Fountainhead, November 11, 1976






THSSSUE
16 PAGES
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over 50 years
C'RCULATION-
8,500
VOL. 52, NO. 18
11 NOVEMBFR1976
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D.O.T. vetoes
264 overpass
SGA HIRED PERSONNEL
budget cut.
hands out BUCCANEERS following staff resignation in protest of
Photo by Brian Strotten.
By DAVID NASH
SGA Correspondent
The Department of Transpor-
tation (DOT) has rejected a
funding proposal for an overpass
at Tenth St. and College Hill Dr.
because of a shortage of funds,
according to SGA Vice-President
Greg Pingston.
In a letter from T.L. Waters,
Manager of Planning and Re-
search fa DOT, Pingston was
told, "because of a shortage of
funds, and many demands fa
other highway improvements, the
pedestrian overpass has not been
approved
"To say the least, I'm disap-
pointed as hell said Pingston.
Earlier this year, Pingston
gave a presentation in suppat of
the overpass at a hearing of DOT
in Washington, D.C after the
proposal was rejected in 1975.
"We were real optimistic
said Pingston.
"We did extensive research,
and had the support of the
Greenville City Council, the local
Easter Seals chapter, the Univer-
sity Board of Trustees, and the
Pitt County Commissioners he
added.
We felt it would be approved
because of our presentation, and
because there has been one
accident per month involving a
pedestrian in 1976, the most
serious last spring, involving
Jeanie Cox of Raleigh he said.
"We're going to have to start
waking ai sane sat of alternate
plan added Pingston.
Aocading to Pingston, Her-
bert R. Carlton, a faculty member
of the Political Science Dept. has
offered the suggestion of rechan-
neling traffic flow around the
intersection.
We're going to wak toward
those lines right now said
Pingston.
"The overpass is still some-
thing we greatly need, and
something we're still waking fa,
but we're going to wak ai
channeling traffic so we can cut
down on traffic student pedes-
trians will have to cross
The bicycle path to various
campus and Greenville are- s,
another project of Pingston's, is
"still in the waking stage
"We're having a hard time
trying to pin down Dr. Best,
Chairman of the Properties Com-
mittee Sub-Committee to get the
land appropriated said Ping-
ston.
"We did meet with C.G.
Moae, and discussed the feasi-
bility of getting land appropria-
ted.
"We also discussed the prob-
lems that might arise from the
bicycle path, including lighting
and security and he was very
favaable commented Pings-
toi.
The proposed path would run
from the main campus to Minges
Coliseum, Allied Health, and
Evans Park in West Greenville.
"We're trying to provide a
safe and easy mode of transpata-
tioi fa students to get to classes
at Minges a Allied Health
Pingstoi concluded.
Dean grades on-campus entertainment
By DEBBIE JACKSON
Co-News Edita
Rudolph Alexander, ECU dean of Student
Affairs, Tuesday discussed the perfamance recad
fa ai-campusentertainment from 1962 through this
year.
Alexander presented the statistics to the Student
Union Program Board which is composed of Student
Union Committee Chairpersons.
Aocading to Alexander, 188 perfamers in
special Entertainment were contracted since 1962
and 176 were held. Of the 12 shows cancelled nine
were canceled by the perfamers themselves and
three by the university.
"Thisgives us a perfamance recad fa Special
Entertainment of 93.5 per cent said Alexander.
"I don't believe that any commercial house can
beat that percentage
Under Maja Attractions, Alexander said that
239 attractions were scheduled since 1962 and 224
were held. Twelve of the attractions were canceled
by perfamers and three by the university.
Aocading to Alexander, the attractions perfa-
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mance recad is 94 per cent.
Alexander said that he was making these
statistics avaiiMe to the public because of
complaints about entertainment and letters to the
edita in the FOUNTAINHEAD.
"It's so easy to criticize if you don't know the
facts
Aocading to Alexander, the Student Union
entertainment oommittees have been providing ECU
with much more entertainment than can be found on
other campuses in Nath Carolina.
The Judy Collins oonoert has been the oily big
event at UNC-Chapel Hill, said Alexander.
N.C. State recently had Mary and Leon Russell
which was their first big show in two years,
aocading to Alexander.
"We are providing more entertainment to the
ECU students than in other schools, but the
students aren't buying
Aocading to Alexander, 16 pop shows have been
held on campus this year including summer.
"There must be a different clientele here than at
other schools.
"There has been a lot going on this year but it
hasn't been successful. I don't know why
� imiiKlW ii M W�tf m'KHiiaiTn m� u n � i
RUDOLPH ALEXANDER, dean of Student Affairs. hUUNlAINHEAD
file photo.





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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1811 NOVEMBER 1976
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Ouch
Swine flu vaccines are being
given in the infirmary. Students
are urged to get their flu shots
early - before it's too late!
Piano Sonata
Aaron Copland's "Piano
Sonata Beethoven's "Wald-
stein and "Hungarian Rhap-
sody' No. 11 By Liszt. The
concert is Monday, Nov. 15 at
7:30 p.m. in the Fletcher Recital
Hall, with Michael Rohrbacher,
pianist, in a Senior Recital.
Coffeehouse
For an evening of music,
laughter and the positives of
God's Word, come on over to a
coffee house, Sat 730 p.m. at
The Way Home, 2007 E. 5th St.
Videos
Water safety B-ball tryouts Dinner Theatre
ECKANAR
ECKANKAR, the Path of
Total Awareness, is sponsoring a
seminar in Greenville, N.C. The
seminar will be held on Nov. 20 at
the Ramada Inn (Hwy 264 By
Pass) in Greenville, N.C. The
Theme of the seminar is "Train-
ing For The Spiritual Life and
the program includes original
ECK music, poetry, art and
drama, as well as talks on various
aspects of ECKANKAR. The
color film, "ECKANKAR, A Way
Of Life" featuring Sri Darwin
Gross, the Living ECK Master,
will be shown. Registration be-
gins at noon and the program is
from 1 to 5 p.m. The registration
fee is $3.00.
Vendors
Vendor registration for the
Dec. 8, Flea Market, to be held in
Wright Auditorium, is now avail-
able at the Mendenhall Studenyt
Center Information Center, from
9 a.m. until 5 p.m Monday
through Friday. Students, facul-
ty, and staff are eligible to sell
items. A $5.00 refundable deposit
is required at the time of
registration. The last day to
register is Monday, Dec. 6.
The Student Union Video-
Tape Committee presents "K.C.
& The Sunshine Band
Shows are from 9.O0-11 flO
daily in the Mendenhall Lobby.
Come by and boogie! And
remember: "Knockout" &
Ernie Kcvaks III" Next Week!
Flea market
Need some great Christmas
gift bargains? You may just be
able to find them at the ECU
pre-Christmas Flea Market spon-
sored by Mendenhall Student
Center. The Flea Market will be
held on Wednesday, Dec. 8,1976,
from 9 a.m. until 7 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium.
Lost and found
The campus Lost and Found
Department is located at the
Information Desk in Mendenhall
Student Center. We have books,
rings, glasses, coats, watches,
umbrellas, etc. If you have lost an
item, please come by the I nforma-
tion desk and see if we have it.
Any unclaimed articles will be
sold at bargain prices at East
Carolina University's Flea Market
sponsored by Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center on Dec. 8 in Wright
Auditorium.
There will be a Water Safety
Instructor Retraining Course held
Dec. 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th in
Memorial Gym. The oourse is
open to only those qualified
Water Safety Instructors who
have not been retrained under the
Water Safety Revisions of 1976.
The first meeting will be held at 7
p.m December 1st, in Room 105
memorial Gym.
Postponed
The Nov. meeting of PSI CHI
has been postponed until Tues,
Nov. 16. The PSI CHI Bake Sale
and Fish Fry were both very
successful and the Officers of PSI
CHI appreciate the support
received for these events. Re-
member to be at the upcoming
meeting which will be held at 7
p.m. in room 129 in the SPEIGHT
building Nov. 16th. The winter
retreat and a Psychology depart-
ment Speaker will highlight the
meeting. See you at the meeting,
refreshments will be free.
LSA meets
The Lutheran Student Asso-
ciation meets on Sunday night at
6 p.m. at Our Redeemer Lutheran
Church (1801 S. Elm St.O For
supper, table talk & program!
Enjoyment For all! Call 756-1166
for rides.
One-act plays Tower of pjsa
Twentieth Century Schnoz
Productions presents two one-act
plays, Friday, Nov. 12, and
Saturday, Nov. 13, at 8 p.m. in
Drama 205. The plays are JEFF
PETERS AS A PERSONAL
MAGNET by O Henry and THE
LADIES SHOULD BE IN BED by
Paul Zindel.
Admission is free. Everyone
welcome.
F.G.
This Friday evening The For-
ever Generation will be meeting
in the Biology auditorium (Bio-
logy 103), at 7:30 p.m. Why not
join us for an interesting time of
Bible study and fellowship?
Sigma Tau Delta Hl,lel social
Sigma Tau Delta English
Honor Society will meet Wednes-
day Nov. 17, 1976 in room 244
Mendenhall at 730 p.m. New
members will be inducted and
Janice Faulkner will provide a
program of folk music. All
members are urged to attend!
Don't be camera shy. Come to
Hillel's movie and Social night.
Free potato chips, beer, soda and
a big fresh sal id. Date-Ncv. 12,
1976. Time 7;30. Fa further
information or ride call Lorey
Duber 752-8190 or Dr. B. Resnih
756-5640.
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The Society of Physics stu-
dents will sponsor a public lecture
on the Tower of Pisa experiment.
At that time the speakers will
discuss what does happen when
balls are dropped in the air and
what Galileo did and did say and
do. A short film of the experiment
will be shown and questions will
be answered. The lecture will be
Mon. Nov. 15 at 7 p.m. room 103
Biology Auditorium. Public is
invited.
Can drive
The ETA Nu Chapter of Alpha
Phi Alpha Fraternity is sponsor-
ing its 2nd Annual Thanksgiving
can food drive for needy and
low-income families in the city of
Greenville. This effort is non-
profit and student directed.
Please help support this effort by
donatng maybe one or two
surplus non-perishable items to
this drive. The collection spot on
campus is the Afro-American
culture center or you may call
752-5347 and have them picked
up. We would deeply appreciate
your contributions. The drive wil
last until Nov. 23.
ii r mimmi i
Anyone interested in tryouts
for the Women's Intercollegiate
Basketball team at ECU please
report to Minges Coliseum Mon-
day at 5:15.
Chem seminar
Peter Smith professor ot
chemistry Duke University will
present a seminar on "Highly
Reactive Free Radicals As Stud-
ied By Electron Spin Resonance
It will be held Nov. 12, 1976 at
2 p.m. In room 201 Flanagan
Building.
Refreshments will be served
in the conference room at 300
p.m.
Fellowship
The Rev. William Hadden,
campus chaplain & city council-
man, will talk about "Erich
Fromm and Christianity Sunday
at the Unitarian-Universalist Fel-
lowship. The meeting will begin
with a covered-dish lunch at noon
in the First Federal Building on
the Bypass at Greenville. Every-
one is invited. If cooking is a
problem, a bag of apples or a
package of cookies qualifies as a
covered dish.
Model UN
The model United Nations
Club will meet Thursday Nov. 11
at 7 p.m in Brewster C-104. All
interested in international rela-
tions, foreign affairs diplomacy
and the United Nations itself are
urged to attend.
The club's participation at the
University of Pennsylvania Model
U.N. Conference held in Philadel-
phia this past .eekend will be
discussed. For further informa-
tion call David Mayo at 758-7578.
DST pyramids
Party with the Pyramids of the
Kappa Sigma Chapter of the
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority at Tar
River Estates on Nov. 13 from 10
p.m. to 2 a.m. Cover Charge-$1
Refreshments will be served.
Grad Exams
Graduate Record Examina-
tions will be offered at ECU Sat.
Dec. 11. Application blanks are to
be completed and mailed to
Educational Testing Service, Box
966-R, Princeton, N.J. 08340 to
arrive by Nov. 10. Applications
may be obtained from the Testing
Center, Rooms 105-106, Speight
Building.
Coming soon! The first Men-
denhall Student Center Dinner
Theatre! Stuart Aronson is put-
ting together a dynamite show of
"The Odd Couple" plus a dinner
that will put your tastebuds in
ectasy. Get tickets now at the
Central Ticket Office in Menden-
hall for one of four shows,
November 11-14. A M.S.C. Pro-
duction.
