Fountainhead, October 31, 1978






Circulation 10,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina � No55 No- lW
t 31
Chancellor Brewer formally installed
ByMARCBARNES
Assistant News Editor
Dr Thomas B. Brewer was formally installed as
chancellor of ECU in ceremonies here Saturday.
Dr Brewer. 46. is the former Vice-Chancellor and Dean
of Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, Texas.
Dr. Brewer was joined on the platform by Governor
James B Hunt, Chief Justice Susie Sharp, and Jack W.
Peltason. who is the president of the American Council On
Education President William C. Friday, of the University
of North Carolina, presided over the ceremonies.
Governor Hunt greeted the crowd, saying "The people
of North Carolina are thrilled to have this great and good
man. Thomas Brewer, who has been found by looking
throughout America to come here and to lead this
university He added that ECU had progressed from a
small teachers college to a nationally recognized university
because of the state s committment to higher education.
�We have, through the past several years consistently
ranked within the top tenten in America in terms of per
capita support of public higher education Hunt noted.
He also said. This university and it's leaders have
been the drivingthrobbing heart of the development
thrust of eastern North Carolina, an area of vast richness
and history
Hunt also praised Brewer's predecessor, Dr. Leo
Jenkins, saying that Jenkins had been a major influence in
the leadership of Eastern North Carolina.
The governor said that he was confident that Dr. Brewer
would carry the university on to greater academic
excellence and thai he would continue to provide leadership
to this region of the state.
Hunt remarked that "I have the best feelings in the
world about what our future will be under his leadership
He added. "Dr. Brewer, you have my strongest personal
backing, and the very best wishes of the people of North
Carolina
Dr Jack Suggs, who is the Dean of the Divinity School
at Texas Christian University, started his greeting on a light
note saying that he had discovered Brewer to be a
"converted Tar Heel He added that he had found a
Biblical basis for Brewer's decision to leave Texas Christian
and come to ECU.
Suggs remarked that he first thought of the story of the
prodigal son He added, "You remember, he went off into a
foreign country and wasted his substance in riotous living
On a more serious note, Suggs remarked that "Tom
Brewer has the energy needed for this job and the
committment to use that energy in the cause of higher
education He added that "He will represent you well to
all sorts of constituencies
Suggs said that "At the end of policy debate, you will
always know that neither numbers nor dollars is his game.
For him. education is students and faculty, people engaged
in the excitement of learning. That is important
CHANCELLORTHOMAS BOWMAN Brewer speaks atjhe ceremony marking his installation as the seventh chief
administrator of ECU. Brewer comes to ECU from Texas Christian University where he was vice chancellor ana
dean. Photo by John H Grogan)
He also said that Brewer's main concern is excellence,
and that he has the ability to recognize quality. He added,
"Tom Brewer is a man of integritythe word integrity
describes him best
Tommy Joe Payne, president of the Student Govern-
ment Association, expressed appreciation for the large
turnout at the inauguration . He added that "Of all the
groups represented here today, no group is more concerned
about what this university represents than we, the
students
Payne commented further that "this hour is the time to
officially place upon Dr. Brewer's shoulders the
responsibility of this university, and that responsibility is
primarily to teach, develop, and help the students on this
campus to learn and live
Payne also thanked Dr. Jenkins for whar he had done,
and Dr. Brewer for his "sincere approach to the procedure
for administering our university
He added that "The future is bright for our school, and
we believe that Dr. Brewer will preserve that essential
quality, a sincereity that for so long has been the hallmark
of East Carolina
Greeetingswere then given by Professor Henry Farrell,
chairman of the faculty. Farrell said that " In many ways the
installation of a chancellor is as much an opportunity to
summarize the accomplishments as it is a movement toward
the future with hope and confidence for continued
excellence
He added that ECU has progressed in many ways since
it's founding. He likened the slow progress of the university
to the search for knowledge, and he added that there is a
need for more and more information that needs to be called
upon from sources such as libraries and computers.
Chairman Troy Pate, of the Board of Trustees,
characterized Brewer as "An educator with rare insight and
abilities Pate added, "He is a man of dreams, who is also
possessed with a magnificent determination and zest,
essential totransofrm these dreamstoreality
He further commented that "We are firmly assured that
the leadership of East Carolina University will rest with one
of our nation's most dedicated and able educators
He went on to say that Brewer is an innovator, and he is
"driven by a vigorous committment tocreativity
The chairman of the Board of Governors of the
University of North Carolina, William A. Johnson said that
"We are gratified indeed when Dr Brewer accepted the
challenge put forward to him by the selection committee
He added that "This is indeed a happy day. but I think
that the happiest day was the day when Dr Brewer said yes
to the invitation
Johnson commented further that ECU would become
even greater under the direction of Chancellor Brewer
"You will have my personal suppport in this endeavor as
you lead this institution forward, and I can say to you that
you will have the support of the entire board of governors.
he noted.
President Friday thanked those who presented
greetings, and he introduced Jack W. Peltason. who is the
president of the American Council on Education.
Pelatson delivered the keynote address at the
installation. He spoke on the sublet "In Honorable
Tradition
He commented that the installation was "both a high
moment in the career of our colleague Tom Brewer. and i1
the opening of a new chapter in the book of East Carolina
University
He went on to say that "It is a privilege to be a college
or university chief executive, and honor to be asked, and an
opportunity to serve He added. "The caliber of their
vision and their integrity can safely be matched against the
best this nation produces from any profession.
He commented that universities should not restrict
access to any economic group, race, religion or any other
segment of our society.
Peltason also said that higher education should reman
independent, and he said that the people of North Carolina
should be proud of it's university system. They
have accorded it an environment in which faculty and
students are free to explore, investigate, and learn without
fear of adverse public sanctions he noted.
He said that higher education is an almost
.mmeasurably rich legacy and he added that e must be
careful of what we do now. because the decisions we make
now will affect future generations.
He added that "colleges and universities provide botr
the continuity which helps glue society together and the
ordered framework withm with change car, be construc-
tively molded
Peltason ended hisspeecn by saying "I ask that an o. us
labor with him in behalf of those high ideals which have
made our system and this University great
He added, "In the measure of their light Tom Brewer
will succeed, and we shall be able to uphold h.s strong right
arm.
See INSTALLATION, p 5
Greenpeace organized here
ByGLENNTHOMAS
Staff Writer
Greenpeace, an organi-
zation dedicated to the pro-
tection of endangered spe-
cies, has come to Green-
ville. Jerry Adderton, co-
ordinator of the soon to be
local chapter, said that he is
looking forward to the first
meeting.
Greenpeace was born in
1970 when a group of
people got together to pro-
test the nuclear tests off the
coast of Alaska. The protest
failed and the test was con-
ducted. After the test ani-
mal carcasses began to
wash ashore and the project
was closed one year later.
Although Greenpeace is
concerned about all en-
dangered species, its pri-
mary concern is the un-
necessary slaugher of
whales and dolphin. "The
main thing with the whales
is that not only are the
whales disappearing, you
know that most of the spe-
cies are in immediate dan-
ger of extinction, but its
also destroying the food
chain said Adderton.
"One of the main things I
want to do is expose these
problems because I really
think that people will re-
spond to it he added.
"What the Japanese
did, they took their own
Civil Defense Forces'
equipment like machine
guns, gunoboats, and went
out and mass-murdered the
dolphin said Adderton.
"They even had patrols
along the beach, any dol-
phins that weren't already
dead that washed up in
shallow water, they went
up and finished them off
he added.
"I first found out about
Greenpeace about three
years ago by a TV special
said Adderton. "Ever since
then I've sort of kept up
with Greenpeace in a kind
of small way
Though not directly af-
filiated with Greenpeace,
many top entertainment
stars have joined the fight
against whale, seal, and
dolphin slaughter.
The two main countries
responsible for the majority
of the killings are Russia
and Japan. Many of the
entertainers have gone as
far as to cancel entire tours
through these countries.
The name Greenpeace
is constructed of the basic
thoughts that the members
have about how the world
should be; green and
peaceful. Though it was
started in Vancouver. B.C
the American office is run
out of California.
The group that is to
form in Greenville will be
the first in North Carolina.
Mr. Adderton said that
he hopes not only to fight
for the whales, but also to
fight against the two nu-
clear power sites in North
Carolina.
Anyone interested in
joining Greenpeace is in-
vited to attend their organ-
izational meeting Tuesday,
October 31, at 6 p.m.
Halloween costumes are
optional.
CHIEF JUSTICE SUSIE Sharp is shown here administering
the oath of office to Chancellor Brewer.
Photo by John H. Grogan
Fill INTAINHEAD members attend
r
ACP held in Houston
By LEIGH COAKLEY
Production Manager
The 54th Associate Col-
legiate Press Convention
(ACP) was held in Houston,
Texas, Oct. 26-28, at the
Shamrock Hilton Hotel.
Three FOUNTAINHEAD
staff members attended
thi� convention. Doug
Wh.te, editor; Robert
Swaim, advertising man-
ager; and Leigh Coakley,
production manager; were
representatives fro ECU.
Last year's convention
was held in New Orleans.
Colleagues from student
publications all over the
country enjoyed sharing
and learning from one
another. The convention
had something for just
about everyone, from edit-
ors to layout artists, from
business managers to
photographers. There were
70 seminar sessions and
short courses.
Each session was learn-
ing experience and were
'�'give-and-take classes
Professional journalists,
and advisors to award-
winning publications were
available to help find an-
swers to each individual
publication pruolem.
Robert L. Kerns, visual
communications coordina-
tor at the University of
South Florida, Tampa, con-
ducted a short course in
photography at the con-
vention. He is also the
author of several books on
the subject of publication
photography. He covered
topics concerning the ba-
sics in photography, ad-
vanced photography, and
photojournalism. Student
photographers brought a-
long samples of their work
to be critiqued.
Jose Quevedo, advisor
to the award-wlimlng FAL-
CON TIMES from Miami-
Dade Community College,
See PAPERSP 9
What's inside
PROFESSOR CLINTON R Prewett. pictured here, served
as the Chief Marshal and Mace Bearer
Photo by John H Grogan
ECU-Appalachian game
Shuttles run
ALANOA TLE Y ST A RS n "God Says
There Is No Peter Ott
Seep. 7. Photoby John H.
I Grogan
ECU Volleyball team wins invitational
See p.10.
Hall of Fame inductees announcedSee
p.10.
God Says There Is No Peter Ott is
reviewed. See p. 7.
National Health Insurance See p.6
The recent "Friends of the Faculty" art
exhibition is "The finest in four years
See p. 7.
Dr. Brewer's profileSee p.3.
L
ECU News Bureau
A free shuttle bus sys-
tem will be put into opera-
tion by ECU on Saturday
evening. Nov. 4. to trans-
port fans to and from
Ficklen Stadium for the
football game between
ECU and Appalachian
State.
University officials hope
that hundreds of fans who
would otherwise drive to
the stadium area will use
the shuttle buses and there-
by relieve parking and
traffic problems around
Ficklen.
The bus service will
begin at 5 p.m. Saturday
from the parking area
around the Willis Building
at Reade and First Streets.
Buses will run at intervals
of 15 minutes prior to the 7
p.m kickoff.
After the game, buses
will leave the stadium at 10
minute intervals returning
fans to the same Reade and
First Street location
The Willis Building loc-
ation is easily accessible
and cars may be parked
there easily and left until
after the game This service
will be particularly valuable
during inclement weather
when much of the stadium
parking is closed to protect
intramural grounds, ECU
officals said.
Area fans are encourag-
ed to use the free shuttle
bus service for the remain-
ing three football games at
Ficklen Stadium on Nov. 4,
Nov. 11 and Nov. 18.
officials said.

, jt �
t
�-��.�-�. � l - .�- -�- . -� - v .





Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 31 October 1978
Pablo
The Student Union Ma-
jor Attractions Committee
will present Pablo Cruise
with special guest Livings-
ton Taylor on Thurs Nov.
9 at 8 p.m. in Minges
Coliseium.
