough at the
edges. The road just hacked out
from the forest is going to be
smooth.
O.) My Song Jarrett returns
to a more traditional style of
com. -sing and playing jazz.
Com quently, My Song comes
off v ry smoothly.
As times goes on Jarrett is
proving his proficiency in just
about any jazz genre.
"Questar" on My Song is a
tempo moderato piece in which
themelody is carried on tenor
sax and piano. Of course Jarrett
plays the piano and he does it
better on this album than on any
other.
He is playing with more
subtlety and humor than before.
He takes more liberty with the
variations and the left hand
accompaniment is more varied
and interesting than before.
Palle Danielsson plays a
finely understated bass. Jon
Christensen is on some svelt
drums. Both of these perform-
ers compliment the melodic
instruments perfectly.
The title cut on the album is
built around a very appealing,
wistful sort of melody. If this is
Keith Jarrett's "Song" it is a
gentle, endearing one. Some-
how each song on the album
exudes Jarrett's very contem-
poraneous tone, making for an
album of uncommon thematic
continuity.
"Tabarka" exhibits a very
subdued Eastern influence but
is mostly just good quartet jazz.
You can hear Jarrett sing along
with the piano on this song, as
you can on his Bremmen and
Koln Concerts.
See KEITH p.27
By DOUQ WHITE
Editor
Elvis Costello has heretofore
been unjustly associated with
punk rock, just as punk has
been unjustly associated with
the New Wave. What we have
here is a problem in labeling.
Although punk and New
Wave share a number of
common elements, such as
musical minimalism and a react-
ionary approach to rock and roil,
they differ in one important
respect: where punk is nihilistic,
New Wave plays things just a
bit safer, seeking to rebel as
much as possible without dest-
roying itself.
Most New Wave artists so
far have directed their energies
towards one individual topic.
Talking Heads is primarily
concerned with middle-class life
in America; Mink DeVille ex-
plores romantic relationships
with women.
Costello, on the other hand,
isobssessedvith women in quite
a different way; whereas Willy
Deville's songs echo the erotic
romanticism of the Phil Specter
hits of the early 60's, Costello
sings of the instruments of
female slavery, such as fashion
and the stereotypes of popular
music, and of his frustrated
relationship with them.
Costello is at heart a roman-
tic soul, but he masks this side
of his character with a soild dose
of cynicism. The result is a
refreshingly sober view of life
and love in the 1970s.
Musically, Costello mines
his music from the same vein as
The Animals and, to alesser
extent, Buddy Holly.
He has resurrected the
whiny vox organ which graced
so many hits of the sixties with
great success. And, perhaps
most importantly, he has given
rock a beat once again.
Finally, the bass work on
Cotello's latest album, This
Year's Model, takes its cues
directly from The Who's bassist
John Entwistle.
He has succeeded in creat-
ing a singularly sinister sound,
like the sound of footsteps at
nicjht on a deserted street.
The bass and organ combine
2W
oux
Jhz gazebo is thz filacz to coma fox clECOXaiing hah.
Wz ncujz one of (fXEZsiuiuE s most unUjus ��i�ctipns
of Exfxsnsixjs cLcoxating accsssoxUs. such as:
DnAiart Pxlnt !Bed &JfiuuuL
HZamboo (lvLndouj� JShaAi
ES
iPostEXS
amps
P�ant� HBaJUu
WalTJJ,
anguig
crtruLso much mots.
dome Ijioujse tnxough the ujoxuL of the, gazebo
Coxnzx of 5m & Cotancths �biEdts
J&ownkown XEenjuiuz
fc �m
to envelope Costello's charact-
ers in what Rolling Stone called
a "black fog while that
unnerving beat continues re-
lentlessly jumping at you like
the unseen assailants lurking in
the shadows.
Costello's choppy .rhythms
run counter to the rhythm of the
human heart, creating a natural
tension reflex in the listener
which makes that deserted
street seem suddenly darker,
the shadowy movements more
frequent.
He is both angered and
frustrated at the merchandising
of women by men. As he sings
in "This Year's Girl "You
think you all own little pieces of
this year's girl� Always prom-
ises satisfaction while she's
being bored to distraction
His frustration stems in part
from his inability to find the
mythic girl who reamins unaf-
fected by all the glamor and
artificiality; his anger from his
masculintiy, which us partly
responsible fa the feminine
entrapment he so despises.
In "The Beat Costello
turns his anger on the disco
scene, eschewing mechanical
embelishments both in music
and sex. His lyrics express a
peculiar ennui with the accepted
standards of achievement: "
don't want to just use you. but
I' m no good with machine there,
Oh I don't want to freeze you;
stop looking at the sceneryO
don't want to be your lover, I
just want to be your victim
But the master, at least in
society's eyes, can never be the
slave, and Costello knows this
only too well.
Costello mines
his music from
the same vein as
The Animals, "
It isironicthat Carly Simon's
"You Belong to Me" was
released at approximately the
same time as This Year's
Model, which contains Costllo's
song of the same name, because
diametricaly opposing views.
Whereas Simon coos that
her lovers belong to her,
Costello violently uproots the
foundation of popular music by
defiantly rejecting this philoso-
phy: "I don't want anybody, no
I don't need anybody saying
you belong to me, you belong to
me Popular music may never
be the same. He juxtaposes this
statement by singing the catch
phrase ever and over at the end
of song, ultimately contradicts
himself by saying that we do
indeed belong to him, once
more playing the role of the
master.
For all his insights into
sexual poses and attitudes,
Costello's music is, neverthe-
less, rock and roll, with imagin-
ative arrangements and excel-
lent production, thanks to prod-
ucer Nick Lowe.
Costello has learned to work
with his back-up band The
Attractions much better than on
his first album My Aim Is True.
The aforementioned organ is
used effectively on a number of
songs.
The album cloees with a
good old sixties style protest
song, "Radio Radio" lambast-
ing the industry which is
Costello'siifebiood.
Establishment radio appar-
ently thinks "we're really get-
ting out of control" but Costello
lashes out, seeking to 'bite the
hand that feeds me" to "make
them wish they'd never seen
me "Radio is in the hands of
such a lot of fools trying to
anesthetize the way that you
feel
So there you have it. A
sixties voice singing to and
about a seventies audience, and
saying, basically, to stop for a
second, look at the mess our
society is in, and then bloody
well do something about it.
.
N
COMPLETE HAR CARE
FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY
Mitchell's Hair Styling
0
Pitt Plaza Shopping Center
Grcenv.llc North Carolina 37834
756-2950
(Advertisement)
The Attic, billed as North Carolina's number three
nightclub and home of Greenville Rock N' Roll, is located at 103
E. 4th St. For six years, quality and diversification in music has
been the Attic's goal.
Tom Haines, manager and owner of the Attic emphasizes the
importance of a variety in entertainment. "College students can
easily become bored with repetition, so that's why we offer a
larger selection of bands and kinds of music than any other club
in the state. We try to cover the whole spectrum of progressive
rock entertainment Last year the Attic used 68 different groups
and numerous types of music including album rock, country rook,
southern rock, show rock, blues rock, blue grass, jazz and
commercial rock. However, soul, disco, and beach music are
avoided. Although the Attic offers excel lent music, cold beer, and
a large dance floor, it doesn't end there. Footsball, which was
introduced to Greenville by the Attic in 1972, offers a diversion
while the band is taking a break or for just plain old fashioned fun.
The Attic also has the largest TV (T Advent) in eastern N.C. which
will feature a closed circuit view of the band as well as various
movies, specials, and sporting events.
Stewart Campbell, co-manager, feels that the clubs downtown
are important to most of the students at ECU because they fill a
void in the students' curriculum. It provides them with an
The Attic
enters
7th year
ATTIC
alternate to work and study, a place to relax, unwind, and
socialize. After a big test, a long term paper or a grueling
academic week, nothing beats a oool brew, a large crowd, an
accommodating date, and a good band; all readily available at the
Attic on most any Wednesday through Sunday night. The
admission price is generally between $1 and $1.50 and the
entertainment is brought to you either by Brice Street, Blaze.
Choice, Bull, Nighthawks, Nantucket, Super Grit, Suiters, Jesse
Bolt, or one of 50 other talented acts. As Chip Gwynn (Staff
Writer) said in a past article in FOUNTAINHEAD. The Attic
seems to have reached a certain plateau of success. It has retained-
remained a favorite night spot of college students for several years
and has remained successful because students know the Attic is
going to book good entertainment and they are willing to go and
see that entertainment even if they have never heard of the
performing band.
This week's entertainment consists of Brice Street on Monday
and Tuesday, Eaze on Wednesday and Thursday, and Tight on the
weekend. The Dixie Road Ducks will perform on Labor Day. Both
Eaze and Tight contain two of the best front ladies in the south.
Wednesday night is Grand Re-Opening night, celebrating the
Attic's new and expanded look.
ATfrlC
�yPrjP
HLr.
mm
'&!5&3&lz,mir2zZ!iKi.i ��





Page 22 FOUNTAINHEAP 28 Auguat 1978
999
V
Miss HiUiard 'portrays the psychicly wrecked Katherine Bates in Kat
Illustration by Susan Lamm Jm
Constance HiUiard plays in 6Kat'
DAVID WHITSON
Staff Reporter
� often that a young
����rented with the
perform a play
. " x her. so it
at to attend a
of Constance
� . a one-woman
b Tadd Sullivan.
ACTRESS"
Miss HiUiard makes the
i Katherine Bates.
�. actress: starlet.
: � life in a
i - .jn self-
beei tact-
reminded of her late
"He at a cast party.
returns to her apart-
h is the play's only
setting.
Awash in a miasmic sea of
inebriate self-pity, Katherine
reveals her past in a gushing,
sporadic stream of conscious-
ness.
The role taxes Miss Mil-
liard's histrionic talents to the
limit, as she portrays the
psychially wrecked Katherine
Bates, pushing her performance
to heights which would 3eem ir�-
accessible to such a young
actress.
Miss Milliard surmount
many difficulties n perform!
the show, including the shu. �
ling of an audience made
restless by the lack of air-
conditioning in the Washington
(N.C.) Art-Civic Center, and the
traffic ballet of the country
Cassanovas outside the theatre.
The herculean effort paid
off, however, and Miss HiUiard
delivered an inspired, flawless
performance.
Miss Milliard's talent trans-
cends the limits of Sullivan's
play, which is deeply flawed
with implausibility.
Kat killed her first husband
during one of her performances,
when the prop pistol she was
using was incredulously loaded.
Her third husband was murder-
ed by the Mafia, no less. (I don't
recall mention being made of
her second husband's demise,
but if he'd been eaten by albino
crocodiles from the sewers of
New York it would make as
much sense as the other deaths.
Yet with David Eason's
direction, highlighted by the
masterful synchopation of
staccato verbal outbursts by
Katherine is counterpoint to the
classical music playing in the
background, and Jerry Adder-
ton's excellent (and varied) use
of lighting which corresponds in
tonal intensity to Kat's emo-
tional intensity, Miss Milliard's
talent turns this otherwise weak
play into a highly commendable
performance.
M iss HiUiard hopes to repeat
the performance at a later date,
if possible - the show was
performed last spring on the
ECU campus and again August
2-3, in the Washington Art-Civic
Center - and continue her drama
studies at ECU next spring.
White Mansions deals with Civil War
by DAVID WHITSON
Staff Reporter
An LP such as this one is a
: treasured find. The
brainchild of Paul Kenner and
Ethan Russell, this epic work is
an interpretation of the Ameri-
can Civil War as experienced by
four principle characters: an
aristocratic Southern belle,
I played by Jessi Colter): her
fiance, a young aristocrat, (John
Dillon of the Ozark Mountain
Daredevils), a drifter (Waylon
Jennings), and a white trash
ne'er-do-well (Steve Cash of the
O.M.D.).
As' Jesus Christ Superstar
-vas a visual and musical
treatment of the passion and
crucifixion of Christ, performed
in the rook genre, "White
Mastons" is a photographic and
musical treatment of the pas-
sionate turmoil of the Civil War
era and the crucifixion of the'
vamquished Confederate
States, performed in the South-
ern rockabilly and blues genres.
Such a concept album could
easily lapse into the realm of
sentimental redneckery; luckily,
Kennerly does not allow the
work to lapse into such over-
cimplification, as evidenced by
the lyrics from "Dixie, Hold
On
King Gotten, your reign is
shadowed with pain
And burning emotion
You need slaves to keep alive
But the North could help you
survive
Your misguided notion
The artists reach an extra-
ordinarily high level of musical
unity on this album, with fine
backing from excellent music-
ians, most notably Eric Clapton
on electric slide guitar and
dobro. The album's only major
flaw is Jessi Colter's over-
wrought country twang. It may
sell C&W albums but it shows a
lack of ability to interpret the
songs in a manner con-
temporaneous with the album's
theme.
THE ARTISTS REACH an
extraordinarily high lev of"
muskxd , unity onWhite
Mansions.
We're proud to belong to the
Seiko family.
No. FB011M�$290.00.
Seiko LC Digital Quartz Alarm
Chronograph Stainless steel.
black dial frame Also available
in yellow�$295.00.
No.YL209M-S290.00.
White topstainless steel back.
gray dial Also available in
yellow-$250.00
You won't have to look far to find just the Seiko
watch you want. We have one of the largest
and most varied selections in town. Seiko
Analog Quartz watches, Multi-ModeLC Digital
Quartz models. Automatic chronographs,
wrist alarms, sport models, elegant
dress watches and more. Exquisitely styled for
men and women. Come see an exciting
range of the world's most dazzling precision
timepieces. Right here!
SEIKO
FLOYDGROBNSON JEWELERS
407 CVtNS MALI.
On the Mail DowrtownGieenvIe (Beirje Dek's)
Grannies OkSEKOHndquKknt
v
on
p(
j&
� ����jg
l �
Hr�n
ll�n
ID
GOOD STUFF
STUFFY'S
SANDWICHES
Reg. buper
No.1 Spiced Ham-Cooked Salami-Cheese
No.2 Cheese-Provolone- Swiss-American
No. 3 Ham-Swiss
No.4 Ham-Salami-Swiss
No.5 TunajSalad
No. 6 Roast Beef
No.7 Turkey
No.8 Club-Ham-Turkey- Cheese
No.9 Stuffy's Famous -Ham-
Cappacola-
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No. 10 Stuffy's Star-Ham-
Cappacola-Prosciuttni-
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No. 11 Bologna-Cooked Salami-Cheese
No. 12 Pastrami
No. 13 Corned Beef
$1.10 $2.15
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�AnStaffy's Garnished at no extra cost w&
onions, oil vinegar, oregano, andsalt.
521 Cotanche Georgetown Shoppes
752-6130 We Deliver 6p.m12p.m. Sun-Thurs.
STUFFY