Unity Weekend
Unity Weekend will be held
Nov. 13 and 14 at the Roxy
Theatre, 629 Albemarle Ave. It
will be a weekend for free
exchange of ideas, ide. and
talents. There will be musicians,
a magician, comics, speakers with
something on their minds, food,
beverage, and a theme of great
hope for the peace and UNITY of
all mankind. The Bahais of
Greenville and friends urge all to
drop, wander or come by the Roxy
Theatre any time Sat. evening or
Sun. afternoon. A UNITY FEAST
will take place at � p.m. Sat.
Inter-Varsity
If 70U want to know how you,
as a Christian, can deal with
alcoholism, oome to I.V. this
Sunday night at eight o'clock.
Animals
The animals available for
adoption this week include a
white kitten, a tabby cat, two
brown and white mixed shephard
puppies, a tan and white mixed
breed, and a brown dog.
The people at Animal Control
would like to extend an invitation
to all interested persons to come
by and visit the Shelter. The
shelter is located on 2nd Street,
off Cemetary Road. They would
appreciate it and so would the
animals.
CINERGY
Get ready fa the big event!
The Pink Panther is back in town
in "The Return of the Pink
Panther an outrageously hilar-
ious movie.
This movie is guaranteed to
give you a laugh a minute or
we'll refund your price of admis-
sion! If you have a weak heart,
stay home you'll die laughing.
The movie is presented by the
Films Committee of the Student
Union.
Admission-I.D. & activity card
or MSC Membership card.
Shows will be at 7 & 9 p.m.
Fri. & Sat Nov. 12 & 13 in
Mendenhall Student Theatre.
B
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FOUNTAINHCADVOL 52, NO. 1811 NOVEMBER 1976
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Meet the Student Union staff
EDI TOR'S NOTE- The Student Union is the major programming body on
campus. This should not be confused with the Student Center in which
the Union is housed. The Program Board is oompoaed of all Student
Union committee chairpersons. Any information concerning program-
ming or general information about the Union can be obtained by calling
the appropriate chairperson or the Student Union office .
PROGRAM BOARD MEMBERS 1976-77
Barry Robinson
Student Union President
756-5086
Travel
Becky Bradshaw
Theatre Arts
Charlotte Cheatham
Art Exhibition
Bill Bass
Entertainer
Georgina E. Langston
Video Tape
Steve Huggins
Lecture
Dennis Ramsey
Minority Arts
CorethaM. Rushing
Films
Larry Romich
Major Attractions
Bob Seraiva
Special Entertainment
Freddy Proctor
Coffeehouse
Ruth Morris
Student Union Secret&ry
PhylissConway
Artist Series
Curtis Pitsenbarger
Films
Committee
Larry Romich -
Chairperson
758-8484
Edward Bean
Dave Haggerty
Sue Hathaway
Teresa Meeks
Gary Romich
Regina Thompson
Reed Warren
Art Exhibition
Committee
Bill Bass, Chairperson
752-6058
David DeBerry
Beverly Joyner
Pat Flynn
Charles W. Kesler
Major A ttractions
Committee
Bob Seriva - Chairperson
752-8907
Hall Sharpe
Regina Thompson
John Whitlow
Dan Wright
Mary Leisy
Special
Entertainment
Committee
Freddy Proctor -
Chairperson
752-7803
Michael Futch
Jeff Judy
Troy Moore
Coni Muhle
David Quinn
Cyndi Whitaker
Wanda Gunter
Coffeehouse
Comittee
Ruth Morris-Chairperson
752-7797
James Barnes
Doug White
Larry Surles
Clara Worthington
Renee Edwards
Rob Maxon
Molly Petty
Entertainer
Committee
Georgina Langston -
Chairperson
752-3402
Rick Bean
Bo Dudley
Chip Hicks
Thomas Frandsen
Noelyne Langston
Biff Bream
Theatre Arts
Committee
Charlotte S. Cheatham -
Chairperson
752-8033
Rebecca Boiling
Clarence Williams
Jo Ellen Wood
Robert Marshall
Lisa Sharff
Laura Royster
Travel
Committee
Becky Bradshaw -
Chairperson
758-9969
Teri Hill
David Harrill
Bill Martin
Susan Moore
Mike Morse
Patricia Peebles
Video Tape
Committee
Steve Huggins -
Chairperson
758-9430
Kathy Wells
Bailey Hurt
Barry Bailey
Minority Arts
Committee
Coretha Rushing -
Chairperson
758-4526
Linda Farmer
Joyce Mourning
Cynthia Henley
Verna Robertson
Steve Wright
Johnny Bryant
Dorothy Harrell
Lecture
Committee
Dennis Ramsey -
Chairperson
752-8271
Richard Cole
Kathy Dixon
Lisa Hopkins
Ron Faust
Leon Schaffer
Robin Pulzone
Artist Series Committee
Curtis Pitsenbarger -
Chairperson
756-5086
Mike Amy
Gay Bowman
Karen Harloe
Mary Pemberton
Gail Ramee
Elizabeth Weeks
Surrie Farmer
Robert House
GAUCHOS
Make Great Gifts
CORDUROY(
AND COTTON
BLENDS a
WITH OR
WITHOUT
MATCHING
VEST
IN
JUNIOR
AND
MISSES
SIZES
REGISTER FOR ONE OF 3
FREE TURKEYS TO BE GIVEN AWAY
TUESDAY NOVEMBER 23rd AT 5 p.m.
YOU DO NOT HAVE TO BE PRESENT TO WIN.
ASK ABOUT OUR $10
CLUB CARD FOR ADDITIONAL SAVINGS
Use our convenient Christmas LAYAWAY or
your MASTER CHARGE
COUNTRY FLAIR
RED OAK ShOPPING CENTER
3PEN MON - THURSDAY 10-6 FRIDAY 10-9 p.m.
AND SATURDAY 10-6 p.m
Ik!
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FOUNTAINHEAOVOL 52, NO. 1811 NOVEMBER 1976
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Onhonorto pickbest
SGA President Sullivan's firing of John Jones as
Attorney General could be a mixed blessing for the
system of jurisprudence on this campus.
Jones was appointed by Jimmy Honeycutt, SGA
president last year. "In the time John has been in
office, he has done a fairly good job Sullivan told
the legislature Monday.
The President's official reason for having the
post vacated was because a new SGA president
should be able to choose a new Attorney General
Sullivan also complained about Jones' having too
much responsibility with his school work to do an
adequate job.
The responsibilities of this post are significant
and to serve in this capacity does require many
devoted hours. Together with the Deans of Men and
Women, the Attorney General determines what
cases have enough evidence to be heard by the
Honor Council or Review Board
The importance of the position is evidenced by
the number of approvals the candidate for the post
must survive. Candidates present themselves to a
selection committee composed of the Chairman of
the Review Board and the Honor Council, the
incumbent Attorney General, and two administra-
tors appointed by the chancellor of the University.
This committee selects two candidates, one of
which is chosen by the 9GA president. The
president's selection then must be approved by the
legislature.
Sullivan said the attorney general is "totally out
of the control of students The president seemed
wary of the reluctance of James Mai lory, dean of
men, to allow Jones to be eliminated from the job.
Sullivan seemed suspicious of the ooziness with
which the two agreed on the status of cases.
Despite his innuendo and suspicion Sullivan is
justified in finding another attorney general who is
more to his liking. The composition of the cabinet,
attorney general included, is certainly the presi-
dent's prerogative.
"However, if the selection committee presents
Sullivan with a choice of candidates, neither of
which is to his liking and worthy of the position we
might have witnessed nothing more than political
calisthenics on the president's part.
Should the selection committee present two
candidates, one of which is to Sullivan's liking and
worthy of the job, the president's action could be
justified. But, what if the candidates are not
acceptable? We may never know the validity of
Jones' being replaced.
M
Fcxjntainheod
Serving the East Carolina community tor over titty years
Senior EditorJim Elliott
Production ManagerJimmy Williams
Advertising ManagerDennis Leonard
News EditorsDebbie Jackson
Neil Sessoms
Trends EditorPat Coyle
Spats EditorSteve Wheeler
Fountainheed is the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Student Government Association
of ECU and appears each Tuesday and Thursday during the
school year, weekly during the summer.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C.
27834.
Editorial Offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions: $10.uu annually for non-students, $6.00 for
alumni.
TOrajfflW -Tp W -UUR IBUfflWfc
Eskw wK wefm iscommwE,
muWlEf NICE Wi
TheForum��
Major Attractions cheats ECU
1
ToFountainhead:
According to the Nov. 4 issue
of Fountainhead, the Major
Attractions committee lost
$27,000 on the oombined Home-
coming oonoerts. Add to this the
recent loss on the Leon Russell
concert and we come up with a
whopping $37,000 lost in only two
weeks! This seems to be an
abominable mismanagement of
funds. i-
I believe that the Major
Attractions committee should
wake up to the wants of the
majority of ECU students. Sure,
the shows provided were "fine
talents in their own right but so
is any performer!
The Homecoming concerts
New system for
To Fountainhead:
The Business Office and the
Financial Aid Department have
been considering means whereby
the duplicate lines on Registra-
tion Day oould be eliminated. In
the future these lines will be
reduced by having all of the
Administrative Units interfaced
on the computer. In the meantime
a new plan will become effective
Monday, November 15.
All scholarship and grant
warrants normally claimed at the
Financial Aid Office will be at the
Cashier's Office. Financial Aid
recipients will be pe-mitted to use
the warrants to register on
November 15 thru 19 and Novem-
ber 22 thru 26. For those students
really disturb me the most,
because although many students
remained in Greenville, most had
no intention of attending either
Charlie Rich or Count Basie. This
was not because of "rumors of
other concerts but because very
few college students have an
interest in these types of music.
The result was very poor
attendance and a negative atti-
tude, but the cause was the Major
Attraction oommittee's lack of
communication with the majority
of students as to their preferen-
ces.
This is a sad thing for all ECU
students, but in the future let's
hope that the Major Attractions
committee will represent the true
interests of all students at ECU.
Gary Whiting
Phi Sigma Pi: Campus needs BUC
To Fountainhead:
We the brothers of Tau
Chapter of Phi Sigma Pi National
Honor Fraternity are deeply
distressed because of the situa-
tion concerning the BUCCANEER
as reported in the November
financial aid line
registering during the week of
November 15-19, a refund check
will be ready for pick up on
Tuesday, November 30. Refund
checks for students registering
after November 19 will be drawn
as soon as possible after Novem-
ber 30.
Robert M. Boudreaux
Forum Policy
Forum letters should be
typed or printed and they must
be signed and include the
writjr's address. Names will
be withheld upon request.
Letters may be sent to Foun-
tainhead or left at the Informa-
tion Desk in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
second edition of the FOUNTAIN-
HEAD. We sincerely feel that
having a yearbook of high quality
is a very important tradition that
should oontinue here at EAST
CAROLINA UNIVERSITY as it
has in the past. Because of our
genuine concern in this matter,
we the brothers of Tau Chapter of
Phi Sigma Pi National Honor
Fraternity have passed the follow-
ing resolution: RESOLVED:
Noting that there may not be a
BUCCANEER for the 1976-1977
academic year due to budget
inconsistency and personality
conflicts, and further noting the
campus-wide interest in said
publication, and further noting
the excellence of said publication
in the past, we the brothers of
Tau Chapter of Phi Sigma Pi
National Honor Fraternity do
hereby call upon the legislature of
the Student Government of East
Carolina University to take imme-
diate action towards correcting
the current situation.
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Sincerely,
Jeff Wilder, Secretary
.
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1811 NOVEMBER 1976
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Utilities Commission plans treatment plant
By LARRY LIEBERMAN
Staff Writer
The Greenville Utilities Com-
mission plans to build a new
wastewater treatment facility on
the nath side of the Tar River in
Greenville by the end of 1981.
The law provides fa federal
financial assistance in the plan-
ning and construction of waste-
water treatment facilities. Fa
cities to qualify fa this aid thev
must prepare a "facilities plan"
under Section 201 of PL 92-500.
Hane estimates an overall
calls for the designing and
construction of an 11 million
gallon a day wastewater treat-
ment plant to handle all the
sewage from the Greenville area.
"We plan to phase out the old
plant at the end of Cemetery
Road said Lewis, "there is no
involves the study and rehabili-
tation of infiltration inflow. Infil-
tration inflow is exoess water
which enters the sewage lines
through bad joints, broken pipes,
and deteriaated manholes.