Tickets will be $5 for
ECU students and $7 for
the public. All tickets are
available from the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center. In addit-
ion, public tickets can be
purchased from: Apple
Records. E 5th St School
Kid's Records - George-
town Shoppes. The Music
Shop - Greenville Square
Mall.
Only public tickets will
be sold at the door.
Percussion
The ECU Percussion
Ensemble will perform in
concert Thursday, Nov. 2 at
8:15 p.m. in the A.J.
Fletcher Music Center Re-
cital Hall.
The concert, free and
open to the public, will
feature "a colorful program
that includes a wide variety
of timbres and styles
Rho Epsilon
Rho Epsilon, the Nat-
ional Real Estate Frater-
nity, will hold its next
meeting Thurs Nov. 9 at 4
p.m. in 221 Mendenhall.
Guest speaker will be C.B.
"Pop" Beasley from New
Bern, N.C. and the topic
will be Resort Develop-
ment.
All members are urged
to attend and anyone inter-
ested in becoming a memb-
er of Rho Epsilon is wel-
comed.
Socio-Anth
The Sociology-Anthro-
pology Club will present a
slide and lecture program
on anthropological field
experiences Mexico.
All interested are wel-
come and encouraged to
attend. Refreshments will
be served.
Leadership
For a time of fun,
fellowship, and Bible
study. Come to Leadership
Training Class. We meet
each Thurs. at 7 p.m. in
Brewster B-103. Sponsored
by Campus Crusade for
Christ.
Comics
The ECU Comic Book
Club will meet Wed Nov.
1 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. in
room 247, Mendenhall.
Topics will include the
upcoming Comic Book Con.
All interested persons are
invited for more info, call
758-6909 before 7 p.m.
Biology
Health
Children
The Student Council for
Exceptional Children will
meet Wed Nov 1 at 5 p.m.
in room 129 Speight. John
Bash will speak on special
education classes on scout-
ing. All members and in-
terested persons are invited
toattend. Refreshments wil
be served.
Mendenhall
Check out "Discount
Day" at the Mendenhall
Student Center recreation
area. Every Monday after-
noon from 2 p.m. until 5
p.m bowling, table tennis,
and billiard prices are 13
off. Bring a friend, catch
the savings, and have some
fun.
An organizational meet-
ing of the newly formed
Biology Club will be Wed
Nov 1 at 7 p.m. in ten
Biology Reading Room (2nd
floor.)
The topic will be,
"What can you do with a
degree in Biology?"
Everyone is invited.
Please bring your quest-
ions.
Lost-Found
In order to provide
better lost and found ser-
vice, all items found
should be turned in to the
University Police as quickly
as possible.
Particular attention
shojld o
h �'
.Vtl
given to keys,
who have lost
jsually need
eday.
. i found, and it
.emont to turn
o tne Police De-
please call the
Police Dispat-
cher and the keys will be
pir j ! y a University
Poh -er The Univer-
sity fs Department is
no; s a position to provide
24 hour a day, seven days a
week, lost and found ser-
vice.
is
then
partr
Univ
Deborah Thomas, em-
ployee development spe-
cialist for the National
Center for Health Statistics
will be on campus Wed
Nov. 1 to interview stu-
dents for Cooperative Edu-
cation placements.
Sophomores will be paid
at the GS-3 level and
juniors and seniors at the
GS-4 level. The agency will
also pay for the student's
tuition and books after the
first placement.
Interested students
should come by the Co-op
office, Rawl 313, to make
an appointment and read
the sample job descriptions
available. Freshmen and
others who may be eligible
for placement next year
should attend a general
information meeting with
Thomas at 2 p.m. Nov. 1 in
Rawl 313. Qualified minor-
ities, women, and handi-
capped students are en-
couraged to apply.
Phi Sigma
Phi Sigma Pi will hold
its monthly meeting Wed
Nov. 1 at 6 p.m. in Austin
room 132. All members are
urged to attend.
Greenpeace
The first organizational
meeting for Greenpeace
will be held Halloween
night, Oct. 31, at 6 p.m. in
room 248 Mendenhall.
Everyone is welcome to
attend. For further infor-
mation, call Jerry Adderton
at 758-6259 after 5 on
weekdays.
Inter -Varsity
Inter-Varsity will meet
this Wednesday night at 7
p.m. in the basement of the
Library. The topic will be
"How to Grow as a Chrsi-
tain
Writers
Psi-Chi
Phi Eta
Phi Eta Sigma will hold
its bimonthly meeting in
the Multipurpose room in
Mendennali, Wed Nov. 1
at 7 p.m.
Elections will be held
and plans for a Christmas
Party will be discussed.
All members are urged
to attend.
Management
The Society for the
Advancement of Manage-
ment will meet Wed Nov.
1 at 4 p.m. in room 102
Rawl. Allen Egard, from
Proctor and Gamble will
speak. All members and
any interested persons are
invited to attend.
Psi-Chi will have a
meeting Wed. night, Nov. 1
at 7 p.m. in Speight 129.
Graduate school programs
in Psyc. at ECU will be
discussed by Dr. Lao, from
the General Psyc. Dept
Dr. Corwin. from the
School of Psychology and
Dr. Long, from Clinical
Psyc.
Topics will be req-
uirements for entering the
graduate programs, curri-
culum and general expecta-
tions of graduate school.
Questions will be answer-
ed. All members and all
interested persons are in-
vited to attend.
The constitutionally
approved WritersGuild will
meet Monday Nov. 6 at 3
p.m. in Austin 207.
Those desiring to be
officers or committee mem-
bers should attend
Abject and rabid per-
sons welcome.
Bowling
.Rent - A - Lane it
available every Saturday
from Noon until 6 p.m. at
the Mendenhall Bowling
Center You can rent a
bowling lane to use for one
hour and it only costs $3
Stop by and try it out you
can't afford to miss it
Travel
Ski
There will be a ski club
meeting, Nov. 1 in. room
105 Memorial Gym at 4
p.m. Those interested in
competing should attend.
Student Union Travel
Committee's trip to Snow
Shoe West Virginia still has
spaces open Don't miss
this wonderful opportunity
to visit one of the East
Coasts most exciting ski
resorts. The cost is only
$169 from Jan 1-5, for
more info, and registration
at Central Ticket office at
Mendenhall
East Carolina University
Union Major Attractions Committee
presents
PABLO CRUISE
with special guest
Livingston Taylor
Thurs Nov. 9, 1978
8 p.m.
Minges Coliseum
L
HEKDRIX THEATRE HWBWT, 1978
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER 8:00 P.M.
Stolzman Is an artist of indescribable genius'
- The Washington Post
STUDENTS:
Buy a Student Ticket
Tuesday ot Wednesday and
you'll be eligible to win a
FREE Pablo Cruise T-Sl
t Winners will be announced in t
Thursday's FOUNTALNHEAD. J
TICKETS:
ECU Students 65.00
Public $7.00
tOnly Public Tickets will:
I be sold at the door. ;
I'One of the most brilliant performances of a fine season
- Miami Herald
TICKETS NOW ON SALE!
Central Ticket Office hours:
10-4 (M-F)
TICKET PRICES: E.C.U. Students, 2.00
and Public, S5.00.
Tickets now available at the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall Student Center.
(only public tickets will be sold at the door)
TECHNICIANS NEEDED:
Dependable , herd-working penom ere needed in tfte area or oouno � ugm. an
Film Projection. Mart be willing to work night, end weekend. K you're intererted. or for
further infonnation contact: Jon Ikker at 757-6611 (Ext 268), Mendenhdl Stedent Cenier.
Classifieds
forsde
@
FOR SALE: Speakers - air
suspension. $200 ew,
asking $100 for pair.
Frank at 758-1186.
Call
FOR SALE: 72 Honda In
excellent cond. New tires,
new battery, 29,000 mi.
One owner. Call 758-3386
or 752-8585
FOR SALE: Rotel stereo
receiver, BSR McDonald
turntable and 2 SMQ speak
-ers. Receiver has 12 watts
per channel and all equip-
ment Is in excellent cond.
$100 Call 758-6198.
FOR SALE: Pioneer Sa-
8500 amp. (100 watts.),
Super Scope AM FM tuner
Panasonic turntable - 8-
track comb. 2 Marantz
HD-77 speakers. $600 for
all or will :sell separately.
Call 756-8571 before 8 p.m.
or 752-9745 after 8 p.m. for
more info.
FOR SALE: Wooden
Clarinet in excellent cond.
Accessories and folding
reading lamp. Will sell or
trade a number of assorted
magazines. If interested
call 752-9652.
FOR SALE77 Ford Cour-
ier truck with AMFM,
sliding glass, camper shell
with carpet, 30 mpg red
with tan interior. 756-2380
after 5 p.m. weekdays ask
for Dexter.
FORRENT:2bdrm.apt. in
Langston Park. $210 a
month, available Thanks-
y������ munin, �vanauie nwms-
NEEDED: A responsible j PdSUI KMgj
NEEDED: A responsible
female roommate by Nov
5 toshare 2bdrm. apt. Rent
is $53 not including utilit-
ies. Call 758-5794.
THE PORTRAIT Gallery;
Would you like to have your
portrait taken, senior res-
ume pictures, weddings,
color, black and white
prints. We also photograph
art, portfolios. Call us and
see. 758-0962 - If the
answer service is on please
leave your name and phone
number.
YOGA: Hatha yoga is now
being taught by Sunshine.
New classes forming. Reiax-
-ation, realization, weight
loss. For more info, ceil
756-0736.
MID EASTERN DANCE:
(Authentic Belly Dancing)
taught by Sunshine - exper-
ienced teacher and perfor-
mer in Ohio, Mexico,
Atlanta, and the D.C. area.
Classes are now forming.
Call 756-0736.
i
1





The chancellor's profile
Brewer; pastand present
31 Odotof 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD N� 3
By RICHY SMITH
Assistant News Editor
Dr Thomas Bowman
Brewer was installed as the
seventh chief executive of-
ficer of East Carolina Univ-
ersity, Saturday on the
North Lawn of campus.
Immediately following the
formal installation cere-
mony was a luncheon for
the new chancellor and his
invited guests. The lunch-
eon was held at Menden-
hall and consisted of a
buffet of assorted meats
and vegetables
Following the luncheon
was a open house of the
Brewers' home. Dr Brewer
and his lovely wife. Betty,
greeted guests as they
entered the chancellor's
home Dr and Mrs Brewer
were also accompanied by
their two children. Tom Jr.
and Dianne. their mothers
and Mrs Brewer's father.
There were other relatives
present as well as close
friends from Texas and
distinguished guests from
Eastern North Carolina.
Academic
credits
ii:
Dr Brewer I came to
ECU on July 3jqpid succee-
ded Leo W Jenkins as
tcellor He is a former
dean and vice-chancellor at
Texas Christam University
Hereceived his B A degree
m the University of
�as-Austm in 1954 in the
Liberal Arts Honor Prog-
ram. He attended on a
Daughters of the Confeder-
acv Scholarship and was a
member of Phi Alpha
Theta. history honorary.
Brewer received his
M A degree at the Univer-
sity of Texas-Austin. 1957.
n iiistory He held an
asstetantship while working
on his thesis entitled, A
History of the Department
of History at the University
of Texas, 1887-1950.
While holding another
teaching assistantship,
Brewer received his Ph.D.
at the University of Penn-
sylvania in 1962. His major
was American History and
his dissertation was entitl-
ed The Formative Period of
140 American Manufactur-
ing Firms. 1800-1936.
Before assuming his
duties at ECU, Brewer
taught at Southwest Texas
State University, North
Texas State University, the
University of Kentucky.
Iowa State University, and
the University of Toledo at
TCU
(Curriculum
planning
Brewer has contributed
to curriculum planning at
several universities. At the
University of Toledo he
helped develop the curricu-
lum for a new Ph.D.
program and the total cur-
riculum for a department
that grew under his chair-
manship. As a member of
Arts and Sciences Council,
he approved revisions in
the College curriculum.