25 OFF
Any Sub purchase
in store)
with
coupon" 8�� Aug.28th-Sept9di)
752-6130
521 Cotanche Street
,





I

Runner's Handbook
28 August 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 23
By JEFF ROLLINS
Assistant Trends Editor
runner's manual discusses everything
Bob Glover is a sub-three-
-nour -wathoner and has been
a competitive runner for 15
years.
While he was director of
New York City's West Side
Y M CA he developed and led the
country's largest fitness pro-
gram, with over 3,000 partici-
pants.
Jack Shepherd graduated
from Columbia University and
was a senior editor at Look
magazine during the 1960's.
He s had articles in all the major
magazines and his The Forest
Killers has been nominated for
the National Book Award.
Shepherd enrolled in
Glover's athletic program and
decided that it deserved to be
the subject of a book.
The Runner s Handbook is
more than simply a runners'
program, it is a book which
teaches one how to stay fit. by
exercise and by a proper diet.
The book is like a Health 12
class in a nutshell.
Shepherd and Glover have
thought their book out well. It is
organized and very readable.
Each aspect of what it takes
to become a successful runner,
successful in the sense of
becoming an aerobically fit
person is dealt with.
Most Americans begin runn-
ing for the health benefits, and
then discover that running is
also relaxing, meditative, thera-
peutic. It's obvious to anyone
that more and more people are
to be seen out on the roadsides.
The book quotes Dr. Ron
Lawrence, president of the
American Medical Joggers
Association, in describing the
running experience this way, "I
am convinced that running
extends life.
"But even if didn't add a
single day to a person's life, it
would be worth doing because
running dearly enhances the
quality of life
"First, if you stick with it for
a year, you're hooked. Runn-
ing's addictive. Second, it
changes your whole lifestyle.
Nobody'sever the same again.
Running produces tranquility.
We know it changes Type A
(highly competitive) personality
to a Type B. You get away from
the rat race on a regular basis
There are important facts
about the correct way to achieve
maximum body fitness which
the authors cover at the beginn-
ing of thebook. The "Run-Easy
Method" is a basic fitness
program for all runners.
Then there is a chapter
devoted to the beginner and
intermediate runners who are
those who run at least 15 miles
a week. A chapter deals with
the beginner competitor and the
next considers the problems of
marathon running.
The authors examine correct
running style. The arms should
be relaxed, the abdominal
muscles strong enough to sup-
port the torso and prevent
crowding of the lungs.
Arms should be held low,
somewhere between shoulders
and pelvis. The authors also
advocate diaghramatic breath-
ing, breathing like professional
singers and wind-instrumental-
ists do; that is expanding the
diaphragm (basically the stom-
ach muscles) with each inhala-
tion and contracting it (making
the stomach flat) with each
exhalation.
"Belly" breathing allows
the lungs to expand to their
fullest capacity and helps re-
lieve the dreaded "side stitch
A runner's heel should strike
the ground first and then his
foot should "roll" forward until
his toe leaves the ground. Only
sprinters should attempt to run
solely on the balls of their feet.
Not only is correct running
style examined but Glover and
Shepherd present us with a
whole gamult of supplemental
exercises. The authors place
great importance on "warming
up" before a run and "cooling
down" afterwards.
It is essential to do stretch-
ing and aerobic exercises like
jumping-jacks before a run in
order to prepare the muscles for
the strain to be placed upon
them, and to widen the blood
vessels which is necessary to
pump the needed amount of
blood to the muscles while doing
aerobic exercises.
When one runs he exercises
his heart and pulmonary
muscles. The running person
takes in 60 times the amount of
oxygen the sedentary person
does.
Consequently, the heart of
the runner possesses a greater
capacity of blood for each beat
than the non-runner's. The
runner's blood-pressure lowers.
After running the muscles
need to be stretched and
worked. I f one does not perform
a proper amount of "cooling
down" exercise, blood may pool
in certain vessels and cause
damage.
Glover and Shepherd em-
phasize that people of all ages
may begin a fitness program at
anytime of their lives. Also a
chapter is devoted to "Women
on the Run and to their special
needs.
The Runner's Handbook ex-
amines running wear. Shoes
are perhaps the most important
piece of running gear and the
book deals with them in some
detail.
It is important that running
shoes have a broad, well-cush-
ioned heel and a strong arch
support. Socks should always
be absorbant and dry. In order
to protect the feet, only clean
socks should be worn.
The Handbook also dis-
cusses "Diseases of Inactivity,
Diseases of Excellence
Again, proper warming up and
oooling down exercises are
stressed in order to prevent
pulled muscles and tendons.
Also treatment fa athlete's
foot, jock itch and other epi-
dermal ailments are discussed.
From there, the book
devotes a section to the heart -
-lung machine, the cardio-pul-
monary system. Although no
absolutely conclusive cause and
effect relationship has been
established betweed running
and a decreased heart-attack
rate, studies do seem to indicate
that runners do have a lesser
chance for heart failure.
Running strengthens the
heart muscle and as the authors
say, "No one ever died from
weak arms
In the Handbook's chapters
on food the authors indulge in a
little basic lecture on what kinds
of food we should eat. No junk
food they say, especially fa
those who are trying to lose
weight.
Also, they go ova the four
basic food groups each of which
are essential in our diet:
carbohydrates - potatoes,
bread, rice, beans, dairy pro-
ducts; proteins - meats,
cheeses, beans, and nuts; mine-
rals - green vegetables, otha
dark-colaed vegetables; and
vitamins - vegetables and
fruits.
Then the authas devae a
section to the special diet racers
would be interested in.
At the end of the book are
chapters dealing with the salu-
brious effects of running on
stress and tension in our lives.
A section is also devoted to ways
to enhance the meditative,
calming aspects of running.
This section is called "Running
Inside Your Head
A final chapta discusses
why "Runnas Make Better
Lovas As the book states,
"Why do runnas make bett:
lovas? The reasons are readi f
apparent, the results joyful.
Runnas, like anyone who exa-
cises regularly, feel and look
betta. They develop firm, lean
bodies
"With pride in your body
comes a self-confidence that
often carries ova into your wak
and leisure That seems to be
the thesis of this book, and it is
one that evayoie can benefit
from learning.
RUNNING IS A WAY of mental and physical training.
Atlanta Daily World first black owned daily
ATLANTA (AP) - The street
extends east out of downtown
Atlanta Its first few blocks are
mostly parking lots. But at
Auburn and Piedmont stands
the Atlanta Daily Wald build-
ing - the first blackowned daily
newspaper.
Here is the beginning of
John Wesley Dobbs, grand-
fatha of Maya Maynard Jack-
son of Atlanta, who took the
name from the poem "The
Desated Village by Oliva
Goldsmith.
Dobbs reportedly said that
Auburn was "sweet" because
unlike black business communi-
railroad tracks.
Part of the street is on the
National Regista of Histaic
Places.
It was in this area that
Martin Lutha King Jr. was
born, and it was here that the
enterprises of Heman E. Pary
acted as a springboard to black
seek their fatunes in Chicago,
Detroit, New Yak and otha
nathan cities.
Perry founded the Standard
Life Insurance Co. He built the
three-stay building which
housed :h1s company, and a
bank which lata bacame the
Citizens Trust Co which still
�nlnl� A�l-n�r ?�-� fIm,richoc a� the aivth larOeSt
black-owned bank in the nation,
aocading to Black Entaprise
magazine.
Pary also founded a chain of
drugstaes, a laundry oompany
and a real estate development
oompany; and he was responsib-
le fa the first housing subdivi-
sion fa blacks.
rSee BLACK p.27
A College Girl's Friend In Greenville!
Saving college student fa ova four decades, Brodys has been
known to bring you the latest ooflege fashions of the time; like new
fashion big tops fa the blousy look to go with he boot leg jean, a
go with layed look with a button down shirt topped with a tarif ic
sweata and vest. Also blazas, leatha and suede ooats and mae!
Tie it all up with belts, sashes, neck ties, and much mae. Match it
up with Frye boots, topsidas, and clogs all to be found at Brodys
of Greenville. All thses fashions and famous names along with
many othas lead us into being the numba one fashion oenta in
eastan Nath Carolina. Stop by and let us help you select the 1978
fall look. Service is what makes Brodys a great place to shop. We
offa free check cashing, free in town telephone savice, free gift
wrapping and smiling personnel toalways make you feel weloome.
College gilrs have long since found a charge account a great
convience. Just fill in the application and drop it in the mailwe
will have your aedit card waiting, may we have the pleasure of
serving you soon!
Your Frioidsat,
Brady's
ufyp&CatiOK 9"0� CWit:
Name.
Home address.
City
State
Zip.
College address if known
Street
State .
Citv
Zip
Father's occupation
Mother's occupation
We will arrange convenient terms upon arrival.
Parent sign here for approval of account
We will arrange conv tent terms np upon arrival
The Bunch with the p fsoni toy h.
805 jbie�imon cfuE. 752-5186
Your Body Deserves the Best
Leotards, Tights
Complete Efcincewear
CAPEZK)
DANSKJN
COZART'S
AUTO SUPPLY, INC
Automotive Replacement Pans
Goodrich Tires, Tubes, Batteries
814-816 Dickinson A ve.
752-3194
Fire Dept.
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmammmKmmmmmmmmmmm$mmm
5th Street
WILLIAMS �LCE SHOP
�3� 1 kill i Ae. 52-4121
BootoandHats All Leather Shoes
Harness and Saddle Repair
Fan�m Dealer Factory Rejects
YARNS tW
Weaving Supplies
MaoameCods
Feathers and Beads
and MOREL

PAJtfTAItfA
BOB'S
WELCOMES
YOU BACK
AND W ANTS YOIJ
TO BE SOMEBODY.
IhB PIT04EK: Cfr PERFECTION
OPEN DAILY
AT 4:00.
C3O0B3
�jiijj343t3feS
M
SS��S





Page 24 FOUNTAINHEAD 28 August 1978
The Gathering Place has 'delectable food'
By KATHY GRIMES
Special to FOUNTAINHEAD
Delectable food, prompt
and friendly service, plus a
pleasing and comfortable
atmosphere are not easy to find
in one resturant. The Gathering
Place at 1112 Dickinson Avenue
in Greenville offers the discrim-
inating diner these three ele-
ments in large portions.
Granted, the slightly high
onces may make the typical
college student tremble in
for his a her budget. But
start saving that loose change
icw. ladies and gents, because
an experience anv true lover of
fine dining can't afford to miss
Loaded in a lovely old home,
The Gathering Place is a feast
for the eyes as well as the
tummy.
About eight months of fairl,
extensive renovation went into
the house before its open'ng th
past February. The fini
product is an inviting, twos .
white-painted Victorian beauiy
with casually elegant, tastefully
decorated dining rooms.
A gift shop, to open in the
next few months, is planned fa
the second floor. I n this graceful
atmosphere, be prepared to
some of the best food you will
ever put in your mouth.
The menu at The Gathering
Place is rather unique in that the
entrees and flambe desserts
change weekly. Prices average,
we were told, from $7.95 -
$8.95, although our menu offer-
ee entrees in the $8.75 - $11.75
ice range.
Ham mousse served in a
rresh tomato, a crisp garden
salad and mouth-watering home
-made bread are served with
each entree.
My date and I sampled The
Gathering Place's fare.We were
offered Duck Montmortucy,
� Wow Open
The
WOODCRAFT
SHOP
218- F East 5th St.
UNIVERSITY
ARCADE
WE DO CUSTOM WORK
AITO
TARE ORDERS
(Tables, Picture Frames. Game Boards,
. Book Shelves, Etc.)
Jacques (a sea scallops dish).
We opted for the Steak
Diane, two tender, perfectly
cooked pieces of boned beef
strip loin sauteed in butter and
flavored with brandy and spices.
"Entrees are accompanied by
vegetables du jour the menu
announces.
Ours were broccoli and
cooked carrots, fresh-tasting
and flavorfulas were the salad
vegetables) and not overcooked.
The crowning glory of the meal
was Bananas Foster, a delicious
flaming dessert of fresh bana-
nas and brown sugar sauce
served ever ice cream and
prepared right before our very
eyes at a oost of $2.00 per
serving.
A selection from the small
but fine wine list completes the
meal. Wine prices rang, -c:
about $6.95 right up to $75.00
We selected a half bottle of
Inglenook Cabernet Sauvignon,
a tart red wine faintly reminis-
cent of rubbing alcohol. I do not
blame this on the resturant; we
selected a less expensive wine
in an effort to appease the old
wallet.
The already-fabulous food
was made even more enjoyable
by the friendly, efficient service.
Each course was served prompt-
ly by our competent, smiling,
and helpful waiter, who also
carefully allowed us enough
time to finish one course before
bringing the next.
We were kept supplied with
refills of water, butter, and that
marvelous bread as soon as our
present supply dwindled. In
THE GATHERING PLACE is
short, our waiter saw to it that
we lacked for nothing.
The Gathering Place is not
for junk food addicts or persons
averse to paying a bit more than
an inviting,
usual for a first-rate meal.
However, it is the place for
those who like to give their
tummies VIP treatment and
appreciate truly superb service
two-story, white-painted Victorian beauty
The Gathering Place (919-
752-1112) is open for dinner
Tuesday through Saturday. 6:00
- 9:30 p.m. Reservations are
requested.
The Crow's Nest is a popular har -out
come see us aot
look around
By JOHN WEYLER
Staff Writer
One of Greenville's finest
dining experiences may be
found at the Crow's Nest rest-
urant. This popular place feat-
ures fine food at modest prices.
The Crows' s Nest is located on
Fast Food oorner, the intersect-
ion of 10th St. and Charles Blvd.
where through the large glass
window the diner is treated to a
beautiful view of Hardees,
McDonalds, Roy Rogers and
Weiner King. This view serves a
double purpose: it gets the
viewer's salivary glands to
circulating while waiting for his
meal to be served, and at the
same time, makes him glad he's
eating at the Crow's Nest and not
one of the aforementioned fast
food houses.
The owners of the Crow's
Nest deserve congradulations
for their ingenuity in selecting
such a site for their establish-
ment.
Most of the Crow's Nest food
is basic American fare: sand-
wiches, hot dogs, seafood, and
dinner dishes such as "Aunt
Cindy s Fried Chicken' and
Deluxe Rib-Eve Rate
range from 30 cents (for hush
puppies cole slaw or ice
cream) to $2.35 (for the "Sea-
food Platter").
They have a superb break-
fast menu too. Offered are such
exotic, out-of-the-ordinary cuis-
ine as eggs, bacon, and even
toast and jelly. They also have
a wide variety of omelets.
Breakfast at the Crow's Nest
is perfect for the struggling
young student because of the
low prices, the nourishing food,
and mainly because of it's the
only real place around that
serves breakfast (not oounting
McDonald's Egg McMuffin).
Especially interesting to the
typical student who spent most
of his money on beer the night
before are the numerous break-
fast "specials These include
the "every day special 2
eggs, and 2 pancakes for 99
cents, the "early bird special"
(served Saturday and Sunday, 6
a.m. to 930 a.m.), omelet, 2
pancakes and coffee for $1.35,
and the immensely tempting
"pancake special" (served
Wednesday and Sunday morn-
ing), all the pancakes you can
eat for $1.00.
This reviewer took up that
an hour.
This reviewer dined with a
partner at the Crow's Nest
recently and sampled the break-
fast fare. The bacon and cheese
omelet was fine, just enough
cheese in proportion to bacon,
all enveloped in eggs so tasty
they didn't require salt. My
dining partner found her ham
and cheese omelet fine too, with
the exception that the ham and
cheese was not evenly spread
out throughout the omelet,
leaving one side of eggs only
eggs.
Orange juice was served in
an excellent way, in very cold
frosted glasses and mason jars.
Mine even had little chunks of
ice swimming in it which
probably weren't supposed to
be there, but were a nice touch
anyway.
The Crow's Nest is a popular
place among ECU students,
partially because of its open 24
hours schedule, low prices, and
closeness to campus but mostly
due to its frequent afternoon
beer specials.
Its regular prices on beer
are about average or perhaps
slightly lower in comparison
with other watering holes. They
serve both draft and cans.
The Nest'spopularity among
the ECU crowd is reflected in
the place's decorations consist-
ing mostly of Pirate sports
plaques. The atmosphere is
low-key, friendly, and quiet,
usually. However, an alv vs-on
TV and an adjoting room of
ever-pingng pinball machines
are there for the enjoyment of
the patrons but often become an
annoyance
When the TV and a pack of
good oT boys on the pinball
machines form a duet, the noise
can get pretty racuous. Pmbali
machines, footsball tables and
etcetera type games are one
feature found in almost every
resturant and establishment in
Greenville. The Gathering Place
(see review) and the local
mortuary seem to be places in
town without them.
A4 JI , J�
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Beany write, directs and produce
Heaven Can Wait 'recaptures spirit of 4Cs
STEVE BACHNFR . JL JL
28 Augu H78 FOUNTAiNHEAD Pag� 25
By STEVE BACHNER
Trends Editor
Warren Beattys Weaver)
Can Wait has recaptured the
spirit of the glorious films of the
1940s, added a few stars and a
lot of color.
His film is a remake of the
1941 Here Comes Mr. Jordan, a
fantasy about a prizefighter
(Robert Montgomery) who is
accidentally sent to heaven
before his time and forced to
find a new body to occupy.
As co-writer, co-director,
and producer Beatty has crafted
one of the most likeable screen
characters in recent memory.
H is performance of the confused
Joe Pendleton is bursting with a
oelestial spirit that he enjoys
even more on earth than at his
heavenly detour.
Pendleton is a quarterback
with the Los Angeles Rams who
is informed at the outset of the
movie that he has overcome a
serious knee injury and will start
against Dallas that Sunday.
However, the following day
Pendleton is involved in an
accident while riding his bicy-
cle. Soon he is being led
through the clouds at a way
station in Heaven by an impa-
tient celestial esc rt (Buck
Henry), Jtse process thai there
has been &jsm ke - that
he can't bw de . When the
arch-angel Mr. Jordan (James
Mason) arrives, he makes a
quick check which confirms that
Pendleton is not due in Heaven
for another 50 years. The
disillusioned Pendleton is
rushed back to earth, but it is
too late as his body has been
cremated.
Jordan immediately begins a
search fa a new body. After
rejecting several possibilities,
they arrive at the estate of Leo
Farnsworth, a wealthy business-
man who is in the process of
being murdered by his wife
Julia (Dyan Cannon) and his
personal secretary Tony Abbot
(Charles Grodin). Not wishing
to get involved with the two,
Pendleton is about to leave the
estate when Betty Logan (Julie
Christie) arrives.
She demands to see
Farnsworth about a refinery his
company is going to build which
will destroy her village in
England. Sympathizing with
her plight, and impressed with
her spirit as well as her beauty,
Pendleton agrees to temporarily
use Farnsworth's body so he can
help her. Jordan explains about
the exchange of bodies: inward-
ly he will still be Joe Pendleton,
but outwardly everyone will still
see and hear Leo Farnsworth
(throughout the film we contin-
ue to see and hear Warren
Beatty as Pendleton).
Naturally, Julia and Tony
are shocked to find Farnsworth
still alive and set about to keep
murdering him until they suc-
ceed. In one of Heaven Can
Waif s best scenes, the fumb-
ling Pendleton, obviously out of
place off the football field, is
forced to attend one of
See HEAVEN, p.26
H JL ffl
The cast of Heaven Can Wah.�
Clockwise from top left: Julie Christie, James
Mason, Charles Grodin, Vincent Gardenia, Buck
Henry, and Dyan Cannon.
Warren Beatty
t
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Page 26 FOUNTAINHEAD 26 August 1978
Animal House: 'a ribald view of youth'
THE ANIMALS OF Delta House: 'Ribald view of youth.
By DAVID WHITSON
Staff Writer
What do you get when you
cross The National Lampoon
and Catcher in the Rye with
American Graffiti and The God-
father? Animal House, a ribald
view of the glorious days of
misspent youth allotted to ac-
quiring a college education.
The "Animal House" is the
Delat Tau Chi fraternity house,
home of Faber College's most
embarrassing campus organiza-
tion. After dumping Fizzies in
the swimming pool, sneaking
cadabers into the alumni dinner,
and Decorating trees with un-
derwear, the fraternity is threat-
ened with extinction when
plaoed on academic probation
by the dean.
At first, the threats of Dean
Wormer (the Darth Vader of
Faber) are ignored, as the
brothers of Delta Tau Chi
romp through the semester by
&$&
throwing a toga party, demoral-
izing the ROTCand demolishing
the school cafeteria; but when
their fraternity charter is re-
voked they decide to go out in
style, with a last-ditch effort
which turns the homecoming
parade into a guerrilla war.
Throughout the diverse and
fast paced scenarios which
comprise the film, John Belushi
blasts like a rocket, embodying
Tau Chi fraternity. Whenever
Belushi appears he exudes a
maddening, magnetic power
which places not only his
' brothers but the audience as
well, under his frenetic control.
(After all, who wouldn't
follow such a quasi-legendary
character - capable of crushing
beer cans on his forehead,
biting through golf balls, and
devouring cheeseburgers in a
single bite - through the very
the esprit de corps 6f the Delta
I Beatty's tour deforce
gates of Hell?)
All in all, the film is a
delight. Director John Landis
and writers Harold Ramis,
Douglas Kenney and Chris
Miller have made excellent use
of the irreverent National Lam-
poon style to sprinkle the film
with cripple jokes, dead people
jokes and , of course, those
beautiful semi-nude girls which
have become a NL trademark
Heaven a success
FUR FLIES IN the finale of Universal's ��Animal House.
continued from p. 25)
Farnsworth's board meetings
where he delivers an expertly
comic monologue that is laced
with football lingo.
He is able to help Betty by
rescinding the order to build the
refinery in England. She is
overcome with gratitude and a
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bond quickly develops between
them. Hence, a twist is in order
when it becomes more and more
evident that Pendleton is be-
coming a bit foooontent with his
temporary body. He even goes
so far as to get it in shape for the
Super Bowl, only to receive the
crushing news that he must give
it up because "it is not his
destiny to continue on as Leo
Farnsworth
All of this is handled very
well, including the elaborate
football sequences, and, this
being a fantasy erf the highest
order, the loose ends and
hopeless situations are all tied
together neatly is a single
passage; everything is resolved
in the end.
As it should be, Beatty and
Christie oomunicate almost ex-
clusively through eye contact.
The film relies very heavily on
plot and Beatty has managed to
get the best work out of his
cohorts. Elaine May has turned
in some of her funniest scripting
since the early days with
husband Mike Nichols.
She has rewritten the old
script for Here Comes Mr.
Jordan so that her jokes about
money, marriage, and adultery
are not out of context. The film
ends happily and makes you feel
good chiefly by implying that
you are never going to die.
So at this point in his career,
no one has more potential to
change the outlook of films in
the 70's than Warren Beatty.
With Heaven Can Wait it has
now become evident that, in
many ways, the films of the 40' s
are the films of Warren Beatty
in the 70"s. And if we want to
understand what the cinema
stands for today, few filmakers
can give us as much intight as
Warren Beatty.
Beatty is one of those
directors who has made films
more modern by taking us
backward in time. Though they
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ate very much a product erf our
own time, his films have always
been cut off by their position as
a mass form of entertainmer'
from the influences of other
more inventive art forms. In the
recent past. Heaven Can Wait
would have been considered ar
experimental film and experi-
mental cinema has been no
more than a fringe activity ana
has had as little influence on the
film industry as a whole as the
equally specialized form of the
cartoon.
Beatty has customized the
commercial movie, typified by
Hollywood, which was always
seen to be amply a form of
storytelling, as the popular
novel had been in the 19th
oentury. In Heaven Can Wait
Beatty has poured all of his
efforts not into rivaling the most
up-to-date literature of the day
but into finding the film equiva-
lentsof the storytelling methods
of Charles Dickens.
The traditional anema's fav-
orite forms like the western and
the gangster film continued to
tell their stories with a straight-
forwardness that is lost in many
of todays movies. With the
success of Heaven Can Wait.
the cinema could oontinue on in
this way for the audienoe for
"Beatty has
customized the
commercial
movie,
typified by
Hollywood,
which was aJkcays
seen to be simply a
form of
storytelling99
which it caters in one that still
I ikes good st ones excitingly anc
grtppingly told. Certainly times
have changed, but the more
things change the more they
stay the same.
Five years ago the anema
had a different audiencs, and a
much reduced one. A new
generation of freer filmmakers
with wider horizons had arrived
and were not that well received
except in small art-film circles
Beatty exemplifies the director
of the 40 s whose style per-
suades us to lose ourselves in
the swiftly unfolding events of
his stories and make us identify
with his heroes (as we do when
John Wayne leads a cavalry
charge).
Beatty does not try and
remind us that what we are
seeing is no more, and no less.
than a film. His style is larger
than life.
Heaven Can Wait gives us
straightforwardness, excite-
ment, fantasy, and humor ail
roiled into one. It's success
relies on the studio structure in
films which is so cruaal to
an understanding of the Ameri-
can cinema, and the contribu-
tions of writers and producers
are no longer passed over in the
cult of the director.
Thanks to the success of this
f'lm. our knowledge of Holly-
iwood can grow even further and
ultimately we can no doubt
expect a full-scale reaaa-eament
which takes into account scoai
� aoonomic pressures and
faces the aitical problems
P091 oy Hollywood as a
Popular art.
hJHT0" OBHton of
Hollywood film. � eacepiat .s
What Heaven Can Wait
�neaoapiatfUmiainvltf
t��of�t�funatan.
success at the box office
�ouaty reftecu moral yaw
tc,amodelcbabeJor
1"��uram� to the
w� don't need
and basic
k
� �





?tare entreated to 'stay off the streets'
�vetoycxw.llprovetobe Z "f�8 in �� Wall
� m the near future F cc, ! Wa,tmQ ,0r you C,�
aspn .ROMANCE: Feathers cTarTaTT aVGra9eS
wm mean much during mS dare a B A-major. Sit tight.
cruaal phase - keep them on CANrcru.
� at all times. The cosmosTs fzlZ hH ' �l"
with you to a oprtam n. the on and � 'S
Thew?nse ntheSH ressi Take care to notice
InK in the we �� "ave a ,ot
The velocity of light ,s "hL Ust T their
me same Listen toa loved one, then listen
again. A typewriter can create a
madrigal. Cosmic vibes cola
your density - tune in.
ROMANCE: Carry on as if
nothing has happened, and it
probably won't. Trust your
heart over your eyesight. Eat
more carrots Meditate befae a
candle fa five minutes befae
retiring. FINANCE: Mind the
essentials; contemplate the rest.
Outlook is even better if you
own extensive patfdio in IBM,
McDonald's, a own a signed
artist's proof of Picasso.
LEO.tJuly 23-Aug. 22) Learn
fron the Jutes; the ruins are
speaking to you. Avoid pedant-
ry at all oosts. (Look up
pedantry if necessary, it's im-
patant.) We are all outlaws in
the eyes of America. We should
be, together; look sharp toward
theill breeze. Take vitamins.
ROMANCE: Cupid's gonna do
a big 10-4 on your heart, ole
buddy. Just don't blow it,
cause looking ahead, if s gonna
be a long dry spell
FINANCE: Spend every dirty
oent you ga.
Film
28 August 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 27
directs
continued from p. 19 ,
According to Tennessee
Williams, Edward Albee is the
only great playwright America
has produced.
Albee has taken time from
his writing schedule to cast,
produce, and direct a series of
his own plays.
Two of them, The Zoo Story
and The American Dream will
be perfamed in the Mendenhall
Student Center Theatre on Jan.
24 at 8 p.m. Albee is probably
best known fa writing Who's
Afraid of Virginia Wooif, these
plays are equally fine.
Esther Rolle steps out of
S
music and crafts at Mendenhall
continued from p. 19
The Student Union Films
Committee offers popular films
The Rocky Horror
Picture Show. Looking for Mr
Goodbar Julia, and Annie Hall
among othetson Friday and
Saturday nights.
� special films like
Fetlii s Casanova and Berg-
man s Sm,les of a Summer
Nigh; among others will be
shown on various nights fa the
film connoisseur.
th popul" vid art
films three Film Festivals will
highlight the Film Series caien-
On September 24 four of
A � ed Hitchcock s thnlers will
give you a taste of this auteurs
wak from early to late in his
caret
Jtrectas Game. Truf-
I Werkmueiler will be
tea: ired the Film Series
Faeign Film Festival. Seven
Beauties. The Man Who Loved
Women, and La Viste Merviel-
leuse will comprise this year's
taste of international films.
r naily, three movies by Jack
Nicholson will round out the
Series Film Festivals. Five
Easy Pieces. The Last Detail.
and One Flew Over the
Cuckoo s Nest will be familiar to
Nicholson fans and should not
be missed by anyone who is
interested in this star's wak.
Six a exhibitions will prov-
ide " . graphic enter-
tainme I � students this year
Famed Bauhaus artist Josef
Alber s wak wil hang in exhibit
here through November. Fol-
lowing that will be a collection of
early book art.
Art from the Lower East Side
of New Yak will be next ai the
agenda. These painting patray
life in that section of Gotham in
the 19th and early 20th Centur-
ies. The Califania Group exhib-
it will give us easterners a taste
of Califania Pop and of what is
happening in art now on the
West Coast
Open to all ECU students,
the lllumnia show is sponsaed
by the Student Union Art
Exhibition Committee. Over
$1,000.00 in prize money is
awarded to the oompetitas.
The Mmaity Arts Commit-
tee is planning a year of
activities fa all campus mina-
ities. The Committee will again
coordinate events fa the Black
Arts Festival, which will include
CBS anchaman Ed Bradley,
television perfamer Esther
Rolle. a gospel concert and an
art exhibit among other activit-
ies.
If you enjoy mellow night
club atmosphere you will prob-
ably find entertainment and
ambience to your liking at the
Student Union Coffeehouse.
The Coffeehouse is located in
Room 15 on the ground floa of
Mendenhall Student Center.
Providing Thursday and Fri-
day night shows a Friday and
teele Graphics are Saturday night shows, the Cof-
exhibit. These feehouse aims fa intimate.
eel ner :ove of the mfamal musical communicat-
�oord the Chang- ion. A wide variety of refresh-
ire s moods. ments are also served, and the
Keith Jarrett's My
Song is 'superb'
comued from p. 21)
ng. rambling melodic
inec s song subtlely
nypnotoze you as if you were a
oobra listening to a flute. The
motto ritard at the end of the
song is one of the most effective
3osmgs this reviewer has ever
"eard
A sat of pastaal content-
ment is reached in "country
This album was reoaded in
Naway so perhaps the breath-
taking Nawegian countryside
inspired the song Country
its tone is that of conservat-
ive optimism, a sat of if-you-
waiong-enough-everything-
wiii-turn-out-ainght attitude.
Mandaia" is the only truly
third-stream piece on My Song.
Namai meiody and rhythm are
abandoned fa their progres-
sive, reactionary counterparts.
This taut, tense style, highly
suggestive of the quick-paced
urban atmosphere, couldn't be
further from the Buocohc pleas-
antries of Country
�Mandaia" is mae than a
little new music thrown in to
salve a composer's conscience,
though. The song exhibits
Jarrett as a highly oompetent
composer
This piece has guts, along
with famal innovation and near
virtuose demands upon the
piayers. Mandaia" acts as
perfect counterpoint to the other
BLACK
continued from p.23
Another black business pio-
neer was Ben Davis, who built
the first high-rise of f ice buiiding
for black businesses in the
nation. His six-stay building
still stands, although it is empty
now. But fa about 35 years, it
was the oily place in Atlanta
where btaok doctas, lawyers
and dentists could rent office
apace
A weather-beaten sign still
hangs along the avenue, exhibi-
ting the call-letters of radio
station WERD, the first Hack-
owned station in the natiot. It
too has moved downtown and its
cadi lettas have changed.
Down the street from the
Atlanta Daily Watd is the
songs on the album.
With "The Journey Home"
Jarrett has written a jazz
composition that transcends the
boundaries of his own peculiar
style (wide though they may be)
and has aeated a piece that will
be picked up by aher jazz
musicains in time to oome.
"The Journey Home" is a
very catchy song that begins
with an upbeat melody and ends
with low key variations on that
melody.
Because of it's initial appeal
and then sophisticated changes
in tempo and melodic line "The
Journey Home" stands as one
of Jarrett s best most mature
compositions to date.
Although there are a la of
them. Keith Jarrett is certainly
one of the most respected,
well-established jazz artists cur-
rently making music.
He has an inventive and
quick-learning mind. He assimi-
lates what aher musicians and
composers have done and syn-
thesizes their innovations with
his own to arrive at a unique,
very modern sounding style.
Befae now, you either liked
a disliked Jarrett, but with My
Song Jarrett has become a much
mae universal composer.
We await with pleasure his
further developments.
Record provided courtesy of
Record Bar
Wheat Street Baptist .Church,
and nearby the low-rent apart-
ments, commercial enterprises
and the aedit union established
by the congregation of the Rev.
William Holmes Baders.
Still there is Big Bethel
African-Methodist Church,
which served as an auditaium
fa black Atlanta at a time when
blacks weren't allowed o use
the municipal auditaium.
It was in the basement of Big
Bethel that Maris Brown Col-
lege was ban. The 2,000-seat
santuary is setdom'ull now, but
the Rev. L.J. Jones still has a
vision.
"I've got a feeling about
Sweet Auburn he said. "I feel
that some additional housing is
going to come to the area. It'll
bring some people back. But it
won't be the Auburn Avenue of
yesterday
cost fa both show and food is
just fifty cents.
Specific shows are,na yet
booked fa the Maja Attract-
ions fo this year but last year
this committee brought Jimmy
Buffett, Firefall, Arlo Guthrie,
Styx and Chuck Mangione to
campus. Hopefully this year
they will bring equally popular
bands and acts to ECU.
The Special Attractions
Committee has already booked
the Amazing Kreskin, one of the
most popular and baffling men-
talists of our time. Though
Special Attractions has na yet
selected particular bands, they
have planned three outdoa mall
concerts and one indoa conoert
fa fall semester as well as mae
fa spring.
Student Union Travel Ad-
venture films offer the viewer a
chance to visit places and
countries he might aherwise
never have the opportunity to
see. Included among this years
"trips" are ones to Hawaii,
South Africa, England, Israel,
Chicago and Russia.
Mendenhall Student Center
will, again sponsa two Mad-
rigal Dinners this year. Fa
those of you who have never
attended one of these dinners.
they are an exciting blend of
entertainment, spectacle and
feasting, all done in the manner
of a Noble Elizabethan England
banquet. This year there will be
one in the Fall and one in the
Spring.
The Student Center will also
sponsa College Bowl competi-
tion thisyear. Any group of four
full-time students, and a fifth
person as alternate, may enter a
team if they have a coach.
Remember the old GE College
Bowl on TV9 Well, here's your
chance to be one of them.
One of the programs that the
Student Center offers that has
drawn the most response in the
past is its Crafts Center. Fa a
nominal fee, students, faculty
and staff may exercise a talent
a develop a new skill in the
Center's extensive facilities.
The Crafts Center includes a
photography lab equipped with
three Omega enlargers, a weav-
ing room with floa looms, a
ceramics room with potters'
wheels and kilns, and tools fa
jewelry, leatherwaking, batik,
linoleum, block printing, and
many others.
The Recreation Area of
Mendenhall Student Center is
located on the ground floa.
.Bowling, billiards, table tennis
and many amusement games
such as pi nbal I, air hockey, and
fcotsball are available.
Also there are game tables
on the Ground Floa at which
one can play Moiopoly, Life.
Risk, Jeopardy, checkers, chess
and backgammon, all available
fa loan. Tournaments in several
of these activities are held each
year. If you are interested,
watch fa tournament mfamat-
ion.
The Student Unioj offers
alternative entertainment to the
downtown scene. Introduce
yourself. Get involved.
comedy on Feb. 13 to character-
ize two great Americans -
Sojourner Truth and Susan B.
Anthony. Bah women were
crusaders fa the female sex.
but, even mae, bah were
ausaders fa humanity, fa the
dignity of all individuals.
This powerful actress deliv-
ers a powerful perfamance
about powerful characters. The
perfamance will be in Menden-
hall Student Center Theatre at 8
p.m.
Dear Liar is how Mrs.
Patrick Campbell began a letter
to Geage Bernard Shaw
Valerie Harper and Anthony
Zerbe recreate the turrultous
love-hate relationship of the
famous pair.
The perfamance has al-
ready won critical acclaim in
New Yak and is just beginning
its tour. The ECU perfamance
is March 26 at 8 p.m. in Wright
Auditaium.
Season tickets are now on
sale at the Central Ticket Office
in Mendenhall Student Center.
Prices are $4 fa ECU
students. $8 fa ECU faculty and
staff, and $12 fa the public.
Fa further infamation. call
757-6611. extension 266
and Pair Electronics
A Pull You
A New World Of Music
PAIR ELECTRONICS, YOUR TOTAL STEREO CENTER
WE SERVICE WHAT WE SELL
Heil air-motion transformer
loudspeaker system
with such fine names of audio equipment as;
Phillips
Ohm
Marantz
Akai
Teac
JVC
Micro Acoutics
JBL
Kenwood
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Technics
When music becomes more than just something to listen toj
PAIR ELECTRONICS AUDIO CENTER
is involved.
766-2891 Store Hoars: 8:30 5:30 Weekdays and Sat. 8:30 12:30
.
.





