Fountainhead, November 4, 1976






THIS ISSUE -
12 PA GES
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over 50 years
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CIRCULATION-
8,5UU
VOL 52, NO. 16
4 NOVEMBER 1976
Pres. vetoes BUCCANEER bill
EMPTY is the wad to describe the BUCCANEER
office after the staff vacated Tuesday at 4 p. m. The
staff resigned Monday night at the SGA Legislature
meeting. Photo by Russ Pogue)
Major Attractions loses
on Homecoming events
By LOUIS TA YLOR
Staff Writer
Due to large losses incurred in providing
entertainment for Homecoming weekend, the
Student Union Major Attractions committee may be
limited in its ability to produce quality entertain-
ment for the remainder of the year, according to Bob
Seraiva, chairperson.
In a Major Attractions meeting Tuesday, Seraiva
announced the loss for the weekend was approx-
imately $27,000
The committee lost $8,000 on the Judy Collins
show earlier. The balance is about $7,000.
With only $7,000 left, the committee must now
operate "somewhat conservatively according to
Seraiva.
Seraiva called the loss incredible but he said
Major Attractions "can compensate
Seraiva is looking forward to a "big turnout" for
the Leon and Mary Russell-Richie Furay show this
Sunday, November 7, at 8 p.m.
He called Leon Russell a "great talent
pointirg out that he has sold out the Spectrum in
Philadelphia, which is quite an l accomplishment.
Seraiva said that the controversy surrounding
the SGA's attempt to provide extra Homecoming
entertainment may have been partially responsible
for the low attendance at the Student Union
sponsored shows.
Viewing this as a "strategic attempt at gaining
recognition Seraiva said they may have "created a
negative atmosphere" around the scheduled shows.
Seraiva admitted that though the shows provided
were "fine talents in their own right they may
have been aimed at an audience that was too
diversified for this area.
He continued that the saturation of local
entertainment in such a short time span may have
limited student budgets, thus detracting from the
attendance.
Though the oommittee has been limited, the
B.B.King et. al. show previously scheduled for
December will not be affected, according to Ken
Hammond, of the Mendenhall program board and
advisor to Major Attractions.
Task Force looks
for alternative
By DEBBIE JACKSON
Co-News Editor
and DA VID NASH
SGA Correspondent
SGA President Tim Sullivan yesterday vetoed the appropriation bill
for ECU'S annual, the BUCCANEER.
Greg Pingston, SGA vice-president said that the reasons for the veto
were (1) that there was no staff and (2) that the money is needed
elsewhere.
Pingston also noted that Sullivan heard responses from a number of
the BUCCANEER staff Tuesday.
"We have chosen an Annual Publications Task Force which I will
head said Pingston.
"The Task Foroe is designed to evaluate the need of any form of
annual publication or to oome up with an alternative to help the student
body
Pingston said that he had chosen the members who will begin work
next week.
The Task Force will make recommendations to Pingston who will
refer them to Sullivan. The final decision rests with Sullivan.
The oommittee which represents a cross-section of the students will
report to Sullivan on Nov. 17, according to Pingston.
"We are hoping to oome up with some quality publication or
publications that will not require such an outrageous amount of the
students' money as was called for by the BUCCANEER editor said
Pingston.
According to Pingston the final budget appropriated by the SGA
Legislature cut $4,000 out of the budget proposed by the BUCCANEER.
"In my opinion, that amount of cut would not call for the emotional
resignation of the entire BUCCANEER staff said pingston.
Monika Sutherland, BUCCANEER editor, responded positively to
the veto.
"I guess it is the best move, because the budget appropriated to us
was insufficient. It was the only move that President Sullivan had said
Sutherland.
"I would still go back if we got the money and if we were wanted
Sutherland said that if the staff published an annual with less money
than they asked the Appropriations Committee for, it would be smaller
than what the students are used to.
I believe that if we put out a book it should be at least equal to, if not
better than the '76 BUCCANEER Sutherland added.
Sutherland said that she believed $67,000 is "a reasonable amount to
put in a book
The BUCCANEER staff resigned Monday night and was notified by
Sullivan on Tuesday that they were to evacuate their office by 4 p.m
according to Sutherland.