As dean of Arts and
Sciences at Texas Christam
University. Brewer served
as a member of committee
which revised the Univer-
sity general education req-
uirements and also served
on the University Courses
of Study Committee.
Business
history
Asan American historian.
Brewer s academic concen-
tration of study is U.S.
business history, particula-
rly transportation history.
He is currently co-author of
a history of the Missouri
Pacific Railway for Mac-
millan
Brewer has also served
as editor of The Robber
Barons: Saints or Sinner?
and has co-edited two vol-
umes in the series Views of
American Economic
Growth. Currently he is the
General Editor of the Rail-
roads of American Series, a
series with a projection of
20-25 volumes.
Publications
The new chancellor has
published many articles,
book reviews, and scholarly
papers Among these in-
clude Labor History. South
western Histonacla Quart-
erly. Southerwestern Social
Science Quarterly and eight
short biographies for the
Encyclopedia of World Bio-
graphy.
Civic and
academic
organizations
Brewer is a member of
the Organization of Amer
-ican Historians. Business
History Society Trustee.
1975. Economic History
Associaton and American
Association of Higher Ed-
ucation.
Brewer's wide-ranging
civic and community activi-
ties in Fort Worth included
being a moderator of the
American Issues Forum
which is a nine-month
television series, the Unit-
ed Way & the Arthritis
Foundation committees.
For five years he was
chairman of the Texas
Committee for the Humani-
ties and Public Policy and a
member of the Fort Worth
Committee for the Human-
ities and Public Policy.
SENATOR JESSE HELMS is shown here greeting Senate candidate John Ingram. The recent installation ceremonies
The Brewer family provided the political foes with an opportunity to take a break from the campaign tra'il Photo by Chap Gurley
Brewer is married to his
high school sweetheart.
They are members of the
Disciples of Christ and the
parents of three children.
Dianne. who recently grad-
uated from the University
of Texas at Austin; Susan,
whodied in a August traffic
accident; and Thomas. Jr
a sophomore at Rose High
School
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No media aid for SGA
There is a clear-cut answer to the proposal
outlined in Brett Melvin's letter in today's
"Forum When the ECU Board of Trustees
created the Media Board in January of this
year, the proposal they passed stated plainly in
section IV, paragraphs three and four, that
"the sum of all appropriated but unspent
Student Government Association (SGA) funds
to any publication or media as of Jan. 31, 1978,
shall automatically and immediately be
transferred to the control of the Media Board
upon approval of its constitution. No
appropriated but unspent SGA funds to any
publication as of Jan. 31, 1978, nor any
revenues generated by any campus publication
or media, shall revert to the SGA.
Suggestions that the Media Board make a
gift to the SGA are useless, since the Media
Board constitution forbids the expenditure of
funds for any purpose other than the programs
of the board and the operation of the media
(Article VI, section 2, part A).
Last year, the SGA appropriated 51 percent
of its budget to the media. When the Media
Board was created, it received only 50 percent
of the activity fees originally slated for the
SGA. The SGA has just as much money for
other organizations as it did in the past.
The SGA proved itself incapable of
handling campus media during the past few
years, culminating in the cancellation of the
1977 BUCCANEER. The current BUC mess
was inherited from the SGA or was caused by
factors beyond their control, not by ineptness
on the board's part. The SGA nearly eliminatd
THE REBEL one year and would have slowly
strangled W ECU to death had they been given
enough time.
The idea of a campus FM radio station has
been discussed for years, yet the SGA never
took any action. Within three months of the
Media Board's creation, a frequency search
was underway, and within six months a license
application was filed with the FCC. The station
is scheduled to go on the air around Christmas,
close to the board's first anniversary.
The Media Board has proved itself to be a
competent trustee of student funds, and ,
contrary to what many politicians would have
you believe, it is not administratively controll-
ed. The administration has only one vote on
the board, as opposed to eight student votes.
In addition, the chairperson must be a student.
SGA politicians will have to look elsewhere for
the solution to their self-imposed money
worries.
Forum
Commentary
Legislator proposes BUC scheme
Questionnaire probes
By HESTER PETTY
Uppity Women of
Greenville
This is not a test, you
don t have to write down
any answers You don't
have to add up a score.
The questionsstate-
ments are truefalse,
multiple choice, and fill-in-
bianks Compare your
answers with the answers
that follow this article. I
hope your comparisons will
prove interesting to you.
That is the purpose of this
article
program. 200.000 women
received annual breast
x-rays for the detection of
breast cancer. 2.500 al-
leged breast cancers were
removed. 53 of the women
who underwent ttfetfaV'
giving birth is being hung
upside-down.
24. TRUE or FALSE:
The second worst position
to be in while giving birth is
on one's back.
�� 25. 'A'dcbrdihg to a
removal operations didn't
have breast cancer.
13. The birth rate is
declining but cesarean
sections are on the in-
crease. From 1970 to 1976,
the number of cesarean
recent Harris poll, what
percentage of men in the
general population believe
that it is a man's right to
beat his wife: (a.) 50
percent (b.) 20 percent (c.)
10 percent (d.) five percent
Questions
1. TRUE or FALSE:
More than half of all
women are now employed
outside of the home.
2. In 1967, women's
earnings were 62 percent of
men's earnings. In 1976,
the percentage was: (a.)
80 percent (b.)74
percent (c.) 56 percent
3. One man in 18 lives
on an annual income of less
than $4,000. With women,
this same income is lived on
by : (a.) one in four (b.) one
in eight (c.) one in 12
4.TRUE or FALSE.
Women and children com-
prise 75 percent of all
welfare recipients.
5. The percentage of
divorced mothers that
collect child support regu-
larly is: (a.) 87 percent
(b.)63 percent (c.) 45
percent (d.) 21 percent
6. TRUE or FALSE: A
single woman is more likely
to attempt suicide than a
married woman.
7. TRUE or FALSE:
Violence occurs in 50
percent of American fami-
lies.
8. TRUE or FALSE: It
is possible for a husband to
sell his wife's car without
her permission if she buys
it with money out of her
own salary.
9. The abbreviation Ms.
has been around since:
(a.)the 1970's (b.) the
1960s (c.) the 1950's (d.)
the 1940's
The first bill for a
federal equal rights amend-
ment was introduced in
Congress In: (a.) 1923 (b.)
1948(c) 1964 d.) 1970
11. TRUE or FALSE:
Studies of boms births
show that there are fewer
injuries and fewer emer-
gencies than among hos-
pital births.
12. TRUE or FALSE:
Under a government health
29.TRUE or FALSE.
Women are more resistant
to disease than men.
Answers
1. True
2. (c.) 56 percent. We
now get more unequal pay
for equal work than we did
nine years ago.
3. (a.) one in four
4. False. Women and
children comprise 90 per-
cent of all welfare recipi-
ents.
(d.) 21 percent
False
True
True, in Louisiana
(d.) the 1940's
(a.) 1923
True
True
(d.) 100 percent
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14. False,
ranks 17th
15. True
the U.S.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
(a.) 250,000
(c.) one in 60
True
True
True
"Women were burned alive but
men were given the option of
being killed before they were
burned. The reasoning behind
this was that women could
endure more pain than men and
21. False. Women were
thus they Were leSS bothered by burned alive but men were
given the option of being
killed before they were
burned. The reasoning
behind this was that women
could endure more pain
than men and thus they
were less bothered by the
flames.
90 percent
True
True
(b.) 20 percent
False
True
True
True
ToFOUNTAINHEAD
There has been much
discrepancy this year over
the publication of a BUC-
CANEER. Rumors abound
throughout the East Caro-
lina Campus as to the
definite possibility of ECU
students once again not re-
ceiving a yearbook.
During the fall elections
I ran on the issue of the
BUC, which I felt the
students wanted and de-
served. The students have
paid fees for the publication
of the BUC, and if the
Media Board finds it im-
possible to fulfill its prom-
ise of a BUCCANEER for
fall of 1978, then rightfully
the student fees appro-
priated from SGA funds for
its publication, should re-
turn to the SGA.
The reversion of this
year's funds for the BUC-
CANEER would in no way
affect the publication of a
BUC for fall semester 1979.
This would simply revert
the funds for the unpub-
lished BUCCANEER of this
year, if this rumor istrue.
As it is becoming more
and more obvious with each
passing day, Student Gov-
ernment does not have the
funds this year that it has
had in the past. With the
SGA's lack of funds this
year, there is the distinct
possibility that many or-
ganizations which have tra-
ditionally been funded in
the past by SGA will not be
funded this year, or shall be
forced to operate on such a
limited budget that they
shall have to fold.
Rather than seeing the
possibility of these funds
sitting in a Media Board
account, I feel that the
reversion of these funds to
SGA will do more to benefit
the student body as a
whole; in the form of
providing adequate funding
for campus organizations,
such as the ECU Play-
house, the School of M usic,
the Visual Arts Forum, the
Model UN, SOULS the
Marching Pirates, etc.
These organizations
realize that with SGA's
current financial crisis,
they will not receive the
funding they have in the
past.
I wish I did not have to
write this letter, because I
feel strongly as do many of
the students on this campus
�that we should have a
BUCCANEER, however, it
seems more apparent every
day that the Media Board
will not deliver this year's
BUCCANEER. To me, the
only thing worse than not
getting a BUC this year is
not getting a BUC and
seeing valuable student
fees unused while good
organizations at East Car-
olina go without, and pos-
sibly fold.
If any lesson can be
learned from this mess, it
may be that, despite our
faults, the elected Student
Government on this cam-
pus can more fairly handle
student needs than a non-
elected, administratively
controlled set-up like the
new Media Board.
Brett Melvin
Day Student Legislator
WRQR's Handelman
offers album-rock
Dr. Dale Rice is
1'one of the best'
the flames
births increased: (a.) 25
percent (b.) 50 percent (c.)
75 percent (d.) 100 percent
14. TRUE or FALSE:
The majority of people in
the U.S. are in favor of the
Equal Rights Amendment.
16. There are 56,000
reported rapes each year.
The estimated total number
of rapes is: (a.) 250,000 (b.)
125,000 (c.) 75,000 (d.)
60,000
17. One reported rape in
four results in arrest. How
many arrests result in
convictions? (a.) one in 25
(b.) one in 45 (c.) one in 60
(d.) one in 100
18. TRUE or FALSE:
The age of witch-hunting
lasted for four centuries.
19. TRUE or FALSE:
Millions of "witches" were
murdered during the witch-
hunting age.
20. TRUE or FALSE: 85
percent of the witches that
were murdered were
women.
21. TRUE or FALSE:
Witches, both male and
female, were usually
burned alive at the stake.
22. A Red book maga-
zine survey of clerical and
professional women in 1976
thatpercent had experi-
enced sexual harassment
on the job.
23. TRUE or FALSE:
The worst position for
26.TRUE or FALSE: There
are more wives who kill
their husbands than hus-
bands who kill their wives.
27. TRUE or FALSE:
In jogging, a woman's
running style is likely to be
more economical than a
man's.
28. TRUE or FALSE: In
long distance running, a
woman has more endur-
ance capacity than an
equally-trained man.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
Uppity Women of
Greenville
P.O. Box 1373
Greenville, N.C. 27834
ToFOUNTAINHEAD:
Today I was deeply
saddened and disappointed
to find out that one of the
best professors I've ever
had at ECU will not be with
the school next year.
This will not affect me,
but there are many stu-
dents who may not have the
opportunity to have a
professor motivate them
and help them realize what
it takes to be a "good"
teacher.
Dr. Dale Rice has only�
been with the ECU science
education department a
short time. Long enough
though, to be admired by
all of his students. He is
young, energetic, interest-
ing, easy to talk to, and
���-
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over 50 years
EDITOR
Doug White
ADVERTISING MANAGER
Leigh Coakley N�W s EDIT0RS Robert M' S"alm
Julie Everette
Kicki Gllarmis
PRODUCTION MANAGER
TRENDS EDITOR
Steve Bachner
SPORTS EDITOR
Sam Rogers
of East
I
FOUNTAINHEAD is the udent �&V
Carolina University tlwadtoy �f
and is distrlbytad eaoh Tuesday and Thursday (weekly
during the summer).