"In this phase the cost effect-
iveness of the rehabilitation neo-
e'sary is decided said Lewis.
' The sewage lines are surveyed
a d evaluated for the most
ft sible oarection
Hane said the secoid phase
of the 201 plan also involves the
detailed planning of the new plant
design. This should be completed
by January 1, 1979.
Lewis said the third stage is
the actual construction of the
wastewater treatment plant. It
will take about two years to build
the plant. Construction should
begin by January 1979 and end
January 1981.
Aooading to Hane the actual
land fa the plant will be about 60
acres but another 140 acres will
be used fa drying sludge.
The 201 secta is the area to
be served by the plant. This
includes Greenville and one a
two miles beyond the city limits.
Hane said there will be a
boid referendum in early 1978
concerning the wastewater treat-
ment plant.
"We' re pushing as hard as we
can to speed up the progress of
the plan said Hane. "Our
aiginal plan was started in June
1973. Then we had to change our
plan to fit the 201 mandate in
1974. Then in 1975 the EPA
changed the criteria fa the plan
and we had to upgrade it.
"It'slike playing in a baseball
game when the rules are changed
after each inning
Hane said the wastewater
treatment plant was needed ije-
cause of the projected popula-
tional increase in Greenville. It is
about 32,000 now and by the year
2000 should be 52,000.
THIS PRESENT WASTEWATER
The initial idea fa a new
wastewater treatment plant be-
gan about three years ago as a
nath side sewage study.
The idea was to make the new
plant handle the build-up of
industrial waste across the river,
aooading to Greenville Utilities
Canmissioner, Charles H. Hane
Jr.
"Just after the Utilities Can-
mission began thinking about the
need for another wastewater
treatment plant, Public Law 92-
500 went into effect Hane said.
Public Law 92-500 is part of
the Federal Water Pol' � tion Con-
trol Amendments of 1972.
The objective of the law is the
restaatioi and maintenance of
the chemical, physical, and bio-
logical integrity of the nation's
waters.
treatment plant will be replaced by
cost of $11,658,000 for the
oomplete planning and construct-
ion of the plant.
The federal government will
supply 75 peroent of the money if
the 201 plan is accepted. An
additional 12.5 peroent is avail-
able fran the North Carolina
Clean Water Bond funds, auth-
aized in 1971.
The Utilities Commission
modified their plan to fit the 201
plan requirements and have
completed it.
"The 201 plan should be
approved by the Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA) and the
N.C. Department of Natural and
Eoononic Resources by Spring
1977 said Hane.
Accading to Wadie D. Lewis
Jr superintendent of water and
sewer department, the 201 plan
1981. Photo by Russ Pogue.)
room to expand it because it is
waking at capacity now with
about 511A million gallons day
"The pump station at the old
plant will be used, even though
the treatment plant will be closed,
to pump the waste from the south
side of the river to the new
plant said Lewis.
Accading to Hane, the 201
plan has three phases The first
phase of the plan is the Greenville
201 Facilities Plan, which is
completed. This was done under
contract by Olsen Associates,
Inc architects and engineers in
Greenville.
The second phase of the plan
Major and Minor Repairs
on ALL Stringed Instruments
-Amplifier Repair -Refinishing
-Custom Work
Guitar, Banjo, Violin & Bass
Lessons Available
The Guitar Workshop
10-1 and 2-5 Daily
403A Evans Street Mall 758-1055
Jenkins praises
vocational schools
Chancella Leo Jenkins said
Sunday that there should "really
be no basic conflict" between
vocational training and liberal
education.
Calling both "great areas of
discipline Dr. Jenkins warned
that as higher education becomes
increasingly expensive "the
voices of those aying fa special-
izeu training may well become
louder
It is his view, Jenkins said at
dedication of a new campus
facility at Vance-Granville Com-
munity College in Henderson,
that "the great strength of
America, in higher education, is
found in its diverse objectives,
slanted simultaneously toward
the vocational and the liberal
arts"
He added, "there is evidence
that the liberal arts people are
understanding the need fa voca-
tional training and that the
professionally oriented groups

are embracing the liberal arts.
This is as it should be, fa they
are mutually dependent
Jenkins, president and chan-
cella of ECU, the state's third
largest higher education institu-
tion fa 16 years, repeated his
philosophy that as the need fa
specialists increases "so will the
nued fa instruction in the art of
living
In education today, Jenkins
said, "our schools have had to
take on responsibilities infinitely
mae oomplex" than the "three
Rs
"We are concerned with
self-realization, with human rela-
tionships, with economic efficien-
cy, and with civic responsibility
He aaded confidently that if
the citizens define any new duties
to Vance-Granville Community
College, and suppat with money,
confidence and faith, "this fine
institution will assume them and
justify your faith and support in
the future as it has in the past
LOCATED ON MALL DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
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50 OFF SELECTED GROUPS OF FALL
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6
FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 1811 NOVEMBER 1976
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Charges administration with racism
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Alabama fires professor for criticism
(LNS)University of Alabama
math professor Steve Whitman,
vocal in his criticism of racist
hiring policies at the University,
has been fired for his protests.
Whitman, who is white, has
taught at the University's Bir-
mingham campus for five years.
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This past year the Math Depart-
ment had two job openings, and
the staff recommended a black
man,Dr. Nelson, for one of the
positions. "Since racism makes it
difficult fa black people to gain
good educations, especially in
technical areas like math, I was
pretty excited about Dr. Nelson,
applying explained Whitman.
But Roger Hanson, Dean of
the School of Natural Sciences
and Mathematics, refused to hire
Nelson, and Whitman attacked
the Dean's action as racist during
a faculty meeting of the Depart-
ment.
Later in the academic year,
Whitman also wrote a strong
letter to the student newspaper
protesting a racist article and
criticizing the Assistant to the
Vice-President, James Wood-
ward. In late summer, Whitman
received a letter from Hanson
saying that his contract would be
terminated as of June, 1977.
"There is absolutely no evi-
dence that I was fired by Hanson
for any other reason than the fact
that I spoke out against racism at
UAB said Whitman, who re-
ported that "half a dozen people
heard him (Hanson) talk bitterly
about me when I called him a racist
in April
The University's record for
"equal opportunity" hiring is
suspect indeed. Whitman points
out that as of 1975, only about 3
per cent of the UAB faculty was
black. Thirty-two new faculty
�members were hired for the
1975-76 academic year, none of
them black.
"One can compare these
figures to the 45 per cent black
population of Birmingham, the 25
per cent black population of
Alabama or the 13 per cent black
population of the United States
said Whitman.
He rattled off several other
examples of the University's
hiring policies. There was, for
instance, the black woman with a
Ph.D. whom the Biology Depart-
ment refused to hire last yea-
even though there were no blacks
in the department. Or the black
woman who was about to apply to
the Philosophy Department three
years ago when told that there
were no positions available and
there wouldn't be any in the
future. Since then the department
has hired four white men. And
there was a black man with a
Ph.D. from Stanford whom the
Psychology Department refused
to hire, choosing a white man
instead.
"I haven't yet been able to
find the statistics for the 1976-77
hirings and firings said Whit-
man. "But as far as I know there
is either one or no black chair-
people, no black deans, no black
studies major and almost no black
courses. Among the few black
courses that do exist, some are
taught by white people
The issue of black employees
other than faculty members is
almost too sickening to even
discuss continued Whitman.
NATIONALLY KNOWN SPEED READING COURSE
TO DE TAUGHT HERE IN GREENVILLE
GREENVILLE (Spec.) United
States Reading Lab will offer a 4
week course in speed reading to
a limited number of qualified
people in the Greenville area.
This recently developed
method of instruction is the most
innovative and effective pro-
gram available in the United
States
Not only does this famous
course reduce your time in the
classroom to just one class per
week for 4 short weeks but it also
includes an advanced speed
reading course on cassette tape
so that you can continue to im-
prove for the rest of your life. In
just 4 weeks the average student
should be reading 4-5 times
faster. In a few months some
students are reading 20-30 times
faster attaining speeds that ap-
proach 6000 words per minute. In
rare instances speeds of up to
13,000 wpm have been
documented.
Our average graduate should
read 7-10 times faster upon com-
pletion of the course with mark-
ed improvement in comprehen-
sion and concentration.
For tho. who would like addi-
tional information, a series of
free, one hour orientation lec-
tures have been scheduled. At
these free lectures the course
will be explained in complete
detail, including classroom pro-
cedures, instruction methods,
class schedule and a special 1
time only introductory tuition
that is less than one-third the
cost of similar courses. You
must attend any of the meetings
for information about the Green-
ville classes
These orientations are open to
the public, above age 14, (per-
sons under 18 should be ac-
companied by a parent if possi-
ble).
If you have always wanted to
be a speed reader but found the
cost prohibitive or the course too
time consuming . . . now you
can! Just by attending 1 evening
per week for 4 short weeks you
can read 7 to 10 times faster,
concentrate better and com-
prehend more.
If you are a student who would
like to make A's instead of B's or
C's or if you are a business per-
son who wants to stay abreast of
today's everchanging ac-
celerating world then this course
is an absolute necessity.
These special one-hour lec-
tures will be held at the following
times and places.
Mr. Ribs Restaurant
706 Evans St.
Monday November 15 at 6:30
P.M. and again at 8:30 P.M.
Tuesday November 16 at 6:30
P.M. and again at 8:30 P.M.
Wednesday November 17 at 6:30
P.M. and again at 8:30 P.M.
Thursday November 18 at 6:30
P.M. and again at 8:38 P.M.
Friday November 19 at 6:30
P.M. and again at 8:30 P.M.
SATURDAY NOVEMBER 20 AT
10:30 A.M. AND AGAIN AT 1:30
P.M.
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21 AT
2:00 P.M. AND AGAIN AT 4:00
P.M.
If you are a businessman, stu-
dent, housewife or executive this
course, which took 5 years of in-
tensive research to develop, is a
must. You can read 7-10 times
faster, comprehend more, con-
centrate better, and remember
longer. Students are offered an
additional discount. This course
can be taught to industry or civic
groups at "Group rates" upon
request. Be sure to attend
whichever free orientation that
fits you best.
ADV.
m
"My casual observations suggest
that the janitorial staff, including
and especially those who come
here at night and work until
morning, is almost all black. It is
not an exaggeration to say that
these employees form a servant
corps for us
Whitman says he has gotten
little support from the University
faculty members. When asked in
a student interview why he was
putting his job on the line to
protest racism, he responded that
"when white people discriminate
against blacks as has happened
here at UAB, it is the responsibi-
lity of the white people who feel
that this shouldn't be happening,
to deal with this discrimination.
After all, if we don't we are
allowing the racism to be per-
petrated in our name
"Secondly, I think we all
become less human if we sit
around and refuse to try to
prevent acts of degradation,
humiliation and destruction
Racism also harms white peo-
ple he remarked. "Traditional-
ly racism has beenperpetuated
by the rich and the institutions
they control in order to keep poor
whites and poor blacks fighting
against each other
Whitman is now in tbe process
of challenging the University's
decision to fire him. "I would like
my job back he said. "From
every indication that I have
received I have been an adequate
teacher. But more important is
the issue of racism. Had I been
more interested in my job I never
would have spoken out in the first
place. It is absolutely crucial that
people who are interested in
dealing with racism here begin to
act as soon as possible
Seminar
accepts
applications
Scandinavian Seminar is now
accepting applications for its
study abroad program in Den-
mark, Finland, Norway, or Swe-
den for the academic year 1977-
78. This living-and-learning ex-
perience is designed for college
students, graduates and other
adults who want to become part of
another culture while acquiring a
second language.
An initial three weeks lang-
uage course, followed by a family
stay whenever possible, will give
the student opportunity to
practice the language on a daily
basisand to share in the life of the
community. For the major part of
the year he is separated from his
fellow American students, living
and studying among Scandi-
navians at a "People's College"
(residential school for continuing
adult education) or some other
specialized institution.
:i0v:
HHHBH
�Hi





FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1811 NOVEMBER 1976
7
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Police open fire on crowd, up to 150 killed
Indians protest against forced sterilization
NEW YORK (LNS) - At least
50 people and perhaps as many as
150 were killed October 18 when
polioe opened fire on villagers
protesting mass foroed sterili-
zation in India.
The villagers said that when
polioe rounded up fourteen men
who had more than two children,
a crowd of 4,000 to 5,000 people
came to their defense. Villagers
told an Associated Press reporter
in Muzaffarnagar, about 100
miles northwest of New Delhi,
that hundreds of people were hit
when police opened fire into the
crowd. Others were rounded up
and shot in the market place later
in the evening.