"We were told to leave all materials and equipment, and if any
damages were discovered we would have to go before the Honor
Council.
"We were also told that the locks on the office doors would be
changed said Sutherland.
According to Sutherland, photos are still being taken, but she doesn' t
know how students will pick up their annuals.
Heavy voter turnout favors Jimmy Carter
By JACK LAIL
Staff Writer
Heavy voter turnout and Jim-
my Carter's " southerness" were
the deciding factors in Tuesday's
election said two ECU professors.
"I am very happy with the
resultsof the election said Mrs.
Janice Faulkner, an English
professor active in the Democratic
party.
"National registration is two
to one in favor of the Democrats,
so a heavy voter turnout is more
likely to help Democrats get
votes
"I think Carter's southern
appeal was sincere and genuine.
Carter pulled the South together
said Dr. John East, Political
Science professor who served as a
delegate to the Republican con-
vention. "I think the large voter
turnout worked to Carter's advan-
tage
Had Mississippi not come
through fa Carter he would not
have been elected, commented
Faulkner.
"I think that a northern
Democrat like Hubert Humphrey
or Walter Mondale would have
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made the Republicans more com-
petitive in the south and they
could have carried several south-
ern states said East. "There
were a lot of factors affecting the
election
"There was no turning point
in the campaign in N.C. or the
south said East.
"He is not any different from
any other aspirant for the presi-
dency said Faulkner. "If
Watergate was an issue, it was an
unspoken one
Carter is indebted to organ-
ized labor, big cities, and blacks,
nwi ii n vmmmmm0mm
according to East.
"In order to pay for all the
things he's promised, somebody
has to pay fa it, which means
higha taxes a barowing which
will cause inflation said East.
"There will be a tremendous
push fa financial aid fa labor,
big cities, and blacks
"As Bob Dole said, 'hang onto
your pocketbooks
Domestic politics will change
but faeign policy will remain
about the same, commented East.
"Carter got the Democratic
nonination by himself and then
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the party helped him said
Faulkna.
President Fad has renoered
a service to the country as intaim
president said Faulkner. "He
served to calm panic and held
cyncism down afta Watagate
"I couldn't support him be-
cause I think he lacked the
intellect to run the oountry. He's
a very decent man she said.
Democrats swept the guber-
natorial and lieutenant guber-
nataial races and all eight council
of state contests by better than 60
per cent of the vote.





2
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 164 NOVEMBER 1976
news
Ballet
New York
Free flick
Game Buses Junk festival
The oldest ballet company in
the U.S the Atlanta Ballet, will
perform in MoGinnis Auditorium
Nov. 9 and 10 1976. Tickets are
available at the Central Ticket
Office. The performances are
sponsored by the Student Union
Theatre Arts Committee, the
people that brought you "Don't
Bother Me, I Cant Cope Danoe
will wake up your life!
Car Wash
A car wash sponsored by
Phi Sigma Pi national honor
fraternity will be held at Pitt Plaza
Exxon Saturday, Nov. 6 starting
at 10 a.m.
Leon Live
Do you like to boogie, or
rook-n-roll? Don't miss the new
Leon & Mary Russell show with
the Richie Furay Band, Sunday
Nov. 7. Student tickets are $4.00
and public tickets $6.00. An
inexpensive investment for four
hours of quality music and
showmanship.
Hockey Tourney
ECU Athletics would like to
weloome to the campus the 1976
Deep South Field Hockey Tour-
nament. The Tournament is sche-
duled for Nov. 6, 7, 8 behind
Allied Health. Tournament time
is8:30 a.m. to 4 JO p.m.
Eighteen teams from North
Carolina, South Carolina and
Georgia will be competing for
regional playoffs.
There will be a daily .25
admission fee. Concessions will
be available also.
Dinner Theatre
Coming soon! The first Men-
denhall Student Center Dinner
Theatre! Stuart Aronson is put-
ting together a dynamite show of
The Odd Couple plus a dinner
that will put your tastebuds in
ecstasy. Get tickets now at the
Central Ticket Office in Menden-
hall for one of four shows,
November 11-14. A M.S.C. Pro-
duction.