Pirates open against WCU
ECU's bowl hopes high in '78
. By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
One thing Pirate head coach
Pat Dye has never quite become
accustomed to during his four
seasons at ECU is sitting at
home during the bowl season.
At Alabama, where Dye
served as an assistant coach for
nine years, the Crimson Tide
appeared in bowl games every
season. And Dye himself played
in the 1959 Orange Bowl when
Georgia topped Missouri 14-0.
But even with four consecu-
tive winning seasons Dye's
Pirates have yet to make an
appearance in a post season
contest. Last year, it was the
underdog William and Mary
Indians who upset the Pirates in
the season final which cost
ECU a possible trip to the Peach
Bowl.
"Last year was disappointing
in a lot of ways explained the
38-year-old Georgia native. "We
lost two games near the end of
the season we should have won
and it cost us a trip to a bowl
game. I was proud of some of
our accomplishments last
season, but I was disappointed
that we didn't go any farther.
"If we are going to be
successful this season we've got
to overoome our shortcomings.
We need an injury free season.
We're lacking in depth every-
where and a lot of injuries could
be critical Offensively, the
Pirates have a corp of returning
starters at the skill positions
which promises to make ECU'S
wishbone attack one of the most
explosive ever.
With lightning quick Leander
Green returning at quarterback
along with speedsters Eddie
Hicks, Theodore Sutton and
Anthony Collins in the backf ield,
the Pirates should once again
rank among the NCAA's top
rushing teams in the country.
Green, the diminutive 5-8,
170 pounder from Jacksonville
scooted around opponent de-
fenses last season for 546 yards
and seven touchdowns. He also
oompleted 14 of 34 passes for
another 178 yards and one touch-
down.
"Leander has a lot of ability,
but more importantly he's just a
great competitor said assist-
ant ooach Al Kincaid who is in
charge of quarterbacks. "He's
improved his throwing immen-
sely and really moved the
offense last year. But it's going
to be awfully important that we
keep him healthy.
Green will pitch to senior
Eddie Hicks, who gained 393
yards on only 68 carries last
year, and now ranks eighth on
ECU'S all-time rushing list.
Sophomore Anthony Collins
will replace graduated Willie
Hawkins at left halfback while
flashy Theodore Sutton returns
at fullback. Sutton was the
biggest surprise offensively last
season, leading the team in
rushing with 706 yards on 125
carries for a nifty 5.6 average.
"Depth will be our biggest
problem noted offensive back-
field ooach Ken Hutcherson,
Wayne Inman (6-4, 235) at
guard. Jeff Hagans, a product of
local GreenvilleRoee High School,
replaces graduated Ricky
Holiday at oenter.
"It'scertainly one of the top
offensive lines we've ever had
here claimed assistant Dick
Kupec. "It takes a different kind
of person to play up front and
we've got a great group of guys.
They work hard, listen and try to
'I think the character this team develops and
our senior leadership will be extremely
important in the success of our team this
season
Pat Dye
Head Football Coach
now in his fourth season at ECU.
"We're fortunate to have three
starters returning, but we're
going to have to concentrate on
getting the ball to our backs
more. We need to take some of
the pressure off Leander.
The offensive line will be one
of the Pirates' biggest ever with
mammoth Mitchell Smith (6-3,
240) and Matt Mulholland (6-0,
242) at tackle with bruisers
Nelson Smith (6-0, 235) and
do everything they can to
perform like you want them to
At split end, the Pirates have
two talented receivers returning
in senior Terry Gailaher and
junior Billy Ray Washington.
Gailaher, granted an extra
year of eligibility by the NCAA
grabbed 27 passes for 512 yards
and two touchdowns last season
while Washington caught four
passes for 97 yards including
two touchdowns.
Having Terry Gailaher back
was one of the greatest things
that could have happened to our
offense noted assistant Henry
Trevathan. "With Billy Ray
Washington we'll probably use
two wide receivers in many
situations. We feel real good
about our depth at this posit-
ion
Junior Bill Lamm and soccer
style kicker Vern Davenport will
probably have the place kicking
duties. Lamm will boot PAT's
and field goals inside the 35
while Davenport will handle
kickoffs and field goals outside
the 35.
"We've got speed at all the
skill positions and our backf ield
and ends have excellent size and
speed Dye observed, "Offen-
sively, we've made the neces-
sary changes which should make
us a better team
"I think the character this
team develops and our senior
leadership will be extremely
important in the success of our
team this season. Only time will
tell
Following the Pirates' opener
against Western Carolina, ECU
will face crucial early season
games, both on the road,
against N.C. State and North
Carolina.
Lamm, Davenport add new 'kick'to ECU offense
ECU DEFENSIVE END lack Valentine will once Wallace Wade Stadium. ECU opens its season
again play a key role for the Pirates. Here, Saturday against Western Carolina in newly
Valentine helps stop a Duke running back in last expanded Ficklen Stadium,
year's 17-16 victory over the Blue Devils in
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
As the sun slowly sinks into
the distance, only a handfull of
players remain on the ECU
practioe field as another workout
oomes to a dose.
The centers and quarter-
backs remain behind to do extra
work with the kicking speaaM
ists. Although thai-place kicking
process is a relatively simple one
- the snap, the place, and a kick,
it'sall too often the difference in
winning or losing on Saturday
afternoons.
And no one knows more
about those door-die situations
than Bill Lamm and Vern
Davenport, the Pirate kicking
specialists who will probably
share the duties this season.
"This season I'm not going
to worry that much about
distance explained Lamm who
will handle PAT'sand field goals
inside the 35 yard line. "I'm
going to concentrate on kicking
the ball a little bit easier and
making a good follow through.
Vern's probably going to handle
the kickoffs and long distance
field goal kicking so my job will
be a little bit easier. I just want
t to develop some accuracy be-

BILL LAMM
cause in the long run that's what
really important
Last year. Junior Creech
handled most of the place
kicking chores converting on 30
of 31 extrapointsand connecting
on six of 15 field goal attempts
including a school record 48
yarder against South Carolina.
But Creech has graduated
leaving the job in the hands of
Lamm and Davenport who are
both untested under fire. Lamm
missed a 34 yarder against Duke
and another one against VMI
while Davenport missed his only
attempt - a 47 yarder against
N.C. State.
"We're both trying to help
each other with our kicking
VERN DA VENPORT
explained Davenport, a soccer
style kicker who also doubles as
split end behind Terry Gailaher
and Billy Ray Washington. "Bill
and I are both trying to build up
confidence in ourselves. We've
heard enough about now nobody
has oonfidenoe in our kicking
game. We're not worried about
that. We've just got to go out
there and prove to everybody
that we can get the job done
This season the NCAA has
ruled that if a field goal is
missed anywhere outside the 20
yard line the ball will be brought
back to the original line of
scrimmage. The new rule will
eliminate many long distance
field goals unless it is late in
the game.
"I don't think the new rule
will affect us that much Lamm
said. "I don't think we will
gamble that much because
we've got some excellent receiv-
ers who can get that necessary
yardage when we really need it.
A lot of it will depend on the
situation of the game
'MENTALLY TOUGH
Placekickers are much like
pinch hitters in baseball.
They're forced to stand on the
sidelines, sometimes for the
entire contest, before they're
called upon to deliver in a clutch
situation.
"Junior Creech was already
halfway on the field when Coach
Dye told me to go out there and
kick it in the game against N.C.
State said Davenport. "Now
that was really tough on my
concentration. But I shouldn't
have let it bother me, I've just
got to block out the crowd
noise
CONSISTENCY IMPORTANT
Davenport, a junior from
nearby Griffon, also wants to
oonosntrate more on his kickoffs
this season. Pirate opponents
had a whopping 942 yards in
kiokoff last year.
"I didn't really have a good
year " explained Davenport "I
pressed a little bit too hard in
games. In practioe I was boom-
ing them into the end zone, but
in the games I was trying to
knock the ball between the
goalpost and leaving it short and
only getting it to the ten yard
line- �? gojnglo work a St
more on consistency this
season
WINTERS THE BEST
Both agree that there'snot
a better oenter around thar
Gene Winters who's handled th
snapping chores for punts ark
place kicks during the last two
seasons. And both are oonf ident
that any quarterback in the
game can handle the ail-
important spot before the kick.
"Gene Winters hasn't made a
bad snap in two years said
Lamm, "and I don't anticipate
him making a bad one this year
either. If I miss a kick, it's my
fault for not making total
concentration. The crowd's not
going to bother me. I've just got
to work on that smooth follow
through and things will take care
of themselves
ECU-State, UNC tickets
Student tickets for the ECU football games
against N.C. State and North Carolina will go on
sale Tuesday, Sept. 5 at the Athletic Ticket Office
now located in the front of Minges Coliseum. The
ticket office will open at 9 a.m.
Each student may purchase only one ticket for
each game with their ID and student activity
card.
FOUNTAINHEAD reported its final summer
edition that students could purchase two tickets
per person, but because of the large demand only
one ticket will be sold to each student. Cost of the
tickets will be $4.00.
ECU will face N.C. State Sept. 9 in Raleigh
and will travel to Chapel Hill Sept. 16 to play
North Carolina.
J
announces
WA YEN BOLT
VINCt KOLANKO
Coach Pat Dye will have
plenty of nelp as he prepares his
team for its opener on Sept. 2
against Western Carolina in
Ficklen Stadium. In addition toa
staff of eight full-time assistants
two former Southeastern Con-
ference players, Neil Callaway
of Alabama and Dennis Hughes
of Georgia have joined the
coaching staff as graduate assis-
tants.
Callaway was recruited to
the Crimson Tide by Dye while
he was an Alabama assistant. A
part-time starter there, he saw
action at five different positions
and lettered two years.
Hughes, who also played
tight end five years profession-
ally, three in the NFL with
Pittsburg and Houston and two
in the WFL with Jacksonville,
was an all-South-eastern Con-
ference player for the Bulldogs.
Johnny Rodgers, a standout
at Winston-Salem State and a
participant in the East-West
all-star game following his
senior year, will be serving as a
volunteer assistant coach. He
was a two-year captain and
four-year letter man at tight end
for the Rams.
Former Pirate players Steve
Hale, Wyane Bolt and Vice
Kdanko will be working as
student assistant coaches. Each
lettered for the past four years
under Dye. Bolt was chosen fa
the all-Southern Conference
team in 1976 and the all-
Southern Independent squad
last fall.
Media, fans agree
ECU
PAT DYE
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
Four years ago, Pat Dye was just another promising new ooach
trying to succeed in this door-die business known as college
football.
He has served as an assistant ooach at Alabama for nine aba
under Paul "Bear" Bryant where he was in charge of linebackers
and recruiting. Although Dye was an All-America at Georgia during
his playing days, and he tutored four more All-Amerlcans at
Alabama, he had never held a head coaching position during his
career.
Fortunately, former ECU ooach Sonny Randle had not left the
Pirate program in shambles when he departed for greener pastures
at Virginia. Randle s '72 and '73 teams had put together
back-to-back Southern Conference championships with identical 9-2
records.
Even with a narrow 28-27 loss to North Carolina during the 1973
season, the Pirate football program had finally gained
respectability among North Carolina ooaching circles.
But once again the ECU program had reached a critical stage.
Could this former Alabama assistant continue to win games and
bring the Pirates into the national limelight? Or would the program
fade back into mediocrity and flounder along at the .500 mark.
34 wins and 12 losses later, Pat Dye has silenced any critics who
may have questioned his ability as a head coach.
Dye has fashioned four consecutive winning seasons since
arriving at ECU and is recognized by his peers as one of the finest
coaches in the game today.
Fa the reoord, his Pirate teams never finished worst than third
when ECU was a member of the Southern Conference, tying for
third in 1974, second in 1975 and winning the title in 1976 with an
impressive 9-2 reoord.
Against Atlantic Coast Conference competition, Dye has
engineered victories over North Carolina, Duke, Virginia and two
against N.C. State.
ECU has also achieved its only national ranking since Dye hat
been the head ooach.
But perhaps more importantly, Dye is as popular among his
peers as he is with his players, and the rest of the Greenville
community.
In the mayor'srace in Greenville last year, Dye received several
write-in votes. Although he has no political aspirations, it's a safe
bet if he campaigned fa the post it certainly wouldn't be very
difficult fa him to win the election.
"Pat Dye is looked upon by most of the ECU fans as one a the
boys said Howard Ward the Sports Edita of the Fayetteville
Observer. "I think he's so popular because evayone can identify
with him. Down here in Fayetteville we've got a very active Pirate
dub and everybody just loves him.
'He's one of the finest young coaches in the
nation today' Chip Alexander
Raleigh News & Observer
"He'8 " up on a pedestal like many aner foaball coaches who
seem to give that impression. His fans feel like they can just walk
right into hisoff ice, call him Pat and talk about anything. That's the
kind of guy he is
Like any program, publicity always plays a key role in promoting
a product, and according to Chip Alexander of the Raleigh News
and Otmrvar, Dye is one of the meat well liked and quotable
coaches around.
' 'Coach Dye is in a position where the irare publicity he gets the
mae he is promoting the ECU program said Alexander � He's a
media conscious coach and at ECU getting publicity fa his team is
a big part of his job. He's certainly one of the finest young coaches
in the nation today
One admirable trait Dye seems to possess which writers
appreciate is that of a straight shooter. Ask him a question and
you'll reoaive an honest answer. Moat coaches are infamous fa
generally baing statements about their teams' perfamance and
many simply have nothing more to say than "no comment But
not Dye,
a Z 3 Play8r haSa ,ousy 9ame� Wew a P"ay. tell you, "said
Art Chansky, the Sports Edita of the Durham Herald " He's not as
rZTZHT ?" Many 00aches ��to � �"
really happened but Coach Dye will tell you the truth. He also
seemsjto relate to his playas much mae doeely than other
Arwtha reason he is so successful is his ability to adaot to anv
situation with any type of person continued OhaWoS
Carolina love, but I ve seen him address groupsand be as articulate
and charm,ng as a politician. He has that CrWytte
piayas, alumni and press all like ���ry that the
Dye's teams also have a reputation fa wmnma the -bio'
conference schools. Dye hasan impressive W recad nJTcr
And two of the games ECU dropped against ACCom.
only by four and two points. schools, were
"He's one of the beet bio cam m�.
Oansky. "His teams are �e����?' �2
Prepared fa the N.C. Sate and North S&TlT'
the most exciting things about his teams la thVET- �"
up with a little of the unexpected " ,s "�� come
Dye begins his fifth season at ECU thi. o- -
Piratesopen their 1978 season a��J!tSEl" T 5
question he has to answer everywhere he cTnal �"�� a
.if �� ?�nJearloWc�nwfc.
Missouri. And if he continues to win thia Z ntand
athletic directas across the wunirTJVTl 8 "� mem
with lucrative contract offers. at his doa
"When he leaves, ECU will haw k� .
aaid Aiexanoar. "Rndmg arXTal �"