There has been no way to
determine exactly how many were
killed, the villagers said, as some
bodies were found in the river and
others were buried secretly. Over
60 people were killed in a
similar demonstration in Delhi in
April.
Prime Minister Indira Ghandi
referred to the government's
sterilization campaign in an
October 27 speech to parliament
and admitted that, "some deaths
have taken place, due to firing
While Mrs. Ghandi insists that
"there is no ooercion in the
national family planning pro-
gram the government has used
its Declaration of Emergency of
1975 to turn the campaign into a
massive assault on poor Indians.
The federal government has
set sterilization targets for each
state, giving the state govern-
ments wide latitude in their
methods for reaching the targets.
At least three of the 22 states
have drafted bills prescribing jail
terms for one member of a couple
who does not voluntarily limit
their family to three children.
Leaders in the town where the
recent demonstrations were held
said that regional authorities told
ricksha pullers, shop keepers,
poor people with government
ration cards, and most others who
need government lioenses that
they would lose their credentials
if they did not volunteer fa-
ster i I izat ion.
"The government policy
wrote New Asia News reporter
Ashok Mukherji recently, "in-
volves the propagation of the
official ideology of family plan-
ning. The idea that population
causes poverty' in many ways fits
the prejudices of the bureaucratic
elite. It is doubtful that India's
rulers really believe the ideology.
There are too manyl ndian agricul-
tural experts saying that India
could relatively easily double its
food production.
"But real agricultural deve-
lopment would involve both in-
vestment and large-scale mobili-
zation of human labor power.
This, however, is not the develop-
ment policy that the government
of India has been following.
Increasingly since the State of
Emergency, the emphasis has
been on export and relianoe on
Western multinationals I ike the
brazilian model' which requires a
relatively small, but 'disciplined'
labor force.
CAMPUS SQUIRREL contemplates approaching photoqrapher
FOUNTAINHEAD file photo.)
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8
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1811 NOVEMBER 1976
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WATCH OUT
FORTHE
RAINBOW
ECU professor conducts study
SIDS highest among N.C. Indians
Sudden Infant Death Syn-
drome (SIDS) in North Carolina is
more likely to occur among
American Indian babies than any
other ethnic group, according to
an ECU geographer.
PIER FIVE
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Sun
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$1.69 includes FF,
hushpuppies, slaw;
264 Bv-Pass
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Dr. Jack Blok recently com-
pleted the nation's first epidemi-
ological study of SIDS covering
an entire state. Previous studies
have been limited to a few major
metropolitan areas.
In 1972-74 North Carolina's
overall SIDS rate per thousand
live births was 2.06. Among
whites it was found to be lowest,
with a rate of 1.23 per thousand
live births. The SIDS rate for
blacks was 3.75, and among
Indians, 5.65.
The Blok study of occurrences
by county revealed SIDS rates
ranging from zero to a high 6.6 in
Robeson County, where Indians
make up a large proportion of the
population.
Popularly known as "crib
death Sudden Infant Death
Syndrome remains a mystery to
doctors, despite a recent increase
of medical research in this area.
SI DS has been associated with
respiratory difficulties, and some
researchers theorize genetic or
environmental causes, but none
of these hypotheses has been
conclusively proven.
Dr. Blok presented .results of
his three-year analysis of the
American Public Health Associ-
ation analysis of the American
Public Health Association in
Miami Beach last week. The
gathering drew about 9,000 pub-
lic health professionals represent-
ing world, national, state and
10 MINUTES
OF YOUR TIME
COULD SAVE
A FRIEND
In the time it takes to drive
your friend home, you could save
his life.
If your friend's been drinking
too much, he shouldn't be driving.
The automobile crash is the
number one cause of death of people
your age. And the ironic thing is
that the drunk drivers responsible
for killing young people are most
often other young people.
Take ten minutes. Or twenty.
Or an hour. Drive your friend
home. That's all. If you can't do
that, call a cab. Or let him sleep
on your couch.
We're not asking you to be
a doctor or a cop. Just a friend.
rr
DRUNK DRIVER, DEPT. Y
BOX 2345
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
I want to save a friend's life.
Tell me what else I can do.
My name is,
Address
City
1
State.
-Zip.
�Y"l IHHIt.HWAY SAM-IV ADVISOKV c'oMMII'IH-
IF YOU LET A FRIEND DRIVE DRUNK,YOU'RE NO FRIEND.
I ID I'AMIMIM ill IKASM'iHIMo.SAIhAI HICHMAV I RAI H( SAI I I Y ADMINIM HAI ION
local health care organizations.
The Blok study is the first
which accurately maps SIDS
occurrences through a state, with
incidence rates outlined for
oounties and cities as well as
ethnic a socio-economic groups.
It was found that there existed
a considerable variability among
locations in the degrees of risk
faced by infants, Blok said.
Among the state's cities with
populations of more than 10,000
the SIDS rates ranged from zero
to 10.6. For whites living in these
cities, the rates ranged from zero
to a high of 6.2 he noted.
"Although North Carolina's
total infant mortality rate has
been declining in recent years,
the SIDS rate has remained quite
stable
Pre-med
advisory
office
opens
By KIM JOHNSON
Assistant News Editor
A pre-medical advisory office
is now open on campus in
Brewster building, A-303 to assist
pre-med and pre-dental students
primarily with curriculum accord-
ing to Smitty Lineberger, Alpha
Epsilon Delta pre-med honor
fraternity president.
The advisory office was es-
pecially designed to assist fresh-
men and sophomores who desire
a pre-profession curriculum in
medicine or dentistry, according
to Lineberger.
The office is also available to
all pre-med and pre-dental stu-
dents who seek advioe on any
aspect of their pre-professional
work, Lineberger said.
Dr. Wayne Ayers, head of the
advisory oommittee, is in charge
of the office.
Students and professors of
five ECU departments man the
office at different times, accord-
ing to Lineberger.
Professors assisting are: Dr.
Steve Taoken - psychology, Dr.
Al Fahren - history, Ms. Grace
Ellenberg - Foreign Languages,
Drs. Graham Davis, Jack I to and
W. James Smith - Biology, Drs.
Wayne Ayers and Warren McAl-
lister - Chemistry.
"The advisory office is a-
nother means of building up the
ECU pre-med school to better
serve the pre-med students
Lineberger said.
According to Lineberger, pre-
med at ECU is "coming into its
own now
The honor fraternity and the
advisory office prove that pro-
gress is going on tn ECU'S
pre-med program, Lineberger
said.
m
mmm
'� � . � � � -�'� �:
-�'��





FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1811 NOVEMBER 1976
9
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Famed Chinese Acrobats
to perform in Minges
"They were specialists in the
impossible (New York Post)
This powerful comment was
based on just one human being's
reaction to the amazing CHINESE
ACROBATS OF TAIWAN in their
first tour of the United States last
year, and now this their excitedly
awaited return tour, the dazzling
65 member company will come to
Greenville, N.C for one very
unique performance in Minges
Coliseum on November 17 at 8:00
p.m.
Last season, the CHINESE
ACROBATS OF TAIWAN created
a sensation wherever they per-
formed and delighted millions of
television viewers with their
appearance on "The Mike Doug-
las Show" and "Wide World of
Sports among others. This
year's tour features many new
acts never before seen in this
country, new production numbers
and oostumes, as well as the
return of last year's electrifying
favorites, including: The Pagoda
of Chairs-where a man balances
several chairs one upon another,
the bottom one resting on four
bottles on a table; Balancing
Rhapsody-where two sisters
balanced head-to-head, climb a
12 foot ladder and perform an
intricate juggling act; Chinese
Somersault-where three sisters
show off their acrobatic skills;
Circle of Knives-featuring blind-
folded tumblers diving through
rings of daggers and fire into the
lap of those who made the trip
before; a Chinese Ch'l-Kung
demonstration; and many other
exciting acts.
You will witness superhuman
acts of levitation, Kung-Fu,
charming dancers, thrilling feats
on bicycles, and breathtaking
balancing acts. All will be done in
elaborate and colorful oostumes
and lighting, with unbelievable
virtuosity and artistry. The
CHINESE ACROBATS OF TAI-
WAN are spectacular.
This show is even better than
a circus a concert. It is a trip to
another land, a rainbow of
incredible and even dangerous
feats, an astounding onoe-in-a-
lifetime evening with many of
Taiwan's most famous and honor-
ed acrobatic masters.
The CHINESE ACROBATS of
TAIWAN are much more than the
finest company of its kind in the
world; they are very special
people in every way. There is
nothing quite like them in the
Western world. You'll flip over
them!
Ticket prices for the CHI NESE
ACROBATS OF TAIWAN are as
follows:
ECU Students$1.00
Non ECU Students$2.00
Children$2.00
Public$4.00
Group (20 or more)$3.00
All tickets will be $4.00 at the
door. Tickets are available at the
Central Ticket Office in Menden-
hall Student Center, which is
open from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00
p.m Monday through Friday.
Mail orders should include a self-
addressed, stamped envelope and
should be directed toThe Central
Ticket Office, Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, ECU, Greenville,
N.C. 27834. Telephone number
(919) 757-6611, Ext. 266.
The CHINESE ACROBATS
OF TAIWAN is a MSC Product-
ion.
(Fountainhead file photo)
Local poets to read on Nov. 14, at 8:30
Roxy Theatre plans 'Evening of Sanity'
By PAT F LYNN
Staff Writer
An evening of interesting
listening is planned by local
Greenville poets at the ROXY
Music Arts and Crafts Center,
Sunday, November 14, at 8:30
p.m.
Local poet, Susan Whalen,
said, "The ROXY is the best and
only place for local, non-univer-
sity poets to have a reading She
described it as "An Evening of
Sanity at the ROXY. It ain't
Frisco, it ain't Sixth Gallery, it's
Greentown, now.
"The reading will be modeled
after the old 1950's, 'Beatnick'
style, coffeehouse atmosphere
Whalen said. "This style of
reading had its origin in San
Francisco with such major 'Beats'
as Ferlingetti and Ginsburg. '
"This laid-back atmosphere
should be conducive to poetry
reading. The participating poets
are bringing a bottle of wine for
themselves. We welcome anyone
in the audience to do the same.
"We are calling this reading
'An Evening of Sanity' because
we want this to be a renewal of
poetry for Greenville residents.
We think it's about time we
initiated something like this for
the non-university poets.
"They have a forum for their
poetry. We don't want so struct-
ured a format. Ours will be
structured to the extent only the
featured poets will be reading
she said.
"This differs from the 'Beat'
readings in that the atmosphere
was completely structureless, no
format whatsoever. We are not
going to be that unstructured.
The reading is going to be divided
into two one-hour halves with a
break in between.
"We are not expecting any
spur-of-the-moment audience
reading. This differs from the
' Beats' also. Though we are going
to sit around and read poetry and
get drunk, we are reserving the
audience reading format for a
later time. We are expecting
some audienoe response after the
i imw
m
wmm
poems are read, clicking of
fingers, or whatever.
"The local, off-campus poets
feel that Greenville is a town
where something is happening
besides the university. There are
people who are talented, talented
poets, artist potters, musi-
cians said Whalen.
"The ROXY is a place where
all non-university artists can
come together to perform and
show exhibits. This is why we
have selected the IOXY. Poets do
not have the same outlet as
musicians or artists, fa example,
The ROXY is a place where we will
be able to have our dreams oome
true.
"We are not down on the
university, most of us graduated
there. On the other hand, the
ROXY is a real life situation, a
place where craftsmen and artists
are making part of their living
from the arts.
Poetry has always been high
in the arts. The subject matter of
Sunday's reading will concern all
perspectives from one-night
stands to unrequited love to social
comments oontinued Whalen.
"Certain poets will have a
vein of radicalism on life, a
radictalism that started in the
50's. probably with the 'Beats
This vein of radidalism is the
spirit that was laid-open in the
60's, the anti-establishment spir-
it she said.
"Some of us reject the es-
tablishment social ader that still
persists into the 70's. Some of the
poems will be about contempa-
ary Greenville, what it is like to
mmmmmmtmmm
live here now.
"We are waking people who
live and wak in Greenville. Thae
are numerous oppatunities fa
university people to take advant-
age. We have no other outlet.
"We have met and had a run
through in preparation of Sunday
evening. We became convinoed
that this famat is the most
intimate way to reach other
people with our poetry Whalen
said.
