Fountainhead, September 5, 1978






Vol. 55 No. 65
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
jJh
1978
Brewer dedicates Ficklen Stadium
By MARK BARNES
Assistant News Editor
The new, enlarged Ficklen
stadium was formally dedicated
before a near capacity crowd of
31,000 during halftirne of the
ECU-WCU football game.
The stadium has an enlarged
seating capacity of 35,000, and
promises to be a showplace of
Pirate athletics.
Financed partly by private
donations and public funds, the
new stadium brings ECU closer
to its UNC system sister schools
in terms of capacity.
It promises to be an im-
portrait contribution to the ath-
letic program at ECU, and
officials here are exuberant over
the completion of the structure.
During halftirne festivities, a
plaque in appreciation of the
student body's efforts in fund-
raising was presented to Tommy m
Joe Payne. The plaque will be
on display in the Mendenhall
student center in the near
future, according to Payne.
Dr. Leo Jenkins, who re-
cently retired as chancellor
here, was at the dedication
ceremony. Dr. Jenkins was .the
chief administrator at ECU
during the planning and con-
stuction of the present enlarge-
ment. Dr. Jenkins' successor,
SU Coffeehouse:
music� munchies
By LUKE WHISNANT
Assistant News Editor
The Student Union Coffee-
house Committe is gearing up
for another big year.
The Coffeehouse, located in
room 15 Mendenhall, presents
fine local and regional talent
along with free munchies in a
relaxed, informal atmosphere.
The food is one of the
Coffeehouse's unique features,
according to Doug White,
committee chairperson.
"Where else can you go in
Greenville to see a good musical
act and stuff your faoe for free at
the same time?" White asks.
Munchies offered at last
year's Coffeehouse included rai-
sin bread, peanuts, cookies,
potatoe chips, cheeses, coffee,
hot tea, and soft drinks.
Coffeehouse entertainment
focuses primarily on local mu-
sical acts, although on occasion
they have presented comedians
and magicians.
"We're tentatively planning
to hold auditions on Fri. and
Sat Sept. 22 and 23, White
said. "Auditions are open to
everybody - musicians, singers,
dancers, actors, mimes, jugg-
lers and dancing bears. All you
have to do is sign up in the
Student Union Office.
"In the past we' ve present-
oks micfrt too' hamryvweigtaB as
Maria Dawkins, Lightning Mike
Wells, and Sally Spring. We
hope to book some of these
people again
There is a 50 cent cover
charge at the door, but White
emphasized that Coffeehouse
'patrons may eat their fill once
inside.
DOUG WHITE
Committee
CHAIRMAN of the Student Union Coffeehouse
Infirmary serves
students full-time
By JULIE EvERETTE
News Editor
The ECU Infirmary, located beside Joyner
Library, is available to all students 24 hours a
day. according to Dr. Dan Jordan, assistant
director of student health services.
Jordan said the infirmary has four full-time
physicians available from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
everyday, and two part-time physicians.
A part-time psychiatrist is also available to
counsel students.
According to Jordan, the infirmary operates
entirely on funds which oome from the students'
fees.
Jordan said the infirmary no longer gives
class excuses for a student who has visited the
infirmary.
ECU was one of the last schools to stop
giving class excuses Jordan said.
"A class absence is now strictly between the
professor and the student
"A professor may call to find out if the
student was here, but they will not be told the
"The studentsare living in the infirmary until
they can find adequate housing Jordan said.
Aocording to Jordan, the winter months are
the, busiest for the infirmary.
Jordan said many students are treated for
respiratory infections during those months.
reason the student came Jordan said.
Although there is no space problem yet,
Jordan said some students are living in the
infirmary because of lack of dorm rooms on
campus.
He said the infirmary often refers students for
specialisrare when needed.
Currently the infirmary has 46 beds available
fa patients.
Students are making use of the infirmary
more than they have in the past Jordan said.
The infirmary is serving students more as a
continuing servioe, not only in emergency cases.
"I think the infirmary is giving better servioe
than it ever has, especially since the nuisance of
giving class excuses was terminated, he said.
Dr. Brewer, complimented him
on the completion of the stadi-
um. He called it one of Dr.
Jenkins' many achievements
during his tenure at ECU.
The stadium was built with
approximately three and a half
million dollars in both public
and private funds.
One of the main fund raisers
and private contributors, ac-
cording to Brewer, was Dr. Ray
M inges. M inges was praised by
Brewer during his speech.
When contacted later, Minges
commented, "It was a necess-
ary expansion to the athletic
complex of ECU and will be a
tremendous economic asset to
the eastern part of the state
(and) congratulations to the
student body for it's financial
support to the stadium, because
without it, there would have
been no expansion of the
stadium
Dr. Brewer, added that
"All of us in the university are
appreciative of the tremendous
generosity of the people of
North Carolina - and in parti-
cular eastern North Carolina - in
providing this university with
this fine stadium . and a deep
appreciation of the support of a
loyal, dedicated student body
which provided well over one
million dollars (towards) the
completion of the stadium
Tommy Joe Payne, pres-
ident of the SGA, who received
the plaque, added that "We
accepted the citation of appre-
ciation from the Pirate club and
the trustees for 1 12 million
dollars which came out of
student fees of years past. I am
sure that everyone is impressed
with the stadium - and we all
hope to have lots of winning
seasons in it
Cliff Moore, vioe-chancellor
of business affairs made the
budget requests and did the
bookwork behind the construc-
tion of the stadium. He acted as
a kind of Mason and figured out
how much the state could afford
to spend out of the ECU budget
DR. THOMAS BREWER, chancellor of ECU,
praised students for providing a large part of the
funds of the enlargement of Ficklen Stadium.
This photograph shows the stadium in its
completed form, with anen, enlarged capactiy of
35,000. Before the enlargement, Ficklen
Stadium could hold 20,000 spectators.
Working women encouraged
to train for non-traditional jobs
WASHINGTON (AP) - Women
must be encouraged to train
fa and accept non-traditional
jobs while low-paying jobs hatd
by the bulk, of them must be
upgraded, a Carter adminialr
tion official says.
Alexis Herman, head of the
Women's Bureau in the Labor
Department, noted that nothing
has been more dramatic in the
past decade than the huge influx
of women into the work foroe.
Mae the 47.1 million
women held paying jobs as of
July, which is a 129 percent
increase from a decade earlier,
she said, adding that the
number of married women who
wak is five times that of the
1940 figures.
Despite this, Ms. Herman
N.C. man, woman
die of strange disease
CHARLOTTE N.C. (AP) - North Carolina health officials
have asked the U.S. Center fa Disease Control in Atlanta to
investigate the deaths a a Mecklenburg County man and woman
from a mysterious and fast-waking disease.
Doctas who treated Leonard and Jo Ann Whiteside at
Presbyterian Hospital in Charlotte say they believe a potent virus
may have been responsible fa the deaths. However, it may be
several days befae health officials are sure of the cause.
Whiteside, 49, died Friday and his 47 year old wife died
Sunday.
Dr. Geage Irons, a cardiologist who treated Mrs. Whiteside,
said he does not believe the couple had Legionaire's Disease
because they did not suffer from respiratay problems namaily
associated with it. But Irons said he was not ruling the disease
that killed 34 people in Philadelphis in 1976.
Bah the Whitesides, described by Irons as healthy adults,
suffered headaches, fever, nausea, diarrhea and aher aches after
becoming ill early last week and being hospitalized several days
later.
They had returned home Aug. 21 from a four-day vacation to
Myrtle Beach, S.C.
Irons said he gave Mrs. Whiteside a broad range of antibiotics
but her condition steadily detiaated.
"There was no question it was an overwhelming acute
infection of some kind he said.
The couple's nine year old daughter, Jodi, became ill as the
family was returning fron Myrtle Beach and another docta
treated her on the presumption she had Rocky Mountain Spated
Feva, Ironssaid. Jodi and her twobrtfhers, Brink, 15, and Andy,
4, were reported to be in good health Sunday.
said in an interview earlier this
week, most women remain
clustered in clerical, service and
sales jobs and their pay is less
than 60 percent that ot men.
STEREOTYPING
"We've got to be just as
concerned about the occupation-
al stereayping a women into
low-paid jobs as we are about
getting women into non-tradi-
tiatal jobs she said.
Ms. Herman helped shape
federal regualtions that will
open more blue-collar jobs to
women.
The regulations, issued earl-
ier this year, require construc-
tion companies with federal
contracts to hire at feast three
percent women.
And apprenticeship pro-
grams registered through the
Labor Department are required
to reauit at least 20 percent
women.
Because most women wak
aly alongside aher women, the
move to require "equal pay fa
equal work" is a little conaete
value to them, Ms. Herman
said. She said thae is an urgent
need to go beyond the tradition-
al equal pay suits with data that
will compare "women's wak"
with similar jobs charactaized
as "men's wak
WOMEN PAID LESS
SaneLaba Deaprtment
studies show that women doing
jobs comparable to those done
by men are paid dramatically
less, indicating women may be
paid less simply because they
are in "women's jobs Ms.
Herman said.
The Laba Department re-
cently resolved a complaint
against the Dallas, Tex school
system by finding that women
cleaning up the schools were
paid far lower than men doing
virtually the same wak.
The system was redesigned.
with persons doing comparable
wak being paid the same.
Ms. Herman said her de-
partment plans to analyze the
sexstereayping of federally fi-
nanced public service jobs as
the next step in attempting to
stop sex discrimination in the
wak faoe.
m