Glee club
Men interested in singing in
the ECU Men's Glee Club, please
contact Mr. Naff, School of Music
B-205, 757-6982. The group will
rehearse from 1-1:50 p.m
MTTH, and will carry 1 hour
credit per quarter.
There will be an orientation
meeting for a Student Union New
York City trip participants Mon. 7
7:30 Pm in tne Multi-purpose
rm Mendenahll. Attendance is
required. If there are conf I ids call
the Student Union Offioe 757-
6611 ext. 210.
Piano Duet
The Contiguglia Brothers, a
masterful piano duo will perform
in Mendenhall Student Center
Theatre, Wednesday night Nov.
10 at 8.00 p.m. Thanks to the,
Student Union Artists Series
Committee, the follies that
brought you the Guarneri String
Quartet! Tickets are available at
the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall.
Animals
The animals available for
adoption this week include a
white kitten, a tabby cat, two
brown and white mixed shephard
puppies, a tan and white mixed
breed, and a brown dog.
The people at Animal Control
would like to extend an invitation
to all interested persons to oome
by and visit the Shelter. The
shelter is located on 2nd Street,
off Cemetery road. They would
appreciate it and so would the
animals.
WRC
The Women's Resident Coun-
cil held a meeting Tues Nov. 2 at
5 p.m. in Mendenhall Student
Center. On the agenda
were: the proposed budget for teh
7677 year, Homecoming publi-
city, float and finances and
Committee Reports. The execu-
tive committee will meet Mon
Nov. 8 at 330 p.m. in Dean
Smith's offioe. The next WRC
meeting will be Tues Nov. 9th at
5 p.m. in Mendenhall.
Coffeehouse
The Coffeehouse Ministry be-
gins its 76 season on November 5
with Local Talent Night. The
entertainment for the rest of the
month is as follows: Nov. 12th-
Faith; Nov. 27th-Sam & Shannon;
Dec. 3rd-Mike Coggins in Con-
cert.
On Oct. 5 & 6 in Mendenhall
Student Theatre the Mendenhall
Student Union Films Committee
will present "The Way We
Were" starring Robert Redford
and Barbra Streisand. Laugh
again. Cry Again. Make sure you
see this tender love story. A
definite must! Admission: ID &
activity Card. Shows at 7 and 9
p.m.
Crusade
Campus crusade for Christ
will meet this Thur. night at 7 p.m
in Brewster 201-D. Come join us
for fun in the Son.
SGA buses will leave Menden-
hall Saturday Nov. 6, at 7 a.m. fa
the Richmond game. The buses
will leave directly after the game.
PsiChi Fry
Psi Chi will have its first
annual fish fry on Sunday, Nov. 7.
All psychology majors and psy-
chology staff members are in-
vited. Mark your calendar now
and watch the Psi Chi bulletin
boards and the FOUNTAINHEAD
for details. Student tickets will go
on sale Tuesday, Oct. 26 in the
Psi Chi Library.
Gamma Beta Phl A,Pha
Gamma Beta Phi national
honor society and service to
education organization will meet
Thursday Nov. 4, at 7 p.m. in rm.
244, Mendenhall, for a very
important business meeting. This
will be the last regular meeting of
the quarter. All members are
urged to attend.
Phi Alpha Theta honor frater-
nity will meet Tues Nov. 9 at
730 p.m. in the Richard Todd
room, Brewster D-110. New
members will be inducted and all
unpaid fees should be paid at this
time. All members are encour-
aged to attend. Plans must be
made for the annual Christmas
party.
Sally Spring Grad exams
The amazing Sally Spring will
appear 8 & 9 p.m. Nov. 5-6 in
MendenhaJI Student Center Prioe
is .25. Sponsored by the Student
Union Coffeehouse Committee.
Home Ec
The American Home Econo-
mics Association will hold its
regular monthly meeting on Mon.
Nov. 8 at 7 p.m. in the Home Ec.
Social Room. Mrs. Carol Stevens,
natural childbirth teacher, will be
in charge of the program. All
members and home ec majors are
invited.