"We discussed this aspect
when we were throwing this idea
around and we thought the
exposure of poetry to the people,
the spontaneity, was the value o
the poetry of the 50's.
"Those 'Beat' poets probably
would not have been known to
any great extent if they had na
attempted their infamal read-
ings. There is nahing wase than
people with talent with no outlet
fcr expression. A lot has been
done through the ROXY to
provide mae serious and mae
cultured entertainment Whalen
said.
The poetry will feature such
poets as Jim Carrol, Jesus, Shep,
Gina, Jim Howe, Ruby Woods,
Susan Whalen, and Rickfield on
background guitar during the
reading.
The poets are asking fa a 50
oents donation which will go to
the ROXY, but this is not
required. They also ask that you
bring your own wine.
Pink Panther returns
Peter Sellers, as Inspecta
Qouseau, is once again in search
of the Pink Panther diamond.
Clouseau has been described as
"a man of great dignity who, is
unfortunately acoiclent prone
Well, does a chicken have lips?
Does a fish have a neck? Is
Clouseau a man of dignity? Judge
fa yourself! What he is, is a
frantically funny, pathetic, aack-
pot private eye.
"from the opening scene in
which Clouseau pompously
asserts his right to arrest a man
begging in front of a bank which,
to all but him is quite obviously in
the process of being robbed, to
the truly insane ending, these
mmwmmmmmmmmmm
virtuoso talents tnreaten to over-
flow the screen with invention
Whatever that means? I
copied it out of a catalogue. What
I do know is that this is a funny,
funny flick. Afta all, when J
asked all my friends (both of
them) what they wanted to see
this was it. So, STAN CHAM-
BERS, since you suggested it, I
want to see you there. The shows
start at 7:00 P.M. & 9fl0 P.M.
Friday and Saturday November
12 & 13. If we don't get a packed
house, I'll lose my job. Then
you'll never know if I'm gang to
showan X-rated flick this year a
na. Mae about that later. Y'all
Come It's free with an I.D. and
Activity Card.
m





io
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1811 NOVEMBER 1976
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'Mary Ellen Walton 'juggles two husbands
ByKIMGARFIELD
For actress Judy Norton,
better known as Mary Ellen on
'The Waltons 1976 will go
down as the year she got married
twice.
As the multi-award winning
series enters its fifth season on
CBS, the Walton's eldest daught-
er, now 18, becomes engaged to a
wealthy young intern while at-
tending nursing school. But on a
two-hour episode titled "The
Wedding which ran last week,
Mark Ellen shelved the intern and
wound up marrying a young
doctor who had taken over the
local practice.
Wedding number two took
place earlier this year when
19-year-old Judy married a young
singer-musician named Douglas
Taylor. The two met at a
Scientology workshop, where
both have achieved the rank of
minister.
"I got into Scientology when I
was 13 Judy relayed during a
lunch break at the Burband
studios where "The Waltons" is
filmed. "My older sister was
having boyfriend problems at the
time, so my step-mother took us
both to one of the meetings. For
me, it was fun getting out of the
house three nights a week
It wasn't until she got older,
she said, that she began to realize
the seriousness of her interest in
the applied religious philosophy.
"It deals with the mind and
how it works she explained
between forkfuls of a chef's salad
in the studio commissary. "If you
agree with what the founder, L.
Ron Hubbard, says about why
people act as they do, then you
can use the information to your
benefit. I don't believe in the
principles because he says so I
believe it because it's worked for
me
For starters, she feels that it's
maeased her awareness of her-
self and other people and has
given her more self-confidence.
She also believes Scientology has
helped her as an actress ("I know
how a character would behave
under certain circumstances even
though I personally have never
See MARY ELLEN, page 11.)
HHS QUARTERLY
USED
STEREO
SALE
Z3T
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� SE 3D qcoooooQ
THESE ARE ALL QUALITY CHECKED IN OUR SHOP AND
CARRY GUARANTEES!
ALLSUBJECTTO PRIOR SALE! FIRST COME!
TRADES ACCEPTED! FINANCING AVALABLE!
PRICE WHEN NEW
OUR SALE PRICE
SONY TC-125 CASSETTE DECK
POINEERPL-6 TURNTABLE
DUAL 1214 TURNTABLE
THORENSTD-124TT wSME tone arm
JVC 1656 CASSETTE DECK
B1 C MODEL 1 SPEAKERS
MARANTZ 2440 4 CH. REAR AMPAC
BOSE IA 4000 SPEAKERS
(FREIGHT DAMAGED)
BOSE 901 STANDARD SPEAKERS 598.00
(SCRATCHED)
ULTRALINEAR SPEAKERS 230.00
PIONEER 1020 REEL DECK (DEMO) 650.00
SONY 2251 TURNTABLE 430.00
SONY PS-5550 TURNTABLE 260.00
SONY MODEL 110 B& W T V 140.00
SONY 1055INT. AMP. 210 00
SONY 1066 INT. AMP. 170.00
JVC 1669 CASS. DECK 499.00
KLH MODEL CL-4 SPEAKERS (PAIR) 400.00
EMPIRE MARBLE TOP SPEAKERS 300.00
(PAIR)
BOSE IA 1000 SPEAKERS (PAIR) 140.00
PIONEERSA-5200 INT. AMP. 140.00
REALISTIC SA-900 INT. AMP. 130.00
REALISTIC AMFM TUNER 60.00
SYLVANIACOMPACT 219.95
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& CHANGERS
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HHS
ON THE MALL - DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
(Fountainhead file photo)
m
m
Would you believe
Peanuts
over
America
By PAT COY LE
Trends Editor
In case you have been locked in a cave in Bear Grass fa the past
week, we have elected a new President (not of the SGA, dummy). Our
new President goes by the name of Jimmy Carter. His platform was
peanut shells and his trademark is teeth.
The week after a Presidential election is always rather disorganized,
both for the old Chief Exec and for his successor. The last several days
have been no exception.
GOP followers have been sadly packing up all the "He's Making Us
Proud Again" posters, throwing out the Ford-Dole stickers, and
wondering if Ronald Reagan is really too old for the 1980 nomination.
The first family has, no doubt, begun the long, sad process of
clearing jut of the White House. I can just picture Betty driving to the
local package store, bumming liquor boxes to aid in the moving process.
President Ford, eyes full of tears, has probably been cleaning out his
desk in the Oval Office, pausing to ponder over such memorabilia as his
leftover "WIN" buttons, and his autographed photo of Bob Hope.
Meanwhile, down in Plains, Ga the Carters are in the process of
getting things organized for the biggest move of their lives (other than
when they moved from their Connor Mobile Home into their present
residence). Rosalyn is worrying about thedimacticdifference between
D.C. and G.A. She'Ir no doubt have to run up to Sears-Roebuck to get a
new winter coat for Amy. Miss Lillian will take care of the fimily's new
linen needs by hodling a quilting bee for all the ladies of Plains.
Jumpin' Jimmy is really busy! He'll have to hire some competent
foreman to watch the peanuts grow for the next four years. (Maybe one
of his brothers). Then comes the task of choosing a staff. (Maybe all of
his cousins.)
We all have confidence that Mr. Carter will use great care in
choosing his Cabinet; especially his foreign policy advisors. There are
countless factors to take into consideration when he chooses these
important men. Oh sure, we must worry about their competence, their
experience, their moral character, but the most important thing is that
they have small teeth, as an overabundance of executive teeth could
cause a disastrous glare on television broadcasts.
The changeover of administrations is not simply the task of the Fads
and Carters. There are oountless aides from both camps who will be
instrumental in making the transition smooth. They must see to it that
the President-Elect is thaoughly briefed on such vital issues as the
Middle East, Russian grain sales, the energy problem, etc.
Americans seem confident that the switchover will be achieved with
efficiency. The only people who seem at all concerned are the socialites
in D.C. This group of politicians, faeign diplanats, and Coigressiaial
"phoie-answers" are all asking the most vital question of all: Does a
good host offer a drink to a Baptist President? I guess we'll just have to
wait and find out the answer to that one later.
mt0m
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FOUN1AINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 1811 NOVEMBER 1976
11
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Crosby, Stills, etc. have long histories
Transiency runs rampant in rock business
By MARK LOCK WOOD
Staff Writer
Music (especially rook music)
presents to us one of the most
transient entites of our day.
Hardly does one new group form
before another splits up - and so
the cycle goes.
Crosby, Stills, Nash and
Young present perhaps one of the
most confusing "family trees" in
rook music today. To trace such a
tree is frustrating in the least.
Neil Young began with the
Buffalo Springfield, a group that
fizzled after two relatively popu-
lar albums. He then pursued a
short solocareer culminating with
his first album entitled Neil
Young in January of 1969. In July
of the following year, he joined up
with former Buffalo Springfield
member, Stephen Stills, along
with Graham Nash (ex-Hollies)
and David Crosby (ex-Byrd) to
form the short-lived Crosby,
Stills, Nash and Young. In
September of the same year,
Young produoed his second solo
album entitled Everybody Knows
This is Nowhere. He then re-
grouped with Crosby, Stills and
Nash to produoe the Dooular Deja
Vu album in March, 1970. In the
following October, once again
solo, Young produced the album
After the Gold Rush, which was
followed closely by another brief
regrouping of C, S, n and Y, in
April, 1971 for the live Four Way
Street album. The road has been
solo fa Neil the rest of the way
(despite attempts at regrouping
Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young).
The list of solo albums is
impressive - Harvest, Journey
Through the Past, On the Beach,
Tonight's the Night, Zuma and
his most recent collaboration with
Stephen Stills entitled, Long May
You Run.
Stephen Stills, another early
member of Buffalo Springfield,
also presents a myriad rock
career. After the aforementioned
demise of Buffalo Springfield,
Stills and ex-Byrd member David
Crosby met Graham Nash in 1968
and formed Crosby, Stills, and
Nash the following year. The
three musicians produced an
album by the same namein July of
that year, and made an appearance
at Woodstock. After the Deja Vu
album, Stills pursued a solo
career with Stephen Stills in
December of 1970. Following the
Four Way Street album, Stills
produoed a sequel, appropriately
entitled Stephen Stills II. Follow-
ing this album, Stills along with
Chris Hillman (ex-Byrd) formed
the super group Manassas, which
survived through two albums
entitled Manassas and Down the
Road. Stills followed this with
MARY ELLEN
Continued from page 10.)
experienced it"), and adds that
it's of enormous help in getting
along in a highly competitive
business.
"I don't think it's a coinci-
dence that two weeks after I
started the first Scientology
oourse I got "The Walton's"
pilot, when I hadn't worked in a
long, long time she offered.
"This is back-stabbing business
where 100 people can be up for
the same job. To me, Scientology
is a way of getting rid of the
barriers that get in your way
whether it's your career or your
relationships
California-born Judy also cre-
dits the philosophy with helping
the newlyweds find their dream
house, a 2-bedroom, rustic, hill-
top home, oomplete with beamed
ceilings, fireplace and swimming
pool.
"We were searching for
months, but we maintained a
positive attitude and wouldn't
compromise too much she
explained. "It was everything we
wanted in the first place
There's even a stable for her
horse, "Spirit whom she rides
in horse shows whenever she gets
the chance. But because there
will be a strong emphasis this
season on the growth and deve-
lopment of the younger members
of thf� Walton family. Judy won't
be riding her horse very much.
In addition to Mary Ellen's
wedding, John-Boy (Richard Tho-
mas) will be publishing and
hand-printing "The Blue Ridge
Chronicle a weekly country
newspaper. And by the end of the
season, he'll have his first book
published.
Judy, who has been acting
since she was 7 (extra work,
mostly) gets a lot of fan mail from
teen-agers who want to know how
she and the other cast members
get along, how she got into acting
and who are her favorite rock
groups. ("Elton John and The
Guess Who)
She's been studying singing
and dance and hopes to expand
her career with other projects
when "The Waltons" goes on
hiatus If the show is renewed fa
a sixth season, however, she
plans to remain with it.
"I'm not really ready to leave
yet she admitted as we strolled
back to the mammoth sound
:stage. "I don't feel all that secure
�and when you're with a series fa
a laig time, it's kind of scary to
leave it. Especially since we just
bought a new house
She smiled and added, "On
the other hand, if you sit back and
stay where you are, then you'll
never go anywhere
other solo ventures (Stills, Illegal
Stills and Stephen Stills Live
which culminatad in the most
recent Stills-Young oollabaatiai.