M
What's inside
I
God's wad gives the right to smoke
paSeep.7.
It's Alive Again but it may as well have stayed :��
dead See Whitaon on Film, p.6.
The Pirates edged past WCU's Catamounts in
the newly-dedicated Ficklen Stadium Saturday
NightFa a wrap-up, see p.9.
MORE HOGS, p. 6
All you ever wanted to know about going -
Greek but were scared to ask See p.5.
ECU'S new purple and gold computerized S?&
scoreboard made its debut Saturday night to rave $"
reviewsSeep.9.
Wir
Chancellor upgrades research
DR. THOMAS BREWER, chancellor , has announced that ha is taking immediate stpes to upgrade
the level of research activity hare at the university.
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Chanceila Thomas Brewer
has announced he Is taking
immediate steps to upgrade the
level of research activity at ECU
and establaishing an improved
teaching awards program.
The new ECU chanceila told
the traditional opening-of-
-school faculty convocation that
at least an additional $88,000 in
university and ECU Foundation
funds will be made available fa
faculty research and support in
1978-79.
This is nearly five times the
amount a university-provided
money allocated fa research
last year.
"We are woefully inade-
quate in research support
Brewer noted.
In addition to the research
money, Brewer announced allo-
cation a $20,000 fa projects
designed to improve teaching
through an awards program
administered by a new faculty
development committee, and
$10,000 to be used fa attend-
ance at seminars and work-
shops.
This, Brewer said, was a
"small beginning" which he
hopes will lead to a fully staffed
faculty development center at
ECU.
Further, Brewer announced
plans fa a program of aeative
activity assignments to al�ow
faculty a full semester to pursue
teaching irnprovemtnt projects
a scholarship, and establishing
six summer awards of $2,000
each, in lieu of summer teaching
fa improvement of teaching a
aeative activity.
The chanceila also disclosed
a "discussion proposer for
aganizdtionaJ changes in
ECU'S administrative structure
is befae the faculty, staff, and
trustees. He said there will be
full discussion befae any deris-
ion is made.
He indicated that one direc-
tion of the propoeed changes
will be toward obtaining greater
financial support from private
"We must find ways to
obtain mucha greater support
from our alumni he said.
"Support must also oome from
foundations, capaattans, and
friends.
'To make a maximum effot
here will require some adminis-
trative reaganizatioi he said.
Brewer's first convocation
speech befae en overflow aud-
ience in the 800 seat Menden-
hall theatre drew a prolonged
standing ovation. He acknow-
ledged that such a response was
an nona.
To encourage greater re-
search activity, Brewer
announced, -aresearch fund of
$60,000 from university monies
to be administered on a compet-
itive basts by a faculty research
ccrnmittee; -an amount of,
See BREWER, p. J
mwm
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Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 5 Septarrtbar 1978
i
Ceramics
The Ceramics Department,
in cooperation with the Visual
Arts Forum and the SGA, is
holding a workshop Sept. 7 and
8 in the Leo Jenkins Fine Arts
Center.
Kent Follette, teacher at
Nichols State in Thibodaux, La
will demonstrate from 10 a.m. -
Noon and 1 - 4 p.m. both days.
He will also give a slide show
and talk in the auditorium at 8
p.m. Thursday evening.
Key club
Rick EIridge REBEL
Special kids Mixed doubles Recclub
Grafts
VAF
The Visual Arts Forum, the
organization representing all
Fine Arts students, will hold its
fust meeting of the year on
Fri Sept. 8 at Noon in Jenkins
Auditorium. All interested per-
sons are enoouraged to attend.
Who's who
We are now in the process of
selecting students from our
school to appear in the 1978-79
edition of Who's Who Among
Students in American Colleges
and Universities
We are sending out forms to
all departments and organizat-
ions that we can possible locate.
If you wish to make a nominat-
ion and do not receive the
necessary forms, please contact
the dean of student affairs office
immediately. All nominations
are due by Oct. 13.
To all former Key and
Keyanette members, also any
other interested students who
are interested in aiding his or
her community: the internation-
al Circle K dub of ECU cordially
invites you to our second club
meeting fa the 1978-79 school
year.
The meeting will be held on
Tues Sept. 5 at 6:30 p.m. at
213 Wright annex. This is the
same building where the ROTC
is stationed.
The meeting will be prece-
eded by snacks and refresh-
ments. All students are invited
to join our worthwhile endeavor.
C.S.O.
The Center Fa Student
Opportunities, Divisiai of
Health Affairs, offers cost-free
tutaial help upoi request to
majas and pre-majas in medi-
cine, premedicine, nursing, and
allied health.
CSO also offers to employ as
tutas graduate and certain
undergraudate students who are
able to assist fellow students in
chemistry, biology, anatomy,
physics, math and other oourses
in health professions curricula.
Students interested in either
aspect of this program should
contact the Center Fa Student
Opportunities immediately.
Visit 208 Ragsdale Hall, a call
757-6122, 6075, a 6081.
You are invited to come and
hear singer, guitarist, and com-
poser Rick EIridge this Thurs. at
8 - 10 p.m. in Wright Audito-
rium.
Rick is a young man who
used to be in a rook band and
now istraveling all over the U.S.
singing songs about whatJpsus
has done and is doing in his life
since he met Him.
There is no admission
charge and everyone is wel-
come. This is being sponsaed
by the ECU Full Gospel Student
Fellowship chapter.
Open house
Everyone is invited to an
open house that is more than
shaking hands at the Baptist
Student Union, 511 East 10th St.
behind the ECU library, tonight
beginning at 5 p.m. Supper is 75
cents and you don't have to be
baptist.
The Baptist Student Union is
a place where social, intellectual
spiritual, and ethical growth are
brought together.
Phi Sigma Pi
Phi Sigma Pi will have its
first business meeting Wed
Sept. 6 at 6 p.m. in Austin room
132. All members are urged to
attend.
The REBEL staff is now
accepting aiginal poetry,
essays, plays, and shat staies
fa publication in the 1979 issue
of ECU'S literary magazine.
Your work should be type-
written and can be brought to
the REBEL office in the publica-
tions building, a mailed to The
REBEL, Mendenhall, Greenvil-
le N.C. 27834, a call 757-6502.
Please keep a copy of your
wak and remember to include
your name, address, and phone
number with each submission.
The deadline fa literature is
Dec. 15, 1978.
All special education, elem-
entary education and other
interested persons are invited to
attend the first meeting of the
Student Council fa exceptional
children.
The meeting will be held
Wed Sept. 6 at 5 p.m. in room
129, Speight.
Refreshments will follow the
meeting. All present and future
members are strongly urged to
attend. Be exceptional and
suppat exceptional children!
Sign up now fa MSC Mixed
Doubles Bowling Leagues. There
will be a Monday night and a
Tuesday league meeting at 7
p.m. each week.
The first meetings will be
held on Sept. 11 and 12 at the
Mendenhall Student Center
Bowling Center. You must sign
your name fa the league of your
choice on the poster located on
the main bulletin board on the
groud floa of the Student
Center.
Anyone interested in fam-
ing a reaeational dub to meet
fa weekly competition in bridge
chess, a table tennis should
sign up now at the Billiards
Center in Mendenhall Student
Center.
Dogs
Tourney
Bowling
The Mendenhall Student
Center reaeation area has a lot
to offer you. Watch fa these
great spedals caning soon.
" Rent-A-Lane" - begins
Sept. 9, Saturdays from Noon to
6 p.m. Fa $3 you can rent a
bowling lane fa aie hour.
"Red Pin Bowling" begins
Sun Sept. 16. Every Sunday
from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. you get
the chance to win one free game
with every game bowled. Make
a strike when the head pin is red
and you win!
"Discount Days" are every
Monday from 2 p.m. until 5
p.m. Prices in bowling, billiards
and table tennis are V3 off
beginning Mon Sept. 18.
Reaeational tournaments
sponsaed by Mendenhall Stud-
ent Center will be held this
semester beginning Od. 9 to
seled representatives to attend
the ACU-I regional games tour-
nament in Knoxville, Tenn.
All full-time students inter-
ested in partidpating should
pick up necessary infamatioi at
the Billiards a Bowling Centers
in Mendenhall. The competition
will invdve billiards, backgam-
mon, table tennis, bowling, and
chess.
Day and Dam student pre-
liminary tournaments will be
held in Odober to seled partid-
pants to oompete in the All-
Campus Tournaments to be held
in November. All students must
register by the deadline set up
fa each tournament.
Several AA members of the
ECU campus community are
aganizing a University AA
group. The initial aganizationa!
meeting will be held Fri Sept.
8, in room 307, Erwin Hall.
All interested individuals are
oadially invited to attend.
Cheer
Anyone interested in a male
position on the ECU cheer-
leading squad, there will be an
opening, beginning with the
second home game, Sept. 30.
Meet at Mingeson Sept. 5 at
6 p.m.
There will also be tryouts fa
a Pirate mascot (male a female).
Meet on the same date
fa mae infamatioi.
Residents of Greenville are
reminded that there is a 24 hour
leash law in the dty. Further,
every dog that is kept in the dty
must at all times have a current
rabies tag on a collar around
their neck.
Civitan Club
ECU Collegiate Civitan Club
will hold its first meeting on
Sept. 7, at 7 p.m. in Brewster
C-205.
All famer Junia Civitans
are invited to attend a anyone
wishing to become a member of
a collegiate service dub.
Coffeehouse
The Student Union Coffee-
house Committee needs you!
Please apply at the Student
Union office, room 234 Men-
denhall.
Hours for the Crafts Center at
Mendenhall Student Centa are
3 p.m. until 10 p.m Ma
through Fri, and 10 a.m. until 3
p.m Sat.
The Center is composed of a
darkroom with three enlargers
a ceramics area, a jewelry
metals area, a general aafts
are, and textiles area with floor
looms fa weaving.
All full-time ECU students
faculty, staff and spouses are
eligible to use these facilities. A
semester membership fee entit-
les the Crafts Center member to
use the fadlities, to check out
tools and equipment, to oheo
out library materials, to enlist
the aid of aafts supervisas.
and to enroll in introduday
level wakshops which are offe-
red throughout the year
Visit the Crafts Center any
time during operating hours a
call 757-6611 Ext. 271 fa mae
infamatiat.
New f rat
Men, how would you like to
be part of something new at
ECU?
Alpha Sigma Phi, rjne of the
finest fraternities in the nation
is beginning at ECU.
We, the brahers of
Alpha Sig believe in individua-
lity and encourage any ideas you
might have. If you are interest-
ed in adding a new and exdting
chapter in your life, call 756-
0893 a 758-8514.
It pays to advertise in
FOUNTAINHEAD
With a circulation of 10,000, FOUNTAINHEAD is distmbut
free of charge throughout the university community.
Advertising Rates
(Effective Aug. 28,1978)
National rate per inch $3.64
National rate per line $.26
Local open rate per inch $2.10
;sified Ads
Three lines f
1st color $50.00
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Must be in FOUNTAINHEAD office 5 days prior to insertion date
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mm
"�'� � -
'mmk � oMrift