Graduate Record Examina-
tions will be offered at ECU Sat.
Dec. 11. Application blanks are to
be completed and mailed to
Educational Testing Service, Box
966-R, Princeton, NJ 08540 to
arrive by Nov. 10. Applications
may be obtained from the Testing
Center, Rooms 105-106, Speight
Building.
Yardsale
FG
YARDSALE! Students who
have been in Greenville 6 yrs.
wish to sell accumulated wealth:
thousands of records, a drafting
table, clothes, furniture and more
exciting paraphanelia. Sat Nov.
6 at 201 S. Library St.
Dan Coutcher, Assistant Di-
rector of the Forever Generation,
will speak at this Friday night's
meeting of the Forever Genera-
tion, ECU. We enoourage you to
join us for an interesting and
profitable time of fellowship and
Bible study. The meeting will
start at 7:30 p.m. in Mendenhall
244.
ACT
Entertainment Sierra Club
The Student Union Special
Entertainment Committee will
meet intheS.U. lounge on Tues
Nov. 9, at 4 p.m.
The Sierra Club will meet
Nov. 8 at the First Presbyterian
Church en Elm St. at 800. The
meeting is informal. Everybody is
weloome!
Two nationally-standardized
tests will be administered at ECU
Nov. 20, the Allied Health
Professions Admissions Test and
the American College Testing
(ACT) Assessment.
Applications to take either test
are available at the ECU Testing
Center, 105-106 Speight Building,
ECU.
Applicants for the Allied
Health test should complete and
mail their applications to the
Psychological Corp P.O. Box
3540 Grand Central Station, New
York, N.Y. 10017 toarrive by Oct.
25.
The Roxy Music Arts and
Crafts Center will present the
Second Annual Junk Trades
Festival this Saturday. There will
be food, music, and many "dia-
monds in the rough so go to the
Roxy, at 629 Albemarle Avenue,
and ENJOY!
Seminar
Walter H. Puterbaugh, pro-
fessor of chemistry at UNC-G will
present a chemistry seminar on
"The Effect of the Metallic Catiou
in Certain Organic Reactions
Involving Strong Bases Nov. 5,
2 p.m. in Flanagan 201. Refresh-
ments will be served in the
Conference Room at 3 p.m.
One-Acts
The Theatre Workshop of the
ECU Playhouse presents two
one-acts by Tennesee Williams,
Thursday, Nov. 4-Saturday, Nov.
6 at 8.O0p.m.
The shows are HELLO
FROM BERTHA and THE LADY
OF LARKSPUR LOTION, and will
be presented in "The Other
Theatre opposite Drama 206.
Admission is free.
Bahai Faith
Bahai Faith : "Equality of
men and women" Baha'u'llah
gave the world this principle 100
years ago. If you would like to
find out more about these teach-
ings come to room 238 in
Mendenhall, 8.30 Thurs. night.
There will be someone there to
talk with you.
Manuscripts
The dosing date fa the
submission of manuscripts by
College Students is Nov. 5. Any
student attending either junior or
senior oollege iseligible to submit
his verse. There is no limitation
as to form or theme. Shorter
works are preferred because of
space limitations.
Each poem must be TYPED or
PRINTED on a separate sheet,
and must bear the NAME and
HOME ADDRESS of the student,
and the COLLEGE ADDRESS as
well. Manuscripts should be sent
to the OFFICE OF THE PRESS.
Crafts Center
The M SC Crafts Center is now
open. Located on the ground
floor, the Crafts Center hours are
2:00 p.m. until 10.00 p.m.
Discover new worlds within!
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FOUNTAiNHEADVOL 52, NO. 164 NOVEMBER 1976
3

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LungAssoc: We mind
very much if you smoke
By LARRY UEBERMAN
Staff Writer
The issue of smoking in the
classroom is often a heated one. It
comes up periodically each year.
Just to set the record straight,
here is the official ECU policy.
"Smoking is prohibited in all
classrooms on the campus of
ECU according to Rosie Griffin,
secretary to the provost.