Mailing address: Old Sooth Building, Greenville, N.C.
27834
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 7576309.
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni $6 annually.
most of all he cares about
his students.
Dr. Rice is a very active
person in his field. Not only
does he teach science
methods, but is also doing
research in his field. One
can find articles he has
written in many of the
science education maga-
zines.
Many more educators
like him are needed to
teach upcoming teachers. It
will be a great loss for the
school to lose someone who
has put forth his best
efforts, and then more.
I would like to thank
1 you, Dr. Rice, for teaching
me so much about science
and the teaching process.
Karen Shipp
Helms
editorial
slings mud
ToFOUNTAINHEAD:
In response to your
editorial "Senator No must
go
It seems to me your
criticism of Jesse Helms
has about as much basis as
his religious beliefs have
bearing in the campaign.
Surely you can find some
better way of "endorsing"
Ingram than criticizing
Helms' campaign tactics.
As for the "Mud-
slinging it seems you
have joined right in.
Lyman Black
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
To the many people whc
enjoy album-rock music
and Allan Handelman's
nighttime show on WRQR,
prepare yourself for a
surprise As the area's only
source of adult rock music
for over one and a half
years, Handelman has
achieved a great amount of
notariety and listener
appeal.
His uncanny ability to
sense the audience's musi-
cal tastes and needs,
coupled with his truly pro-
fessional apprach to FM
radio has made him without
question the best person-
ality to ever by heard on
radio in eastern North
Carolina. Now for the
surprise.
He no longer does
nighttime album rock on
WRQR. Effective Oct. 23,
he has moved to daytime
and is now on from 3-6 p.m.
daily.
As the many adult rock
listeners begin to listen to
Allan during his new hours,
they may be surprised at
what they hear. If an
occasional top 40 or disco
song is played, don't
assume Handelman is
copping out and has
abandoned rock fans.
This is simply not the
case, according to sources
close to Handelman. He
has no desire to play top 40
or disco. That type of music
does not particularly suit
his tastes personally and he
truly appreciates the fact
that the typical WRQR
listener wants album-rock.
So, why is he pitying
questionable music now?
An excellent question.
A former WRQR employee
indicated the station's
initial plunge into auto-
mated, top 40, disco end
beech music format and its
almost overnightanti-album
rock tendency (except at
night) was due to internal
pressure by station em-
ployee Steve Hardee The
former employee from
Rocky Mount also feels the
station's ratings have been
so low during the day
(probably attributable to a
combination of overplayed
top 40 music and imper-
sonal automation) that
Handelman has been per-
suaded to help bad out the
daytime ratings with his
obvious radio abilities
It is hoped, another
former WRQR employee
from Kinston states, that
he will be able to recapture
the vast afternoon audience
WRQR once had prior to
questionalbe format
changes and automation
Handelman must now face
the reality of broadcasting
in a time slot that has given
us an automated, top 40
sound for one and a half
years.
Common sense dictates
that a careful and orderly
transition coour between
this automation and Han-
delman' s more suitable
album-rock format Hope-
fully, all rock listeners will
find Handelman's new
show more acceptable after
the transition.
As you turn on to
Handelman from 3-6 p.m.
daily, recall what he stands
for and what he's done for
album-rock in North Caro-
lina. He needs our support
as he attempts to ease
daytime WRQR into a more
acceptable musical situa-
tion.
Listen to him, do
business with his show's
sponsors, and tell them you
enjoy "the beet rock in
North Carolina" and Allen
Handelman!
Phil





Brewer addresses guests
31 October 1978 FPU NT A INIH E A 0 Pag� B
continued from pi)
'resident Friday then introduced members of Chan-
cellor Brewers family, including his wife, Betty, his
daughter Diane, who is a senior at the University of Texas,
usson, Thomas, Jr who is a sophomore at Rose High
School Friday then introduced Brewer's mother, Mrs. Earl
Brewer, and Mrs Brewers parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lesley
Smith, all of Fort Worth, Texas.
Friday then recognized the chancellors brother and his
'e. Dr and Mrs EarlJ. Brewer.
'day recognized several other dignitaries as well.
mong them were Chancellor Emeritus Leo Jenkins,
Senator Robert Morgan, and Senator Jessee Helms Senate
candidate John Ingram, was also present as was Lieutenant
Governor Jimmy Green, and Congressman L.H. Fountain.
Members of the General Assembly were also present.
Oath of off ice administered
rne oath of office was then administered by Chief
Justice Susie Sharp
Mter the oath was administered, President Friday said
l now have the privilege of investing Thomas
Bowman Brewer with the authority and responsibility of the
of chancellor. Thomas Bowman Brewer, by my
as President of the University of North Carolina,
� rtue of your election by it's Board of Governors,
the oath by which you have pledged yourself. I do
are you Chancellor of East Carolina University.
an ou a full realization of the responsibilities laid
this office, to the necessisity for courageous
1 � uctive thought in their fulfillment and to the duty
an ege of seeking out the intellectual and educational
needs of the people, in order to achieve that high destiny
.as the vision and purpose of the founders
ly added. I count it our good fortune that I may
install you, Thomas Brewer as Chancellor of
East Carolina University
1825 and an elementary school system in 1839. He added
that the state-sup ported system of higher education was the
first of its kind in the nation, and "Historians give high
grades to the leadership responsible for this original step in
education
He added that "The seal of our university carried the
inscription, To serve and neither power nor principality
will be permitted to tarnish this inscription
Brewer praises ECU
Chancellor Brewer said, "East Carolina has always
been close to its people, and its people have always been
close to East Carolina He added that the constituency
includes people from the working class as well as people
from the middle class. "Our people historically have been
in harmony with the ideology of workingmen with respect to
education he noted.
A lnew urgency' in education
Brewer emphasized that a "new urgency" was upon us
- that urgency being the ava.labl.ty of an education for all
American youth, not just the exceptionally able. Brewer
quoted President Kennedy, saying that "The human mind
is our fundamental resource and he added that the
legislature had the "right to allocate means and list
exceptions in termsof thtsgreat truism
Brewer repeated his pledge for excellence at ECU. Me
added that "Allow us to have education and we shall not
only survive; we will prevail
On this last note . he quoted Martin Luther King as
saying We must work unceasingly to lift this nation that
e love to a higher destiny, to a new plateau of
i
l
GOVERNOR JAMES B. Hunt greeted the crowd at the mstallation with a renewed pledge to w,den US 264
Photo by John H Grogan
He went on to say Excellance today means that we
must go beyond the narrow historical parameters of good
traditional schooling
He commented further that services to the community,
teaching insightfully, and concern with the goals of human
fulfillment were important in an academic setting.
Brewer accepts challenge
Brewer then accepted the charge from President Friday,
and he pledged faithfully to "attend to the duties of the
Chancellorship of East Carolina University
The benediction was led by Rabbi Levi A. Olan, who is
the Rabbi Emeritus.
After the recessional, the guests and visiting dignitaries
attended a luncheon at Mendenhall Student Center. There
was an Open House held at the Chancellor" s residence.
compassion, to a
more noble expression of humaness.
Brewer speaks
"er applause subsided. Chancellor Brewer spoke. He
� anked the keynote speaker. The Board of Trustees,
lent Friday, and the faculty, staff, and student body of
ECU He added We note with great appreciation the
:valty. and support that have come from alumni,
5 and former members of the ECU faculty and
' .it or S
Brewer referred specifically to former Chancellor
- ns and former President John Messick. saying
Jnder their gifted and bold leadership the welfare of
East Carolina University has been nobly advanced
also thanked his family for their support. Brewer
saul that the university would try to remain faithful to it's
harge, which was made in 1907
A cording to Brewer. North Carolina has had a priority
on e ' n, because of the creation of a school �und in
News
writers
needed
Call
757-6366
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ige6 FOUNTAINHEAD 31 October 1978
�tm
hOWN HERE in front of the student store
aJ?9 �"��.
hurry to make it to class on time. Photo by Steve Romero)
GREENVILLE and NAGS HEAD NORTH CAROLINA
Wed. is
Dollar Day at
Newby's
V Sub for Sl.OO
with purchase
of a soft drink.
All day Wed. Every Wed.
ARMY-NAVY STORE
1501 S Evans
B-15, bomber, field,
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Back Packs
SAADS SHOE REPAIR
113 GRANDE AVE.
at
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Consumer watch
By LOUISE COOK
Associated Press Writer
While politicians argue about national health insurance,
consumers are left the seek their own protection and
individuals can find that thousands of dollars depend on
their making the right decision.
A report issued last week by the Department of Health,
Education and Welfare said 57 percent of all medical bills
were paid by third parties, including governement and
private insuranoers, in 1975. By the year 2000, third parties
are expected to pay 75 percent of the bills.
An estimated 80 percent of the population is covered by
some type of health insurance; Americans pay over $20
billion a year in premiums.
A new government publication, "How to Shop for
Health Insurance issued by HEW's Public Health
Service, offers some help for consumers. It is available, at
no charge, from Consumer Information Center, Dept. 582G,
Pueblo, Colo 81009.
Most health insurance is sold to groups - of employees,
association members, etc. Group coverage is usually
cheaper than individual protection and is often more
comprehensive.
The disadvantage of group insurance is that when you
leave the group, you lose the coverage. You probably can
convert your policy to an individual one, but you are likely
to pay more for less protection. There are two basic types of
coverage: hospital and medical-surgical.
Serve aboard cruise ships
nrotection against hospital bills
Basic hospital covers; P ,ab0ratcxy tests, drugs
for such items as room, rooa. plans pf0V(de
and use of operating ese plans cover the full
what are called mrm�" number of days
cost of hospital expenses for � ated
Other plans offer indemn.ty benefits, y
amount or percentage ofthe.a
Basic edical-surg.cal coverage w
doctors" bmsyoumcrwheh operates
of the amounts allowed for different types
S150 for an appendectomy, for examp
The allowance may �-may not
actual bill; it depends on you' a;dJve es - oover
-edicas.rgiclpo.aes- th ��Tc or � hlSOr her
the costs of a doctor s services in yuu
CTirri -end. to -nsure you
o e whTre basic coverage stops and provides benes of
$25,000 to $50,000 or more for expenses both ,n and out of
theMZ,amed,ca. polices do not necessarily covet,h.ifuH
cost of injury or illness; they usually pay on.y 75 to 80
percent of the Mile. M a,or medical polices - like automobile
ponces-also have deduct.bles, making you responsible for
the f.rst several hundred dollars; your basic policy probably
will cover the deductible.
Two ECUgrads are sanitarians
Tim Neweli and Debbie
Hawkins are the first san-
itarians to serve aboard
passenger cruise ships.
They joined the Holland-
American Lines, Inc. as two
of five sanitarians that the
company hired to promote
the health and prevent
disease of passengers and
crew aboard the cruise
ships.
Hawkins, from Ashe-
boro, N.C was the first
graduate of the ECU Envir-
onmental Health program
in march, 1974, and Newell
from Rocky Mount, N.C.
graduated with a B.S. in
Environmental Health in
June, 1976. He completed
graduate studies for M.S.
in Administrative Services
in June of this year.
The work will take them
on Caribbean, Alaskan, and
around-the-world cruises
They will maintain surveil-
lance and quality of food,
water, and general envir-
onments aboard ship.
Several fringe benefits
of the job are reported to be
one-month paid vacation
per year, tax-
free income because they
will be out of the country
for ten consecutive months,
and they receive food,
lodging and clothing in
addition to salary.
The Chairman of the
Department, Dr Trenton
Davis, stated that, while all
graduates in the program
could probably not find
such a job. there were
many opportunities avail-
able He added that any
student interested in pursu
ing a career in environmen-
tal health should contact
the department
College papers yearbooks,graded
continued from p. 1
North Florida, conducted a
short course in newspaper
design and discussed de-
sign rules and techniques.
The presentation of
Pacemaker awards were
given Thursday night by
the managing editor of the
Sample copies of stu-
dent publications were a-
vailable for all interested.