David Crosby left the Byrds in
1968 under what might have been
termed "stamy circumstances
The disgruntled Crosby soon
famed what was to be a lasting
friendship with Graham Nash in
1968, followed by the Crosby,
Stills and Nash, and Crosby,
Stills, Nash and Young effats
Crosby produoed his first album
in March of 1971 entitled, If I
Could Only Remember My Name,
preceding the CSNY live album.
Crosby followed this effat with
three collaborations with old
friend Graham NashDavid
Crosby and Graham Nash, Wind
on the Water, and Whistling
Down the Wire.
Graham Nash began with the
Hollies, but during the faays of a
contract dispute, began his ca-
reer in 1969 with Crosby and
Nash. Along with his group
effats he also produoed the solo
Songs for Beginners and Wild
Tales. These were shatly follow-
ed by the two most recent
CrosbyNash albums.
Consider the confusion of
King Crimson. In 1969, the group
began with standout members
Greg Lake, Robert Fripp and Boz
Burrell. After a year of tenure,
Greg Lake, disgusted with his
small part in the group, famed
his own with the help of Keith
Emerson (famer of The Nice) and
Carl Palmer (famerly of Atomic
Rooster). We all know them today
as, of oourse, Emerson, Lake and
Palmer. Boz Burrell left King
Crimson also after a shat tenure,
but received little notaiety until
joining Bad Company in 1974.
To further complicate matters,
Bill Brufad left Yes in 1973 to
help refam King Crimson along
with bassist John Wetton and
aiginal guitarist Robert Fripp.
This complement of musicians
lasted until their break up in iate
1974. Then, John Wetton joined
Uriah Heep and Brufad most
recently joined Genesis in ader
to allow drummer Phil Collins
mae freedan with his vocals
The Beach Boys remained
relatively the same group
throughout fifteen years. Al-
though Brian quit touring with
the group in 1964, due to ear
problems, he remained a vital
face in the studio. Alan Jardine
left the group fa a shat six
maiths with ambitiai. fa dental
school Believe it a not Glen
Campbell replaced him during
this shat stint. Bruce Johnston
was a member of the group
throughout most of the fifteen
years until 1971, when he left the
group to become an executive
with Equinox reoads. To replace
him, the Beach Beys found two
South Africans, Ricky Sataar and
Bloudie Chaplin (From Flame).
After the So Tough album the two
members left the group. The
Beach Boys now retain a basic
core of Dennis, Brian and Carl
Wilson (brothers), Mike Love (a
oousin) and Alan Jardin (a famer
neighba) so it still remains after
15 years, a "family affair
So the list goes on and on. I'd
trace a histay of Eric Clapton,
but who would believe me?
THE
RAINBOW
IS COMING
HELP WANTED
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per hour while on
vacation or on weekend
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W. Palm Beach, FL 33401
�The Morgan Press. 1976
CAN
TURN
YOUR EDUCATION
INTO A PROMOTION
Visit me at the East Carolina
University Bookstore each Thursday
and ask me how you can now step
right into a good job after basic
training. A job with a good salary.
Choice of location. And opportu-
nities for immediate advancement.
OR
CALL ARMY
SGT PHIL MURPHY
PHONE
752-4826
North Carolina's Number 3 Rock Night Club
ATTIC ATTIC ATTIC ATTIC
Sunday Nov. 14 - Four Band Extravaganza
Sutter's GoldBull
EzraKing Cotton
m





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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1811 NOVEMBER 1976
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ECU faces Furma
in key league tilt
The game between East Caro-
lina and Furman this Saturday
afternoon should provide more
fireworks than the folks of
Greenville, South Carolina have
seen in a long time.
Furman has possession of the
football, the 13,000-plus people in
Sirrine Stadium will be watching
the Southern Conference's top
offensive team facing the top
defensive unit of the league.
(ECU'S defense is also number
two in the nation, limiting oppo-
nents to 207 yards per game.)
The Paladins are an experi-
enced offensive team, with eight
of the eleven starters classified as
seniors- Their leader is David
Whitehurst. The 205 pound senio
is a poised field general who runs
the team's veer option expertly
and passes extremely well to wide
receivers Greg Laetsch and Tom-
my Southard and tight end Angus
Poole.
Furman's backfield is well-
manned with class tailback Harry
King the leading rusher. He
alternates with Larry Robinson
who has also proven himself one
of the finest runners in the
conference. The fullback is Ike
Simpson, a good blocker who is
the starter for the third year.
When ECU has possession,
nobody will go out to buy
popoorn. Mike Weaver and oorrv
pany are ranked sixth in the
nation in rushing, rolling up close
to 300 yards per game. They will
face a stiff Furman defense which
features a super noseguard in 210
pound junior Frank Moses. Both
linebackers, Larry Anderson and
Jimmy Neal, are tough. And
strong safety Mark Gordon is
all-Southern Conference.
ECU assistant coach Rick
Bankston expects Furman to use
a five-man front, dropping their
nebackers down to oover the
guards, and bring the strong
safety up. They will mix five-man
to six-man fronts.
This season has been some-
what disappointing fa the Fur-
man Paladins who have been up
and down since surprising N.S.
State 17-12 in their season
opener.
Their overall record stands at
four wins, four losses and one tie,
with only one conference win to
date. Beating ECU, whose record
is perfect in Southern Conference
play, would make life sweeter fa
the people in the aher Green-
ville, but the Pirates have some-
thing different in mind.
Sports
Callahan, Redeen
best divers around
By DAVID ROBEY
Staff Writer
ECU'S women's swim team
has had a good season thus far
this year due to plenty of hard
wak, a good coach and some new
talent. The team ga some of that
new talent when freshmen Patty
Redeem and Cathy Callahan
joined the tem as divers.
Between the two of three
girls, they have put in an
excellent showing by sharing first
and second place on the boards all
season.
Patty Redeen is from Reston,
Va. She came to ECU to maja in
Industrial Technology Luckily fa
us saneone ai the men's swim
team talked her into trying out fa
a positiai on the wanen's team
as diver.
Redeen swam three years in
Amateur Athletic Union (AAU)
meets befae aiming to ECU.
During her senia year she
started waking out on the boards
and it was then that she learned
the mechanics of diving.
"I liked swimming but you
have to put so much wak and
time into it Redeen stated. "I
enjoy diving because it's fun. I
like the competition and you
really have to ooncentrate to do
well
Redeen waks out on the
trampoline because it helps her
diving and she plans to wak out
with the men divers to gain more
experience. She plans to keep
diving fa the team in the future if
she can keep her diving fam up
to par.
"It's hard fa me to push
myself and to keep practicing.
Ideally, I need to do seven a
eight dives and ooncentrate on
them. If I do mae I wai't
ajncentrate as I should and I
probably dive with poa fam.
"My diving is mainly self
taught because it's hard a next to
impossible fa Coach Chepko to
wak with me and Cathy and the
swim team at the same time
she continued. "Miss Chepko
does put in extra time and help us
aftawards. We don't have a
diving coach and I don't think
anyone in the state does.
"There is little competition in
diving in this state and usually
Cathy and I fight it out between
us fa first and seoond place.
That's bad fa the competition to
be between us because we are
good friends and do a la of things
together. Cathy and I work
together and tell one anaher
what we're dang wrong
This brings us to Cathy
Callahan, Patty's fellow diva and
good friend. Callahan has also
won some first places along with
Redeen.
Callahan, a native of Char-
late, has been diving fa four
years. She started diving in Texas
and then moved to Nath Carolina
where she oontinued her diving.
mmmmmmm
She decided to come to ECU then
to try out fa the team.
"I enjoy the competition of
diving. It's fun but also some-
times depressing Callahan
said. "It gets depressing when I
wak and can't seem to do ber
But right now that might be
because Patty and I are waking
ai much hard dives.
"I need to push myself mae
and improve. A diva is always
trying to improve hisha fam
and heshe does so by waking ai
hisher concentration and co-
adinatiai
Callahan says she prefas the
low board, one-meta off the
wata, because thae is less room
fa ara. Although most divas
like the three-meta board ova
the low board, thae is much mae
room fa ara ai it and it is
harda to judge.
Like Redeen, Callahan agrees
that the state needs mae people
diving in oollege meets.
"I'm intaested in seeing the
competition at the State
Championship. I would like to see
me and Patty grab the first two
places at the meet
These two girls will travel to
the Sate Championship in Janu-
ary and should do well. Although
they are new to the scene, they
have little to fear if they keep
diving in the future as they are
now. If they keep waking togeth-
a they are sure to put in a good
show.
Sideline Chat
with Steve Wheeler
CROSS COUNTRY SPA RK LES
ECU'saossoountry team in year's past has been less than good in
all respects. There has not been active reauiting of distance runners by
East Carolina fa three years now. Walk-ons have braved the oool fall
weather to run fa the Pirates ai very little a no scholarship money.
And, they have done it with little a no recognition. This writer went
into the locker room a couple of months ago to get a preview fa the
harriers. Coach Bill Carson refused to give any infamatioi out on the
team saying they did not need any publicity saying that it might put
pressure on them.
It turns out the team was not as bad as Carson thought. In the
Southern Conference Championships last Saturday at Boone, the Pirate
harriers finished a respectable seventh out of nine teams oompeting. Of
the seven official teams competing (Furman, William and Mary,
Appalachian, VMI, ECU, Davidson, and The Citadel) the Pirates
finished fifth, beating Davidson and The Citadel.
Individually, sophomae Jim Dill finished 14th, the best finish by a
Pirate in three years.
All this might na sound like it is too good fa an athletic team to
finish fifth out of seven schoola But, fa aoss country, a spat virtually
ignaed fa the last three years, it is quite an acconplishment.
Coigratulatiois are in acter fa the gutsy team membas.
RICHMOND NOT BIG-TIME
In the past year, the Southan Confaenoe has seen four schools
eitha leave the league a announce their intentions to exit. Richmond
left last May, while East Carolina, William and Mary and VMI will take
to the road next June.
As far asthis writa sees it, only one isdesaving the hona of exitinq
the Southan-ECU.
This writa has been to Williamsburg and Richmond and seen the
shoddy way things are handled and read about the year's top aowd at
VMI - 7,700.
The way Richmond officials ran their game with the Pirates last
week, they would hardly make the high school level. The facilities were
less than adequate and the operation of the press box and aowd was
much less than big-time; as a matta of face, it was wase than this
writa has seen in the Southan this year.
The grand Astraurf field was laid on top of asphalt and was hard as a
rock as compared to a grass field. Neither goal post was near being
straight. As the team walked onto the field Friday fa practice afta the
long bus ride up, Mike Weava was the first out. Pete Conaty followed
and Weava turned to Conaty and said Hey, Pete, you get to kick at an
angle whetha you're in front of the goal posts a na
The Spidas did na waste any of the Astraurf eitha. Less than ten
feet out of bounds, the bare asphalt begins. This can really cause a
serious injury to the playas on the field - even the Spida troops.
The press box opaations were less than professional. The press box
PA system (which evay school is supposed to have to give the writas an
official summary of each play) consisted of Nick Boccella, Richmond's
Spats InfamatiaOirecta, yelling bah ways from the middle. When he
was wrong someaie had to holla back fa a correction.
The game itself looked like a contest between a pair of high school
teams. Thae wae a taal of 15 turnovers: nine fumbles, four inta-
oeptions, and two blocked runts It is not often when thae are two
blocked punts in which neitha result in a score.
Anaha inequity in the Richmond game was the officiating. That was
positively the wast officiating this writa has eva seen in a college
foaball game. They wae contracted out of the Atlantic Coast
Confaenoe officials office, but seemed to call as if they wae just
learning the game of football. Norvell Neve (ACC Supavisa of Ofticials)
needs to keep a dosa eye on his pasonally-trained staff.
Richmond might have the money to be ag-time, out tney sure oc na
show it. Teams like Richmond, VMI and William and Mary trying to go
maja in oollege will have many problems. They will definitely have to do
something to their stadiums to hold mae people. Even then they will
have problems. This writa sees their leaving the Southan a mistake.
STILL HIGH IN STATS
East Carolina's football team, which took a big drop in the
statistical categaies against Richmond, is still among the nation's best.
Individually, Pete Conaty istenth among scaas with an 8.6 avaage
pa game and sixth in field goals with 1.44 pa game.
In punt returns, Gaald ranks ninth with a 13.3 yard avaage pa
return. Hall and Reggie Pinkney are tied fa sixth in intaoeptions with
.67 pa game. Pinkney leads the nation in intaoeption raurn yardage
with 197 while Hall ranks second with 153.