Lorey H. White, of the
Eastern Lung Association and a
graduate student at ECU is
ooncerned about the amount of
smoking that goes on in class-
rooms.
White said that students
should not have to put up with
second hand smoke, the smoke
from the burning end of a
cigarette and the exhaled smoke.
"Smoking is not socially
acceptable anymore said
White. "The overall percentage
of smokers has dropped
"Because the population has
increased, so has the number of
smokers, but the percentage of
male smokers in 1964 was 52.4
as oompared to 39 in 1975
said White.
Most smokers have tried to
stop, according to the Lung
Association. Six out of ten would
stop if they could and another
three would if there was an easy
way, said White.
Second hand smoke has more
chemicals in it than inhaled
smoke.
Some of the most hazardous
oompounds in smoke are tar,
niootine, carbon monoxide, cad-
mium, and nitrogen dioxide,
according to the American Lung
Association.
"Even when a smoker in-
hales, researchers have calcula-
ted that two-thirds of the smoke
from a burning cigarette goes into
the environment.
"The amount of carbon mon-
oxide generated from one cigar is
twice as much as three cigarettes
smoked simultaneously. The car-
bon monoxide robs the blood of
oxygen and the niootine narrows
the blood vessels.
"Inhaling seoond hand smoke
makes the heart beat faster, steps
up the blood pressure, and raises
the level of carbon monoxide in
the nonsmoker's blood
One study shows that the
smoke from nine cigars in half an
hour polluted the air as much as
the smoke from 42 cigarettes.
Both types of pollution raised the
level of carbon monoxide above
safety limits for workers in
industry, according to the Ameri-
can Lung Association.
White said students are re-
quired to sit in a classroom if they
want credit but they shouldn't be
required to inhale other people's
smoke.
"People are beginning to be
more serious in their objections to
people smoking near them said
White. "Now they say, yes I mind
if you smoke
The Lung Association says
there are millions of people,
children and adults, who are
sensitive to tobaooo smoke and
suffer smoke-caused asthma at-
tacks.
Through researoh the Lung
Association has found that the
human body attracts smoke.
Burning tobacco smoke creates a
high electrical potential and the
body whioh is water-filled has a
low one.
STUDENTS ignore anti-smoking policy. Photo by Russ Pogue
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4
FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 164 NOVEMBER 1976
m


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An annual farce DON'T CALL US, WEU CRLL YOU
The resignation of the BUCCANEER staff in toto
Tuesday provides an exoellent opportunity to
examine the needs of and purposes for the ECU
yearbook.
Complete blame fa what happened at last
Monday's meeting of the legislature cannot be
squarely fixed upon either a parsimonious SGA or a
reactionary BUCCANEER staff. Perhaps the real
fault lies with the system by which the yearbook is
produoed.
This year, as in years past, the BUCCANEER
covering last year's events came back from the
printer and was available to students several weeks
before the budget fa the 1976-77 yearbook was
considered. At no time during the previous 12
months did the SGA have a chance to sautinize the
progress and content of the BUCCANEER (unless
there had been a budgeting erra last year and the
staff needed mae maiey). Unlike FOUNTAIN-
HEAD, which is published twice weekly and
therefae open to periodic aiticism, the BUC-
CANEER is a love-it-a ieave-it proposition.
The decision by the legislature was superficially
motivated by a desire to wisely appropriate student
funds. What was conspicuously lacking from the
budget-cutting action was an indication of the kind
of yearbook that the SGA demands-except, of
course, one which has mae coverage of the Student
Government.
Constructive criticism requires at least a basic
knowledge of the way a yearbook is put together.
The legislature, now that the Publications Board is
defunct, iseven mae responsible fa understanding
the nuances of yearbook production in ader to make
an appropriation which will buy the kind of yearbook
students want and can affad.
But the extent of the legislature's dislike fa the
last yearbook and its lack of expertise is reflected by
their punishing appropriation.
Nevertheless, now is the time fa the legislature
to obtain fa itself the savoir faire once provided by
the Publications Board.
Now is the time to saap the idea of an "annual"
fa sanething mae modern, perhaps even avant
garde.