Seven starters rvt
28 Augu 1078 FOUNT AINHEAD Pggt 29
Valentine, Hall head veteran ECU defensive team
OSAvf ROGERS
Sports Editor
It's not likely many Pirate
fans will ever forget the heroics
ECU s defensive troopes staged
in back-to-back games against
N.C. State and Duke last
season.
First, it wasRuffm McNeils
luring stop on States
- . a jams on the final play of
the game which preserved a
23 win for the Pirates.
And the following week, a
host of Pirates led by Wayne
Pools and Thomas McLaurin
stopped Duke quarterback Mike
Dunn just short of the goal line
I two-point conversion at-
tempt which gave ECU its
� end victory in as many weeks
over an Atlantic Coast Confer -
school
The Pirate defense certainly
promises more of the same this
season with 19 lettermen return
including All-Amencan
candidates Zack Valentine and
oeraid Hall.
Defensively, we've got to
a good team this season
said ECU head coach Pat Dye.
We have some excellent play-
ers returning with more exper-
ence than we've ever had
coming back before, so I know
Me can have a fine defensive
dub this fall
Experience is certainly an
ZACK VALENTINE
Pirates' defense this season.
Up front in the DMZ zone
return defensive end Zack
Valentine who Dye says is "one
of the finest in the country
The 6-3, 212 pound senior from
Edenton, N.C. has been a
starter since his freshman year
and has figured in 165 solo
tackles during his career includ-
ing three interceptions. Perhaps
his biggest interception came
last season against N.C. State
when he picked off a Johnny
Evans aerial and raced 60
yards for a touchdown in the
first quarter.
At the other end will be John
Morris, a 6-2, 212 pound junior
from Durham. N.C. who was in
on 50 solo tackles last season,
TOMMY SUMMER
Chavis will probably see plenty
of action behind Morris.
"We've got superior athel-
etes at defensive end this
season observed assistant
coach Cary Godette. "Zack
Valentine is the best defensive
end to ever play at ECU and in
my opinion he's probably one of
the best in the country
Although the Pirates lost
Wayne Poole and Woodrow
Stevenson before the season
started, Noah Clark, Oliver
Felton, D.T. Joyner and Nate
Wigfall are all experienced
veterans at nose guard and
tackle.
Clark, a 6-1, 225 pound
junior from Robersonville, N.C.
finished third on the team i�
CHARLIE CARTER
Felton, a 5-9, 218 pound senior
from Hertford, N.C. managed
41 tackles from his nose guard
position.
A familiar face missing from
the Pirate camp this year has
been linebacker Harold
Randolph, a walkon from Rose
High School, who garnered
All-American honors last
season.
But Mike Brewington, a part
time starter last season, returns
along with senior Tommy
Summer to shore up the Pirate
linebacking corps. Brewington,
considered one of the top prep
players in the state three years
ago, and 68 stops last year fhile
Summer had 41 tackles. Sopho-
more Jeffery Warren and junior
Cliff Williams will also see
playing time.
Perhaps the most experienc-
ed group of returners is in the
Pirates' defensive secondary
where safety Gerald Hall, along
with cornerbacks Willey Holley
and Charlie Carter will be back
to pester opponent passing
attacks. Only Steve Hale is
missing from the secondary and
he will be replaced by Ruffin
McNeil.
Wayne Perry, Nill Pinkney,
and James Freer are all talented
reserves and assistant coach
Bobby Wallace couldn't be
happier with the improvement
the secondary made last season.
"They all play smart and
aggressive defense said
Wallace. "Gerald Hall is a great
player and does so many things
for our secondary. Willie Holltsy
and Charlie Carter have nr.�de
tremendous improvement since
last season
THE ECU DEFENSE recovers a fumble against starters this season including All-America
Appalachian State as the Pirates went on to take candidates Zack Valentine and Gerald Hall
a 45-14 victory. The Pirate defense returns seven
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Pwq 30 FOUNTAINHEAD 26 Augu 1978
Freshmen aid ECU soccer team
JEFF KARPOVICH MANEUVERS around an martin at wing. The Pirate booters finished 2-10
opponent during a Pirate socoer match. After last season,
missing last season, Karpovich returns to the
Pirate lineup along side all-state performer Phil
By SAM ROQERfi-
Sports Editor
An air of optimism surrounds
the ECU soooer team this year as
head coach Brad Smith begins
his second season in an attempt
to rebuild the Pirates' sagging
program.
Since 1974 when the Pirate
booters finished 7-4 and captur-
ed victories over Duke, Carolina
and N.C. State, ECU has failed
to win more than games in one
season.
But Smith, who was a
member of that 1974 team which
at one time was ranked 10th in
the South, feels his Pirates will
be an improved club over last
year when ECU fashioned a
disappointing 2-10 record.
"Things can't be any tough-
er than they ware last year
says Smith. "We lost a lot of
players from last year's squad.
We're going to be counting
heavily upon our freshmen and
sophomores so we will be a very
inexperienced team
"With our defense, we'll be
giving up a lot of goals which
means our offense is going to
have to produce this season. But
we're awfully young so as the
season progresses I think we'll
improve more every game
Offensively, all-state per-
former Phil Martin returns along
with Jeff Karpovich and a host of
talented newcomers.
Martin, a Junior from Green-
sboro, N.C, led the team in
scoring last season with nine
goaJs and also added three
assists.
Karpovich, a Junior from
Ramsey, N.J. was one of the
Pirates' top offensive performers
on the 1976 squad but missed
last season. Smith indicated
Martin will probably be at left
wing while Karpovich will be at
the right wing position or center
forward.
Help will oome from fresh-
man Brad Wincheil, ECU'S first
socoer scholarship recipient and
Dwayne Bailey, a member of the
Pirate track team who posses
excellent speed.
Wincheil scored 22 goals for
Northside High School in
Atlanta, Ga. last season, and will
probably start at center forward.
John Stewart, a transfer from
Do you have
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And get three games for only $1.25.
( Per Person Rate )
LOCATED BESIDE RlfER BUFF ACTS
Phone 758-1820
Bond's
BAck to School - Student Appreciation Sale
All tennis shirts by Adidas and Wilson: Buy one at regular price.
get nd for M prleet Seleet group of tennis shirts V off I
Adidas Tom Okker and John Neweombe Tennis Shoes 819.98 ft
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PHIL MARTIN
California State College, along
with freshmen Brian Parrott and
Ricky Tucker will add depth at
the wing position.
Defensively, the Pirates lost
three starters and return only
one. And Jeff Kluger, the lone
ddefensive returner, missed the
final three games last year with
a knee injury and still hasn't
fully recovered.
"We'll have a more versatile
defense said Smith, "but we
need more speed. With only one
returning starter, we'll certainly
have to mature quickly
Besides Kluger, Stanley
Griff, another scholarship per-
former from Rockaway, N.J. will
be at fullback along with William
Teter, an all-oountry performer
from Alberque, N. Mex. and
Keith Newbern, an all-state
honorable mention selection
fiom Wilson's Fike High
Schoc
"Our transition game will
probably be the most improved
area on our team claimed
Smith. "We've got a lot of
freshmen who should be able to
oome right in and help us
immediately
Terry Rainor, another scho-
larship player, will be at center.
Rainor, a a native of Orlando,
Fla was selected first team
all-state last season.
Malcolm McLean from
Charlotte, N.C. along with John
Merring from Oxen Hill are all
freshmen who Smith feels will
see plenty of action.
Smith also says Sean Berry
and Andy Roman, teammates at
Greensboro Page High Shool
last season and Howard Bmus
from Greensboro Grimsley will
also play at halfback.
Pirate goalies Mike.
Lawrence and Hal Bullock allow-
ed a whopping total of 39 goals,
last season, but both have a year
JEFF KLUGER
Senior Kevin Tysus from
Desputo, Va. emerged as the top
goalie after spring practice drills
and will battle Lawrence and
Bullock for the starting position
The Pirates' 1978 schedule
has to rank as one of the
toughest in the south. ECU will
face five teams which in all
probability will be among the
south' s top ten this season
including North Carolina, Duke,
and Appalachian State.
"It's an excellent schedule,
but it's undoubtedly one of the
toughest East Carolina has ever
had observed Smith. "But I
think our players would rather
play all the top teams. This way
we' re going to build a better and
more improved team every
season
Carroll
new ECU
assistant
Pirate dub Executive Director
Gus Andrews has announced We
appointment of Mike Carroll as an
assistant director of the Pirate
Club effective immediately.
Carroll, 24, is an N.C. Sate
graduate and the son of Warren
Carrol, who for 17 years served as
the Executive Secretary of the
highly-suooessful Woifpack Club
and the N.C. State Univerty
Student Aid Association.
For the past four years the
new appointee has worked for
Warren Carroll and Associates, a
Raleigh fund-raising and consult-
ing firm.
"We are very excited to have
Mike with us Andrews said in
announcing the appointment.
Carroll's primary duties will
be to aid in the development and
expansion of Pirate Club operat-
ions throughout North Carolina.
� Ill
DFVUG
E
j i �
�18 Arlington Blvd. Greenville, N C N.C. 7M4M1
The management and employees at Kroger Sav-on would
like to welcome returning ECU students & incoming freshmen.
Our Deli-Bakery has a wide variety offcods to choose from,
from delicious cakes & donuts to freshly sliced gourmet meats &
cheeses in our deli case. Wealso offer a full cafeteria line of
delicious home cooked meals, ranging from $1.79 to $219 &
sandwiches served with the salad of ycjur choice.
If you haven't received one already, come out to the store and
pickyour ECU STUDENT DISCOUNT CARD, which
credits bearer with 20 off any dinner all year
Bhak 7:00-10:30
Lunch&Dhnl 1:00400
AA about our sonata meal plan for Kudo &
our catering for large gathering.
a-v-Mamm
� ,
TT- - �
bottom
mmmm' mm i





Oyepraises offensive backs
28
August 1978 FOUNTAINHEAO Page 31
Collins, Hicks star in final scrimmage
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
s�Phomore halfback
Anthony Collins soared three
Mouchdowns while Eddie Hicks
added two more as the first
team offense put seven touch-
downs on the scoreboard here
'ast Thursday night in the
Drates' final scrimage before
the season opener Sept. 2
against Western Carolina.
Collins scored on a one yard
plunge early in the scrimmage
and later added touchdown runs
of three and 19 yards. Collins
also grabbed a pass from
quarterback Leander Green for
a two point conversion.
Hioks scored both his touch-
downs on three yard runs.
"Our offensive backs all
played well said ECU head
coach Pat Dye after the scrim-
mage. - really oouldrVt see
what they were doing from
where I was on the field, but
they were sure opening up some
STEVE GREER
big holes for our backs. I was
also pleased with our receivers.
Offensively, we did a good job. '
Reserve quarterback Steve
Greer scored on a seven yard
keeper while Henry Trevathan
hit freshman Greg Montgomery
with an 85 yard touchdown pass
to round the Pirates scoring fa
the evening.
Bill Lamm added flve PAT's
and also did a fine job on
kickoffs with several booming
HENRY TREVATHAN
kicks into the end zone.
Dye had particular praise for
quarterback Steve Greer and
was also pleased with the
performance of the second team
defense.
I've been real pleased with
Steve s progress during the last
two weeks observed Dye.
"His passing has improved
tremendously. He has the abil-
ity and he's gaining more
confidence in himself out on the
d:t. joyner
field. We've just got to have a
quarterback that can go in there
and help Leander Green when
he gets tired or hurt
"We ran Western Carolina's
defense against the number one
offense and I though they
performed as well as the first
team defense at times cent in
-ued Dye "D.T. Joyner, Clifford
William and Nat Wigfall all had
fine individual efforts
Dye also expressed concern
with the Pirates' poor pass rush
which must improve before
ECU'S home opener against
Western Carolina. The Cata-
mounts' nuarterback, Mike
Pusey is one of the nation's top
passing quarterbacks.
"Our pass rush has simply
got to improve said Dye.
" M ike Pusey is the best passing
quarterback we've played
against since I've been here and
that's saying alot since we've
played against guys like Mike
Dunn and Johnny Evans. Byt
we've got to put more pressure
on the quarterback
With two-a-day practices
ending after the scrimmage,
Dye was also pleased with the
team's pre-season conditioning
and injury situation.
"We've been very fortunate
from the injury standpoint
noted Dye. "We've had no key
people hurt during pre-season
and hope it continues
Transfers bolster ECU volleyball
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
Even with the loss of veter-
ans Gail Kerbaugh and Debbie
Freeman. ECU volleyball coach
Ahta Dillon is confident her
netters will be a strong contend-
er this season in the expanded
NCAIAW conference.
"We have no replacement
for Debbie, because she was
such a great all-round player
observed Dillon, 'but we'll be a
stronger team. We have a lot
more depth this season and I
think we should be top contend-
ers for the conference title
Dillon, who begins her se-
cond season at ECU. is excited
about her 78 squad largely
because of two talented junior
college transfers who should
rxeak into the Pirates starting
lineup immediately.
Gmny Rogers and Rebecca
Beauchamp, a 5 10' spiker.
both starred for Anne Arundell
Community College last season.
They led Anne Arundell to the
Maryland state and regional
titles and took fifth place in the
national junior college champ-
ionships.
Dillon describes Rodgers as
a "good all-round player" while
Beauchamp is a "powerful"
spiker who should help Roste
Thompson on the front line.
Rodgers garnered all-
oonference and all-region hon-
ors at Anne Arundell and was
named to the regional all-
tournament team. Beauchamp
was named to the second team
all-conference and all region
teams and was also selected to
the first team in the regional
tournament.
Returning fa the Pirates
this season are spikers Rosie
Thompson and 5-10" junior
Linda McClellan. Sophomores
Sandy Sampson and Judy
Haliada also return with junior
Joy Forbes.
Rose brings a lot of
experienoe into to the lineup for
us said Dillon. "With Ginny
Rodgers and Becky Beauchamp,
I hope thay can all step in and
provide the leadership we
need
Rozealla Major is another
schoia-ship performer who
Dillcn feels will help up front.
Major, a 57" spiker from
Fayettevilie. prepped at E.E.
Smith last year and led her team
to an impressive 13-5 record.
She was also named to the
all-conference team.
LaVonda Duncan, another
transfer who played at Louis-
burg College last season, will
strengthen the Pirates defen-
sively.
"With Wake Forest in the
conference it's a real competi-
tive league observed Dillon.
"We have only four home
matches so our schedule will be
awfully tough this year
ECU will host the NCAIAW
tournament Nov. 10 and 11 and
the Pirates will also sponsor the
ECU Invitational Oct. 27 and 28.
Teams competing in the ECU
Invitational will be Peace,
Louisburg, Virginia Tech, long-
wood and Concord.
How Hardens
beefed up
our line.
"We were down 26-zip at the
half. Instead of the same old pep
talk, I promised the boys I'd buy
them all Hardee's Roast Beef Sand-
wiches if we won.The thought of
that piled-high roast beef must
have beefed up our line, because
we piled up 12 touchdowns and
26 safeties. I wonder what'll hap-
pen if I promise each of
them two Roast Beef
Sandwiches?"
Hacrfeer
91 OCowhe Street
3G0EaGre�vileBoulevaid
2907 ��t 10th Street
Volleyball Schedule
Sept. 19
Sept. 21
Sept. 23
Sept. 26
Sept. 29
Oct.3
Oct.4
Oct.6& 7
Oct. 10
Oct. 12
Oct. 18
Oct.20&21
Oct. 24
Oct 27 & 28
Nov. 1
Nov. 10& 11
Nov. 17& 18
Louisburg, UNC-Wilmington
Duke, Wake Forest
Unc-Greensboro
Sppalachian State, North Carolina
N.C. State
North Carolina
Chowan
South Carolina Invit. Tournament
Wake Forest; High Point
Pembroke State. Elon
N.C. State
Appalachian State Tournament
Louisburg, Duke
ECU Invitational
UNC-Greensboro, Appalachian, Peace
NCAIAW Tournament
NCAIAW Region II Tournament
Home
Away
Home
Away
Away
Home
Away
Away
Away
Away
Home
Away
Away
Home
Away
Home
Away
ECU HA LFBA CK EDDIE Hicks uses his fore arm touchdowns in the Pirat c t
y ICKS scorea nQ brilliant senior camninn tnhntnhu .lhn Qauri
Make the campus connection.
If you want to be listed in the ECU Telephone
Directory for 78 - 79, you need to order your
phone now.
You can place your order at the Carolina Telephone
Phone ShopBusiness Office at 1530 Hooker Rd.
So get in on the connection, and order your phone today.
fflQQ Carolina Telephone
.
UNITED TELEPHONE SYSTEM
f
THE SAVING PLACE
KMART'S FANTASTIC
FOOD WEEK!
OPEN DAILY
9:00- 9:00
CLOSED SUNDAY
August 28 Thru Sept 2
Mon.
Hamburger Plate $1.09
Chicken a- Dumpling $1.00
B.B.Q. Chicken P!ate$1.49
2 Hot Dogs sm. drink$1.00
Smrthfield B.B.Q. $1.19
Meatloaf $1.00
Thurs.
Liver and Onions
Beef Macaroni & Tomatoes
$1.00
l-ri
Fish Plate $1.69
Macaroni & Cheese $1.00
SaturdayShrimp M
B.B.Q. Plate $1.19
HAMBURGER PLATE
Golf Shop Sale Ccmtinues:
AH Ladies summer skirts, blouses, shorts, and tennis outfits - now 60 off
� Excellent selection of men's and ladies golf shoes at close out prices.
25 off on all golf bags in stock
� Sock Sale - men's and ladies buy 2 pairs and get one free
Closeout sale on all men's short sleeve shirts.
GOLF PRO DIVISION
All Men s IZod Lacoste short sleeve shots
reduced drastically for quick sale.
Good selection.