Team-wise East Carolina ranks sixth in rushing offense with 298.1
yards pa game. Defensively, the Pirates stand second in taal defense,
giving up just 207.1 yards per game, fourth In ruahing defense (105.4
yards pa game), and fifth In acaing defense (10.2 points pa game.)
��





FOUNTAIN,iEADVOL 52. NO. 1811 NOVEMBER 1976
13
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�MMMMM�I
Inexperienced grappiers
open season in tourney
By STEVE WHEELER
Sports Editor
When you go to an ECU
wrestling match this year, do not
expect to see Mike Radford, Ron
Whitcomb, or Tom Marriott
throwing their opponents to the
mat for a pin. Those three
national performers plus two
more starters are gone from the
five-time Southern Conference
champions, so except for a few
top returnees, the Pirates will be
fairly inexperienced going into
this weekend's opening tourna-
ment at Norfolk, Va.
The Bucs return three national
performers this season along with
two other starters and four
part-time starters from 1975 in
their bid for an unprecedented
sixh straight SC title.
The Pirates will be competing
Friday and Saturday in the
Monarch Invitational with just
seven of the ten weight classes
filled. Wendell Hardy and Jeff
Curtis, both 118 pounders, are
out with injuries as are Paul
Thorp and Kirk Tucker at 150.
D.T. Joyner, the only heavy-
weight of the team, is currently
playing football but should join
the team in a couple of weeks,
unless the team gets a bowl bid.
"We've got some good re-
turners John Welborn, SC
Coach of the Year, said, "But,
losing guys of the caliber of
Marriott, Whitbomb and Radford
definitely hurts. They are almost
irreplacabie.
"Inexperience will definitely
be a problem. We have just four
seniors and three of them were
part-time starters last year. We
also have only two juniors with
experience and two that have
seen very little action. That leaves
us with 15 freshmen and sopho-
mores
Inexperience may not be the
only probelm the Pirates face this
season. They tackle their tough-
est schedule of dual meets ever.
However, most of the hard-nose
matches will be held in Minges
Coliseum, affording the Bucs a
much-needed home-mat crowd.
There is no doubt that this is
the strongest list of opponents
I've had to face si nee coming here
nine years ago Welborn added.
"We have many of the same
teams we had last year, but
they've gotten so much stronger
this year. Lehigh finished fifth in
Division I last year while Wilkes
College won the Division II
championsup. State and Carolina
have put a lot of money in their
programs and should be top 20
teams this season. Athletes in
Action boasts an Olympic gold
medalist in John Peterson and
have several former national
champs. West Chester is always
tough also
The only real test fa the
Pirates on the road will be at
William and Mary, the pre-
season SC favorite.
"William and Mary would
have to be the conference early
pick Welborn continued. "They
have just about everyone back
from last year. Wrestling them up
there will be tough, but we've got
them right before the conference
meet and we should be in good
shape by then with our young
peoplethey should have some
experience
The Bucs will be hosting the
1977 Southern Conference Cham-
pionships Mar. 4-5, something
Welborn is happy about.
"It's sure nice having them
come to our place. With our
student support (the Pirates
averaged over 2,000 fans per
meet at home last year) it will
surely help
Phil Mueller, Paul Osman and
Paul Thap all competed fa the
Pirates in last year's NCAA
national tournament.
Mueller, a 167 pounder, is a
senior from Eden, N.C. He
transferred here from the Univa-
sity of Wisconsin at Stevens Point
last year and made it to the
quarterfinals of the NCAA's.
While at UW, Mueller finish-
ed fourth and second in the NAIA
finals during his freshman and
sophonae years, respectively.
Mueller had a super dual meet
recad last year, losing just once.
He won a number of tournaments
including the Southern Confer-
ence title.
Osman, wrestling at 126, was
named the outstanding wrestler
of the Neptune Invitational in
winning his weight class easily.
He was also a Southern Confa-
See WRESTLING, page 14.
ECU Karate Club best in
nation two years in row
By JOHN EVANS
Intramural Carespondent
Did you know there is an athletic team on
campus that has won two straight national titles and
numerous other state and regional titles? Did you
also know that the same club has a membership of
over 400 students, one of the largest on the ECU
campus, and yet is one of the least publicized clubs
on campus?
You probably didn't if you are like most people,
but that has been the situation concerning the ECU
KaFate Club since its founding on the East Carolina
campus back in 1962.
The dub, which is now the largest on campus,
began in 1962 as an impromptu get together after
Bill McDonald was approached by several students
who were interested in learning "those funny
exercises" he was doing.
"I got interested in Karate as a teenager in Ft.
Bragg in 1958 explained McDonald, "and when I
came to East Carolina College I used to wak out by
myself in the old Memaial Gym. Several students
wanted to know what I was doing one day and I told
when I told them they asked me to teach them. That
is how the ECU Karate Club started.
"At first we met in the gym continued
McDonald, "but we were soon run out because of
the noise (screams) we made and the funny outfits
(white robes) we wae. We started practicing
outside underneath the streetlight beside the old
football stadium and pretty scon we had about 25
ilia i i nmmmmmmmmnmtm � 'i 'Wi
students involved
A professa became interested in what the club
was doing and offered his assistance as an advisa.
Through his help, the students became a recognized
club by the college and were allowed to come in out
of the cold.
"We've been winning medals ever since
boasted McDonald. "It seems that everyone knows
about the ECU Karate Club except the people at
ECU and in Greenville. We have even had people
come to ECU over antf her school because of the
Karate Club.
"It used to bother me that nobody knew about
us added McDonald, "but I have gotten over it by
now and the publicity has been a little better in the
past few years
During the 14-year existence of the dub it has
won 14 Nath Carolina State championships, as well
as numerous southern and southeastern champion-
ships. Over the last two years the Karate Club has
won the National Open Championships. In the
championships the ECU dub competed against the
best university, dub and school teams in the United
States.
"We are well respected throughout the nation
said McDonald. People know us when we arrive at
a meet because we have always done so well in all
aspeds and regions of competition
Of its 401 members, only a few are members of
the competitive team. Accading to McDonald the
remainder of the dub members are divided into
See KARATE, page 15.
ummmzmmmmmmmmmnnmmwHm
PHIL MUELLER, senior wrestler at 167 pounds, has his arm raised in
victory one of the many times he was victoriocis last year. One of the top
eight in the nation in his weight class, Mueller leads the Pirate grapplers
into the Monarch Invitational tomorrow in Norfolk, Va. FOUNTAIN-
HEAD file photo.
DateJVntuu OpponentLL Place
Nov. 12-13Monarch OpenNafolk, Va.
19-20Carolina Invitational Chapel Hill, N.C.
Dec. 8Campbell, N.C. Central BuiesCreek, N.C. and Barber Scotia
10Athletes in Adion Home
27-28Wilkes OpenWilkes Bane, Pa.
Jan. 6West ChesterHome
8LehighHome
10Wilkes CollegeHome
21Appalachian State Home
28University of N.C. Home
Feb. 7N.C. State Univasity Home
12Old DominionNorfolk, Va.
19RichmondHome
24William and Mjry Williamsburg, Va.
Mar. 4-5South. Con. Tourna. Home
17-19NCAA Wrest. Champ. Naman, Okla.
ctOSTEn
rn
Namea.wt.Hometown
Mitch BurrJr.177Greenville, N.C.
Jeff CurtisJr.118Greensbao, N.C.
Jay DeverFr.167Moaestown, N.J.
Mark FurstFr.126Columbus, Ohio
"TimGaghanSr.142Alexandria, Va.
RonGoodallFr.190Greenville, N.C.
Steve GoodeFr.158Patsmouth, Va.
'Wendell HardySo.118Patsmouth, Va.
Steve HinsonSo.l�Chariate, N.C.
Ron JeromeSo.167Adams Center, N.Y.
D.T. JoynerSo.Hwt.Nafolk, Va.
James KirbySo.134Centreville, Va.
Harry MartinFr.134Alexandria, Va.
Phil MuellaSr.167Eden, N.C.
'Paul OsmanJr.126Greenville, N.C.
Mark PetersSo.177Oak Ridge, N.C.
Bruce PaterSo.177Wat at own, N.Y.
Paul PrewittSr.158Nawich, N.Y.
Barry PurserSo.177Greenville, N.C.
Frank SchaedeFr.142Fairfax, Va.
�Paul ThapJr.150Greenville, N.C.
Kirk TuckerSo.150Gastonia, N.C.
"Jain WilliamsSr.190Greenville, N.C.
'1975-76 starter
1975-76 part-time starter
Captains-Phil MuellerPaul Prewitt Co-captains-Tim Gaohan.
Join Williams.
Head Coach-John Welban





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14
FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 1811 NOVEMBER 1976
m

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m
Hockey team places high in Deep South
ByANNEHOGGE
Staff Writer
ECU'S field hockey team won
three of its four matches in last
weekend's Deep South Field
Hookey Tournament.
The Pirates finished as one of
the top teams of the tourney.
Others in the top five were
Appalachian, Duke, UNC-G and
Winthrop. UNC-CH lost ail three
of its matches
ECU won its first match
Friday against Coker College by a
score of 6-0. Scoring was done by
Gail Bettor with three goals,
Kathy Zwigard with two and
Montai ne Swain with one.
ECU lost its second match to
UNC-G by a score of 2-0. Jill
Masterman scored both of
UNC-G" s goals.
The Pirates were victorious in
both of their matches Saturday.
Thev beat Davidson 1-0. with
Zwigard scoring ECU'S winning
goal.
ECU won its final match
against Converse College by a
score of 7-0. Zwinard orreri six
WRESTLING
Continued from page 13.)
ence champ and competed in the
nationals.
Thorp did an excellent job at
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150 and 158 last year. He won
some crucial matches during the
dual meet season, beating a
national place winner. He was
upset in the conference finals, but
went to the nationals as the
conference's wild-card berth.
Other top returnees include
Wendeil Hardy, D.T. Joyner, Tim
Gaghan, Paul Prewitt, and John
Williams.
Hardy, a sophomore 118
pounder, finished second in the
Conference championships last
year. A former Virginia state
champ, Hardy has a lot of
potential but has been bothered
of late with a strained knee. He
will miss the first couple of
tourneys this year.
Joyner, also a sophomore, is a
defensive tackle on ECU'S foot-
ball team in addition to wrestling
at the heavyweight class. Joyner
placed second in the SC last year
and is a former Virginia state
title-holder.
Gaghan, a senior co-captain,
came on at the end of last year to
place second in the 134-pound
weight class at the league meet.
He is a precision wrestler and a
good year is expected.
Prewitt, captain on this year's
team, took a second at 158 in the
Southern and is expected to have
a good year.
John Williams, a senior 190-
pounder saw considerable action
last year and should help the
team out this year.
Top newcomers include: Jay
Dever, 177; Mark Furst, 126;
Harry Martin, 134; Frank
Schaede, 142; Steve Goode, 158;
Ron Goodall, 190.
"I think some of our young
freshmen and sophomores will
have to come along by the end of
the year for us to win the
conference Welborn stated.
"We have a tradition of winning
around here and I hope it
continues
You might not see Marriott,
Whitoomb, or Radford on the mat
this year, but you will probably
see a winner for most of the year,
after some of the inexperienoe
wears off.
points with Betton adding one.
Coach Laurie Arrants said she
has "received many compliments
on the set-up of the tournament.
It was well run. I'd like to thank
the sororities and sports medicine
fa their assistance
Arrantsfeit her team "played
well, we finally pulled together.
The UNC-G match was one of our
better games, but we lost it in the
second half
Three ECU players will move
on in tournament play. Betton
was named to the Deep South
first team. Zwigard and Beth
Beam were named to the Deep
South third team.
They will play this weekend in
the Southeast Regional Field
Hockey Tournament at Winthrop
College.
Talking Sports
with Kurt Hie km an
ACTION WAS FOUGHT in last weekend's Deep South field hockey
tournament held here. Photo by Kip Sloan.
As expected, the 30 man limit on recruiting high school football
players has had quite an impact on the college football scene. The rule is
designed to keep the big schools with large budgets from dominating the
sport and so far it is working as planned. Big name schools are still
recruiting top quality athletes, but they cannot get all the ones they
would like because of the 30 limit.
This is leaving a surplus of good football players which provides
talent to other schools.