Girlgets
hospital
proposal
WARWICK, R.I (AP), Charlie
Fngondidn't let littleth.ngslike
a boating aocdent, a hospital
stay and arm surgery keep him
from Proposing to his high
school sweetheart.
Fngon. 19, was injured
Thursday when the steering
mechanism on his outboard
mot or boat apparently broke,
throwing himout of the craft into
Narragansett Bay.
On Saturday, he invited
Nancy Leonard, 18, to the
hospital She thought he just
wanted a visitor but he had
more important things on his
tever dreamed of a
proposal said his new
oee.
The couple had an engage-
ment party in his hospital room
Saturday
Fngon expects to be re-
leased from the hospital Wed-
nesday, and he and Miss
i-eonard plan to get married in
� :hs
Teachers
receive
awards
ECU News Bureau
jmni awards to recognize
teaching excellence among the
4 ECU were presented
Aug 28 to Dr. Alvin
professor of hist-
Warie Farr. assistant
English.
� ihrner. who received
md Lina Worthing-
: received the
: in 1972. He has
ember of the ECU
� faculty a e i960.
member of the
- �- since 1973,
Robert L. Jones
awvar - established to rec-
ognize teaching exoeWenoe.
The awards were presented
. Powell of Greenville.
the ECU Alumni
Association, at the annual open-
� 'acuity convocation
emcon Donald Y.
Aiumni director, said
mners would share
a SVOOC allocated
. the ECU Alumni
Asscoa' ' to recognize and
emphasize the good teaching
� - i � . :oes on through-
jniversity as well as to
�nose who have been
;eo especially outstanding
The award winners are def-
ied by an Instructional
Survey Committee of the
Faculty Senate.
Fahrner, native of
-etia, W. Va . received his
A B degree trom Hampden-
Sydeny College and his MA
and Ph D from the University
of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.
He served 1940-47 in the U.S.
Navy and won 12 major battles
� ns and the Commendation
Medal fa service in combat in
the Pacific during World War II.
In 1971. he completed 31
years service in the U.S. Naval
Reserve.
Farr. a native of Chicago,
received her B.S degree from
Loyola University of Chicago,
her M A from Purdue Univer-
sity and holds a certificate of
candidacy for the Ph.D. from
the University of Washington.
In 1966-68 she taught at the
University of Seattle and taught
in the ECU Division of Contin-
uing Education before becoming
a member of the English faculty
in the College of Arts and
Sciences
BREWER
continued from p. 1)
$10,000 from the ECU Founda-
tion1 for research support, most-
ly small items to be handled
administratively; -an additional
$18,000 in ytstorl gunfd ptobifrf
-an additional $18,000 in travel
funds provided fa faculty mem-
bers who present papers or
participate in scholarly meet-
ings.
In the area of teachng
improvement, Brewer said
most universities support
scholarship - few support the
improvement of teaching, which
is the fundamental mission of
the university
The new teaching improve-
ment projects, he said, will be
on a competitive basis and be
awarded administratively.
L
Fountainhead staff meeting Wednesday at 5
5S�pt�mtiec 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 3
Anyone interested in writing News,
meet in the Fountainhead office,
Wednesday at 4:30
1st ANNIVERSARY SALE!
703 Greenville Blvd.
IN THE GREENVILLE
SQUARE SHOPPING CENTER
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re
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at or below the advertised price in
each A&P Store, except as specifi
cally noted in this ad
We're Open All Day
PRICES GOOD THROUGH TUES SEPT. 5 AT A&P IN GREENVILLE
EIGHT O'CLOCK
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SWEEPSTAKES
YOUR CHOICE OF PRIZES
GRAND PRIZE: 8 DAYS OR 8 NIGHTS IN RIO DE JANEIRO, 3RASIL
Including Round Trip
Air Fare For Two Via
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and Accommodations at � "3 f
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Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 5 September 1978
Women score TKO
With last Wednesday's settlement of the
Title IX grievance against ECU, initiated by a
former JV basketball player, Debby Newby,
the university has finally taken an overdue but
important step towards equalizing male and
female athletic opportunities.
Women have been discriminated against in
many fields throughout history, particularly in
intercollegiate athletics. Until recent modifi-
cations in the athletic program, the university
was clearly in violation of Title IX (requiring
equivalent athletic programs for men and
women) evidenced by the grossly dispropor-
tionate funding of the two programs.
According to the department of Institution-
al Research. 55 percent of ECU students are
female. Last year's athletic budget states
that there are approximately 111 female
athletes participating in eight sports.
Yet, according to Stevie Chepko, former
ECU gymnastics coach, only four percent of
that budget was devoted to female athletics;
the other 96 percent, less administrative costs,
went to the men.
Last year, there was a total of $287,003
available for men's athletic scholarships;
women were given $11,718 worth of crumbs.
The university now proposes to increase
funding of athletic scholarships for women to
$40,825, an increase of $28,107, in order to
comply with Title IX.
This is a major step towards equal
scholarship opportunities fa women, but the
gap is still too great. Even though Title IX
states that unequal aggregate expenditures
for either sex will not constitute non-compli-
ance the university should take the initiative
and do more than merely meet the minimum
requirements.
Debby Newby, leader of the five grievants,
feels the university is still not in compliance,
and will not be until the university supplies the
$84,000 she feels is necessary to meet the law.
The administration should view the recent
settlement not as a final solution of the
inequality that exists, but instead should view
it as a starting point from which to gradually
increase funding until equality, or at least
legal equality, is achieved. The university
should, however, move as quickly as possible
to rectify this situation. Last Wednesday's
settlement is a fine step in that direction.
Forum
Commentary
Student praises new FOUNTAINHEAD
Birth control pills may
have adverse side-effects
By HESTER PETTY
Uppity Women of Greenville
In any heterosexual relation-
ship, it is the woman who is
ultimately respons4ble for the
prevention of unwanted preg-
nancy Whether the method of
birth control is male-oriented or
'emale-onented, a resulting
;f eg nancy is always female-ori-
ted.
Therefore, it is important
that a woman be given the
chance to make an informed
decision on which type of birth
control is best suited for her
particular situation.
In the case of the birth
control pill, it is becoming
increasingly apparent that
women are being denied gener-
al access to the facts. Although
news reports-periodically sur-
face about recently discovered
side-effects, ft is important for
any woman who "is using the Pill
or thinking about using it to
know about all the side-effects
and their relationship to her
individual medical history.
There are two basic types of
birth control pill available at this
time the estrogen - progestin
or combination type, and the
progestin only, or"Mini-Pill"
type.
Brand names of the combi-
nation type include Demulen,
Brevicon, Enovid, Loestrin, Lo
Ovral, Modicon, Norinyl, Nor-
lestnn, Ortho-Novum, Ovral,
Ovulen, and Zorane. Brand
names of the "Mini-Pill' type
are Micronor. Nor-Q.D. and
Ovrette. The combined pills are
considered more reliable than
the "Mini-Pill
The "Mini-Pill" is believed
to be less apt to cause blood
clotting problems or high blood
pressure because it dees not
contain estrogen.
A brief word about effective-
ness The combined pill is
theoretically 99.5 percent effect-
ive. In actual use it has an
effectiveness as low as 94
percent. This is due to a
percentage of women who for-
get to take the Pill every day and
become pregnant.
POSSIBLE NATURAL. EX-
PECTED SIDE-EFFECTS: Re-
tention of fluid, gain in weight;
"breakthrough" bleeding (spot-
ting m middle of menstrual
cycle), change in menstrual
flow, absence of menstrual flow;
i nor eased tendency towards de-
velopment of yeast infections.
POSSIBLE MILD ADVERSE
EFFECTS: Nausea, vomiting;
allergic reaction (skin rashes,
itching, hives); headache, nerv-
ous tension and irritability;
breast enlargement, tenderness
and secretion; tannish pigmen-
tation of the face; reduced
tolerance to contact lenses;
impaired color vision (blue tinge
to objects, blue halo around
lights); accentuation of migraine
headaches.
POSSIBLE SERIOUS AD
VERSE EFFECTS: Thrombo-
phlebitis (inflammation of a vein
with the formation of a blood
clot); pulmonary embolism
(movement of blood clot to the
lung); stroke (blood clot in the
brain); rise in bicod pressure;
ooronary thrombosis (heart
attack); retinal thrombosis
(blood dot in eye vessels);
hepatitis with jaundice; emo-
tional depression (may be se-
vere) ; formation of benign tu-
mors; gall bladder disease.
If you are using the Pill and
experience any of the side-eff-
ects mentioned in the mild or
serious adverse effects groups,
notify your physician. It is
possible that a change in dosage
will solve some problems that
you may be having. It is a good
idea for all Pill users to be
familiar with the symptoms
associated with the diseases
that are affected by the Pill.
At this point it would be
valuable to examine some of the
major problems of the Pill in
more depth.
BLOOD CLOTS
A minimum of 300-500 oth-
erwise healthy women die from
pill-associated pulmonary em-
bolism each year in the U.S.
(this is acknowledged by the
Food and Drug Adminsitration).
The annual risk of being
hospitalized, with a blood dott-
ing disorder for non-pill users is
five in 100,000 Fa pill users
the risk is 45 in 100,000.
UVER DISEASE
The FDA acknowledges that
th2 Pill may cause liver tumors
which may result in serious or
fatal hemorrhage.
CANCER
It was known by sdentists in
the 1940s that estrogen could
speed up the prooess of pre-ex-
isting cancer. What is not
known at this time is whether
the Pill adually causes cancer.
VENERAL DISEASE
A woman using no protec-
tion or birth oontrol method has
a one-third chance of oontrad-
ing VD if she has sex with a
gonorrhea-infected man. A
woman using the Pill has a 90
percent chance of oontrading
gonorrhea from an infected
man.
OTHER COM PLICA TIONS
-Five percent of pill
users get high blood pressure.
-Thirteen percent of pill
users get chemical diabetes.
-Thirty percent of pill users
get mild to severe depression.
-Five peroent of pill users
are infertile when they stop
Rxintainhead
Production Managar
Leigh Coakiey
fcrowrflftr
EditorDoug White
News Editors
Julie Everette
Ricki Gliarmis
Advertising Manager
n. Swum
Trends Editor
Sam Rogers
FOUNTAINHEAD Is f�i
by
using the Pill (sometimes perm-
nently).
The purpose of presenting
this information about the Pill is
to inform women of the possible
risks isnvolved with using this
method of birth oontrol. The Pill
is not the universally useful and
safe drug that it was onoe
believed to be in 1960 when it
went on the market.
At that time the Pill had
been tested on only 132 women
who had used it oontinously for
a year or more. By 1978,
millions of women had been
induced in the test and we now
have a better understanding of
the Pill's effed on women's
bodies.
For some women, the Pill
can be a fairly undamaging
choice. For others, it can be
damaging and even fatal. The
choice should be made with
oomplete knowledge of the Pill's
side-effeds. Discuss these
side-effects with your physidan
in relation to your personal and
family medical history. Consid-
er the alternatives to the Pill.
There may be a better birth
control method for you.
NOTE
I am not a dodor. My
sources for this artide are listed
below. I have made an effort to
avoid mentioning some possible
Pill side-effeds because they
are not recognized as such by
the FDA. It is my personal
belief that much of the evidence
that remains unacknowledged
by the FDA and some medical
organizations is frighteningly
true. It is up to each individual
to dedde for herself what risks
the Pill carries. It is an
important dedsion because the
Pill is a drug that will be
introduced into the blood-
streams of healthy women day
after day, week after week, year
after year.
SOURCES:
The Essential Guide to Pre-
scription Drugs by James W.
Long, M.D (Harper and Row).
Women and the Crisis in Sex
Hormones by Barbara Seaman
and Gideon Seaman, M.D
(Bantam Books), paper $2.95.
FURTHER READING
Physicians Desk Reference
(can be found in many libraries).
Our Bodies, Our Selves, by
the Boston Women's Health
Book Cdledive, (Simon and
' Schuster), paper $4.95.
The Hidden Malpractice by
GenaCorea, (JoveHBJ Books),
paper $1.95.
Reese send comments, etc,
to Uppity Women of Greenville,
, P.O. Box 1373, Greenville, N.C.
27834. Next week's article:
Alternatives to the PHI.
To FOUNT AINHE AD:
I can't tell you guys how
pleased I was when I saw the
first edition of FOUNTAIN-
HEAD when I returned to
school. I couldn't believe the
improvements that were made
over those three short months of
summer.
The new page size makes
FOUNTAINHEAD look a lot
more like a newspaper and the
individual pages somehow
looked better than before. The
whole thing was a lot easier to
read except where the ads
covered up the stories. What
happened fdks? The print looks
a lot dearer too.
I look forward to Tuesdays
and Thursdays now so I can read
the insightful movie reviews of
Steve Bachner and David
Whitson, the album reviews of
Doug White, Jeff Rollins, and
David Whitson, the sports
pieces by Sam Rogers, and the
editorials. By the way who
writes the editorials? They
never have a name under them
I guess I've heaped enough
accolades on y' all already, so I'll
finish with a simple "keep up
the good work We students
sure do enjoy
FOUNTAINHEAD
Alain Douglass
Reporter defends confidential sources
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Sources.
A small word, perhaps, but a
very important word to anyone
in the news media.
Journalism serves the public
with the belief that a free and
democratic sodety will exist and
flourish if and when the public's
right to know is guarded.
The public's right to know
can only be guarded when there
is a free flow of information
from reliable sources to news-
men to the public through a
public journal, such as a news-
paper or broadcast fad I ity. This
flow ol information must oe Kept
free and confidential. It is
fortunate indeed that the laws of
this country cover the confident-
iality of sources. No one can
make a reporter reveal his
source.
This reporter believes in this
system. I will at no time "give
away" the source of anything I
ever write in this or any other
publication. I recently had the
pleasure of doing a story which
shall, for the purposes of this
letter, remain unnamed.
I cannot recall hearing the
words "no comment" so often
in my life. Everywhere I turned.
-r�G69crtbe fcfeoIlleW
the people who had the informa-
tion I needed to have in order to
write a fair, unbiased news
story. I felt as though I was
running down the football field,
and everywhere I turned, some-
one placed a tackling dummy in
front of me.
Early in the 1960s. Mike
Wallace of CBS, (now famous
for "60 Minutes") had a news
show in which he told the
viewers, "Please remember
that the opinions that are aired
and the questions that are asked
refled in no way the personal
opinions of the reporter, but is
merely his way of getting the
story
only ask the questions that I feer
are pertinent to the subject
matter at hand, and it the
person being interviewed doe
not want to answer the question;
he can say no comment, or,
he can say. "well, off the record
. . That way. he will not be
quoted, and he will remain
anonymous.
What I am talking about
basically is 'cooperation. We
exist to serve the public, but we
can't serve the public unless the
public lets us.
Marc Barnes
Assistant News Editor
Crosswinds
Greenville summer weather smites
the poor citizens in a meteorlogical
analogue to the story of Job
By JIM BARNES
Do you think much about the weather? I didn't used to
until I moved to Greenville. But I do now. I'm not sure why,
unless it's because weather in this area, especially summer,
smites the poor dtizen in a meteorlogical analogue to the story of
Job.
I single out summer weather in Greenville because I am about
to survive my third dose of it, and I feel a measure of pride in that.
Some people are sun bunnies and some people are pdar bears;
some like it hot, some cold. I am definitely a polar bear. Mention
the Sahara Desert to me and I sweat.
A new faculty member some years ago, upon living one
summer in Greenville, dedded to find out why the months of May
through August (and sometimes September) were so oppressively
hot and humid. His research showed, as I recall, that Greenville is
in a trough between two major wind patterns which haven't
comingled in a millenium a so. Thus, Greenville sits and bakes
each summer between these two breeze systems.
This may or may not be an accurate description of why
Greenville's air is so stale and muggy and hot, but I'd like to think
that there is some reason, some justification fa t- ee!her.
Prior to the advent of nudear fall-out, humans tew ttle effed
on the weather. Well, aside from sabotaging wort jamesr with
nudear indiscretions, we still more or less complain about the
weather while doing little in the positive sense of Use word. And
we complain with good reason - weather has, in times past,
played a significant role in world history.
Russian winters, fa example, are notoriously adverse to
megalomaniacs who wish to add Siberia to their holdings.
Napoiean found out the hard way what winter can do to an army
without snow mobiles and sled dogs. Hitler also found, thank
God, that the combination of a Russian winter and the stalwart
nature of the defenders were more than the Third Reich could
handle.
But weather has been impatant in times other than war.
Floods and drought have, in sane cases, influenced the
migrations of entire races of people. There are still nonadic tribes
in the Middle East; these folks keep on the move, with the next
oasis in view.
We are learning rrwre about the weahter, if not how to control
it. Apparently, humankind has always tried to propitiate the
weather through observance of ritual. Where once priest-kings
gestured with sticks, we now at glued to a radar weather set on
the 150 mile scan.
The real difference is slight: each sits waiting to see what the
weather will be - one has a stick, the other a radar screen
In The New Golden Bough, Gastor's abridgement of Fraser s
dassic on the rituals of dvilization, the reader finds many various
rituals concerning the weather. Frogs and toads like rain, so the
Aymara Indians of Peru and Bolivia make images of frogs and
place them on a hill to induce rain. The beat goes on: my father
always says that it will rain if he washes his car
People have banged drums, scraped sticks together, run nude
through villages, sung, danced, and burned incense to draw rain.
In the Punjab, drought is thought to be averted by spilling "a pot
of filth on the threshold of a notorious old shrew, in ader that the
fluent stream of foul language in which she vents her feelings may
accelerate the lingering rain
Sometimes, the weather charms and rituals don't wak at all
When this happens to the Feloupes of Senegambia, they fling
j1the oround' �� them- and drag them through
the fields until it rains.
So it looks as though we have to put up with the weather fa
now, just like all a our faebears had to do. We still try thouoh
we Still want to have a say in things Bach in the 1 gee's. hen
petrodollars were a relative novelty, the rich people oYd!�
Ku,wa,t toyed with the idea a putting � danTover the.
country so as to provide air-conoitiating fa one and all i ZH
why they didn't follow through with the tut Tt
interesting to contemplate. ��, out it �es
As I draw this to a dose, a slight breeze oominG throunh mv
window teases me into beli�winn �h�. - oam,n0 through my
over but 5 daVtlLv t ?JT� " 8Umrner ln GrwwiMt is
ww, out, aon t buy it. By the way, if you �� � v
making hisway down Fifth StreetZLirJTJH
�dsnowshoaa.wav� wuh� d0n WW
-mwvioea, wave. Who knows - it might snow