.ONER � GREENVILLE m ARLINGTON BOULEVARD!
Ski trips to SrKwshoe this wmterwifl be arranged byGordoriFulp.
Ski Trip will be from from January 7th through January 12th. 5 days. Modified American Plan.
Staying at Trmberlodge Lodge. We only have 25 rooms so please hurry and call Gordon.
You may arrange your own transportation or may go up on our charier bus.
� � We will rent and sell snow skis, equipment, and ski dotiiing and accessories agamtliis year.
GORDON D. FULP
GOLF PROFESSIONAL
LOCATED AT GREENVULE OOUOTRY CLUB
COUNTRY CLUB DRIVE
OFF MEMORIAL DRIVE
GREENVLLE, NORTH CAROUNA 27834





Page 32 FOUNTAINHEAD 28 August 1978
Pirates on television
i season football
ill by WITN-TV
A . - lelayed
j ason
' � - rted to bi
it 11:30 p m. on
eai, will include

it tana
of Notre Dame football
dor DioS ' WITN-TV
Ken Strayhorn, a former
ill-Conf bac will handle the
N � � � - undei way with othei
ind Virginia to carry
WELCOME BACK
ECIT STUDENTS!
GREENVILLE HARDWARE
m
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Phone 756-4949- Next Door ToArby's
Offn Weekdays 8 30-9 Saturday 8 to 9
YOUR FULL SERVICE HARDWARE STORE
HV repair appliance
sharpen seissors, am!
make keys. FesJ Wicarrv
a full line of houseware
from hot plates to nitusur
tM spoons, uloiii with all
your hardware and paint
needs.
JlkM) SUMMER 78
pon 1.99
3-PC -
MEASURING SET
n 8 oz 2i
1 qt 6511 -
dn ixpiRfs n � t; -
mi pP' Adult Customer
Jones, Zwigard head
ECU field hockey
m
'K athy Zwigard and Sue Jones are 1 super
offensive players. I'm expecting a lot from the
this season'
Laurie Arrants
Field Hoekev Coach
QhulfaAu) SUMMER 78

ThuVa&ti SUMMER 78
Mil TY MATCH'
Z MASKING TAPE
upon Pet Adult Customer
HPIES "� -
.m
Pfi Adull Customer
Prices are Falling
At Blue Bell's
Fall Fashion Sale!
SUE JONES THE Pirates leading scorer last lunior Kathy Zwigard are two of the top players
eason wards the goal against the state The Pirates face Wake Forest m their
nnorfr
too�L.
vow
FoW
�nfy
?'03Oo
from your neighborhood ASSOCIATED DRUGGISTS
�00, unuw,fll September Sate
FAff4fi!ftll�
r7w
SUAVE
STRAWBERRY
SHAMPOO
sutv�-
Laai
only
B'ouso
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todies
Peasant
SWfH-
only
values to $12.00
Hurry! Sale ends Sept 2nd!
First quahty and .rregular ,eans sportswear k.ds
wear boots. T-shirts, western Shirts underwear and
more for the entire family
ALL AT OUTLET 9ICES
Blue Bell
Factory Outlet
703 Greenville Blvd , Greenville Square ShoppingCenter,
Monday Friday 10:00-9:00. Saturday 10:00-6:00.
Also in New Bern, Rocky Mount. Goldsboro. Kinston
(FORMERLY THE factory)
PHISODERM
FACIAL
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:v
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HALEY S MO
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MO
INSTAPURE
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TAMPAX
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I � LOTION, -T�. PAPER TOWELSjlp-iBATHROOM TISSUE"
tm�c� ��f SUGGf S'f DAD P�tff s .
Biggs Drug Store
300 Evans, on the maD
Phone 752-2136
. fH PBT- rPNG S'S
Hargetts Drug Store
2500 S. Charles St Extend &I
Phcne phone 756-3344 Jp
fly SAW ROGERS
Sports Editor
Take a glance down the ECU
field hockey roster and it's
certainly not hard to understand
why Pirate head coach Laurie
Arrants is exated about the
upcoming season
With the team's top two
scorers returning along with a
veteran defensive squad, the
Pirees should be serious con-
tenders m the eight team
NCAIAW conference this seas-
on
"All the teams in the
conference have improved over
last year, observed Arrants.
now in her fourth year at ECU
"But overall, it looks like a good
year for us right now Kathy
Zwigard and Sue Jones are two
super offensive players and
they'll score a lot of points for
us We'll be making some
changes in our defense this
season which will probably help
us"
Offensively, the Pirates have
one of the top one-two punches
m the state in Sue Jones, a
sophomore from Virginia Beach.
Van and Kathy Zwigard. a
junior from New Jersey. Jones
led the team in scoring last
season while Zwigard paced the
squad in asists
They re our dynamic duo,
said Arrants. They both seem
to complement each other so
weli on the field. They re both
strong players and have excell-
ent speed
Sue iearned the mental
game last season and has gotten
over a lot of her mental
mistakes She had a tendency to
play ail over the field at times
which hurt her. but she's a team
oriented piayer and I'm very
confident in he ability
Alongside Jones and
Zwigard. who will play a;
left and right attacker positions
m oe senior Ann Holmes ana
freshman Caro Belcher
Beicher. who signed a fack
grant-in-aid. alsostarrc
hockey at Virginia Beach s Co
High School where she rea
an award as the outsit
female athlete in the area
Seniors Montine Sv.
Sally Burch will head the P
defense Burch co-Cci; I
the team last seasu Mi
Swam is a three year star
Sally Burch arid M '
both provided exoellerri ���-
ship last season, sa
" They rebotn erytaJ
I'm expecting b .
them this year
Sopnomores L-
Harnso? �� �' on Ba
be at the defense v bad1
tions and �
junior Ruth Gross
i or Lynette I -
Leigh Sum- � i sof
from Newton G' �� �
the all importar- j ��
with a year of experie -
her
Ve plan a
zone defenses this
noted Arrants
past .���-� e goTK m
man-to-man 0
�� - ZOTM A
to help our goa �- re a
other end a4
The - will ca
NCAIA title Oct. ; �
Bcone anc a - i
prestigious Deej. j �-�'
menl
Our schec j -
more every sea l � A
said Pla
Souther
to place some of on
the all-star team ar
us some top flight i
We cer; �
who are worthy or co
tne Deep Soc
ECU opens its seas �
22 against Wake
3on Saiem
� home contest
st Duke Univ
nome games schecu -
. . � rech Dav i �
Like Sports?
Why not write
about it?
The Fountain head Sports Staff
will have a meeting for anyone
interested in writing sports this
fall, Tuesday, Sept. 5 at 3:00 p.m.
Fountainhead is looking for an
assistant sports editor as well
as staff writers
If you cannot attend the meeting call
Fountainhead and leave your name,
address and phone number.
OPEN DAILY 9:30- 9:00
CLOSED SUNDAY
DEVELOPING and PRINTING
SPECIAL
f K MART Goof Proof Policv
12 Exp. 110,126,135
printing fir developing $i .97
20 Exp. 110,126,135
printing fir developing $2.97
Slide and Movie Film
developing 97
36 Exp. 35 mm Slide Film
developing $1.97
36 Exp. 35 mm Print Film
printing fir developing $4.97 I
CORNER GREENVILLE ARLINGTON BQQLEVARBS