Penn St. is a good example of a big name school that has been forced
to ignore a number of fine players in favor of oonosntrating on a selected
few. In the past the Nitany Lions recruited most of Pennsylvania's top
high school football players and that state has always had a wealth of
high school talent. PSU took these players and built itself into a national
football power. With the 30 man limit now in effect PSU now has to turn
down many quality prospects. These players go elsewhere, namely
cross-state rival Pittsburg and Maryland. Has this strengthened the
programs at Pitt and Maryland, two schools whose football programs
were in poor condition a few years ago? Pitt is now tanked number one in
the nation and the Terps stand in at number seven.
NFL Playoffs Approach
The National Football League season is nine games old and the
playoff picture is beginning to develop.
In the American Football Conference, Oakland, 8-1, has just about
wrapped up the Western Division. The Raiders have a solid lead over
Denver, 5-4, and appear to have the strongest team in the conference.
An inadverdent whistle by referee Chuck Herbeiing enabled Oakland to
overtake Jack Pardee's Chicago Beers this past week, but the Raiders
seldom need such breaks to win. They probably have the best 43 man
roster in football which is nothing new fa this team.
Ted Marchibroda's young BaJtimae Colts, 8-1, should waltz to the
Central Division title. The Colts have won 16 of their last 17 regular
season games and needless to say, this team has the momentum. The
Baltimore fans, oonsidaed by many to be football's most fanatical, are
again filling Memaial Stadium and the enthusiasm in the " Moiumental
City" is unbelievable.
Cincinnati, 7-2, firmly established itself as a solid contender fa the
AFC championship with a 20-12 victay over Los AngelesMonday night.
The Bengals are young and talented. So far this year they have escaped
the injury jinx that has plagued them in the past. Cincinnati is capable of
holding off the onooming Pittsburg Steelas, who should get the
wild-card spot in the playoffs if the Bengals don't fold.
The Steelers, 5-4, have had their problems but are slowly coming
around. They have not allowed a point in their last three games and
should be a big facta in the playoffs.
The National Foaball Confaenoe races are somewhat closer with
Dallas, 8-1, Los Angeles, 6-2-1, and Minnesota, 7-1-1, leading their
divisions right now. Minnesota hasa readyvon the Central Division and
Dallas is in good shape to take the East.
Los Angeles finally has some competition in the West as the San
Francisco 49ers, 6-3, are only a half game behind the Rams. L.A. has
had quarterback problems as James Harris has never been accused of
being a top notch pro signal caller. However, the Rams are strong
defensively and this is what oounts in the long run. The wild-card
position could very well come from this division, especially if the 49ers
overtake the Rams for the divisional championship.
The NFC East is the most balanced division in the NFL Avoiding a
collapse, Dallas will win it. St. Louis, 7-2, and Washington, 6-3 will
battle either Los Angeles a San Francisco fa the wild-card Bah the
Cardinals and Redskins are faced with the same problem, numerous
injuries and a tough remaining schedule.
Who will play in the Super Bowl XI on January 9 in Pasadena?
Statistically the two best teams in their respective conferences right now
are Dallas and Baltimore. However, statistics don't mean a thing At
least 10 teams have a good chance to daim the title of Wald ChamDion
for 1976. ���!���
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52. NO. 1811 NOVEMBER 1976
15
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M
VIVIAN PIERCE shows excellent form on a front
kick. A member of the ECU Karate Club, Vivian is a
second degree black belt and national champion in
her class. Intramural photo.)
KARATE
Continued from page 13.
beginners, intermediates and non-competitive ad-
vanced students.
The beginners make up about 60 percent of the
club membership. They are mainly learning Karate
for self-defense or conditioning and about two-thirds
of these members will continue into the intermediate
class.
The intermediate class consists of about 25
percent of the club membership and is composed
mainly of those students working to attain belt
ranks.
The final 15 peroent is the advanced class. These
students are seeking a better knowledge of the art of
Karate. Of these advanoed students, about 25-35
will work on the competitive team.
"The largest problems we have with the dub is
not having enough room or money said
McDonald. "This isn't meant to sound like sour
grapes, it's just a fact
For the first time this year the Karate Club is
receiving some financial support from the Intra-
mural department.
"The competitive student needs to train daily
and there just isn' t enough room fa them to do so
continued McDonald. "Money is a problem because
we need it to travel to the meets with the
competition team. For example, the nationals will be
in California this year but we don't have the money
to send a full team out there. Consequently, we
probably won't oompete at all
Nonetheless, McDonald said the success of the
team has caused i1 to grow a lot over the years and
serve several other useful purposes.
"Our club seems to have helped a lot of people
said McDonald. "Of oourse there is the self-
defense. There have been two reported cases where
women students have protected themselves from
rape by using what they learned in class against
their assailants.
The club has had a decided effect on the lives of
many people added McDonald. "For some it
builds up their confidence and helps to relieve
everyday tension and curb aggression. For others it
is a form of everyday exercise and conditioning
McDonald is quick to say that conditioning is
important to anyone interested in getting the most
out of Karate and its benefits.
"Karate competitors must be in extremely good
condition. They must do all sorts of exercises for
every part of the body, as well as bag work with their
moves, kicks and punches
The ECU Karate Club practices the GOJU-
SHORIN style of Karate, which involves continual
repetition to learn the correct moves. The moves are
MKi n� � imiw i' i mi m i i u
done over and over again for perfection that
eventually will help them in the two levels of
competition, sparring and Kata.
Sparring is done against an opponent. Scoring is
based on landing a kick or a punch without the
opponent blocking it. Competitors spar for three
minutes and the fighter with the most points is
declared the winner.
"In sparring a man may have to fight ten times
before winning the title McDonald points out,
"and even then it isn't really contact sparring
Contact sparring involves the use of gloves and
boots to cushion the oontact of the blow so as not to
injure the competitor and generally can be stratched
to go more than one round. In regulation sparring a
blow is achieved when a move ends up within two
inches of the opponent's body, without hitting the
opponent.
The "Kata" is a routine using different
sequences to depict an imaginary fight. In a sense a
Kata is like a skater's routine in ice skating or a
gymnast's floor exercise. The Kata is scored on the
basis of balance, power, technique, knowledge of
form, weapon control and eye control.
"It takes hours and hours of practice to perfect
one's Kata explained McDonald. "Most com-
petitors have to practive everyday and the higher the
belt rank, the more intricate the scoring becomes,
but you always compete on your own level
Beyond competition McDonald adds there have
been many members of the dub who have reached
the level of Black Belt. McDonald himself is a
fifth-degree black belt (there are 10 degrees of black
belt). Vicki Morrow, the dub's President, is a
second degree black belt and a past national
champion. McDonald said there were currently
several black belts within the dub's ranks.
McDonald feels that those not competing and
achieving high belt ranks can still get a lot from the
study of Karate.
"I feel anyone willing to put the time and the
effort into learning Karate can learn it said
McDonald. "And it can be very worthwhile in that it
helps to relieve tension and give i person
self-oonfidence. It is also a year-round adivity so it
is a good form of getting exerdse throughout the
year. I think if more people know about Karate its
popularity would catch on
Maybe now more people know about Karate.
PLAYOFFSCHEDULE
Monday 8:45
Scott Dry Heaves vs. Scott Players
Umstead Voilies vs. Soott 76ers
Pi Kappa Phi (A) vs. Pi Lambda Phi
Kappa Alpha (A) vs. Tau Kappa Epsilon (A)
Volley Follies vs. Sediment Stompers
AFROTC vs. Phi Epsilon Kappa
CLASSIFIEDS
MENWOMEN!
JOBS ON SHIPS! American.
Foreign. No experience required.
Excellent pay. Worldwide travel.
Summer job or career. Send $3.00
for information SEA FAX, Dept.
Boc 2049, Port Angeles, Was-
hington 98362.
NEED A PAPER TYPED? Call
Alice, 757-6366 or 758-0497.
Eight years of experience. I need
the money. Only 50 cents a page.
USED 8 track tapes, variety of
rock by Bob Dylan, Elton John,
Led Zeppelin and others. $2.50
each or lot of 45 for 185.00.
If you have something to buy 758-1314 after 5 p.m.
or sell come to the Red Oak Show
and Sell; We sell on consignment FOR SALE: Sony 6046 A 20 watt
anything of value, excluding receiver. 6 mo. old $190.00.
clothing. Open Mon. - Sat. 758-7884.
11:00-6 00 Sun. 2-6, dosed Thurs.
Located 3 miles west of
Greenville at the intersedion of
264and Farmville Highway in the
pld Red Oak church building.
LOST- Tortise-shell glasses in a
black padded case. Lost on
Thursday of last week. Please
contad Smitty 756-5394.
HELP-Two girls need ride to
Tupelo, Mississippi fa Thanks-
giving. Will share expenses. Call
Kathy (752-8180) a Lucy (756-
1263).
PIANO AND GUITAR lessons.
Daily and evenings. Richard J.
Knapp, B.A. 756-3908.
FOR SALE: Soundesign 8-Track
tape deck, stereo headphone jack,
two Soundesign speakers indu-
ded, excellent condition. $50.00
Call 752-9550.
FOR SALE :1974 Yamaha
DT125A. Only 1600 miles. Used
as commuter, never in dirt. Gal
756-7275.
NEEDED: Female student with
auto 2 hrs. dai I y fran 1 30 to 3 30
FOUND: Man's watch at dub t0 Pick UP 2 boys at Wahl-Coats
football game Sunday, Od. 10. on sit witn tnem until 3:3�- Gas
intramural field. Call 752-8825.
Do you have problems? Do
you need a caring listener? Call
758-2047.
WANTED-Female roommate to
share 3-bedroom traila located at
Shady Knoll. Rent $50 plus
utilities. Call 758-9577 after 3:00.
FOR SALE: Fast back Mustang,
302 V-8, automatic, AM radio &
tape, Mags. $1000.00. 756-1857
any afternoon a night.
FOR SALE: AR2AX loud speak-
ers. $220.00. Excellent conditioi.
Serious inquiries only. 758-5150.
LOST: Checkbook with dark
brown textured oover, Biff a
Karen Brean, oi Od. 20 in the
vidnity of Austin. 758-4126.
FOR SALE: BSR Auto-Manual
turntable equipped with cueing,
anti-skate, new stylus. I35.00.
409 B-Belk.
RIDING LESSONS: International
balanoed seat taught by qualified
professional on your own hase.
Hunters, eventing, dressage.
Regina Kear 758-4706. Free
Kittens.
will be furnished and pay will be
discussed. Call 758-9467 between
12 and 1 M-F only.
RENT: Private and semi-private
rooms with kitchen privileges-
available Winter-Spring terms.
756-2459.
FOR SALE-1966 Jeep Wagoneer
4 wheel Dr. Mech. good, body
fair, asking $700, 758-1083.
NEED TYPING? Call Gail Joyner
at 756-1062 fa professional typ-
ing and related services. All wak
guaranteed!
FOR SALE: 1969 Fa Fairlane.
Good oondition. Priced to go. Call
756-1906.
SUPER DEAL: Sony HST-110
Receiver, BSR 8 track player,
recorder, deck, Garrard X-10
turntable, 2 Woodstock air sus-
pension speakers. Excellent con-
ditioi. $200.00. Matt 758-3763.
FOR SALE: Stereo - Pioneer SX
1250,160 watts RMS per channel.
Sony TC-580 remote control servo
switching reel to reel with mic
SMALL SCALE masonry, brick,
block, conaete repair a aiginal and line mixing.
wak. Rex Bost 758-7569.
Yamaha FG-200 LOST: Contad Lenses in a green
FOR SALE
Aoooustic Guitar-well cared fa
case. Between Brewster and
m
m
Case, leather strap, new predsion vard, Albert McMicken,
shaler machine heads and many 758-5074.
other extras. $135.00. 758-7690.
FOR RENT: Effiaency apartment
MEDITATION- Want to learn
meditation without the high price
itihties furnished across of atmosphere. Complete instruo-
from college, 758-2585. Com- tjons $3.00. Monaco, P.O. Box
pletely furnished with air cond-
itioning.
NEEDED: Female roommate fa
large condominum. $50.00
month. Freedom of house in
exchange fa light housekeeping
duties. Pool, tennis courts and
sauna available. Board not In-
ducted. 756-5423.
2593, Greenville, N.C.
FEMALE ROOMATE NEEDED:
To share two bedroom apart-
ment; two blocks from campus,
704D East Third St. If I'm not
home leave your name and phone
number, so I can call you back.
H'Wi





16
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1811 NOVEMBER 1976
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Title
Fountainhead, November 11, 1976
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 11, 1976
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.424
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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