5Saplembai 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
Greek Forum
NEW BEGINNINGS
bVRlCKIGLlARMlS
News Editor
The GreeKForumtaJ.es time
� th.s week to answer
��ons that ECU students
may out fraternities and
3ororltles Tne foii�wng material
's taken from Volume 1, Number
o Lfestyie. a magazine
wh.ch deals with Greek Life.
"HT CAN I EXPECT FROM
GREEK LIFE- You cap expect
the satisfaction of be.ng a
productive and integral part of a
fellowship designed to enhance
the college exper.ence.
FELLOWSHIP IS GREAT BUT
WHAT ABOUT MY INDIVID-
UALITY- Greeks do not want
anyone to sacrifice his or her
own individuality. Rather, they
wish to strengthen their system
through the combination of
various types of personalities.
Being yourself is an important
part of bang a Greek.
ATER PLEDGING A FRA-
� 'v OR SORORITY
Hi MUCH OF MY TIME
MUST I DONATE TO IT?
Requirements for membership
vary from house to house.
However, each Greek organ-
ization will request its members
and pledges to spend enough
"��e at the house necessary to
formulate friendships. This time
is certainly minimal when com-
pared to the many benefits it
renders.
DO FRATERNITIES AND SO-
RORITIES LIMIT THEIR AC-
TIVITIES TO SOCIAL GA-
THBRINGS- No. Greek mem-
bers participate in student go-
vernment, honorary organiza-
tions, scholastic clubs, athletics,
religious organizations, and
other extra curricular activities.
In fact. Greek organizations
compete among themselves for
high academic and excellanoe in
sporting events.
DO GREEKS RESTRICT THEIR
FRIENDSHIPS TO THEIR
OWN RESPECTIVE HOUSES
OR DO THEY GAIN COMPAN-
IONS IN OTHER ORGANIZA-
TIONS AS WELL? When you
pledge a fraternity or soroity,
you become a member of the
entire Greek system. Conse-
quently, you are encouragement
build friendships in houses
other than you own through
friendly competitions and social
activities.
a
ABOUT FRATERNITIES:
HOW DOES MEN'S RUSH
OPERA TE? Rush is initiated by
special invitational parties host-
ed by individual fraternities
during the spring and summer.
Then the fraternities oombine
efforts in the fall to participate
in an open rush organized by the
University's Interfraternity
Council.
WHAT IF I'M NOT INVITED
TO ANY RUSH PARTIES DUR-
ING THE SUMMER? Do not
worry. It is impossible for a
fraternity to invite every rushee
to the pre-fall parties. That is
why open fall rush is so
important - it involves every
fraternity and every interested
rushee.
WAS OFFERED A BID TO
PLEDGE A FRATERNITY
DURING THIS SUMMER.
SHOULD I TAKE IT OR WAIT
TO GO THOUGH OPEN RUSH
IN THE FALL? That decision
must be yours - just make sure
it's the right decision. There is
no need to make a hasty cboioe,
and you may want to wait until
fall in order to visit all the
houses. On the other hand, you
may be sure that the fraternity
extending the invitation is
where you seek affiliation. It's
up to you!
HOW IS FALL RUSH STRUC-
TURED- Open fall rush con-
sists of three nights of free
visitation to all the campus
fraternities. It is initiated by an
informative and instructional
convocation on the first night.
are recommendations from
A RE RECOM M END A TIONS
FROM ALUMNI HELPFUL IN
RUSHING A FRATERNITY?
Although recommendations are
by no means a decisive factor,
they can serve as a helpful
introduction for you into a
particular fraternity house.
I'VE BEEN TOLD NOT TO
PLEDGE A SMALL FRATER-
NITY. ISTHISGOOD ADVICE?
It is true that a small fraternity
may suffer some minor handi-
caps, but it may also present the
following advantages: a closer
brotherhood, the opportunity to
observe the house expand, and
the increased emphasis on
individual initiative. In a small
fraternity, you may experience
the rewards in seeing you r
efforts pay off as your house
membership grows.
HOW MUCH MONEY IS
NEEDED TO BE A FRATERNI-
TY MAN- IS IT EXPENSIVE?
Finance is usually a matter
worked out within each indivi-
dual organization. Roughly, fra-
ternity life is twenty dollars
more monthly than dorm life.
But it must be remembered that
dorm life doesn' t offer the social
activities of its Greek counter-
part.
ABOUT SORORITIES:
PLEASE EXPLAIN THE ACTI-
VITIES OF SORORITY RUSH
WEEK - WHAT DO WE
REALLY DO? You'll find these
exciting days a part of the week:
Informal parties: September 6
and 7. On these nights each
sorority will entertain you with a
particualr theme. You will visit
four of the eight sorority houses
on the first night and four of the
houses on the seoond night.
Open house: September 11 and
12. On these two nights, you will
be given a tour of the sorority
houses and more than likely will
be informed of the finances from
each house. On these two nights
you will visit three houses on the
first night and three houses on
the second night.
Skit Night: September 14. This
part of rush is perhaps the most
fun of Rush. Since the parties
are a little longer, you and the
members of the sorority are
given a mutual chance to talk
deeper about what a soroity
means. During the party, you
will be entertained with a
decorative skit at each house.
Preferential Night: September
15. This final night is a very
meaningful time, where the
rushee can go back to only three
houses. Songs, candlelight and
talks about sisterhood are what
you'll probably find at these
parties. This evening is truly
beautiful and sacred.
HOW DOES SORORITY LIFE
CONTRIBUTE TO INVOLVE-
MENT ON CAMPUS? By
becoming a pledge in an organ-
ization which is dedicated to
excellence, you will be enoour-
aged to develop scholastically,
emotionally, physically, and
often spiritually. A sorority
therefore provides the incentive
and the means by which you
may achieve that growth. You
will share with your sisters the
true rewards of campus involve-
ment and leadership.
WAHT IS "PANHELLENIC"
ANYWAY? Panhellenic is a
Greek word which means bring-
ipg together of the Greek
system. Composed of all the
sororities on campus, it works to
develop and maintain a strong
sorority system on campus.
Officers and delegates are
elected from each house, and
these girls have a great time,
serving the oommunity, promo-
ting scholarships and most of
all, getting ready for you to be
weloomed to Rush ' 78.
DOES SORORITY AND FRAT-
ERNITY LIFE INTERFERE
WITH SCHOOL? Sororities and
fraternities encourage each of
their member in their studies
through study halls and tutorial
programs while competing with
other organizations as well as
themselves to uphold their high
academic standards.

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PagaS FOUNTAINHEAD 5 September 1978
It's Alive 2: better dead
"BURT REYNOLDS AND Sally
Field in a scene from
'� Hooper "The film's ending
is a scene involving about a
dozen assorted car wrecks and
exploding buildings, climaxing
with Reynolds and co-star Jan
Michael Vincent piloting a rock-
et-powered Pontiac Firebird
Trans-Am across a deep gorge,
Evel Kneivel style . . . really
exciting stuff
Baby lives again: too bad
By DAVID WHITSON
Staff Writer
You know, sometimes I'd
rather see a kinda crummy
movie than a really good one -
you know what I mean?
Like when you just feel like
getting stoned and goin' out to
laugh at something.
Well, me a Dave just sorta
felt like that, so we went out to
laugh at the It's Alive 2 baby,
("only now there's three").
The one with three claws
that rips through little girl's
birthday cakes and people's
faces and all kinds of stuff. But
I'm getting ahead of myself.
Movie starts with these
decent middle-calss lookin'
people havin' a party. Nothin'
wild, just your average "Subur-
ban Sunday" afternoon type of
thing.
There's this guy who hangs
around after everybody else
leaves- real spooky like, 'cause
nobody knows who he is or what
he represents or anything.
Mysterious dude.
Says he wants to tell the
suburban couple that some
government type guys want to
get their baby 'cause it's
special.
Then he tells 'em how it's
special. Howit'sall hideous and
ugly and will rip out people's
throats and stuff - but there I go
again.
Okay, so the father wants to
kill the thing, and pronto. But
the mother lady thinks he's just
being kinda rash, you know, so
they don't. Kill it, that is.
Tension mounts. Telephones
ring a lot. When they get to the
hospital - get this - the WHOLE
PLACE is full of a bunch of
bondage lookin' oops.
Helmets, big sticks, hand-
Hooper: Reynolds'latest
ByJOHNWEYLER
Staff Writer
In Burt Reynolds new flick
�Hooper he plays Sonny
Hooper, billed as "the greatest
stuntman alive
This film is about the
dangerous lives of professional
movie stuntmen. the only
actors who. when told to break
a leg before their performance
often do.
The film opens with
Reynolds driving a motorcycle,
at high speed, under a moving
truck and into a car. upon which
he ?hps off the cycle backwards
and aashiands on his ass.
It's ending is a scene
involving about a dozen assort-
ed car wrecks and exploding
buildings, climaxing with Rey-
nolds and co-star Jan-Michael
Vincent piloting a rocket-power -
ed Pontiac Firebird Trans-Am
across a deep gorge. Evel
Kneivel style.
In between, we get to see
some really exating stuff hap-
pen.
Such as: Reynolds falling
from a very high place - on
tightrope while holding a small
dog. Reynolds driving a truck
backward down a busy highway.
Jan-Michael Vincent jumping a
plane, waiting a hell of long
time before opening his para-
?
.��
4m
v
�y.