Exhibitors from yearbook
companies, photography
studios, and other business
publications conducted raf-
fles and were available for
consultation.
The seminars proved to
be motivating and instilled
enthusiasm to all attend-
ing. Next year's convention
is scheduled to be hefd in
San Francisco, California.
A disco dance was held
on Friday night from 9 p.m.
until midnight with atten-
dance of about 700.
Also attending the con-
ference were members of
the National Council of
College Publications Advi-
sors (NCCPA). They are
professionals that assist
college publications and
they operate a placement
bureau, and publish a
newsletter and magazine






31 October 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
Good direction sparks 'successful
Dinner Theatre production
a i- ,lo;in4 I
LLEN MCLEOD
M Writer
There Is No
presented as part
Student
Theatre.
edy

� Bill Hare.
a tten.
on tor
serious
for-
the
it lish-
he play.
to a
ling in-
� een
s began
tion of
N a the
very
closely together, present-
ing continuity and believ-
ability. Most notable was
the connection between
Avis Phelps (Rosalie
Hutchens) and Peter Ott
(Alan Oately).
These characters are
a fine performance as Avis
Phelps. She displayed
strength of character as
well as the resilency nec-
essary to reflect the cour-
ageous woman Avis is.
As Peter Ott, Alan
Oately was also very ef-
Drama
drawn to each other
throughout the play Al-
though barely surfacing at
their first meeting, the
undercurrent linking them
exists from the first and
grows subtly with each
successive meeting
Rosalie Hutchens gave
fective The ease and art-
fullness with which he
makes the transaction from
a nervous, careful man to a
calm; loose, liar is not only
effective but very enjoy-
able.
Cindy Lyle. as Mary
Phelps, seemed uncertain
in the delivery of her lines,
yet at the same time pre-
sented a very viable stage
presence. While her ac-
tions were believable and
motivated, her lines
seemed to stem from a
different source of motiva-
tion.
Michael Lee and Suzie
Martin, as Harold and
Marsha Phelps, were hil-
ariousas Mary's parents. A
delightful contrast devel-
oped between the straight-
laced parents and the lib-
eral attitudes of the other
characters. Lee was es-
pecially successful in pre-
senting the comic features
inherent in Harold Phelps
while playing the role
straight
The set, designed by
Dana M ills, was beautifully
detailed Largely workable,
it was hampered by visibly
shaking walls in response
to closed doors. Mills also
designed the lighting which
was particularly effective.
A specific fade-out, end-
ing the act, was perfectly
coordinated. The actor was
wrestling with emotional
indecision as the light
dimmed until he was totally
eclipsed by darkness and
confusion.
With strong characters
easily adaptable to comedy,
and the benefit of special
effects with lighting and
sound, God Says There Is
No Peter Ott is an in-
triguing and happy play
which has provided a suc-
cessful beginning for 1978
Dinner Theatre
CINDY LYLE IN a scene from -God Says There Is No Peter Ott

avafian of Tashi -The group has toured throughout Europe and the United States-
Artists Series Committee
presents Tashi Wednesday
Since its New York debut in 1973, TASHI (Tibetan for
good fortune) has been hailed for its unusual programs and
joyous performances throughout North and South America.
Europe, and the Far East. The Student Union Artists Series
Committee presents this fine ensemble on Nov. 1. 1978 at 8
p.m. in the Hendrix Theatre in Mendenhall Student Center
In their programs for clarinet and string quartet this
season, three TASHI members - clarinetist Richard
Stoltzman, violinist Ida Kavafian, and cellist Fred Sherry -
will be joined by guest artists Theodore Arm. violin, and
Ik-Hwan Bae. viola. Critic James Ross captured the
enthusiasm of the audience to the group s first appearance
��to hear such a remarkable performance comes under
the heading of things worth treasuring
In addition to the major quintets for clarinet and strings.
their usually varied program also include duos, string trios,
and string quartets. One of the most recent and most
acclaimed performances, the Mozart-Clarinet Quintet, was
released by RCA Records in August. 1978. Many of the
tours of the 1978-79 season are already sold out.
Group is multi-national
Not only isTASHI remarkable as a group; each member
is outstanding on an individual basis. Clarinetist Richard
Stoltzman has been especially acclaimed recently He is
ranked with Rampal, Andre, and Tuckwell. He most
recently appeared with "Isaac Stern and Friends" at
Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Center
Violinist Ida Kavafian was born in Instanbul, Turkey
and is of American descent. She is a graduate of Julliard
School where she earned a Master of Music degree. Cellist
Fred Sherry is also a graduate of the Julliard School He is a
founding member of both TASHI and Speculum Musicae
On this particular tour, the standard TASHI configura-
tion is joined by guest artists Theodore Arm and Ik-Hwan
Bae Theodore Arm holds his doctorate from the Julliard
School and is an associate professor at the University of
Connecticut. He has been violin soloist with the National
Symphony of Washington. DC Ik-Hwan E
made his debut at age 12 with the Seoul Pt
has been concertmaster of both the Juiiiaro C
the National Orchestra Association
Tashi: Tibetan for good fortune
Since its New York debut in 1973. TA ��
good fortune) has become one of today s
ensembles, and has been hailed for its unusi.
and joyous performances on tours throughou N
South America. Europe, and the Far East
original configuration, and with gues' artists
In its programs for clarinet a I
season, trhree TASHI members - clarini
Stoltzman. violinist Ida Kavafian and ce
will be joined by guest artists Theodore Arm .
Ik-Hwan Bae. viola
Critic JamesRoss. is reviewig ne
appearances, captured the enthusiasr�
" to hear three such remarkable performan. �
under the heading of things worth treasuring '
In addition to the maior qumte's for cUi-
their unusually varied programs cenera .
string trios, and string quartets.
Miss Kavaan and Sherry said the N
had tones and used phrasing which were hauni
and peculiarly sensitive to the music's style a
One of TASHI s most acclaimed perfoi
Mozart Clarinet Quintet - was released bv RCA
August. 1978.
The 1978-79 season includes soid-out tour
Coast. Mid-West. South, and West Coast
These five excellent artists combine tali
concert which is truly good fortune
TASHI concert are now on sale at the Cen1
m Mendenhall Student Center Prices
students and $5 for the public For furl
757-6611. extension 266
Friends of Faculty' exhibition 'finest in four years'
DAVID W
By
TREVINOandMARK WILKINSON
Staff Writers
Saturday s canonization of a new head bureaucrat
.ed-the beginning of a new era for all those who ,� to
m for guidance in life and an end to the finest
onof art on this campus in the past 'our y�
ly was the final day "Friends of the Faculty and
Nat .res Abstractions" were d.splayed In the Wellington
B Gray Gallery m the ienk.ns Art Center.
Natures Abstractions" consisted of twenty-three
rosoop.c photographs of mineral inclusions.n musoovrte
m the Spruce Fine District of North Carolina taken by :
I. Dayvault of the ECU Department of Geology faculty.
e photographs, taken on a petrograph.c microscope,
show spaaa. arrangements that are cryslal.ograph.cally
consistent with the mineral they include.
Dayvaulf s work is a collection of thought provoking
,mages that provide a unique perception of the world
around us Although the two dimens.onal geometries of the
Tneral inclusions are design onented, the startling colors
impiy motion as well as Expressionist traces.
Friends of the Faculty" was an impress.ve show
omhrac.no a wide variety of mediums. Gallery d.rector
ATarp asked members of the Schcx. of Art faculty to
mv� their friends to submit pfeces of their work which
woTd enhance the gallery's instructive aspect. The show
Thtt resulted was truly national In scope and reflected the
natlcoa. rather than regional, character of the School of Art
'oJer two dozen artists from all parts of the United
State! submitted over one hundred pieces. The show
S�i "are opportunity for Pjopom �.ural.y starved
eastern North Carolina to view art on that level.
Perhaps the most engrossing work is the show was a
haunting intaglio print by Peter M ilton of Francistown, New
Hampshire entitled "October Piece Although it initially
appears to be a collage of photographs, "October Piece"
was etched by hand on a steel plate.
Milton harnesses several disconcordant images into a
harmonious unity that captivates the viewer with a
mysteriously realistic fantasy of townhouses, trees, people,
a statue, a field of fallen leaves and a locomotive. The
gentle softness of his images testified to Milton's position
as one of the premier prmtmakers in America today. M ilton
is color blind. It seems like a small price to pay for the
beauty of his vision.
Art
M yra Sexauer of Greenville reflects a different vision in
her pheasant feather, mica and natural fiber wall hanging.
This delicate, whispy piece is a fragile balance of hard and
soft as well as warm and cold The piece seemed to have
sprung complete from the heart of the forest to the walls of
the Gray Gallery. Mrs. Sexauer captured the harmony of
tranquil nature.
Ann Sturgis Tickner of Beimar, New Jersey submitted
three works in leather. Two were hanging webs of leather
and plastic tubing which played on space and shadows. The
most interesting was a piece entitled "Brown Relief wh.ch
experimented with leather out of its natural presentation
�Brown Relief is a series of sewn leather layers and
wrapped plastic tubing on a wooden frame.
The varying levels are effectively united in a series of
active geometric forms. By hanging "Brown Relief" on the
wall like a painting Tickner has asked the viewer to expand
his perception of the expressive capabiltiy of leather
Bruce Bobicks "Grandmother Mendel's Quilt made for
Little Gregor" was a pleasing total composition done in
watercolor. Bobick unites separate elements, the sectional
pieces of the quilt and the natural forms of bean pods, in a
soothing blending of subdued colors.
Of the three oil paintings Ron Taylor submitted to the
show, only "Gun Fighter" seemed representative of his
talent. "Gun Fighter" is an impressionistic portrait
surreally held within an oil as well as wooden frame. The
piece is optically challenging and rich in its use of color
E. Jessie Shefrin presents a view into the urban world
with her three untitled compositions of folded xerox cards
The works are polarizing layers of shapes and openings. It
is the art of the city, the world where most Americans now
live.
Robert Peppers of Athens, Ohio provided a more
graphic glimpse of city life with his linoleum print,
'Hooker It is a hard-edged graphic study of the tragedy
of prostitution. Radial, contour lines follow the shape of
breasts, arms and a hand with money to create a powerfully
evocative piece.
Richard Craven also evoked emotion with his dadaistic
collages of mass produced commercial products arranged to
express his thoughts. His visual puns exceed the level of
artistic achievement defined by the graffitti found in the
first floor men's room in Rawl Building. If you've never
shed a tear there, those business majors are as dull as they
look. But there is humor in work and laughter is worth
something.
George Brett isn't even funny. His cellophane tape on
rag paper pieces are experiments in geometric shapes and
designs They were hung, mistakenly I believe
entrance to the gallery so everyone could see then
appropriate place to display this work would have i
the door, past the Art School offices and in I
unnal found in the restroom by the stairs when si
could weep over it
Anyone who missed the Friends of the -
exhibition should weep It was on the whole �
show Rather than bask in your pain at having mis!
sure and take in the next two shows to be dis
Gray Gallery.
Women on Paper from the oollecl he
Weatherspoon Gallery and Ten Centuries of One- ta A I
from the private collection of a member of the ECU M e
School faculty will open with a reception on c� I iy
November 5 at three o clock and remain u
twenty-second
"Ten Centuries o Oriental Art" is a show drawn from
the collection of East Asian art owned by a membe- e
medical school faculty who wished to remain anew
will be an exhibition of furniture, porceim and scrolls
collected over the years
�Women on Paper" from the well-known Weather-
spoon Gallery the University of North Carolina at
Greensboro is a collection of various artists impressions of
women.
Among the artists whose works will be exhibited are
Palbo Picasso. Roy Lichtenstem. Henri Matisse. Jacques
Villon. Andy Warhol. Richard Under. WHhelm deKconing.
Robert deNiro. James McNeill Whistler and Tom
Wesselmann.
The Wellington B gray Gallery is open Monday through
Friday from nine until five Admission is absolutely free
and the art is stimulating at any price.