New pressbox and scoreboard
2�AugmHtW FOUKTAINHEAD Pig�33
Ficklen expansion completed
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
Except for a few finishing
touches, the newly expanded
Ficklen Stadium will be ready
for another season of Pirate
football when ECU opens its '78
campaign Saturday night
against Western Carolina Univ-
ersity.
Cost of the expansion was
estimated at $2.5 million and
was raised through the efforts of
ECU alumni and the Greenville
community.
Ficklen Stadium will now
seat 35.000 fans and also has an
ultra modern pressbox facility
which is one of the largest in the
country.
The old Ficklen scoreboard
has been replaced with a new
fully computerized system
which stands 18 feet high and 40
feet long. The scoreboard will
also have a message board.
v. The new pressbox will ao-
oomodate as many as 210
members of the working press.
"The new structure is three levels
and also has darkroom facilities
for photographers to develop
'pictures during the game.
"I don't think there is a
"better -pressbox in the region
and maybe throughout the
entire nation said ECU Sports
Information Director Walt
Atkinslt's as good if not
better than anything I've ever
seen before U' snertainly goin to
be a pleasure working in it and I
know the media around eastern
North Carolina will find it far
more comfortable than the old
one
Each seat in the pressbox is
equipped with an electrical
outlet as well as a phone jack,
according to Atkins.
"We' re fast approaching the
age of electronic journalism
explained Atkins. "Media need
to gather their information
quickly and get it out fast. Each
writer now has plenty of spaos
to finish his assignment quickly
and efficiently.
The pressbox will also be
equipped with an inside public
address system. A screen show-
ing running ststistics as the
game progresses will also be
used.
The seating underneath the
pressbox will be used by ECU
Chancellor Thomas Brewer, and
other ECU administrative offic-
ials, and their guests. The old'
chancellor's seating was located
almost directly behind the visit-
ors bench on the ground level.
PRESS LEVELS
The first level of the press
box will be used for the working
morlia vhilp thp qoomd level
will oonsist of nine booths which
will accomodate coaches along
with radio and television media.
The third level will be used for
television crews and coaches
making their films of the game.
The original Ficklen Stadium
was constructed during 1962 at
a cost of $283,387.00 The
stadium contained the south
stands (pressbox side) with
bleachers used for seating on
the north side. The old lighting
facilities which were removed
after the 1974 season, were also
part of the original structure.
The current lighting sys-
tem is a combination of metaliic
and incandescent lights. There
are 384 fixtures of 1500 watts
each in the six 162 foot towers.
Ficklen stadium is the best
lighted stadium in the Southeast
according to engineers.
STADIUM DEDICATION
The stadium was dedicated
Sept. 21, 1963 when ECU
defeated Wake Forest 20-10 in
the oniy meeting between the
two schools.
In 1968, stands were con-
structed on the north side
replacing the bleachers and the
seating capacity was raised to
20,000.
A new lighting system and a
new scoreboard were built after
the conclusion of th1 1974
season. Cost of the lighting
system was $450,000.
With seating capacity now at
35,000, Ficklen Sjtadium ranks
as the fourth largest stadium in
North Carolina. Only UNCs
Kenan Stadium, Duke's
Wallace Wade Stadium and
N.C. State's Carter Stadium will
seat more fans.
After the Pirates season
opener against Western
Carolina University, ECU will
play Texas-Arlington, Appala-
chian State, William and Mary
and Marshall this year.
ISIS
IN COMES THE new and out goes the old, W feet niah is fu"Y computerized with a
construction workers install the new Ficklen messaffe &�xf.
Stadium scoreboard. The new scoreboard stands hotos Jonn H Grogan
I
mm
1890
Seafood
Pirates move into enlarged Ficklen Stadium
Welcome Aboard All Students. FRIDAY'S
is Greenville's newest and most exciting
Restaurant. Great Lunches served from
11:30-SB at reasonable prices. Dinner starts
at II till 9 10:00 Fri. & Sat. Great Atmoshere
and delicious Food.
Head to FRIDAY'S today
Show your Student
ID and get a Golden
off your
choice
FICKLEN STADIUM HAS finally been complet-
ed and will be ready for the Pirates opener
Saturday night against Western Carolina Univer-
sity Cosf of the structure was estimated at $2.5
million and was raisea through the efforts of ECU
alumni and the Greenville community. The ultra
modern pressbox is considered one of the finest
facilities in the country. The pressbox has three
levels and can accomodate as many as 210
members of the working press. Photos by John
H. Grogan
FRIDAY'S 1S90 Seafood
�311 S. fivans St.
Lunch ll:30-�:00 Dinner 5-9 (5 -10 Fri & Sat)
The Pro Shop tic
111 EastbrookDr.
Greenville
(Nest to King & Queen restaurant)
Pro line golf
tennis
ski
equipment & apparel
racket stringing-club repair ski rentals
Listen to the I Welcome to ECU and Greenville
Pirates
on the radio
The Pirate Sports Network,
the official voice for live play-by-
play coverage of ECU athletics
will again include more than 20
radio stations, blanketing east-
ern North Carolina. It will be
third largest such networK in tne
state. The population in the
coverage area fa Pirate football
will include well over 2 million
people.
The capable team of Jim
Woods and Lee Moore will be in
its fifth year of handling the
broadcasts of ECU football this
fall. Woods, the sports director
of WNCT-TV in Greenville has a
background wich includes 28
years in broadcasting and
sportscasting. he will handle the
play-by-play chores fa this, his
tenth season with Pirate spats.
Moae, the spats directa of
WCTI-TV in New Bern will
handle the odor oommentary thi
fall, his fifth with the netwak.
His background includes prev-
ious spatscasting experience in
Hamilton, Ohio.
The Pirate Sports Netwak
will aiginate through the facili-
ties of WKTC-FM in Tartwro, a
100,000 watt station that covers
eastern North Carolina.
The regional netwrok spon-
scr of Pirate football will be
Budwetaer fa the third consecu-
tive
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Page 34 FOUNTAINHEAD 28 August 1978
chief thief-
By SAM ROGER?
Sports Editor
It's never been very hard to
recognize members of the ECU
defensive secondary. Players
like Jim Bolding, Ernest
Madison. Reggie Pinkney and
Bobby Myrick were all extreme-
ly quick with blazing speed.
They picked enemy aerials out
of the air with regularity and
generally created havoc for
opposing receivers.
Gerald Hall is no exception.
Since the Edenton native broke
into the Pirates starting lineup
as a sophomore, his perform-
ances on the gridiron have been
nothing less than spectacular.
I n his first game as a stater
two seasons ago against South
Mississippi, ne interceptea
two passes and returned a punt
70 yards fa a touchuown to lead
the Pirates to a 48-0 victay.
Befae the year was over, he
ntercepted a total of six passes
and finished 12th in the nation
in punt returns. ECU also led
the nation in pass interceptions.
Last season. Hall intercept-
ed four mae passes and return-
ed 80 yards fa a touchdown
against Richmond. Little won-
der why the flashy free safety is
eagerly looking faward fa the
1978 season to open.
I'm in the best shape I've
ever been in since coming to
ECU explained Hall, "last
season. I was bothered most of
the year with ankle injuries than we were last year. I've got
which kind of slowed me down, lot of confidence in Charlie
But this year I'm ready to go. Carter, Whilly Hoiley and
We all want to finish 11-0 and Ruffin McNeill
get a bowl invitation. That Hall has received as much
would be a great way to finish publicity for his exciting punt
my career returns as his play in the
ECU assistant coach Bobby secondary. Besides his 80 yard
Wallace couldn't be happier return fa a touchdown against
with Hall's pre-season perfam- Richmond, he also set up
ance and feels the rest of the two mae scaes against South-
Pirate secondary is a rrwch ern Illinois with long returns,
improved unit over last season. "Our overall kicking game
Gerald doesn't have great will be improved this season
speed, it's his quickness which noted Hall. "The downfield
makes him a great player, blocking is always aucial on any
Gerald's our lone senig in the return and I always seemed to get
'Th is year we 11 take them one game at a
time'
ECU safety Gerald Hall
secondary this year and the rest
of the players look fa his
leadersnip oi tne field
The Pirate seconday will be
tested early this seasai when
ECU faces Western Carolina in
its season opener. The Cata-
mounts quarterback Mike Pusey
is one of the nation's leading
passers and finished eighth in
the country last season in total
offense.
"No doubt about it, that
game is going to be a maja test
fa our secondary admitted
Hall. They've ga a great
group of receivers as well, but
we're a mae experienced roup
some good blocks. I just hope no
one starts kicking way from me
like they did towards the end of
last season
Last seasoi's 21-17 loss to
William and Mary still weighs
heavily upon Hall and the rest of
the Pirates, but Hall also feels
the game may serve as an
! one starts kicking away from me
year.
"That William and Mary
game will always be in our
minds said Hall. "We were
all disappointed that we loss.
This year we'll take them one
game at a time.
We've Got A New Store
For You From
oPftnanfe
y
Fasrucn and styles change as yean go by. The clothing needs of a youngman
today an? no longer satisfied by a jeans shop. Our look at the Clothes Hone �
one of more classically styled casual clothing. We wifl cany some jeans, but
this look will also be complimented by a great selection of casual khaki pants,
buttoned down shim, crew and v-neck sweateis, and sport coats and clothing
stvled for today's young man. Please drop by and have a look-
The Clothes Horse
218 East Fifth Street
We have the Brands and the Service.
-Americas
announces signees
GERALD HALL
Anthony Fields, the nation's
fastest schoolboy in the 100-
yard dash last spring, is among
four All-Americas on a list of
eight scholarship signees an-
nounced by East Carolina Univ-
ersity track coach Bill Carson.
Fields led the country's high
school sprinters to the tape with
a 9.3-second clocking fa 100
yards, added a 21.1-second
effat fa 220 yards which
ranked fourth in America, and
washonaed by the Washingtai
Post as the Metro Washington
male track and field athlete of
the year.
Another high school all-
America, hurdler Antoine Hol-
loman of Virginia Beach, Va
along with Daryl McCoy and Bill
Miller, both all-Americas at
Hagerstown (Md.) Junia Col-
lege canpleie the all-star group.
Versatile sprinter Warren
Days of Chinquapin, state high
school 440-yard champion
Carlton Bell of Tarboro, high
jumper Russell Parker of Wind-
Linksmen
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Edita
The collegiate golf schedule
during the fall is usually some-
what different than the spring
season. With conference titles
and the prestigious
NCAA Championships
mae than eight months away.
sa, and hurdler Valentino
Robinson of Richmond, Va.
complete the list as announced.
"This isan outstanding group
of young men that will add a lot
to our program right away
Carson saidBut I' m particular-
ly excited about their potential
fa the years ahead
Fields, a Washingtai native
and product of H.D. Woodson
High, was the outstanding
perfamer in the 1978 city
Interhigh- meet, where he set
the Metro area record fa the
100, breaking a 9.4-seooid
effat posted in 1970. His 21.1
equalled the area record set in
1958.
"Anthoiy is the best shat
sprinter we have ever signed
Carsoi continued, "But at the
same time he has the best range
of any first-year man, that is,
from the 60 indcors, througr
the 100 and 200-meters out-
doas, right up to the 400-met-
ers
Fields had been a national
leader as a junia as well,
running with America's fastest
schoolboy mile relay.
Holloman ranked second in
the country among prepsters in
the 330-yard intermediate hur-
dles at 36.8 seconds and as a
senia wai the Virginia indoa
and outdcor high hurdlec
aowns and outdoa intermed-
iates title while running fa
Princess Anne High.
McCoy, a 6.1-second per-
famer in the 60-yard dash and a
an outstanding relay member, is
from Roanoke, Va while
Miller, a standout miler. is from
Pasadena. Md.
Days, a product of East
Duplin High, will likely run the
200-meter in college, but his
talents include the 100. hurdles
and long jump.
Beli not only won the state
440 crown fa Tarbao High last
scaing but also showed gooc
ability in the high jump and
hurdles.
COnVERSE
Puma
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RATHSKELLER
Downtown Fifth Street
lOpen Every Day off the The Week 4:9 4:00-UntilJ
Featuring:
Monday � Tuesday -
8:00-10:00�Customer
Appreciation nights
Wednesday -
5:00-until�Popular prices and
weekly prize drawings (Giving aw
i record albums, dinners for two,
eoneert and ballgame tickets, Ect
Friday -
4:00until Rathskeller Friday
afternoon traditional gathering
now in its 15th year.
SATURDAY -
9:00-Until�Special entertainmei- -
Jeaturinjf Jazz, Blues. Rock. Bluegrass
Best ntmosohere in town: Air conditioned.
iee-eold bottle beverages, superior sound
system and taped music.
JOHN'S BIKE
-IAS CHANGED NAMES BUT N
GREENVILLE
BICYCLE j�
& A
SPORT (
We can outfit girL� and guys from head to foot
with quality sportswear. CHECK US OUT.
r i
IH.LHODGES
INC.
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E. 5th St. Phone 752-4156
A SHORT WALK FROM CAMPUS
210
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FOR YOUR RECREATION
OFFERING QUALITY � peugeot
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�TAKARA
WE REPAIR
ALL MAKES & MODELS!
752-4854 530 Cotanche St.
most players are oontent with
working on their game and
playing in a few tournaments
before packing away the clubs
for the winter months.
ECU head golf ooach Mac
McLendon has a few tourna-
ments scheduled along with a
oouple of dual matches, but he
also wants to find some players
capable of posting some low
numbers for next spring when
the season moves into full
swing.
With only two veterans
returning this year, the Pirates
will bean inexperienced squad.
Sophomores David Brogan and
Steve Jones are the only return-
ees while two other sophomores
Jim Parkin and Carl Beamon
saw some action last season.
"Obviously, we'll be a very
inexperienced team observed
McLendon. now in his fourth
season at the helm of the Pirate
golf program. "I want to use
the fall season to let some of the
players work on their games,
but more importantly, I'm look-
ing for some talented players
who can really help us next
spring
The Pirate linksmen were hit
hard by graduation in the
spring. Gone are standouts
Keith Hiller. Donnie Owens and
Mike Buckmaster. McLendon
has no incoming freshman sign-
ees so the players will have to
come from the student body
ranks.
"I want to look at a lot of
players this fall and try to
determine who an help us this
spring said McLendon.
"If I think a player has da �
a good job for us during the "a,
and shows a lot of potential. I
may extend scholarship. So I
hope we can get a lot of players
to oome and tryout for the
team
During its first season as an
independent. ECU had several
impressive tournament per-
formances. The Pirates finished
seventh out of 20 teams in the
prestigious Pmehurst Invitation-
al and placed 12th in a 28 team
field in the Furrrtan Intercolleg-
iate Tournament. ECU topped
Wake Forest in the Furman
Interooiiegiate which was one of
the highlights of the spring
season.
The Pirates will compete in
the 36 hole Methodist College
Intercollegiate Invitational Sept.
24-25. ECU will also play in the
Atlantic Christian Coiiege-
-Campbell College Invitational
Oct. 9-10 and the Fall Duke
Invitational Oct. 14-16. The
ACC-Campbeli tournament will
be a 35 hole event while the Fall
Duke tourney will be 54 holes.
ECU's Oliver Felton
'somebody on the
Pirates defense
By CHRIS HOLLOMON
Sports I nformation Of f ice
To ECU's nose guard Oliver
Felton, the song "short people
got nobody" just doesn't hold
true.
Felton, a 5'9 210 pounder
from Hertford, always seems to
have "somebody usually an
opposing quarterback or runner.
Felton has never considered
his height as being a disadvant-
age. In fact, he sees his
diminuitive stature as a definite
asset when he plays against a
larger center.
"I feel my height and size
serve as an advantage to me
against a larger player because I
have more quickness and
speed Felton said while put-
ting on his pads for a pre-season
practice. The Pirates open at
home Sept. 2 against Western
Carolina.
Felton'sspeed (4.7 in the 40)
was developed in high school
when he played fullback. When
he was recruited by ECU,
however, coach Pat Dye project-
ed Oliver as a nose guard. It
wasn't long befae Felton made
his presence known at that
position.
"It took him a while to
become adapted to college
football Dye said. Oliver
started as a freshman against
N.C. State and now I can't
imagine lining up without him
Felton made life miserable
for William and Mary's offense,
stunning the Indians for minus
19 yards and kept North Caroli-
na quarterbacks company in the
backftetd in another standout
froah performance. He finished
the year with 34 tackles.
Felton added 66 tackles as a
sorjhomcre when the Pirate
defense ranked third in the
nation and made another 41 last
OLIVER FELTON
fall.
But. what about this year
Though the opener against the
Catamounts is still two weeks
away, Felton s mind is only on
that game. He has goals fa
himself, the defense, and the
team as a whole, though.
I want to help the team out
any way I can Felton said. "I
feel like my goals are team
goals. I want to see the defense
ranked in the top ten again and I
would really like to get a bowl
bid this year. This team has a
really good attitude and I feel
like ovaall we have a chance to
have a great team
Dye summed up Felton's
career the best.
'Oliver is another typical
youngster from eastern North
Carolina that some schools
didn't offer a scholarship Dye
said. "And it wasn't because of
academics, because Oliver is an
excellent student. I'm happy
he's on our side He'S not
easy to spot on the street a tne
sideline, but in action fie has
convinced his coach and ECU
fans alike that - short or tall -
Oliver Felton is ail they want at
nose guard.
-�-j ��





Oyster Bowl contest included
28 August 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 35
ECU faces tough road schedule
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
Once again, ECU will face
ial games with Atlantic
Coasl Conference foes N.C.
State and North Carolina early
eason. The remainder of
�'nates schedule will be
t1 like last season with VMI.
thwestern Louisiana, Rich-
.Viliiam and Mary and
tnan State all returning.
rhe Pirates will face Texas-
ton fa the first time
Southern Miss and Mar-
vin been on the ECU
� fule be-
With six of the Pirates first
�meson the road, it's a
coach would envy.
the Pirates contest
North Carolina in Chap-
ECU will then travel to
La to face South-
Louisiana. It's not
ite fans will ever
ist season's bitter 9-7
i greatly diminished
hopes.
�� m also play games
iouthern Mississippi.
R chmond which have
1 the Pirates prob-
ed,
re is a brief recap of this
opponents.
STERN CAROLINA
The Catamounts are coming
eir greatest seasons
story WCU
1977 and had
; oass receiv-
iieson and
Da- : a 1.000 yard-
' hough both
ated. quart-
. the na-
best passer last
th a talented
ers.
18 of 22
star- st year and head
.v in his
s squad
�-riders m the
.inference. "Over-
-sustam our
ist year and
add a little to it.
some extremely
positions with the
' Tolleson and Lip-
eadows. Curtis
j Harp, and Wayne
be Pusey's favorite
hile taiiback Mitchell
bad1 Andy Jordan
� Catamounts top
eats.
. 10 starters in-
including linebackers
, and Mike
� th veterans Robert
md Ty Smith at
Safety Willie
enter heads the secondary
i ming from corner-
Sary and Willie
N.C STATE
Z State has dropped its
ast t.vo contests to ECU and its
a streak Woitpack head coach
vvouid like to see end
ear Last season. ECU
nsive back Ruffin McNeill
ped State s Ricky Adams
wo yard line to preserve
�v 28-23 victory.
. an trophy and All-
.1 candidate Jim Richter
sive line while
replace Johnny
it quarterback.
ety, the Wolfpack
lost seven starters from last
� hard hitting linebacker
Bi i her returns along with
tad Simon Gupton and free
� � 'J'ow Wilson.
st find someone to
ekicker Jay Sherril
also have to find
icements in the secondary.
NORTH CAROLINA
Dick Crum replaces Bill
Doofey at North Carolina, but
the Heels are expected to be as
good if not better than last
year's team which won the
Atlantic Coast Conference
championship and played in the
Liberty Bowl.
Veteran quarterback Matt
Kupec returns to operate.
Crum s new veer offense and
he'll have one of the nation's
top backs to pitch to in
4' Famous Amos Lawrenoe who
rushed for more than a 1,000
yards in just his first season.
Billy Johnson, Bob Loomism
and Ken Mack are the other top
backs while Jim Rouse, Delbert
Powell, Carey Casey, and
Wayne Tucker are the Heels top
receivers.
Seven starters return on
denfense which allowed the
fewet points in the nation last
oeason. Up front are Bunn
Rhames, Dave Simmons while
linebackers Buddy Curry, Ken
Sheets, and T.K. McDaniels
return
Ricky Bar den, Bobby Cale,
Bernie Menapace, and Francis
Winter will shore up defensive-
secondary.
The Pirates topped UNC
38-17 three years ago, but lost a
narrow 12-10 contest in 1976.
Crum has already expressed his
displeasure with opening again-
st the Pirates after ECU will
already have two games under
its belt.
SOU TH WESTERN LOU I SI A NA
Last year, the Ragin'
Cajuns' upset the Pirates 9-7 in
Ficklen Stadium and this season
ECU will be forced to travel to
Lafayette, Ls. for what promises
to be another tough contest.
Gone is quarterback Roy
Henry, one of the nation's top
passers, but )uoo all-America
Bob Gagliano will probably
replace him.
Tight end Calvin James
returns along with David Gray
and wingbaok Nat Durrant.
The Cajun's lost seven start-
ers on denfense, but All-South-
land Conference selection Ron
Irving. Al Kennedy and Gerald
Joseph return to head up a
strong defensive secondary.
TEXAS-ARLINGTON
This will be fisrt meeting
bewteen ECU and Texas-Arling-
ton, a member of hte improving
Southland conference.
The Movin Mavs' finished
ties for second with Southwest-
ern Lousiaina last season in the
conference. Although tweleve
starters are missing from last
year, the Mavs have capable
replacements.
Quarterback Roy DeWalt
returns along with running
backs Tony Feider and talented
spilt end Scott Burt.
Willie Thomas, an all-
conference selection last year
returns at linebacker along with
Rob Micheisen, who was the
team's leading tackier in '77.
The Mavs have a dynamic
return in 5'3, 150 pound
Mike Guadangolo.
VMI
The Pirates were forced to
come from behind before finally
edging last. 14-13.
The Keydets went on to tie
for the Southern Conference
championship last season with
an impressive 7-4 record.
Quarterback Robby Clark
returns with halfbacks Jimmy
Garnett. Larry Williams and
Carl Jackson. Tight end Greg
Weaver is the Keydets top
receiver while placekicker Bog
Craig is one of the best in the
country.
Defensively, Bob Bookmal-
ler, Alan Soltis and John
Shuman returns up front while
Gary McNeal, Tony Hamilton,
and Mike Alston and Walt
Bellamy are the top perfromers
in the secondary.
SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI
It's not likely Southern
Miss coach Bobby Collins will
ever forget the 48-0 thrashing
his Golden Eagles took in
Greenville in 1976.
This season, however, ECU
will be forced to travel to
Hattiesburg, Miss, where the
Pirates won a hard fought 13-7
contest in 1973.
Southern Mississippi finish-
ed 6-5 with impressive wins
over Southeastern foes
Mississippi, Mississippi State
and Auburn. Collins has 14
returning starters induding
quarterback Jeff Hammond
along with stellar running back
Tiko Beal, Chuck Cook and
calvm Jones. John Canon and
Chuck Brown are his two
favority receivers. Tackles J.J.
Stewart and nose guard Thad
Dillard head an experienced
defense.
RICHMOND
The Spiders finished 3-8
last season, but head ooach Jim
Tait expeds a much improved
dub this year with ten starters
returning on defense induding
All-America candidate Jeff
Nixon back for his senior
camoaian.
Although the Spiders must
find a replacment for quarter-
TED BROWN
back Dave Taylor and leading
rusher Buster Jackson help
willcome from Demitri Korne-
gay an exciting breakaway
threat who returned a kickoff 96
yards for a touchdown against
the Pirates last season.
Top recievers are Ken
Tweedy, Harvey Jones and
tightends Tim Spriggs and Ian
Beckstead.
APPALACIAN STATE
last season Appalachain
State was picked to win the
Southern Conference and break
into the top twenty, but injuries
to key offensive players and a
young defense caught up with
the Mountaineers.
The Mountaineers finished
BILL COWHER
the bottom of the Southern
Conference with a disappointing
2-9 record. Gone are quarter-
back Robbie Price, center Gill
Beck, halfback Emmitt Hamil-
ton and defensive Jay
McDonald.
Steve Brown and John Keith
are the leading candidates at
quarterback while Scott
McConnell and Arnold Floyd
return at halfback.
Defensively, the Mountain-
eers return seven starters with
David Bowman and Pat Murphy
at linebacker with Mike
Pntchett and Butch Cannady
and Gary Falden back in the
secondary.
WILLIMA AND MARY
William and Mary ended
the Pirate bowl hopes last
season with a shocking 21-17
upset in the Oyster Bowl in
Norfolt, Va.
The Indians finished 6-5 last
season and Tom Rozantz one of
the nation's top passing quart-
erbacks returns along with wide
receivers Joe Manderfield and
Ken Cloud. Jim Kruis returns at
halfback with an experienced
offensive line to open holes for
him.
Defensively linebackers Jim
Ray and Melvin Martin return
while up front the Indains have
Rolfe Carawan and Dave
O'Neill.
Head coach Jim Tait must
find a secondary, but the
Indians will still bean explosive
offense unit thsi season.
MARSHALL
The last time ECU faced
Marshall was in 1970 when the
Pi rates captured a 17-14 vidory.
But the entire Thundering Herd
team died in a tragic plane crash
on the return trip to Huntington,
W.Va.
Although Marshall finished
2-9 last season, 11 starters
return on offense talented rec-
eivers Ray Crisp and Todd
Ellwood. Crisp is one of the
nations premier punt and kickoff
return spedalists.
THE PIRA TES HA VE always been a big draw in A not her sellout crowd is expected for this year s
Raleigh's Carter Stadium. Last year more than contest which will be Sept. 9.
49,000 fans attended ECU-N.C State game
which ECU won in the final seconds 28-23.
WELCOME
BACK
STUDENTS
LET US HELP YOU
DECORATE YOUR ROOM
WITH POSTERS, FANS,
WALL HANGINGS,
AND BAMBOO SHADES
WEHAVE
HALLMARK CARDS,
STATIONERY,
AND PARTY GOODS
WE ALSO HAVE
TOTE BAGS AND MANY
OTHER GIFT ITEMS
117 EAST FIFTH STREET 7SS-3811
VMI QUARTERBACK ROBBY Clark returns to 14-13 before one of the largest crowds in Ficklen
lead the Keydet offense again in 1978. The Stadium.
Pirates travel to Keydet Stadium later this
season. Last year ECU narrowly edged VMI
SHERLOCKS
-Ljourntourn restuxunt
Comhlete JLunen& lSlnne.1 zAIejw
CTTLL iPxetcLXEO. Ijrxzin and Jeiiciou�
�&f3�ciallu ot HJou!
vjjT
tfU OCd Oovan Dnn
US �ast 5tn �bi��.t
Welcome Back
Students
JOLLY
ROGER
Disco
Greenville's Finest Disco
Does It Again.
See the All New Fabulous
Light Show.
Sunday Night Specials
Wednesday Ladies Night
R&N Inc.
209 E. 5th St.
Floyd G. Robinson Jewelers
Exclusive Dealers For J. O. Pollack
Fraternity & Sorority Jewelry
Laualiers
Dangles
�Pins
And stick Pins Li Stock
Prompt Attention Given To Special Orders
Large Selection of Diamonds Rings,
Earrings, Pendants, and Stick Pins
Over 200 SEKOwatches
Over 400 TIMEX watches
Come by, if we don't have that personal item, well get it for you!
Floyd CL Robinson Jewelers
On the mall
Downtown Greenville (beside Dak's)
758-2452
(Greenvifte't only Seiko Headquaiten)
t






!
Page 36 FOUNTAINHEAD 28 August 1978
5000 participants last year
Intramural activities open again
MORE THA N 5,000 STUDENTS pantapated in year the ECU intramural department will offer 22
the ECU intramural program last year One of hte men's and women's activities.
most popular tall sports is towel football. This
By JOHN EVANS
9taff Writer
With the beginning of the
school year also comes the
beginning of another intramural
season at East Carolina. Last
year's intramural program
reached record levels of partic-
ipation as over 5,000 ECU
students took part in some sort
of intramural activity.
During this first week of
classes, registration will take
place for the first of this year's
intramural activities, men's and
women's flag football and co-rec
Softball. In addition, registrat-
ion for the McDonald's sponsor-
ed Frisbee tournament will
begin this week and run through
Sept. 17.
Registration for the Almost
Anything Goes sports carnival
will begin next week, running
from Sept. 5-7. Students should
get a copy of the intramural
handbook and study the rules
concerning eligibility in each
sport and each division.
Other sports to be offered to
both men and women during fall
semester will include flag foot-
ball, golf, team tennis, one-on-
one basketball, track and field,
soccer, team handball and free
throw shooting.
Some changes have been
made in the intramural program
this year. First of all, there will
no longer be a dub division in
men's activities. The dub teams
will now have to compete with
the independent teams in the
new Club Independent division.
FOOD DIUJG
600 GREENVILLE BLVD.
PHONE: 756-7031
COPYRIGHT 1971-KROGER SAVON ITEMS AND PRICES
GOOD THRU SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 2. 1971. WE RESERVE
THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES. NONE SOLD TO DEALER.
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is fequired to be readily
available for sale m each Kroger Sav On Store, except as
specifically noted m this ad If we do run out of an adver
tised item, we will offer you your choice of a comparable
item, when available, reflecting the same savings or a ram
check which will entitle you to purchase the advertised item
at the advertised price within 30 days
5
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DARK BEER
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Pak-12
wenb1' Ox. Btls.
RETURNABLE BOTTLES
Pepsi Cola
, KROGER SAVON
COST CUTTER COUPON
COUNTRY OVEN
Potato Chips
� ITU COtPM MO
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LIMIT ONE PER FAMILY WITH COUPON
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KROGER SAVON
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16-ox.
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YOUR NEXT GROCERY BILL
WITH PURCHASE OF $10.00 OF MERCHADISE OR
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PER FAMILY
COOPM MM TIM SATJ0JAT, UPTUMCI2,1171
SMftCT Tf AfPUCAHi STITI A LOCAL TAXES
We're A Whole Lot More Than Just One Store
t
l
More can be found out
concerning these sports and
what plans there are for this
year at the first Intramural
Council meeting, which will be
held on August 30 at 4 p.m. The
football captain's meeting will
be held on September 5 a 4 p.m.
in Brewster Building Fkxxn
B-102. The flag football
official's ciinic will be" held on
August X and 31 at 7 30 p.m. in
the same room. Attendance at
the captain's meetins is mand-
atory for team captains and any
person wanting to become an
official must attend the official s
clinic. ECU Intramural officals
are paid for their work.
The Dormitory and Fraternity
divisions will remain the same.
In determining the four teams
for the all-campus playoffs, the
top two teams from the Dormi-
tory division will qualify along
with the championship team in
the fraternity divison and the
championship team in the Club
Independent division.
No new activities have been
added this fall, but team
handball was moved up from
spring semester last year. A
total of 22 men's and 22
women's sports, nine orec
sports, and six special events
will be offered during the year
this year. In addition, there win
be a 100-mile Jog Club and a
25-mile 9wim dub begun this
fall for the enttyjsasts m those
two sports.
Team handball
popular sport
on ECU campus
By JOHN EVANS
Staff Writer
�The inter-
national sport of Team Handball
hs now become a permanent
Olympic sport and with its
addition to the Olympic prog-
ram, Dr. Wayne Edwards will
have an opportunity to work
with the United States Olympic
Committee (U90C).
Dr. Edwards, who is the
Director of Intramuralsat ECU,
has just been named to the
Board of Directors for the
National Team Handball Feder-
ation and ne spent this past
summer working with the USOC
Team Handball oommittee at
the National Sports Festival in
Colorado Springs, Colo.
The National Sports Festival
was held for the first time this
year to promote training and
tryoutsof American athletes for
the Olympics. According to
Edwards, the Festival was so
successful that USOC officials
plan tooontinue the extravagan-
za on an annual basis, except j&,KWerai instructors that taught
Olympics, the Federation hopes
to have a team that will
challenge for a medal.
Edwards said the national
team for the 1980 Olympics is
now being selected in Colorado
from among 26 candidates who
were invited to tryout.
� We picked 26 players at the
Sports Festival and invited them
to tryout for the U.S. National
team explained Edwards.
"Sixteen of those players will be
chosen for the Olympics. 12 as
team members and four as
alternates.
"Toqualify for the Olympics
we'll have to compete in the
Western hemisphere qualificat-
ions next year against teams
' from Canada, Central America
and South America. We did it in
1972 and 1976. but Canada will
be tough competition tor us this
year
Edwards first became inter-
ested in Handball as a member
of the Armed Forces in Ger-
many in 1971. He was one o
Olympic years.
"Each Olympic sport has a
national governing body that is
designed to handle that sport
and to pick Olympic teams for
that sport explained Edwards.
"The governing body for the
U.S. team also helped to
sponsor the National Team
Handball championships
It was while coaching the
ECU team in the national
championships that Edwards
became involved with the sport
as an Olympic spec
"We (ECU) were one of the
15 teams in the championship.
It was our first year and we won
only one of five games, but after
it was all over I had some
comments about the way the
tournament had been run said
Edwards. "I didn't feel that the
tournament was being run in the
best interest of the sport and its
development in the U.S. I was
disappointed in the prospects of
Team Handball in the United
States
It was from his comments to
Peter Buehning, the U.S. Team
Handball Federation president,
that Edwards was invited to go
to Colorado Springs as a mem-
ber of the Team Handball
support party. He served as the
official scorer during the round-
robin team handball competit-
ion.
Following the Sports Fest-
ival, Edwards was voted to the
Board of Directors of the Team
Handball national organization.
This will allow him to oontinue
his work with the sport and to
help promote the sport in the
United Slates. It may also bring
him a trip to Moscow for the
1980 Olympics.
"It was a great experience
for me because I am able to
work with a sport from its very
beginning sad Edwards.
"The Sport of Team Handball is
big in Europe. It's the second
moot popular sport over there.
"But in the United States
added Edwards, "the program
is still in the formative stages. It
has been an Olympic sport only
three times, in 1936, 1S72 and
1976. It is a big thrill to work
with an Olympic organization. I
am too old to dream of participa-
ting as an athlete in the
Olympics, but I am excited to be
able to help in the organization
of the team
The goal of the National
Team Handball Federation is to
place a team in the 1980
Otympka and finish in the top
10 among the 12 teams which
wall be qualifying. By the 1984
the sport to U.S. servicemen
When he returned to the
U.S. in 1972. he was hired as the
Director of Intramurals at
Appalachian State, where he
included Team Handball in the
school's intramural program
Edwards came to ECU in the tali
of 1975. That year he taught the
sport in his physical education
classes and last fall he inductee
the sport in the intramural
program at ECU. This fall, the
sport will be included in the
school's club sport program.
"Handball is a very exciting
sport said Edwards. And a
great spectator sport. There is a
lot of scoring, a lot of action and
the fundamentals are easy to
learn. The game resembles Ice
Hockey in the speed of the
sport, soccer in terms of scoring
and basketball in terms of
moving the bail. The game is
played with the hands and the
ball is advanced by running,
dribbling or passing the ban
down a court a little larger than
a basketball oourt
Very few peop'e are familiar
with the sport and only a few
oolleges sponsor teams, but
Edwards hopes that by 1980 the
sport will have become more
popular in the United States.
And he is certainly doing his
share to help promote the sport
New
assistants
named
The East Carolina University
Intramural department has hir-
ec two full-time assistants to fill
vacancies on the staff.
Director of Intramurals Dr
Wayne Edwards has announoed
the hiring of Ms. Nancy Mize
and Mr. Rnfcart Fox as Assistant
Intramural Directors. They will
replace Hose Mary Adkins
Smith and Marty Martinez, both
of whom resigned last spring.
Mize will be in charge of the
women's and co-recreational
intramural program, as well as
the new adpated intramural
program for the handicapped.
She will also supervise all
lifeguards and swimming pool
operations.
She attended Tens
Women's University in Denton,
Texas and earned her B.A. and
M.A.clegreaBinpjiyaicoJ
tion from the school.





� t 1
STATEMENT OF ETHICS-
qLS�(TPet!i,Ve m � ia Want to offer
aTef lLE?1, I�����! aervioe. We do not
sonSZLi? t0 �� � in the ore so we can asll you
kEST We fl'Ve ,99ltimate dl800unls- � ����"�"
haTS?�L8 �0urt60us P appreciate your business. We
exHfiL a ,0n� time " e �� �� the kind of
rW!lt!l!r0m,ae8 " by "w�l a8 t� �� no �W
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sealer or a product we do not sell, he will be discharged. We are
prouoof our stereo, our serivoe, and our staff. We sincerely
your bus�-
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ereiy solicit fg Vb -
28 August 1871 FOUMTAINHEAO
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with our

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the Mail- Downtown Greenville
i
w0mmmmefm0m






38 FOUNTAINriEAD 28 August 1978
presents
8 GOOD REASONS FOR
BUYING YOUR TEXTS
DOWNTOWN
1. Low Prices�The University Book Exchange
has got thousands of USED TEXTS that save
you 25 over the price of new texts.
2. Great textbook selection�The U.B.E. has made
an all out effort to have everv book used at ECU.
3. Quick Se
This Fall we will have 8 cash
get you through our store quickly!
4. Friendly Personnel� 80 of our book rush employees are
ECU students. They can easily relate to your textbook needs
and problems.
5. Mastercharge and Bank Americard�Again this fall at
U.B.E We now accept America's top 2 charge cards for texts
& supplies.
6. Convenient Location�We're across Cotanche Street from
the girl's dorms, down the hill from Greenville's bars.
The University Book Exchange will be
Extended H
open from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p jn. on Aug. 30, Aug. 31, Sep
8. Increased Selection of school supplies, art supplies, and sports
wear. Let us be your only stop for all your texts & supplies.
NEW TEXTS
USEDTEXTS
PHOTO SUPPLES
ARTSUPPLES
3
STUDY AIDS
ECUNOVELTES
LX)WNTOWN-GREENVILLE
SPORTSWEAR
TEACHING AIDS
SCHCOLSUPPLES
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f





Title
Fountainhead, August 28, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 28, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.505
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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