'? f
ft
chute, then getting rid of the
chute; Reynolds and Vincent
driving a car through huge
flames. Vincent down the side of
a 20-story building using a thin
rope, Reynolds and Vincent and
several others in multitude of
chariotstagecoach
racescrashes in a very violent
barroom brawl with a S.W.A.T.
team, and Reynolds leaping,
sans parachute, from a helicopt-
er 232 feet up.
world's best but also knows he's
getting old and that the final,
fatal crackup could happen at
any time.
Vincent, is the young, enth-
usiastic stuntman who'll some-
day take Reynold's palce (stunt-
work has a high employee
turnover rate).
Brian Keith plays an old
retired stunter, the man who
Reynolds replaced years ago.
"This film is about the dangerous
lives of movie stuntmen, the only
actors who, when told to 'break a
leg'before performing, often do.
99
This feat is supposed to be
commemorated in the Guiness
Book of World Records.
Directed by Hal Needham,
who at one time was himself the
highest paid stuntman in the
business, this movie certainly
isn't lacking in thrills.
The plot follows the making
of what appears to be a highly
absurd spy flick, focusing on the
stuntwork and the men and
women who perform.
Reynolds is the stuntman
supreme, who knows he's the
and the father of Reynold's
girlfriend, Sally Field. (Never
noticed she had legs like than on
The Flying Nun)
The acting, storyline direc-
tion, dialogue, etc are just
adequate, no great shakes, but
then they don't have to be.
The stunts are important
here, and they are pretty great.
The question is who did
them?
Did Burt Reynolds and Jan-
Michael Vincent really do all
those death-defying deeds?
V
Vincent, though he's young,
muscular, and supposedly does
his own stunt surfing in the
current Big Wednesday pro-
bably had a stunt double here.
Reynolds - maybe. Reynolds
was in fact a real stuntman in
the early days of his career.
But now that he's a big
superstar, with so much to lose,
would he still risk his life the
way he had to as a struggling
unknown years ago?
If not, the following type
scenes must have occurred. On
screen Adam ("Batman")
West, as himself, as the spy
flick's star, gets ready to say,
jump off a rooftop onto an
overhanging rope.
He makes like he's about to
jump when "Cut yells the
director, played by Robert
Klein. Reynolds, as Hooper the
stuntman comes running up and
takes Wests place on the
"rooftop. He makes like he's
about to jump, when "Cut
yells the real director, Hal
Needham.
Still another person runs up
and takes Reynolds' palce, the
" stuntman's" stuntman, who
finally leaps and gets the thing
over with. Filming "Hooper"
must have been awfully confus-
ing.
"Hooper" is a movie worth
seeing just for the stunts and
excitiment and thrills. One just
wonders how real the thrills
were.
'angry'
Harlan Ellison:
science fiction writer
By DARREN BERGSTEIN
Assistant Trends Editor
This review appears in two parts. - Ed.
The coinage of the two words 'science fiction'
today are as akin to Harlan Ellison as the word
pyromania is to Smokie the Bear. Harlan Ellison,
one of the most exciting and easily on of the
finest writers of modern speculative fiction, is
separating himself from the passive sf world and
graduating into the finer things in life. Why?
Harlan burst (or to be more exact, crept) into
the genre with a story entitled "Glowworm"
which, according to the late James Blish, could
be classified as the worst story written in the
history of the medium.
As with every starting writer, he built a name
for himself with agonizing slowness, selling to
every possible market, from The Magazine of
Fantasy and Science Fiction to Knight.
Harlan bears the exemption of being one of
the few writers to establish himself without the
aid of novels. His stunning short stories, packed
with grim revelation and morbid yet believable
characters, have led him to be placed on quite a
high pedestal.
And that is what he does not want.
Harlan Ellison is an angry man. His anger
forced him to resign from the Science Fiction
Writers of America; led him to breaking the sf
authors' taboo by writing screenplays for novels
and television; intensified so much for him to
lead publishers of his books to drop the
abbreviation " sf" or the words science fiction.
All of this raises some interesting questions.
Science fiction is actually rising beyond the
tips of the mountains. It has boomed in sales,
increased circulation the world over and given
birth to new writers of amazing talents such as
John Varley, Vonda N. Mclntyre, Greg Benford,
cuffs, black leather Heavy trip.
The mother, well, she gets
kinda bent, what with all the big
deal about her kid. Startes
screamin' how they're not
gonna take her kid. So they
shoot her up with big needles
Then - well, to make a long
story short - the father and the
mysterious dude (who knows
what's really gan' on) hijack the
whole truck and run away
They go to this place whe'e
the government already has two
"It" babies in cages. Ruggec
lookin' types. ST posed to be a
new breed that can resist
pollution.
Finally the place erupts witri
"It" - babiesattackm people in
bed and in the swimmin' pool a
stuff. "It" - babies never
forget or forgive. So the
take some pistols and blow 'err
away.
P.J. Plauger, and many others.
In 1976 over 890 books were published, more
than three quarters of them new books.
Much more had happened, but we are
straying off the subject. This immeasurable boom
hasnot thrown Harlan Ellison into turmoil. What
has is the obscure treatment that sf gets from the
general public.
�FRITZ LEI BER GREATEST OF USALL"
Even today, payment is relatively low.
Analog, the most prolific of the sf magazines, still
pays from three cents to five cents a word,
slightly more for novelettes. Novels submitted to
book oompaniesare not given more man a $1.000
advance, unless exceptionally good. Harlan, in
his resignation speech to SFWA, cites an
example:
" Fritz Leiber is the greatest of us all. Not one
of us, there is not one of us who hasn't learned
from that man. When he wants to work, he must
prop histypewriter on a chair and sit on the edge
ofhisbed
Tnia writer couldn't agree with him more.
Here are masterpieces, a sheer joy to read and
suitable enough to store on any classic shelf in
any library, and instead they are shoved to the
back; Harold Robbins' hopelessly allegorical
pieces put gloriously in the front. Total injustice.
" IT BABIES NEVER forget.
or forgive. So they take some
pistols and blow em away.
aiS�
Hedgepeth's Hog Book
'Loose mixture of fact and fancy'with
poetry and page after page of pigs
I
ByJOHNWEYLER
Staff Writer
In last Thursday's edition of
FOUNTAINHEAD the first in-
stallment of a review of William
Hedgepeth's "The Hog Book"
appeared in the Trends section.
Below is the conclusion of the
review.
We're seated in the dining
room
Enjoying a buffet
Of bacon, ham and
sausage that
The cook prepared today;
And the chitterlings and
spare ribs
Plus pork chops, spam and
brain
I can' t imagine why my hog
Has chosen to refrain
Above is an example of The
Hog Book's porcine poetry. Au-
thor William Hedgepeth's loose
mixture of fact and fancy would
rock the typical pork merchant.
Below is another example:
a very rare type of wild
hog said to exist on a few islands
in the Caribbean is reputed to
be extremely retiring, shy and
furtive in the presence of other
creatures on account of his
having developed at some point
in the obscure past, pubic hair.
Natives allege that they have
caught only the most fleeting
sight of these hogs dashing
shamefacedly from tree to tree,
always seeking the proper co-
vering and oftentime carrying
bits of bush or leafy vines
trailing in their mouths in a vain
effort to camouflage their hir-
sute gentilia
Is Hedgepeth putting us on
or what? At times he appears to
be a serious student of the pig, a
straight-faced swine scholar at-
tempting to uncover such mys-
teries as why the little piggy ran
woo woo woo all the way home
and why you can't make a silk
purse from a sow's ear.
His notes section lists such
respectable sources as the Lar-
cusse Encyclopedia of Animal
Life, but at the same time lists
as a source the works of Joseph
Farqua who supposedly is an
authority on everything except
what falls within the range of
BER-CROG as a result of being
shipwrecked during all of WWII
with an incomplete set of the
Encyclopaedia Britannioa. Is
Hedgepeth having fun with us?
Who the hell is he anyhow?
A brief bio on the book cover
discloses nothing but his place
of residence (Georgia) and some
of his other writings. A small
photo accompanying the bio
shows a shovel-weilding bear-
ded man wearing an eyepatch.
By his side is what appears
to be a common porker which he
But the book is filled with
page after page of scientific
studies and case histories prov-
ing the remarkable intelligence
of pigs. (They're much smarter
than dogs and horses). Maybe
so, you say, but they still can't
write books. So? The pig hired
someone to type it fa him!
I'll leave you with this
Some Girls: 'sex and
sex and sex and sex'
By DOUG WHITE
Editor
Don't be misled by the hit single "Miss You" or the not quite a hit "Faraway
Eyes off Some Grs; the RoJling Stones are alive and fairly well in 1978. despite the
oombined attacks of disco, age, and Keith Richards' heroin bust in Toronto. Although
the title "the world's greatest rock and roll band" isno longer fully deserved, they still
have the potential to be so once again.
Mick Jagger hasn't sounded so good since �x7e on Main Street, and the whole
band sounds as if they're fighting fa the championship. Richards' guitar wak is
quintessential Stones, while Charlie Wattsand Bill Wyman make up the most versatile
and exciting rhythm section in rock.
Side one opens with " M iss You a pseudo-disco offering which once again put the
Stones at the top of the singles charts. It's a pleasant change of pace from the usual
sturm und drang. Most remarkable is the excellent harp wak of Sugar Blue, a New
Yak musician who the Stones found playing on a street oaner. His harmonica
blends well with Mel Collins' sax toexpressthe bitter loneliness a the singer. Jagger
is happy playing the role of a lonely man with a broken heart, "walkin' in Central Park
. . .people think I'm aaaaa-zy
"When the Whip Comes Down is textbook Stones with a pinch oiSiM. Watts
drumming stands out on this track, along with Richards' and Ron Woods' guitar wak
The band has managed to breathe new life into the 60"s soul hit "Imagination,
rearranging it into a gentle fusion ot rock and reggae.
The title track is one of the album's best songs, a rocking parody of women, and
Sugar Blue's harp throws the song back 20 years to the M uddy Waters brand a blues
which evolved into rock. This song capsulizes two major Stones periods, the early
PIGS'EARS
anti-anticlimax
is either feeding with the shovel� � ���� blues aiented period and the late BO'S acid period
a facing to kiss the shovel. Is
the book's autha this weird
one-eyed stranger a could
William Hedgepeth actually be
the pig?
Did he pen this paean to
pigdon in ader to surrepitious-
ly strike back against auei
humanity symbolized by a bru-
tal man who faces a helpless
animal into bizarre sexual acts
with gardening instruments?
Is the man's eyepatch a
symbol of mankind's inability
to see the true potential of the
pig? Was the photo only to
sneakily show the true autha
and to point out the pigs eternal
predicament?
Was the Hog Book written
by a hog?
These are thoughts that
demand deeper delving into.
Fa who else would know as
much about pigs as a pig? Who
else would write a book called
the Hog Book but a hog? That's
absurd, you say. Pigs can't
write books: their doven hooves
canThddapendl!
One Saturday night
to make an event
I bought pigs' ears
at the Colonial Store.
It would be something
to talk about I knew
as I asked the Negro woman
at the meat counter what
I should do with them.
Boil them for an hour.
Which made the leathery
cartilage pink and soft
as any young thing's ear
on my cannibal plate like
a last-minute blind date
and deaf.
I really had
rather eat a silk purse.
-Coieman Barks
"Faraway Eyes the not quite a hit mentioned in the first paragraph opens ade
two. It is a delightful parody ot American radio evangelists and country music in
general. Jagger's ridiculously drawled speech is pure camp.
The Stones oonfroit the paradox of being both rock and roll stars (i e soaai
misfits, angry young men,) and of "being respected in society" in "Respectable
Unfortunately, they merely oonfrott the paradox and never answer it The irony of
"discussing heroin with the president yes there's a problem sir, but it can be bent "
when Keith Richards is a recently refamed addict can either be taken as hypoaitical
a as antiestaoJishment. They give us no due as to how it was meant to be taken
Richards' "Befae They Make Me Run on which he sings lead It the anonest
rSrKZS? 2?t!2- bthte����tofreedom, and he7nows
it. Well it s another bust, another frame, I'm gonna walk befae they make me
run He feels as if he has already paid any price due fa his heroin a2i (Z
gonna find my way to Heaven 'oca I've done my time in Hell " His naaa?Z� Z
startling on first hearing, but he sings his lyrice with mae 2mwEi�Zl
singers, Jagger induced. This is easily the beat out on the albunT
?T��"� a beilad faintly reminiscent of "Wild
atonement fa his faults. y' I1' 0,r,� �� if in
The album doaas with "Shattered almost a prtf eat soig about Na� Ynrk n�
Thadaoadancaa-atxandaaxandsexandsex" endothaL Qty'
th. dty and the nger in "tattara Jagger delivar. bisT . m
maemuatcaj. He
Many ttwtk$ to Doubledmy and
CoDolphin Books for the re-
view copy of "The Hog Book)
����� JWr.iw.hi8yoalC
spoken, half sung manner, similar to Lou Read, though a great deal
ThisisraQeatSton�album,butitisagood. HopafiJly,trwovTsDSJ
the 3tones might still be able to rmain th tii L T " �w,De aentaweL
Record Bar " " tm they �"� (��� courfeey
"��'�&'�'
�aaai





5 Saptembr 1978 FOUWTAINHEAD Page 7
semi
By SUSAN CHESTON
Staff Writer
� "wTas?r r at aj F,e ta,
�on :s free and thPn,T " at 8:15 Pm-
� this year T Car�lina � Music
�JThpHPnVate P,an� teacher ���s most
. ,rrti 19, r00 p,an�whe ��'nfl the
requ.red for the Doctor of Musical Arts degree
ftSX L PreSently a �mi-tinalist in the Kennedy
Rofeller Foundation Competition fa Excellence m the
" n of Amer.can Mus.c. excellence in the
�ne of 12 p.an.sts selected from a field of 112
competitors. Ms. Coleman w.ll perform on
September 11 at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C in the
final stages of the competition.
Her Wednesday performance at ECU will feature the same
works that won her present position as semi-finalist and will
comprise her Kennedy Center program
Ms Coleman first became interested in 20th century music
while an undergraduate student at Indiana University of
Pennsylvania.
Her interest increased with exposure to new compositions at
the University of Michigan, where she earned her Master of Music
in piano.
Till Then" -Gestures II, fa piano and electronic tape, is a
parody of Richard Strauss' symphonic poem "Till Eulenspiegels
lustige Streiche
Till Then" isan unpublished wak by David Bates, oieof the
Michigan University composers whose waks intrigues Ms.
Pot smoker obeys 'the word'
Coleman into explaing oontempaary music.
Another unpublished piece from the Michigan School of
Gregay Ballard's "Piano Music 2" (1975), a virtuostic wak by
the 24-year-old composer.
The first half of the program also features Salvatae
Martirano's "Cocktail Music" (1962) and the "Piano Variations"
(1930) of one of America's most distinguished composers, Aaron
Copland.
The only traditional piece on the program is the "Sonata in
A-flat Opus 110 (1821) of Ludwig van Beethoven.
While at Eastman, Ms. Coleman began study of Charles Ives'
"First Sonata fa Piano" (1902-10). This massive 40-minute wak
will canplete the Wednesday program.
Jazz licks and Cuban rumba rhythms, quotations of hymn
tunes such as "Bringing in the Sheaves" and "What a Friend We
SeeMS. COLEMAN, p. 8
College Bowl begins
The game that made eggheads as popular as football heroes is
back fa its third year at ECU With the possible ultimate goal of
over $3,500.00 in prize money fa each player, College Bowl
competition is about to begin.
Registration begins Monday, August 28, 1978 at 830 am and
last until Thursday, Sept 21, 1978, the day of the team aientatioi
meeting. Conpetitioi is open to all full-time students, whether
graduate a undergraduate
Each team must have four players, one alternate, and a coach
Competition will be limited to the first sixteen teams registered
Intramural oompetitioi begins Thurs Sept. 28 in Mendenhall
Auditaium 244.
ECU will send a team to the regional tournament and, if they are
successful there, on to national competition. Mendenhall, which
See COLLEGE, p.8
V
AP) - Herb
� s wad in
29 gave him the right
� -� C JuKje Ear1 Jones
ottf strict Court
said Overton
' a higher
� 31, of Olathe. was
possession of
marijuana.
After a lengthy search fa a
Bible coitaining the Old Test-
ament - one was finally found in
the county jail - the judge read
the bibical verse: "And God
said. Behold. I have given you
every herb bearing seed, which
is upon the face of all the earth.
and every tree yielding seed, to
you it shall be fa meat
The judge told Overton, "As
a mere matal, I am going to
find you guilty of possession of
marijuana. If you want to appeal
to a higher authaity, that's fine
with me
Sentencing was scheduled
fa Oct. 19.
METHODIST STUDENT
CENTER
501E. 5th St.corner of 5th &
Holly opposite Garrett Dorm )
Welcomes you to an
Open House
Tonight Tuesday, Sept. 5
7-10 p.m.
BISSfTTCS
DISCOUNT CENTER
416 Evans ON THE MALL
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
Open Daily (except Sun.)
8a.m. "til 6 pan. sale ends sat.
55-asS
;�y n�
while rffey lAsr
FRIDAY'S
1890
Seafood
FRIDAY'S
Wants You!
to visit our
new Restaurant-
We think you
will love our
atmosphere and our food &
prices are just for you.
Come out today for lunch or
dinner-We will give you a
golden beverage of your
choice, just show your ID.
Friday's 1890 Seafood
2311S. Evans St.
Lunch 1130-2 Dinner 5-10
Fri. & Sat. 5-11
Fifth St.
4th St.
3rd St.
Overton'
V
INC
SUPERMARKET
"�N$
&V
CfECUK
A free T shirt
to the first 1,000 students
with a $20.00 food order,
also free desk blotters.
Overtones welcomes all ECUstudents and faculty.
Located just 2 Mocks from ECU at the corner of 3rd & Jarvis. We have everyday
low prices that are more than competitive with any other store, large or small, A free cart
service is availahle to push your groceries home. We accept Master Charge and Visa. We
are your hometown food store away from home. We appreciate your husiness strive to
please in every way possible.
Thank you for shopping at Overton's.