��-





Pag
� 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 31 October 1978
Convoy: Peckinpah plays
cowboys and Indians again
By STEVE BACHNER
Trends Editor
Sam Peckinpah's heavy-handed direction is just the
touch needed to bring the hodgepodge of stars, extras,
mammoth eighteen-wheeled mechanical monsters and old
film genres together to form some semblance of order and
eventually the film Convoy.
But where do I go from there?
The lead in Convoy required macho appeal. Enter Kris
Kristofferson Sex and snobbery? Ali MacGraw. A spirited
heavy? Ernest Borgnine. The casting is par excellent.
But let me point out one thing. Nobody is going to win
an academy award by doing a Peckinah film. The director is
far more interested in his action sequences and message-
filled material than in tour-de-force fodder for any one
player.
Gosh golly! There's messages in his movies. Well
Convoy's big message is what finally brings the entire
eighteen-wheeled mess to a grinding halt.
Convoy is tightly based on C.W. McCall's ballad about
a maior (50 trucks or more) convoy that keeps on truckin'
despite the unbelievable odds stacked against it.
From this premise Peckinpah elicits a protest march
composed of an innumerable assemblage of trucks replete
with operators from every imaginable walk of life. Just
about every trucker has a legitimate beef. One driver is
discontent with our boys in Washington; another
disgruntled about the fifty-five mile-an-hour speed limit.
The protagonists, Kristofferson and his little troupe, are
on the lamfrom the law, from themselves, and, of course,
from society.
PIAF LIVES
Tripe on an epic scale! Fortunately, the banality of the
material is surpassed by Peckinpah's ingenious allusions to
one of the cinema's foregone genres � the western.
Peckinpah is obsessed with the lifestyle of the old West
Cinema
and its eye-for-an-eye code of ethics. He aptly depicts this
violent existence, as he does in many of his films, in what is
probably his best work, The Wild Bunch. Peckinpah fulfills
his promise of a Ride in the High Country in what may be
classified as one of the most important records of the mood
of our times and one of the most important American films
of the era.
In his attempt repeat the feat under a different guise,
Peckinpah has managed to muster some fine moments for
us to revel in.
Audiences have, it seems, always been reassured by
some elements of continutiy between a specific film by a
director and that director's ensuing efforts. Hence, and this
is especially true for Peckinpah, stars are almost by
definition players who never vary from film to film and for a
star to play a part that fell outside his customary range was
always condidered a risky undertaking.
In the same way, if the film itself can be made to fit into
a certain category, so that the audience knows what to
expect in general terms but is intrigued as to how the
well-known ingrediants will be served up this time, them a
certain level of success can almost be guaranteed.
Audiences like to know what is in store for them and a
successful film is one which can be clearly and accurately
labelled.
KRIS KRISTOFFERSON AND Ali
MacGraw: "Peckinpah is unsure about
the staging of the main action in a
scene, except where seedy debauchery or
sudden flare-ups of violence are concer-
ned. The dialogue rides high in
"Convoy" as well as wide�from the
awful to the quite acceptable. But even
the hip C.B. slang employed inevitably
leads us to believe that Peckinpah is
playing cowboys and Indians again
To an even greater degree, Convoy is like the
contemporary Peckinpah westerns of the director's earlier
days. It is a story of adventurous open-air life that can take
you out of your everyday life, away from the monotony of
your job or textbook.
It is a clear and gripping development that moves to a
satisfying climax when everything is settled in a blaze of
guns.
But the automatic response evoked by Peckinpah,
resulting from a certain sameness not only inherent in his
films but in the "western style itself, is so strong in
Convoy that it drowns his message.
But for the filmmaker who wants to talk directly to his
audience about moral values, or about themes such as male
friendship or patriotism, the western can offer unequalled
freedom.
Westerns tend to be about a certain period of American
history and to show the building-up of an organization
united in a common good cause, but the best of them have
an attraction that is internat.ona I. The '��
Peckinpah's guise is the mam reason for loss of hat feehng
of universality and in a sense what we are left w.th ,s
poor man's Nashville. � of
There is no doubt that Peckinpah has a n.ce sense of
time and place; that h.s locations and groupmgs. as wen as
the faces and peripheral activit.es that fill a g.ven shot have
the right look and feel about them.
But he is much less sure about the staging of the mam
action in a scene, except where seedy debauchery or
sudden flare-ups of violence are concerned. The dia ogue
rides high in Convoy as well as w.de - from the awful to
the quite acceptable. But even the hip C.B. slang employed
inevitably leads us to believe that Peckinpah is playing
cowboys and Indians again.
Peckinpah is half Indian, and that may have induced our
guilt feelings to turn him into a prodigy before his time; it
may also give him a keener understanding of his subject
matter.
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31 nnhiir 1978 FOUNTAINHEAP
78 In Shade: 'mass produced mediocrity'
By JEFF ROLLINS
Assistant Trends Editor
The Small Faoes new
album, 78 In The Shade, is
a perfectly boring album of
old-fashined rock and roll.
These rock retardates do
not do anything creative at
all, but compose their
uous, woody slide guitar
that gives those albums
life. The Small Faces did
nothing that a group of high
school musicians couldn't
have done, and probably
have done better.
It didn't take Stewart and
Wood long to abandon this
bunch of dolts. While Stew-
Music
ROCK GROUP SMALL Faces 'Were it not for the
"sipidly designed album cover, one might well imagine
� � the group were trying to cultivate an audience of the
songs of stale techniques
and trite ideas.
The music lover who
possesses a knowledge of
dreary rock and roll trivia
might remember that the
Small Faces appeared on
the music scene as Rod
Stewart's back-up band
The albums-A Nod is as
Good as a Wink to a Blind
Horse, Every Picture Tell A
Story, and Gasoline Alley
that they recorded with
Stewart and Ron Wood are
not bad at all. But it is
Stewart's inimitable person-
ality and voice and Ron
Wood's delectable, sen-
art went on to solo stardom
and Wood became a Rolling
Stone, the Samll Faces
remained in deservable ob-
scurity. Except, that is, to
inflict the music listening
public with an occasional
travesty in order to play out
the contract they signed
with Atlantic.
Were it not for the
insipidly designed album
cover, one might well im-
agine that the Small Faces
were trying to cultivate an
audience of the deaf. Their
songs fill you with the
intense desire to change
records.
Of course, it is possible
that the entire album is well
conceived parody of itself.
M aybe it si supposed to be
bad, in order to satirize all
that is vacuous, hackneyed
and uncreative in rock and
roll. If so, fine job gentle-
men, for the album is truly
execrable.
There is nothing at all to
distinguish Steve Mar-
riott's voice or his perform-
ance with it. He reminds
one of a tired, Holiday Inn
musician who is grinding
out for the umpteenth time
"House of the Rising Sun
How can he expect his
audience to be excited
about his performance if he
is not?
Equally lackluster are
Ian McLagan's keyboards.
They are, well, adolescent
if not puerile. McLagan is
neither technically adept
nor compositionally crea-
tive. In this respect, he
resembles the otehr band
members.
Rick Wills' bass is best
when it is not hears. And
Kenny Jones has every-
thing it takes to be a fine
drummer except a sense of
rhythm. As such, Wills and
Jones are exemplary mem-
bers of the Small Faces.
New ideas are what one
looks for in music, and new
combinations of ideas al-
ready used. Also, the worth
of music in increased pro-
portionally to the emotive
capability of the musicians,
to the depth of the feelings
that the man can arouse in
us with his instrument.
By these criteria, the
Small Faces' new album, 78
In The Shade, can only be
called "music" if we use
the word's broader defin-
ition: "any controlled
sound of interval of si-
lence On listening to the
album, one gets a good
sense of the ad absurdum
of the academic definition.
If you have a parti-
cualrly cruel streak in you,
you might recommend this
album to someone you
don't like, otherwise you
will only lose friends by
possessing this album. If
people hear you play it,
they will think less of you.
78 In The Shade is a
tribute to mass produced
mediocrity and as such
represents the nadir of the
never interesting Small
Faces.
BASF
POLISHED FOR GREATER CLARITY
Performance
Reel-to-Reel Sale
Things I Meant To Say is 'sugary
product aimed at teen market'
By EDWARD KALE
Staff Writer
While sitting at my
desk, listening to a first
album by the newcomer
musician. Marcus Joseph, I
was musing about how re-
freshing it would be to find
something tine and inno-
vative by some talented
new performer.
Every once in a great
while there comes an album
that stands out from that
mass of sugary ineptness
that is being produced
today m the name of music.
it is exciting to find an
artist who has pointed and
illuminating things to say
about himself and the world
about him. and who is able
to express this insight mu-
sically m such a way as to
be pleasing and cummuni-
catively effective.
Unfortunately, Marcus
Joseph's newalbum,Things
I Meant To Say, doesn't fall
into this category of a few.
This album takes its place,
rather, among the multi-
tudinous other albums that
are being produced to
appeal to the "Budding
love" emotions of people
who are junior high school
age or younger.
Nine of the ten songs on
the album are love songs
with such titles as "I Don't
Want To Get Over You
"Things I Meant To Say
and "I've Got You Where I
Want You
A sample of the lyrics:
I'm not the kind of guy
who wants to meet just
anyone
But when I saw you
standing there I knew
that you're the one.
or
Oohwee baby I can't
stand it, I can't take it
when you walkaway
Come on, sugar, such a
bad girl, say you're
leaving when you want
to stay.
Add background
strings, some backup vo-
cals, keyboards, guitars,
and drums, all doing elem-
entary rythmical work, and
you have Things I Meant To
Say.
This is not to say that
the album is technically
bad. It is mixed well and
sounds fine technically.
The musicians appear ing
on this album are pro-
ficient, and might even be
very talented. However,
with what is called for on
this album, they hardly
have a chance to show that
they know but a few chords.
One of the few re-
deeming points of the al-
bum is iV-rcus Joseph's
voice. It is -mooth and
rather pleasing, it is unfor-
tunate, though, that he
hasn't the artistic insight to
strive for something a little
less flat than this, his first.
Seemingly, what has
happened is that the record
company found a young
man who had a cute voice,
put him with a couple of
sets of studio musicians
(this album was recorded in
two different places) and
came up with a product
aimed at the young teen
market.
A cute album that takes
its place among the large
body of music that is
lacking in depth and mean-
ing. Things t Meant To.$ay
is not really an album that
someone of college age
would be interested in. I am
content to let M arcusJoseph
remain a face in the crowd.
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In eight team field
ECU wins invitational
,� �
Warmups?
L PL A YER appears slumped on the floor
' actually she is performing some warmup
�e a match in this weekends ECU
Steve Romero
By JIMMY DuPREE
Staff Writer
The first annual ECU
Invitational Volleyball
Tournament was held this
weekend in Minges Coli-
seum and the Pirate part-
isans were not disappointed
with the outcome. ECU
captured first place with an
easy 15-9, 15-4 victory over
Louisburg College.
In the round-robin
action which set the pair-
ings for the playoffs, the
Pirates were able to with-
stand all pressure and
finished the only undefeat-
ed team with a 10-0 mark.
Second seed was a three-
way tie between Louisburg,
Longwood College, and
Concord College, each with
identical 5-5 records.
ECU opened the tour-
nament Friday against
Longwood with a 15-11,
15-9 win. Later in the
evening the Pirates faced
Louisburg and captured a
hard fought 16-14, 15-5
victory.
We were behind to
Louisburg said coach
Alita Dillon, "but we show-
ed that we can come from
behind when we have to. I
think that must be our
biggest improvement dur-
ing this tournament
The Pirates closed the
Friday evening session with
a victory over Concord
College. 15-11. 15-0.
In Saturday round-robin
action, ECU defeated Peace
College from Raleigh, 15-9,
15-7 and also Virginia Tech,
15-5, 15-4.
Virginia Tech and Peace
failed to qualify for the
playoffs, with 4-6 and 1-9
records which were the
poorest marks in the tour-
nament.