i

Overtones
the home of Greenville's
best meats, just ask anyone
Overtones is Greenville's headquarters for ground
no order too large or small.

: At
'

i ,





Pagefl FOUNTAINHEAD 5 September 1978
Carlene Carter, daughter of the country
music Carter's, is a 'blue-eyed and
sweet singing' new star
By PETER J. BOYER
Associated Press Writer
LOS ANGELES (AP) - You can't
be born royal in thiscountry, but
you can be born lucky. If your
daddy's the porcelain king of
Toledo, you know you can
always go into tubs and toilets if
vour great American novel
doesn't sell.
If ever anyone was born into
success, it was blue-eyed,
sweet singing Carlene Carter.
The name alone meant stardom.
No, no kin to Jimmy. Better
than that. The Carter family,
from nashville.
Carlene's grandmother is
Mother Maybelle Carter, the
matriarch of country music.
Mama is June Carter Cash.
Country folk singer Carl Smith
sner father. Johnny Cash is her
step-daddy.
With that pedigree, all Carl-
ene had to do to become a
oountry star was learn to stand
in front of a microphone and
avoid committing any heinous
crimes. When it turned out she
could sing, everyone knew
Nashville would one day be
hers.
She turned it down.
Carlene Carter wanted rock
n' roll. She played lead guitar
with a rock band when she was
11. The Electric Kumquats
didn't go far. but the experience
hardened Carlene's wish to be a
pop star.
"It would nave been really
easy for me to kinda ride off that
name and just play oountry
music she says in a Tennessee
twang that oould bend nails.
"And I might be a lot more
secure about my future and
everything if I did that, but
that's not what I want to do.
"I'd rather know that I did it
myself, and I'd rather be doing
what I wanted to do instead of
dang what I was expected to do
just because of tradition
So now she's running the
rounds of a pop singer - playing
the pop nightclubs, indulging
the rock n' roll press, touting
her debut album.
The LP, "Carlene Carter
is good, clean pop music, and
allows Carlene to show off some
powerful vocals.
It's interesting that in a time
when everybody is claiming a
few ounces of Southrn blood,
infusing a few obligatory licks of
pedal steel and dobro into pop,
some of the purest pop around
oomes from a qirl who cut her
teeth on the curtain weights at
the Grand Ole Opry.
Carlene is almost obsessive
in her avoidance of anything
oountry. Every recording studio
in Nashville was awaiting her
pleasure, but she flew to London
to record the album.
"I went to England mainly
becasue I wanted to be sure I
was being myself when I
recorded the album she says.
College Bowl offers
diverse experience
continued from p. 7
sponsors ECU College Bowl, pays all the teams expenses.
College Bowl contestants have been very diverse; they range
from rugby players to nursing majors to philosophy students to the
Baptist Student Union and the Newman Club.
Teams have been organized by departments, fraternities, honor
societies, clubs, and groups of friertds. Players have been of every
classification from freshman to graduate students.
College Bowl is almost as much fun to watch as to play. Many
teams, especially History and English, had enthusiastic supporters
for all their matches.
ECU College Bowl is the same game that was televised a few
years ago.Television rights to the game have again been purchased
and the show is being revived.
For further information oonoerning any aspect of College Bowl,
contact Wanda Yuhasin the Program Off ioe in Mendenhall Student
Center at 757-6611 extension 213.
COLEMAN
continued from p. 7
Have in Jesus and achestraJ.y conceived sounds combine to
make the Ives a challenge and a �P"�-
hear arTrned wcrks as the .ves. F- m
exposed to the new language of exprese.cn created by 20th
century American composers. �mw� tn
This whole new vocabulary of sounds and a ler� attempts to
reach out and communicate feelings and ideas that the composer
wants desperately to express.
Performances have the potential intimacy of a jazz nKJhtdub
where "something is going out and something is coming back.
Too often, however, no one gets the chance to hear what the
composer is saying. Performances of traditional music will always
have their place, but the new, unfamiliar forms of express can
be an exciting and meaningful communication.
This Wednesday night will be the introduction of the
26-year-old pianist to the ECU faculty and students In any reatal
the performer is saying "look, this is meand MsCoiemanw.il
be saying that through the language of 20th oentury Amer.can
music in a very personal way.
CUFF'S
WEEKLY JPECIdU
Cliff's Monday Nite Special
Fillet Whole Baby Flounder99
Served with french fries, slaw,& hushpuppies.
"Cliff's Tuesday Night Special
Crab Cakes (2)99
Served with french fries, slaw ,& hushpuppies.
Monday-Th u rsday
i
Crab Cakes (2)2.25
Fillet Whole Baby Flounder2.25
Hamburger Steak�2.25
Fried Chicken2.25
Served with french fries and All You Want Salad Bar
MAKE THE CAMPUS
phone before Friday, !WfoICTIiy
September 1 st,you IJI 11 iDLl 1 VLJl !�
can save yourself a trip.��m m m ata w
Now thru Friday, Carolina Telephone representatives will be taking
your orders at three campus locations: the Book Store, Clement Dorm
Lobby and Tyler Dorm Lobby.
In addition, by ordering your phone now, you'll beat
the crowd and get early installation.
And finally, your early order ensures that
��
M
your number will be in-
cluded in the ECU
Telephone Directory
for 78-79.
So make the
connection. Or-
der your phone
today.
LUQE3 Carolina Telephone
UNITED TELEPHONE SYSTEM

PATRONIZE
FOUNT AINHEAD
ADVERTISERS
The Tree House
"A Place For Friends"
PROUDLY PRESENTS
SEPTEMBER
1978
ART & CAMERA
526 S. Cotanche St.
Down Town
COUPON EXPIRES
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� OAF
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28 MON DAVID LEWIS
29 TUE �CHRIS FARREN
30 WED FARM & HOME BLUE GRASS BAND
31 �uTHE BUBBA WILUS jam
I
1 FRI MIKE LIGHTNING" WELLS
2 SAT TOMMY G. - MIKE HAMER - THE
WIZARD
3 SUN ROCK TREE JAM AND BOOGIE
4 MON PIZZA SPECIAL (5-8 P M )
S TUE CHRI8 FARREN
6 WED FARM & HOME BLUE GRASS BAND
8 FRI RABBIT & KEN
9 SAT RABBIT & KEN
10 SUN Special Guest (EDNA WILLIAMS)
11 MON PIZZA SPECIAL (5-8 P.M.)
�12 TUECHRIST FARREN
13 WED KURT FORTMEYER
14 THUR ALAN OATLEY
15 �PAT DANNY
16 SAT TOMMY G. - MIKE HAMER - THE
WIZARD
17 SUNSPECIAL GUEST
18 MON PIZZA SPECIAL (5-8 P.M.)
�19 TUECHRIS FARREN
20 WED FARM & HOM.E BLUE GRASS BAND
21 THUTHE BUBBA WILUS JAM
22 FRIDAVID LEWIS
23 SAT DAVID LEWIS (MANAGERS BIRTHDAY)
24 SUN SPECIAL GUEST (EDNA WILLIAMS)
25 MON PIZZA SPECIAL (5-8 P.M.)
�29 TUECHRIS FARREN
28 THUMITCH BOWEN
29 FRIMITCH BOWEN
30 SAT TOMMY G. - MIKE HAMER - THE
WIZARD
�Every Tuesday night is "Ladies Nite with
reAiced beverage prices tor ladies from (8 PM
10 P.M.)
THE TREE HOUSE RESTAURANT
N.C.
The Classic
Capezio
DOWNTOWN
TO ALL ECU.
DANCE STUDENTS:
Brody's now
carries a lijji
Ijne of LEOTARDS,
BALLET SHOES, TAPSHOES;
AND jAZZ SHOES,
for .aU,
dance
students!
Try Shoes
$17.00
Ballet Shoes
$9.00
Tap Shoes
'11.50
Leotards and Footwear
For Dancers
Regular Leotards
$6.75-to$16X�
Also Dancewear
For Children at
our Pitt Plaza Store
Capezio's
DOWNTOWN

���r?t-
'





5 September 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 9
Hicks, Green star
Pirates edge WCU, 14-6
Hicks turns the corner
J HALFBACK EDDIE H,cks shifts d.rectos as he manuevers
oast several Western Carolina defenders in Saturday nights 14-6
�m over the Catamounts and scored the seasons first touchdown
Zf, YT mn 'ate in the fourth quarter & y Greenville
Reflector photographer Tommy Forrest
'Comedy of errors Dye
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
" a record crowd of
31.261 looking on in newly
enlarged Ficklen Stadium, a
brand new pressoox. and a
Sjpiffy new computerized score-
board, this was certainly one
season opener ECU could ill
afford to lose.
And despite a variety of
miscues which ECU head coach
Pat Dye called a "comedy of
errors the Pirates came
through with a hard earned 14-6
victory over a gutsy Western
Carolina team. But just barely.
I don't feel embarrassed
about the game. Dye said ,
but I know we've got an awful
lot of work to do. We just
weren t a very polished team on
offense tonight.
"But the same thing has
happended before. It looked like
we were gang to run it right out
of the end zone, but we just
didn t have that killer instinct "
Indeed it did. Halfback
Anthony Collins took the open-
ing kickoff, cut through a big
gap on the right side and went
down the sidelines for a big 58
yard return before he was
bumped out of bounds. But after
that electrifying play most of the
Pirate fans had very little to
cheer about the rest of the
evening.
"Our concentration wasn't
good at all said quarterback
Leander Green. "Western
Carolina didn't do anything we
hadn't seen before, they just
played a great game on defense.
Our game plan was to run
straight at them, but we should
have moved the bait a k
better
Green, who played almost
the entire game, carried the ball
13 times for 43 yards, but was
dropped behind the line of
scrimmage for losses totaling 34
yards. However, the former
Jacksonville High School star
had his moments.
Green completed six of 15
passes fa 96 yards including
the game's winning touchdown
play, a 60 yard scoring strike to
his old high school teammate
Bill Ray Washington early in the
?ourth quarter.
yes. I guess it was kind of like
the old days when Bill Ray
grabbed that one admitted
the dimunutive signal caller.
He was the third receiver on
that play, but I looked fa him
coming across the middle and
he was there.
"I was not real happy with
the rest of my passing game,
however noted Green. "I
wasn't getting out there quick
enough on my sprint out pat-
terns and I couldn't read the
defense real well.
Split end Terry Gallaher was
on the receiving end of three of
Green s passes fa 22 yards, but
the Warner Robbins. Ga. native
admitted he was also disappoin-
ted with his team's inability to
move the ball against the
Catamounts defense.
't realty don't Know what
was wrong out there tonight
said Gallaher who was granted
an extra year of eligibility by the
NCAA this season. "Before the
game I felt like we were a little
bit better prepared, but I'm just
at kind of a loss to explain what
happened. Maybe I can tell after
looking at the films. It's probab-
ly more a matter of the first
game jitters
At times Eddie Hicks re-
sembles the same Eddie Hicks
who rushed fa yards and
touchdowns during the 1976
season. Hicks carried the ball 15
times fa 59 yards and one
touchdown against Western
Carolina, but like the rest of the
ECU backfield had problems
holding on to the ball.
"I ran the ball fairly well,
but I think I can run a little but
better said the Henderson,
N.C. native. "We didn't exe-
cute on offense like we're
capable of doing. We weren't
coming off the ball very well
either. They didn't do anything
we hadn't seen, but they sure
hit pretty hard
And with Western Carolina
out of the way, ECU now faces
two crucial road games against
Atlantic Coast Conference foes
N.C. State and North Carolina.
But Dye, along with the rest
of his Pirates, admits it will take
a far superior effort il ECU
expects to upend N.C. Slate
next week. The Pirates have
won their last two oontests over
Bo Rein and his Wolfpack.
"We cant ask anymore of
our defense noted Hicks.
"Next week we've just got to
hold on to the ball. We're
certainly capable of doing it, but
we're going to have to play
much better. I'm sure glad we
played like this against Western
Carolina instead of N.C. State. I
think we'll be ready
Green, who took his first
varsity snap from center and ran
82 yards for a touchdown
against N.C. State last season,
also feels the Pirates are a
capable team, but must iron out
the kinks in practice this week.
"A missed block here and a
missed block there, there are
things you just have to work on
more in practice explained
Green. "I don't think we will
add anything special for the
State game. But I imagine our
execution better be a whole lot
better or we'll be in trouble
By SAM ROGERS
Sports Editor
ECU's season opener
against Western Carolina was
billed as an offensive extrav-
aganza: The Pirates' powerful
wishbone attact against the
Catamounts productive passing
game led by quarterback Mike
Pusey.
But with a total of seven
turnovers in the second half,
four by the Pirates and three by
WCU, the offensive show never
materialized as ECU was foroed
to scratch and claw its way to a
narrow 14-6 victory over the
determined Catamounts.
Although a reoord crowd of
31,251 turned out fa the contest
in newly expanded Ficklen
Stadium, the Pirates were ob-
viously not a polished offensive
unit and ECU head coach Pat
Dye was the first to admit as
much.
"You didn't have to be an
Einstein to see what was wrong
out there tonight said Dye,
now in his fifth season at ECU.
"It was obviously a very poor
coaching job. Offensively, some
of the decisions made tonight
were absolutely ridiculous. We
should have had between 21 and
28 points on the scoreboard
before the end of the first half.
"I don't want to take away
anything from Western
Carolina oontinued Dye.
"Bob Waters does an excellent
job of preparing them everytime
they come down here to play us.
We just had very little concent-
ration on offense. I'm just real
happy to win
Even though the offense
amassed 302 yards, efforts of
a stingy Pirate defense
overshadowed any offense per-
formers.
The ECU secondary picked
off four Catamount passes and
allowed only 10 completions fa
131 yards as heralded quarter-
back Mike Pusey was held well
below his average from last
season.
Up front, the defensive line
and linebacking caps faced
five fumbles as WCU running
backs managed oily 178 yards
on the ground.
Def ensi vel y, we played
very well Dye said. "They
were never able to establish
their passing game. I don't feel
embarassed about the way we
played tonight. All I know is that
we have a lot of work to do this
week befae we're ready fa
N.C. State
Halfback Anthoiy Collins
took the opening kickoff 58
yards down the right sidelines
and almost went all the way
befae he was bumped out of
bounds at the WCU 42.
But it was not until the
Pirates' fourth possession of the
game befae ECU oould push
over a touchdown. Nate Wigfall
recovered a M itchell Ray fumble
on the WCU 24 and four plays
later halfback Eddie Hicks broke
right over the middle from four
yards out fa the Pirates' first
touchdown of the '78 season.
Bill Lamm's PAT pushed ECU
ahead 7-0 with 231 remaining
in the first period.
The Catamounts fumbled
the ensuing kickoff and ECU
was in business again with the
ball on the WCU 16 yard line.
But, oi fourth and goal from the
one, WCU's Thonas Gunn
threw halfback Sam Harrell fa a
five yard loss which thwarted
anaher serious scaing threat
by the Pirates.
Strong safety Ruffin McNeill
picked off the first of three
Pusey passes and gave the
Pirates another excellent 'sca-
ing oppatunity with possession
at the WCU 26
Once again Lamm's field
goal attempt from 27 yards out
was blocked by Willie Wells.
Defensive end John Maris
stopped one Catamount scaing
threat early in the second half
when he recovered a Pusey
fumble on the ECU eight.
But the Catamounts came
right back when Cunningham
recovered an ECU fumble on the
two yard line. Mitchell Ray went
around the left side fa the
Catamounts first and only
touchdown of the evening.
A bad snap from center cost
WCU the PAT and the scae
remained 7-6 with 435 left in
the third quarter.
The Pirates ga their win-
ning touchdown on the second
play of the fourth quarter when
old Jacksonville high school
teammates Leander Green and
Billy Ray Washington hooked
up on a 60 yard touchdown pass.
Lamm's seoond conversion put
the Pirates ahead 14-6 which
was the way it finally ended.
The remainder of the game
was an endless series of erras
by bah teams. The Pirates
coughed up the ball twice on
fumbles in the fourth quarter
while Gerald Hall and Charlie
Carter each picked off a WCU
pass.
"It was a comedy of erras
out there tonight explained
Dye about his team's seven
fumbles in the game. " At times
it looked like we didn't know
what we were doing. I don't
think we were looking ahead to
next week, but we weren't a
very polished team tonight.
"We were real frustrated at
times because we had some
excellent scaing opportunities,
but we just couldn't score.
ackled Dye. "We were very
fatunate to overcome some of
our mistakes and still win. The
same thing has happended to us
befae.
Defensive tackle D.T. Joyner
received the R.W. Mcore Award
which goes to the outstanding
ECU player in the game. Joyner
had nine tackles and stopped
Catamount runners four times
losses.
Scae by Quarters
WCU 0 0 6 0 -6
ECU 7 0 0 7 -14
ECU - Hicks 4 run (Lamm kick)
WCU - Ray 1 run (run failed)
ECU - Washington 60 pass from
Green (Lamm kick)
Meanderin' Leander
ECU QUARTERBACK LEANDER Green loses another jersey
as he eludes a would be tackier. Green completed six of 15 passes
for 96 yards Saturday night against Western Carolina University.
His 60 yard touchdown pass the fourth quarter to old high school
teammate Billy Ray Washington was the games winning score
The Pirates return to action this Saturday when ECU faces N C
State in Carter stadium.
Fans rave at scoreboard
ECU'S NEW $160,000 computerizedscoreboard.
By SAM ROGERS
Spats Edita
Almost as impressive as the
new seating additions in Ficklen
Stadium Saturday night along
with new three level pressbox
was ECU's new computerized
scaeboard.
"Beautiful, simply beauti-
ful said mae than one Pirate
fanas they walked by the 18 fort
structure located at the east end
of the field.
The purple and gold scae-
board was built by the American
. Sign and Indicata Company
fron Spokane, Wash. Total cost
of the structure was $160,000 an
the university paid another
$10,000 fa its installation.
Cost of the scoreboard also
includes another computerized
message center which will be
built on the corner of Charles
Blvd. and the 264 Bypass later
this month.
The message center on the
264 Bypass will flash ECU
athletic schedules and infama-
tioi about upcoming spats
events, aocading to Spats
Pranrtiat Directa Wayne
Newnam.
"The message center oi the
bypass can also flash drawings
on the screen explained New-
nam. "It will also have two light
banks instead of just one like the
stadium scaeboard. It's a great
pronrtiai item fa the athletic
department and it will infam
everyone what's going on in
Pirate athletics from day-to-
day
The scaeboard in the stad-
ium and the message center was
not part of the Ficklen Stadium
expansion. Five local businesses
in Greenville raised the money
and donated the scaeboard as a
gift to the athletic department.
The five sponsas who paid
fa the scoreboard were the
Jeanette Cox Agency of Green-
ville, The Beef Barn, First
Federal Savings and Loan of Pitt
County, Pepsi Cola Bottling
Company and Hardee's.
"The athletic department
had not planned to buy a new
scaeboard this season said
Newnam. "The oost of a new
scaeboard wasn't covered in
the expansion of the stadium
and a new one was simply too
expensive
A sales representative from
the American Sign and Indicata
Company came in and present-
ed the idea to the athletic
department oontinued New-
nam. "He went out and ap-
proached several local busines-
ses and they agreed to give the
scaeboard as a gift to the
athletic department
The five local businesses
have permanent advertising dis-
plays on the scaeboard and also
have top advertising priaity
during ECU football games.
Newman said advertising
will be said by the athletic
department fa the message
center located on the 263
Bypass.
"The new scaeboard cert-
ainly gives the stadium a
different look said Newnam.
"It gives Ficklen Stadium that
"big-time" image now.
Defense stops Pusey
By CHA RLES CHA NDLER
Staff Writer
Most football coaches claim
that a good defense is the key
ingredient to a winning team.
This was certainly true in
Saturday night's ECU-Western
Carolina contest. With the Pir-
ate offense held at bay most all
night, the ECU defense was
faced with constant pressure.
And the defense was nothing
less than spectacular, facing
eight Western Carolina turnov-
ers, and contributing several
goal stands to the 14-6 Pirate
vicrtry.
"I was very proud of the way
our defense played said ECU
coach, Pat Dye. "The defense
carried out our game plan well.
Western was never able to
establish a passing game
Stopping the Catamount
passing game was the Pirate's
main oortosm entering the
game. WCU quarterback, Mike
Pusey was ranked among the
nation's top passers a year ago.
The Pirate defense frustrat-
ed Pussy all night long, inter-
cepting three of his passes.
Pusey, who passed fa over 900
yards in less than afull
last year, was held to 131
Saturday.
Each time Pusey dropped
back to pass, he was greeted by
a fieroe Pirate rush. One of the
enfacers of the r ush was
defensive end Zack Valentine.
"We were well prepared
said defensive end Zack Valen-
tine, "Our defensive scheme
waked great "Last year we
didn't have a good rush. We had
to have one tonight. Rushing the
passer is 90 percent just want-
ing to get there anyway. We
went 100 percent tonight
Even when Valentine, Oliver
Felton, D.T. Joyner, a the
members of the Pirate front
weren't chasing him, Pusey
rarely could find any of his
receivers open. "ECU'S sec-
ondary deserves a great deal of
aedit said WCU head coach
Bob Waters, "They are probab-
ly as good as we have ever
faced
Pusey was not the only
Catamount quarterback victimi-
zed by the Pirate secondary.
Dee Walsh also had one of his
passes intercepted. The second-
ary also came up with the key
defensive play of the game,
halfway through the fourth
quarter, with the game still in
doubt and ECU leading 14-6,
Western Carolina found them-
seivesat the Pirate 16 yard line.
Pusey's seoond attempt in the
series was picked off by Pirate
free safety Gerlad Hall, insuring
the Pirate victay. "We were
playing ate oi oie coverage
said Hall, "They ran an inside
post pattern. I just got a good
break
The Pirate defense got
"good breaks" all night. Each
time the Catamounts got a drive
started, the Pirate defense came
up with big play. "We had to
keep getting the ball back to the
offense Pirate linebacker
Mike Brewirtgton said, "We
couldn't let up. We knew
Western was going to be
tough "But I knew we were
going to win. We had a good
plan. We felt wc could stop
anything they ran
As fa next week's game
with N.C. State, "We've beaten
them befae said Brewington,
"They've got to respect ua
Mike Pusey sure does.
I