"Virginia Tech played
below the level which we
were expecting said
Dillon. I though that they
would place much higher
than fifth. Peace was ham-
perred by injuries, which
was just as I had heard
prior to the tournament.
They finished in sixth
place
Since three of the teams
were tied for second seed,
there was a draw to decide
the pairings of the playoffs.
ECU was paired with Long-
wood and Concord was left
to challenge Louisburg for a
shot at the finals.
The Pirates won a three
game match with Long-
wood, 11-15. 15-10, 15-7
"We lost one game to
Longwood Dillon said.
"Our goal was to go to the
entire Tournament without
losing a single game
Louisburg edges Con-
cord 15-8, 15-7, which set
up the championship show-
down with ECU.
Longwood took home
the third place trophy with
a decisive victory over Con-
cord in the consolation
match.
ECU and Louisburg
each placed two players on
the All-Tournament team.
Juniors Becky Beauchamp
and LaVonda Duncan were
the Pirates selected to that
honor. "LaVonda is the
quarterback of the team;
she did an excellent job for
us all weekend stated
Dillon. "Becky had an
outstanding weeknd offen-
sively, especially with her
spiking
Louisburg placed
Loretta Holden and Sharon
Perry on the squad of the
tournaments best players.
Longwood's Linda Eagle
and Concord's Jean Zelt-
man rounded out the six
member team.
Dillon also praised sen-
ior Rosie Thompson for her
team leadership. She also
cited junior Joy Forbes for
her defensive play and
serving and junior Ginny
Rodgers for her all around
hustle during the Tour-
nament.
"Everyone saw action
at one time or another this
weekend. It truely was a
group effort with everyone
making a contribution
said Dillon.
"We hope to have a
bigger tournament next
year with more teams. I
also hope we can get a
weekend when there are
less other activities going
on campus which kept
many students from attend-
ing.
The Pirates now own a
26-20 overall record with a
6-4 record against in-state
Division I schools. The
in-state record is what
decides the seeding for the
state tournament which will
be held at ECU November
10-11.
ECU closes out its regu-
lar season schedule Wed-
nesday in Greensboro with
matches with UNC-G and
Appalachian State.
Duncan sets
LA VONDA DUNCA N PREPA RES to set up a teammate
this weekend's ECU Invitational held in Minges Coliseum
Duncan along with Becky Beauchamp were Doth named
the All-Tournament team ECU captured the inaugura
event m the eight team field Photo by Steve Romero)
Simply Sports
Sam Rogers
ICC fanaticism
. were born and raised around Atlantic Coast
ike most of the students here at ECU
s s.mply a matter of life and death you receive a
ACC reading
?60s and the early 1970's newspaper
magaizine features in Sports
� ACC fans But now that's fans.
atics.
your local newstand today and you
bombarded by publications about ACC
Ketbal And what's funny is these ACC
even more
g these magazine publications is
is ACC Basketball Handbook which is now
Circulation. And just this year. Nick Pond.
� ports Development for the Capitol Sports
together the first magazine on Atlantic Coast
e football Pond followed his football publication
basketball edition similar to Mothershead ACC
tl I's not enough three businessmen from
Matt and Chris Thomas along with Jack Newman
shed another magazine known as ACC Sports
be on the newstand monthly through the
of the year.
-hese magazines are a result of immense interest
the people who follow the ACC every year explained
� Chansky. the Sports Editor of the Durham Morning
erald an. former Sports Editor of the Daily Tar Heel at
UNC Most people just cant get enough information from
their local papers and that's why these magazines have
become so popular.
When there's a market for something as interesting as
e ACC. people are going to make an attempt to make
some money out of the situtation noted Chansky "But
some of these publications have a tendency to overlap each
d consequently you're going to read the same thing
in a lot of them
AL TYSON
Freshman center rarin' to go
; x -
Al Tyson
L
Photo by Chap Gurley
byCHARLESCHANDLER
Assistant Sports Editor
M At 6'11 215 pounds, highly-touted freshman center Al
V. Tyson finds himself at the crossroads of his life. He is now
preparing what could very possibly be a very outstanding
college basketball career. This year he must face athletes of
comparable size and abiltiy to his own.
Yet ECU head coach Larry Gillman feels his prized
recuit is ready for the transition. "A! has unlimited
potential said Gillman. "He just must get physically
stronger. He's already put on tenpounds since the end of
last season After he gets a little experience, hell beo.k
Can Tyson be a factor for the Pirates this season
Gillman sure hopes so. "It depends on how fast Al
progresses as to how much playing time he'll get this
season said the Pirate mentor. "We certainly hope that
hell make a big contribution this year. It just depends on
how fast he matures
Tyson says he feels he can help the Pirates immediately.
�Tm going to do my best said the freshman from
Wintervillelknowitwillbetough.Butall I can do is give
it all I have
All-American candidate, Oliver Mack will provide
encouragement and leadership for Tyson. "Mack will
help Al says Gillman. "Anytime a young player can play
with an athlete like a Mack, a Phil Ford, a Butch Lee, or a
John Lucas, he can't help but benefit from the experience
� Mack makes me feel like I can do the job sid Tyson.
"Playing with him makes me play harder. It seems to give
me confidence
A look at Tyson's high school record credentials shows
why the freshman was recruited by teams from all ove- the
Atlantic Coast and Southern Conference area
"Big Al" averaged 18.6 points and 14.5 rebounds
during his senior season Tyson made severa- 50'
lists of high school stars He was listed in Street and
Smith's basketball yearbook as one of the top 20 p a�ers in
the south last season
So. with all these credentials, why dd Tyson decide
come to ECU9 "I like the situation here, said Tyson
real dose to home I didn't want to go that far away A ong
with ECU. I thought about going to Ciemson. Memphis
State, and Virginia Tech East Carolina just seemec �
place that I should play
Tyson's decision brought much controversy to the Prate
program According to Tyson, it was all unwarranted C �
the summer, the ECU coaching staff was allegedly charged
by the University of M tssissippi with recruiting violations n
the intense battle to land Tyson
"They tried toclaim that ECU wasgivmg me things that
were illegal said Tyson "But there was no truth to any of
it. The NCAA investigated the situation and everything
checked out ok
"Even though I knew it was all false. I couldn't help bu1
worry. I thought it might mess up my career. I'm glad
over
So. in a sense. Al Tyson has already climbed the first
mountain in his ECU career Gillman feeis Big Al
climb many more in the next four years "Al is a hard
worker noted Gillman. "He has the talent and he loves
basketball
Mallory named
to Hall of Fame
Wuycik's Poop Sheet
The ACC Basketball Handbook, ACC Football and ACC
Baseball are filled with everything one could imagine.
Preview stories written by local sports writers, pictures,
recruiting notes, stats and schedules can all be found in any
of these three publications.
The ACC M agazme is a feature oriented publicattonwith
stories on the individual coaches and players themselves.
It's also written by contributing writers from around the
ACC area.
Perhaps the most interesting inside info about the
Atlantic Coast Conference is a small newletter published in
Chapel Hill known as the Poop Sheet Dennis Wuycik, a
former basketball All-America from North Carolina is the
publisher and it's the only newsletter of its kind in the
country
The Poop Sheet is filled with rumors and gossip about
the ACC and the area, including a detailed look at
recruiting written by Brick Otteinger.
The Poop Sheet has gotten great response from people
all over the country said Wuycik. "The weekly update on
games and the recruiting information is something no other
publication in the country has.
"People love to hear inside information and try to find
out just a little bit more about what goes on in the ACC. It's
also an excellent item for people who live a long way from
the area and like to keep up with ACC sports
If you're totally confused by now with all these titles I II
go over them again and even slip the price in there as well.
There's the ACC Basketball Handbook ($2.50) ACC
Football ($3.00) ACC Basketball ($3.00) and ACC Sports
($1 50) A year's subscription to the Poop Sheet is ($20.00).
As for me, the hell with all this trash. I'm still satisfied
with reading my old hometown newspaper, the Durham
Morning Herald.
Three former ECU
athletesand a former coach,
the schools current Dean
of Men, will be installed in
the ECU Sports hall of
Fame during ceremonies at
the Pirates' Nov. 11 home-
coming football game
against William and Mary.
Jim Mallory. who coac-
hed the Pirates to the 1961
national championship in
baseball. Jim Johnson,
winner of 16 letters and
coach of four sports, full-
back Tom Michel, the first
man to score a touchdown
in Ficklen Stadium, and
Richard Narron, baseball
all-America, will be honor-
ed in the fifth year of the
Hall of Fame.
The induction of these
four brings to 23 the total
enshrined since the Hall
was begun with 10 persons
in 1974. Former Athletics
Director Clarence Stasavich
was inducted alone in 1976,
with four being honored the
other two years.
Mallory, a native of
Lawrenceville, Va and cur-
rently the Dean of Men,
coached the Pirate baseball
team from 1954 through
1962, winning numerous
championships including
the 1961 NAIA crown. His
teams won 161 games and
lost only 60. He captained
the baseball team at North
Carolina as an undergrad-
uate, was named the top
amateur baseball player in
America one year, and
played in the first major
league game he ever saw,
that with the Washington
Senators. He became the
Dean of Men in 1959 and is
now also the Associate
Dean of Students.
Johnson, a football,
basketball, and baseball
star for the Pirates as an
undergraduate, also, is the
only alumnus to have been
the head football coach at
ECU. He served as captain
for each team twice, boxed
as a amateur, and coached
the first ECU boxing team
in 1938, the same year he
received his degree. He
served as Athletics Director
following the war, coached
three sports, and helped
establish the ECU Educat-
ional Foundation as a
scholarship fund. He cur-
rently resides in Virginia
Beach, Va.
See HALL on p 12
Indians defeat
ECU booters3-0
Kevin Tyus
THE ECU QOALIE turned in another superb performance
agaisnt William and Mary despite the Pirates 3-0 setback.
Tyus was credited with 18 saves against the Indians. Photo
by John H. Grogan)
By DAVID MAREADY
Staff Writer
The Indians of William
and Mary tacked another
win onto their five game
winning streak by defeating
the Pirates 3-0, Sunday, on
Minges Soccer Field.
William and Mary took
the initiative early as they
cranked out numerous
shots at the Pirate goal
before they finally hit pay-
dirt with 15:53 gone in the
first half. The goal, which
came after a penalty
against the Pirates, was
booted by Indian Rob
Olson.
Several minutes later,
with 19.40 gone in the half,
the Indians added another
goal to boost their lead to
2-0. William and Mary's
Kevin Park was credited
with the tally.
The remainder of the
half was scoreless and the
half ended in favor of the
Indians, 2-0.
The stats for the first
half saw William and Mary
way out front with twenty-
three shots at the Pirate
goal, while the Pirates
could muster only four
shots at the we!l-def�
Indian goal
William and Mary res
umed second half action
fght where they left of the
first half. The Indians ton
ahawked a wean P �
defense for their third
consecutive goal off the toe
of Kip Germame with 9 18
gone in the half B
Watson was credited with
the assist
Both clubs seemed to
tire in the latter stages of
the contest as neither the
Pirates, nor the Indians
could generate an effective
offense Fleeting hopes of a
Pirate comeback were das-
hed as they were beset by
several penalties The dock
finally ran out on the
Pirates with score in favor
of the Indians 3-0
Despite a weak showing
offensively as a team, sev-
eral Pirates played excel-
lent games including, Phil
Martin, Brad Winchefl and
Stan Griff.
Statistically. William
and Mary dominated with
thirty-six total shots at the
Pirate goal, while ECU
could only manage eight
shots at the Indian goal
t
I





f �
f t f f
t S
ffrffffrfl
Thompson boosts
Pirat
e cause
By DAVID MAREADY
Staff Writer
Agile, strong, friendly.
These are just a few of the
characteristics describing
ECU'S sports star, Rosie
Thompson.
The 21-year-old native
of Blounts Creek, N.C. has
earned varsity letters on
both the Lady Pirate volley-
ball and basketball teams.
As a sophomore starter
on last year's basketball
team, Thompson scored
645 total points while aver-
aging a blistering 20.8
points in each of her
thrity-one games.