'
Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAP 5 September 1978
ECU opens in Mayor's Tourney
Pirates' Martin a 'team player'
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Staff Writer
As he walks off the practice
field, ECU soocer star Phil
Martin stops and looks back at
his teammates. A determined
look comes over his face. Phil
Martin is ready fa the 1978
season, and he's going to do
everything he can to make it a
successful-one for himself and
the Pirates.
Phil Martin isateamman.
Disappointing 2-10 record.
Though Martin lead the team in
scoring last year - 9 goals and 3
assists - he'd like to push the
whole year aside
But didn't Phil make honor-
able mention All-State and and
wasn't he selected to the
sectional Olympic tryouts that
same year? Exactly, but Phil has
higher team than individual
ambitions.
"Sure I like to score goals
like anyone else but if we
don't win, I can't feel that good
about what I might have done
"He is a compelte player
and a team player said ECU
soccer coach Brad Smith. "He's
a very hard worker. I know of no
one in all the sports here who
works harder than Phil
Like any devoted athlete,
Phil spent the off-season work-
ing on the fine points of his
game. Smith said Phil spent at
least an hour to an hour and a
half each day practicing soocer
during summer school.
Phil doesn't stop practicing
when he goes to his home in
Greensboro, either. He even has
a soccer goal in his back yard.
But why does Martin work so
hard?
" I've been lucky to win some
awards. Each time I win an
award, it makes me want to
work that much harder to
improve myself
Since he began playing
organized soocer at age 15,
Phil's awards have multiplied
yearly. In high school, he
starred fa Page High of Green-
sboro and was selected the
team's most valuable player his
senia year.
In addition to his all-state
and Olympic tryout honors last
year, Phil was named to the
Campbell Soocer Classic All-
Tournament Team. He was also
selected as the Pirate's most
valuable player last season. Phil
is the "building block" fa the
ECU soccer program. As many
as six a seven freshmen will
start fa the Pirates this year.
Smith feels that Phil is just the
man to have around to help
these freshmen adjust.
Phil is high on these fresh-
men, often choosing to talk of
them, rather than himself. "We
have brought in some players
with a lot of experience. This
should make a difference. There
are several good goal scorers in
the group
Smith says the offensive
help from the freshmen should
wak to Phil' 8 advantage Now
we can give him sons relief. He
won't have to do it all. Our
opponents can no longer con-
centrate on just Phil
Phil's outlook on the coming
season? "We should be better
offensively. The defense will
need to be bsttsr than last year.
We gave up about 39 goals. But
I'm expecting better things this
year
AN ECY SOOCER player manuevers the ball
past an opponent during a game last season. The
Pirates open their 1978 season this Saturday
when ECU oompetes in the first Mayor's Cup
Tournament in Raleigh, N.C. Other teams
competing in the two-day event are Atlantic
Coast Conference teams Duke, N.C. State and
North Carolina.
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Intramural flag football season underway
By JOHN EVANS
Staff Writer
A brand new intramural
football season begins this
afternoon on the Ficklen Sta-
dium intramural fields as a
record number of teams will vie
fa the all-campus title.
Last year's men's title was
won by the Soott Time-Outs,
while the women's title was
oopped by the Cotton Bunnies .
Both teams will be back to
defend their title. During the
first week, though, most of the
teams will test out their strenths
and weaknesses in preparation
fa the first Intramural top ten.
That will debut next week.
Once again this season,
intramural flag football will be
played under the lights next to
Ficklen Stadium and on new
fields out by Allied Health. The
women will also play on College
Hill Drive at the bottom of the
hill.
But while football will be
taking the limelight this week,
several other intramural events
will begin their registration
periods soon. Team tennis, golf
and tennis mixed doubles are
only a week off, with the
registration dates beginning
next Monday. The Almost Any-
thing Goes carnival will be held
next Tuesday, September 11 on
the ECU Mall.
The Almost Anything Goes
carnival is namally the most
interesting event held on the
campus, though the carnival
is patterned aner the Almost
Anything Goes television show
of several years back, and
features athletic events in any-
thing from balloon toss to the
football throw. Each team is
composed of four men and four
women.
Another oo-reaeationaJ e-
vent, co-ed softball, began this
week and is in full swing,
although some teams haven't
played their first game. Co-rec
team softball was offered fa the
first time last season and met
with a good response, so it was
offered again this year.
The intramural equipement
rooms and both gyms open
today fa student use and will be
open seven days a week. The
swimming pools in Minges and
Memaial gyms also open this
evening fa student use.
Gymnasium hours in Mem-
aial Gym run fron 5 pm to 10
pm on Monday through Thurs-
day, 5 pm through 8 pm on
Friday, from 12 noon to 8 pm on
Saturday and from 2 pm to 8 pm
on Sunday. Equipment room
hours in Memaial gym will run
from 7:45 am to 10 pm on
weeknights, including Friday;
from 12 - 8 pm on Saturday;
from 2 pm - 8 pm on Sunday.
Memaial pool hours will run
from 4 pm to 6 pm Monday
through Friday; from 2 to 5 pm
on Saturday and from 12-1 pm
on Monday, Wednesday and
Friday.
Minges Coliseum will be
open from 6:45 pm to 10:00 pm
Monday through Friday fa Free
Play hours; from 10 am to 6 pm
on most Saturday afternoons
and from 3 to 8 pm on Sunday.
The Minges equipment room
will be open from 7:45 am to 10
pm on weekdays, from 10 am to
6 pm on most Saturdays, and
from 2 to 8 pm on Sundays. The
Minges swimming pool is open
every day except Saturday,
when only the Memaial pool is
open.
Hours fa swimming at
Minges pool will run from 12-1
pm Monday, Wednesday and
Friday fa special noontime
swims; from 8-10 pm fa even-
ing swims, Monday through
Friday; and from 2-8 pm on
Sundays.
The annual ECU Fnsbee
tournament, which is co-spon-
saed by McDonalds, is sched-
uled fa September 20. Reg-
istratiai is now taking place at
the McDonalds on Tenth and
Cotanche Sts.
Waters unimpressed with Cats'
By JOHN EVANS
Staff Writer
While ECU'S Pat Dye was
muttering comments about "a
comedy of errors In regards to
the way his team played in
Saturday night's 14-6 ueaaon
opening win, Western Carolina
head coach Bob Waters wasn't
too happy with his team's play
either.
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"I hope we can eliminate all
the mistakes we made tonight
said a falan Waters in the
Catamount dressing room after
Saturday's game. "I am sure we
are going to be a much better
football team when we eliminate
all those offensive mistakes we
made tonight. You can get by
with a few mistakes, but not
against a team like East Caro-
lina
Waters' squad suffered from
the same oomedy of errors
that Dye talked about, losing
four fumbles and suffering four
mteroept ions, for a total of eight
turnovas. When one oonsiders
that the Cats' had the ball fa
oily 58 plays during the game,
that isn't a very productive
percentage.
And the Cats' didn't move
the ball very well when they did
hang onto it. They finished the
game with a total offensive
effat of 178 yards, gaining only
51 yards against the Pirates in
the first half. The only real
display of offense showed by the
Catamounts during the night
was a 58-yard pass from Mike
Pusey to Fred Meadows in the
third period. That oompletioi
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set the Cats up with sane fine
field positiai at the ECU 20, but
a fumble at the eight oost the
Cats a shot at scoring.
That was the only time the
Catamounts moved the ball in
the game, as they got aaoss the
midfieid stripe only three times
in the game.
"Our passing game and
running game didn't go as well
as we had planned fa it to
remarked Waters. "We need a
great deal of wak in both areas
befae we become a good
football team.
"Mike (Pusey) did not have
a good night by his standards
added WatersBut I can't find
fault with him fa that. It was
our gameplan that was respon-
sible fa the poa showing as
much as anything else. Then,
ECU'S secondary also deserves
alrt of aedit. They are as good
as we have ever faced
Pusey came into the game
against ECU as the ninth-best
passer in the nation returning
from 1977. But against the
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You won't have to look far to rind just the Seiko
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Pirates, he completed only
10of-23 passes fa 131 yards and
the tour interceptions were the
most off a WCU quarterback
sinoe ECU picked atf seven
against the Cats back in 1975.
Only one Catamount ball-
carrier had a successful night
lugging the football. That was
Mitchell Ray. Ray scored the
Cats' only touchdown of the
game on one-yard run in the
third period and picked up a
total of 46 yards on 15 carries
On the night, the entire Cata-
mount running game managed
just 47 yards rushing on 33
carries.
Obviously the ECU defense
dominated the Cats on the line
of scrimmage, as well as in the
secondary, even if the ECU
offense was slowed down by its
own mistakes.
Waters was pleased with the
way Western played on defense
too, dting the fact that they
made only one major mistake
the entire evening. That came
on a 60-yard touchdown pass
from Leander Green to Billy Ray
Washington. That aerial by the
Jacksonville duo put the clamps
on any hopes of winning that
WCU may have had.
Ironically, the goat on the
pass, Willie Wells, was the
same player who had broken
through and blocked two first
half ECU field goal attempts by
Bill Lamm.
"Willie Wells played a real
fine game, but made one
mistake when he gambled on
that post pattern to Washing-
ton pointed out Waters. "He
lost that chance, he thought he
could catch it.
"For the most Dart added
Waters, "our defense did a
great job agains: Lost Carolina,
both against the pass and
against the run. They only hurt
us on that long pass and a
couple of options outside. We
played as tough as I can
remember them playing. I can't
fault the offense for its effort
either, they just made too many
mistakes
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ECU players recognized
Anthony Collins, Joe Uod-
�te, D.T. Joyner,Ruffin McNeil,
freshman Glen Morris were
"arrwd the players oj the week
by the ECU coaching staff for
their efforts in the Pirate 14-6
victory over Western Carolina
Saturday night.
Collins, who carried the ball
17 times for 84 yards against
JOE GODETTE
WCU was named the top
offensive backfield performer.
He also returned the opening
kickoff 58 yards.
Godette, a native of Green-
ville, was cited as the top
offensive lineman.
The top performer in the
defensive line was D.T. Joyner
who made nine tackles including
three sacks. Joyner also receiv-
ed the R.W. Moore Award for
the outstanding ECU player in
the game.
Strong safety Ruffin McNeill
was the top defensive back. He
made four tackles and intercep-
ted a pass against highly touted
Catamount quarterback Mike
Pusey.
Glen Morris, a native of
Greensboro, N.C. was the top
player on the specialty teams.
The former Western Guilford
prep star made three tackles
against the Catamounts.
Other ECU players who
received special recognition
from the coaching staff on
offense were Mitchell Smith,
Wayne Inman, Perry Allred and
Terry Gallaher.
Top defensive performers
were linebackers Tommy
Summer, Mike Brewington and
Jeffery Warren along with John
Morris, Zack Valentine, Fred
Chavis, Cliff Williams, Oliver
Felton, Nate Wigfall, Vance
Tingler and Noah Clark. Top
players in the secondary were
Gerald Hall, Wayne Perry and
Charlie Carter.
1978 FOUNTAINMEAD
Sportswriters Needed
Call FOUNT AIINHEAD at 757-6366
and leave your name and number
GERALD HALL
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And get three games for only $1.25.
( Per Person Rate )
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Phone 758-1820
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For all your party needs
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Welcome Back Students
752-4606
r
Breakfast
from 7 a.m.
to 11a.m.
specializing
in large
country ham or sausage
biscuits. Hot cakes. Scrambled
eggs with country ham or
sausage. Our 14 lb. beef
burgers are ground from fresh
Western Chuck. We have pure
soft served ice cream. Also
serving ham and cheese,
chicken fillets, hot dogs, chill
and beans, french fries, apple
turnovers, and a variety of soft
drinks. Located on the corner
of 5th and Reade St. and on
Hwy. 264 In Washington.
DISCOUNT FURNITURE
at
AZALEA MOBILE HOMES
Dinette $40 and up
Bed Frames $10 and up
Refrigerators $75 and up
Couches $50 and up
Couch and chair $75 and up
Lamps $7.50 and up
Chest $95 and up
See Tommy Williams at
AZALEA MOBILE HOMES
864 by-pass
KORE-O-MAT
Attention ECU men on the the hill:
If you want to know where the
girls do their wash, then come to
KORE-O-Mat on E. 14th Street
(bottom of the hill across from
Chanelo's) You 11 be glad you did!
In addition to girls we offer the
following:
fluff and fold service drinks and snacks
decolor TV attendant
professional dry-cleaning pick-up station
pinball
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Why,
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one free wash Sam-4pm daily!
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offer good thru Sept 30,197 I

SW
The primary answer to this question is it is 1978.
The clothing needs of a young man today are dif-
ferent than they were three to five years ago.
Yes, we are still carrying a great selection of
MALE and LEVI jeans, but we have also added an
extensive collection of other trousers. We also
have some great looks in suits and sport coats
and lightweight jackets. We have dress and sport
shirts by Gant and LaCoste Knit shirts. You'll also
find Sparry Topsiders and many other pieces of
clothing styled especially for the young man.
Please drop by and have a look.
The Clothes Horse
218 East Fifth Street





STATEMENT OF ETHICS-
In today's competitive market we feet it is important to offer
quality at a fair profit, and with professional service. We do not
advertise one thing to get you in the store so we can sail you
something else. We give legitimate discounts. Our salesmen offer
knowledgeable courteous help and appreciate your business. We
have been here a long time and have never offered the kind of
exagerated promises made by several dealers that are no longer
here to honor the promises. If any of our sales men knock another
dealer a a product we do not sell, he will be discharged. We are
proud of our stereo, our serivce, and our staff. We sincerely
your business.
Page 12 FOUNTAINHEAD 5 September 1978
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Title
Fountainhead, September 5, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 05, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.668
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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