Her average ranks her
among the top three women
basketball players in the
State Thompson also led
the squad in rebounds with
a season total of 307 at an
average of 9.9 per game.
This total seems remark-
able considering she's only
five feet nine inches tall.
"I think I can compen-
sate tor my heigth by being
a littel quicker than my
opponents and by being in
the right place at the right
time said Thompson.
Thompson was certainly
in the right place at the
right time last year. She
was credited with 69 steals,
and 14 blocked shots, sec-
ond only to teammate,
Marcia Girven. She was
also tops on the team in
free throws with a solid
779 average in 199
attempts.
Thompson says the pot-
ential on this year's squad
is unlimited. "We're all
very hopeful, especially
since we have most of our
team returning noted
Thompson.
She did admit, however,
that her team will have a
handicap defensively.
"Our height does leave
us with a disadvantage in
the rebounding depart-
ment, but I think with a
little work we can overcome
that
Thompson is also aware
that her squad faces per-
haps one of the toughest
schedules, both at home
and away, as any team in
the state. The Lady Pirates
will face such powerhouses
as N.C. State, UNC, Old
Dominion, and Ohio State.
"Our schedule is pretty
tough said Thompson,
"but I think our team is
capable of beating any one
of them. We're experienc-
ed and that should prove to
be a decisive factor in most
of the contests
Miss Thompson admits
she along with the rest of
her teammates must rely on
their quickness and
strength in order to im-
prove on last year's out-
standing 20-11 record.
31 October 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 11
Middleton leads Belk Golas
By JOHN EVANS
Staff Writer
The International Stu-
dents Association hasn't
played a game yet in
intramural soccer, but they
have already proved a
formidable foe as two
teams have forfeited to
them during the first week
of soccer action. Both Phi
Kappa Tau "B" and Phi
Epsilon Kappa forfeited to
the ISA.
The strongest team that
has played so far seems to
be the Belk Gola, which
downed the Aycock Alpi,
1-0, and the Scott Rogues,
6-0, last week. In the game
against Scott, the Golas
were led by Brad Middle-
ton's three goals ans Kris
Solt'stwoqoals. Stu Fields
also contributed many fine
saves as the Gola goal-
keeper. And it was the
Gola's John Ryan who
scored the first goal of the
intramural soccer season
with the one and only goal
in the Aycock game.
Three-ln-A-Row, which has
several members from last
year's intramural soccer
championship team, got off
to a big start with a 2-1 win
over the Aycock Alps. The
score was 0-0 at the half but
scored two goals in the
second half to win. The
winning goal was scored by
Jack Simonneau. Robert
Barnhill had the other goal
for the winners. Three-
In-A-Row lost their other
game during the week,
losing to the Jones Cosmos
in a 2-1 upset. The Cosmos
went 2-0 during the week
with a 4-2 win over On Your
Back.
In fraternity play, Pi
Kappa Phi and Tau Kappa
Epsilon have emerged as
the teams to beat. The Pi
Kapps got their season off
on the right foot with a pair
of wins over Sigma Nu (2-0)
and Sigma Phi Epsilon
(2-1). Clay Edmonds has a
goal in each game for the Pi
Kappas. He also had one
assist. Tau Kappa Epsilon
downed Kappa Sigma 1-0
and Lambda Chi Alpha 4-0
for two wins in the first
week of play. Kappa Alpha
is also undefeated with a
2-1 win over Delta Sigma
Phi. The most exciting frat
game of the week, though,
came in the game between
the Phi Kappa Taus and
Sigma Nus when the Sigma
Nu team won on penalty
kicks after a 1 -1 tie between
the two teams.
In women's league play,
the Spirit of Fleming
mauled Alpha Phi, 8-0, in
their first game of the
season as eight different
women scored. Only two
other games were played
due to a large number of
forfeits. In those games,
Cotten beat Alpha Xi Delta
4-0 and Alpha Xi Delta beat
Greene Dorm 1-0.
The women's team ten-
nis finals were played on
Wednesday and Tri Sigma
defeated Fleming Dorm,
10-0, 10-0, and 10-0. In
men's play, the Aycock
Aces and the Undefeated
met for the men's champ-
ionship, with the Unde-
feated winning 3-0.
in the match went 10-4.
10-6 and 10-4. In the
number one match a pair of
teammates from last year's
team tennis champions
met, with Bill Dixon top-
ping Michael Lupton, 10-4.
In another match, Michael
Joyner beat Mike Sawicki.
10-4, but not until after
Sawicki had fought back
from a 5-0 deficit to close it
to 5-4. John Irby won the
other match for the Un-
defeated, topping Rick Ad-
ams, 10-6.
Rosie Thompson
THE TWO SPORT ECU star displays the form that allowed
her to lead the Lady Pirate basketball team in scoring last
season. She will be counted on again this season to carry a
large load for the Pirates.
-NEW-
Now Available
BASF
W
professional
cassettes
Trivia contest begins
By JOHN EVANS
Staff Writer
How many persons out
there think they know their
baseball?
Well, there's more to
baseball than knowing
Reggie Jackson's batting
average or Pete Rose's
salary.
For example, who was
the pitcher that gave up the
pitch that Hank Aaron hit
for his 715th major league
home run that broke Babe
Ruth's record? Or, how
about the infielder who
holds the record for least
errors committed in a 162-
game season? Or for that
matter, how about a
toughie like who were the
three catchers on the 1964
New York Yankees baseball
team?
If you know the three
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ball fan, you ought to sign
up to participate in the
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coming up November 20.
Registration begins on
November 12 and runs
through November 16, so
that should give you all you
amateur Howard Cosells
out there a chance to brush
up before you make the
fatal plunge into the lime-
light.
Want to know the an-
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to enter the competition
and find out because they
are sure to be included.
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Page 12 FOUNTAINHEAD 31 October 1978
hist week in NCAA action
Maryland,
NSON
5 sur -
978 �
Navy,

weeki
se nay be
ind.
one Of the foui remaining
major teams with perfect
records, blanked Duke 27-0
but the Terrapins are from
from home free. They have
a major non-league show
down with second-ranked
Penn State on tap next
Saturday, plus an Atlantic-
Coast Conference shootout
with Clemson on Nov 18
Houston. No 11 in last
week's Associated Press
ratings, probably will crack
the Top Ten in the next one
a come-from-
behind 20-9 victory over
ninth i Arkansas
No 18 Navy remained
I the unbeatens �
Oklahoma and
merup Penn State are
by knocking
oft No 15 Pitt 21-11 while
No. 11 came from
1t iown to nip
Kentucky 17-16 and No 17
Purdue whipped Iowa 34-7
The weekend's results
left Houston and Texas tied
for the Southwest Con-
ference lead. Georgia and
Alabama among the non-
losers in Southeastern
Conference play � so is
Auburn � and Purdue in
the driver's seat for the Big
Ten title and the P
Bowl
Meanwhile, Oklahoma
and Penn State kept rolling
toward a possible national
championship showdown in
the Orange Bowl if they
finish the regular season
1-2 Both teams have 8-0
records Oklah'
trounced Kansas State
56-19 and Penn Stale trim-
med West Virginia 49-21 -
with three regular-season
contests remaining Okla-
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homa must face Colorado,
Nebraska and Oklahoma
State while Penn State has
Maryland. North Carolina
State and Pitt left
One team had its per-
fect record ended when
unranked Holy Cross
bowed 31-25 to Brown as
Mark Whippie passed for
two touchdowns and scored
two.
Elsewhere, Keith Pugh
caught five passes � four
of them sensational grabs
� for 148 yards, including
a 45-yard touchdown toss
m Jeff Rutiedge. to lead
third-ranked Alabama past
Virginia Tech 35-0 Rut-
ledge also fired a 27yarder
� 3ruce Bolton
Fourth-ranked Nebra-
i preppmg for its Nov.
11 shootout with Oklahoma,
� ned back Oklahoma
ite 22-14 as Tom Sorley
scored once and passed 20
. irds to Rick Berns for
� er TD
Paul McDonald threw
ee touchdown passes to
,m Williams and one to
Vic Rakhsham while
Charle- �� and Lynn
Cam combined for 320
ne ground to lead
�tl ra ked Southern Cai
i 42-1 7
Olympian Jot
La �� led a
school record 100 yards
a th a kickoff return as No
� is defeated SouU
V list 22-3 The Long-
� e : V -�- Ford to 10
mpletion; i V oasses
v :h i-
t year s
� � nesota � � ���' ���
� Jophers 42-10 as
v for tl
� � �� ' ' ��
�. �� ra -ed UClA
�-sated Ariz na 24-14 on
��.� e on Sat -
12 Arizona S'ate
ubbed -� by
Washington as Toussaint
r . ei scored tw x i 1 T -
j one TD and
, � M ss ii squan-
a 27-7 iead in the
a 20 minutes and lost to
� 28-27 when E I
�ed on 'u"s
and 1
added a 12-
Louisiana State. No 14
was idle but Vagas Fer-
guson scored twice as No
19 Notre Dame blanked
M.ami of Florida 20-0 and
Clemson s Lester Brown
outrushed North Carolina
States Ted Brown 117
yards to 70 as the 20th-
ranked Tigers downed the
Wolfpack 33-10
Arkansas took a 9-0
second-period lead over
Houston on three field
goals but the Cougars
rallied on two touchdown
runs by Randy Love while
the defense turned back
numerous Arkansas threats
and limited Ben Cowms to
40 yards on 11 carries
Navy s No 1-ranked
defense threw punchless
Pitt for a minus 28 yards
rushing offense and scored
when Phil McConkey re-
covered a teammate's fum-
ble in the end zone, on
Larry Kiawmski's 3-yard
run and on Bob Lesz-
czynski's 4-yard toss to
Curt Gamer
Georgia fen be
Kentucky 16-0 in the third
period but rallied on Willie
McClendon s 4-yard run.
Jefl Pyburn's 6-yard pass
to Ulysses Norns and Rex
Robinson's 29-yard field
goa .v th eight seconds
The BuHdogs don t
� Alabama and can go
the Sugar Bowl I .
be 3� la an 1 A .Dur"
on Now 11-18 no mal
what Bama does
Ma" Herrn ann
bntzed Iowa a th
touchd mt passes a
ago. settled for "wo th
� � 25 yards to Dave
You-g and ii to Ba"
Burre" � as P re-
amed one game area
h jar Michigan State
State in the B 3
The B- ikers
e already beaten Ohio
State and M higan State
but jst race Michigan on
Nov 18
Bi"y Sims, who rushed
for 23"1 vards a week ago
added 202 on 25 carries a" J
red 'a ce to ead O a-
'ive
.ear
homa past Kansas Si i
penn State H
napless West . j �M
in the first four minuh
roared from behind ck M
Suhey's two scoring
Mike Guman's
punt retu'
ship of Chuck F
scored once anc
yards loSa'
another TD
AP Top
Twentv
results
How the Tot �
m The A
college footba
this weeke
10' i 8-C
Kansas State 56
2 Penn Sta1- -
West � i 49-21
3 a aban -
. rgmia Tech 35
4 Nebraska
Oklahoma Sia-
5 Maryland 8-C
Duke 2
6. S
Calil
7 T
em Mett -
8 '�'
M esota 42
9 a rkai sa - 2
H
UCLA 7-1
a 24 14
- - �
A �- a-sas 20-9

� r . 41
� � 28-27
A na
Nav y 21
16 G
17 Pui �
34-7
' - N
bi

Miami. Fla 2C
20
ECU Hall of Fame
� .eo from c ' -
M ichel, a four-ear
back u Jer Jack Boone a
arence Stasavich aver-
aged 5 7 yards oer ca� �
. ege and became
SP9
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COIN COLLECTIONS
BRING TO "COIN MAN"
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resides " G r e �
j in a
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Southei
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We also have a large selection of
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Gordon D. Fulp
Golf Professional
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O' of Memorial Or
Pt one 754 0504
Open 7 days a week until dark
I





Title
Fountainhead, October 31, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 31, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.669
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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