Instead of publishing one book annually as a
recad of the year's events, the BUCCANEER could
produce two a mae publications per year on a
magazine famat. The longevity of the publication
would be oomparable to a hard-bound book but
thousands of dollars less expensive.
Fbunfainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for war titty years
Senior EditorJim Elliott
Production ManagerJimmy Williams
Advertising ManagerDennis Leonard
News EditorsDebbie Jackson
Neil Sessoms
Trends EditorPat Coyle
Sports EditorSteve Wheeler
Fountainnead is the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Student Government Association
of ECU and appears each Tuesday and Thursday during the
school year, weekly during the summer.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C.
27834.
Editorial Offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions: SIO.vO annually tor non-students, $6.00 for
alumni.
Budget cuts explained
To the Fountainnead:
As a member of the Appro-
priations Committee, I would like
to explain some of the reasons for
the outs to the Bug's budget.
First, the SGA does not have
the surplus money this year as it
has had in recent years past. If
the Appropriations Committee
passed out every bill to the floor
of the legislature with no cuts at
all, there is little doubt the SGA
would be operating in the red by
the end of the year.
The Buc bill was brought
before the legislature the second
week it met. It then went to the
Appropriations oommittee which
met the following Monday. Due to
lack of time (the committee met at
4.00 and the SGA started at 5 00)
the Buc budget was postponed till
Thursday On Thursday the
oommittee was ready to go over
the bill, but no one from the
Buccaneer showed up. The print-
ing cost at that time was
54,500.00. The following Mon-
day, Monika Sutherland came
before the SGA and said that she
needed $4,000 more because of a
rise in printing cost from that
week alone! This extra money
would not have been needed if the
Buc staff had been at the
Committee meeting on Thursday.
Miss Sutherland stated in the
SGA meeting, November 1st, that
she was "unaware" of the
meeting. It seems to me that
someone who is asking for
66,010.00 of the students money
should make it a point to find out
when her budget comes before
Appropriations.
The editor's salary was cut
from $1,200 to $1,000 a year.
Every executive officer of the
SGAhascut their salaries, includ-
ing the President's which has
been cut $25 a month. The Buc's
editor was also cut $25 a month.
The Greek Editor was cut and
put under the Organizations
Editor, which received a raise of
$25 a month ($75 a month and
$600 a year). The assistant Sports
Editor was cut, but the Women's
Sports Editor, which was a new
position as of last year, was kept.
This leaves two Editors for
Sports. For staffers, last year the
Buc asked for $3,225. This year
they ask for $5,640. This included
a new assistant editor and $2,200
for free lance writing. We cut the
assistant editor entirely out (a
salary of $800 a year) and $1600
out of free lance, leaving $600.
The salaries of all staffers run
for eight months. In the Greek
section for instance, there are 19
groups. These groups have their
pictures made and they are
turned in to the Buc along with a
fact sheet listing their doings
during the year. The Greek editor
transforms this fact sheet into a
small paragraph and layouts the
pictures. For this he was paid
$400. Jamie Austria, former
Greek Editor, said himself before
the SGA that there were a lot of
weeks where the only thing to do
was small busy work and the
answering of telephones in the
WP
office. If this is true, then why
were there so many organiza-
tions, with pictures in the Buc,
but no write-up?
I know an annual is a very
huge task to tackle, but cuts have
to be made if the student's SGA is
to run in the black instead of the
red. The Committee spent three
hours going over this budget. The
Fountainhead reported it was in
closed session. Let me inform the
Fountainnead that every organi-
zation that comes before Appro-
priations is given the right to fully
explain its bill before the full
oommittee and then is asked to
leave the room while debate
between the members is taking
place. The organization is then
asked back into the oommittee
where it can witness the vote
taken on the bill.
The students who you elected
to SGA stood behind us in our
decisions. I hope there will be a
Buc fa this year, because I enjoy
it, but let me also remind you that
in a recent SGA survey, the Buc
placed sixth on a list of impor-
tance to the students.
Signed,
Tommy Joe Payne
Day Student Representative
Appropriations Committee
P.S. If you will notice, all cutsthat
'were made were in salaries. From
this, one would have to assume
that the entire Buc staff quit over
the amount of money they were
paid.





FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 164 NOVEMBER 1976
5
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TheForum
Do you want a yearbook?
ToFOUNTAINHEAD:
Since I am among those who
resigned from the BUCCANEER
staff earlier this week, I believe I
owe all of you an explanation for
my action.
As you know, the SGA Appro-
priations Committee cut the bud-
get of the BUCCANEER
$5,786.00 from the previous year,
even after hearing that printing
costs alone had risen by more
than $2,500.00. Not only did the
Appropriations Committee cut
the BUCCANEER budget finan-
cially, they took it upon them-
selves to dictate what staff
positions the BUCCANEER could
not have. The position of Greek
Editor was deleted, leaving one
person responsible for covering
more than 150 organizations, a
virtually impossible task. The
position of assistant editor was
eliminated, leaving the full task of
supervising all aspects of pro-
duction of the yearbook to the
editor. The Appropriations Com-
mittee also made other damaging
cuts.
As for my decision to resign, I
must attribute this to my faith in
the editor of the BUCCANEER.
She has had six years of yearbook
experience, three of which were
as editor of a yearbook. I would
deem her infinitely more capable
than the SGA in determining the
amount of money necessary to
produce a yearbook of which the
student body can be proud. Not
one of the members of the SGA,
to my knowledge, could under-
stand all that is necessary to
produce a yearbook.
So I have chosen to no longer
work for the BUCCANEER, not
simply because the SGA didn't
appropriate the amount of money
the BUCCANEER staff asked for,
but because I don want to be
associated with the poor quality
yearbook which will result from
the present butchered budget.
Certainly we must admire to
an extent the thriftiness of the
Appropriations Committee. This
letter is not meant to undermine
their integrity. Too, it must be
realized that the SGA has to fund
other campus organizations and
that its finances are limited. But
the budget requested by the
BUCCANEER staff is a cut-to-
the-bone amount. Anything less
than that would, in one way or
another, diminish the quality of
the book. Do you deserve a
aibstandard book after having
How 'bout compromising?
I'm writing to try and get a
compromise between SGA legis-
lature and the ECU yearbook
BUCCANEER over the BUC-
CANEER'S budget.
I have been speaking with
SGA officials and the yearbook
staff trying to find some middle
ground for a compromise.
The BUCCANEER staff is
willing to return to work if they
can add $4,000 to printing, $600
assistant editor, $400 freelance
photography and writers, $200 for
Greek editor, $320 layout persons
which totals $5,520 that would
give a total new proposed budget
of $66,710. The editor and
assistant have both taken a pay
cut of $25 a month to keep this
budget to the bare minimum and
put out a quality yearbook out for
ECU students. They (ECU
students) deserve it. All I ask
now is that the SGA legislature
take a look and give a little -
please!
Scott Bright
Quality is not cheap
ToFOUNTAINHEAD:
It is our belief that the SGA
has too much authority. Who
gives them the right to decide
without prior knowledge as to
what activities and procedures
should go on within the BUC-
CANEER office and positions
are necessary? It has often been
said that one is not known to be
ignorant until he opens his mouth
and removes that doubt, by
taking this action of slashing the
BUCCANEER funds.
We feel that the students
should be made aware that they
have already paid $10.00 (TEN
DOLLARS) for the BUCCANEER
of 1977. It seems they have paid
for something they may never
receive. If you want your year-
book, let it be known to the SGA.
Ask for a refund of your $10.00
(TEN DOLLARS) or your BUC-
CANEER of 1977. Quality does
not come cheap. The cheapest is
mcst frequently the worst.
Former Buc staff members
Maria Rice
Ricky Lee
Deloris Roberson
Forum Policy
Forum letters should be
typed or printed and they must
be signed and include the
writer's address. Names will
be withheld upon request.
Letters may be sent to Foun-
tainhead or left at the Informa-
tion Desk in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
paid your activity fees?
I would like to think that our
legislators are open to recom-
mendations from their constit-
uencies. I urge each of you
students to suggest to your
legislators that our proposed
budget be reinstated. The SGA
cannot deny your desires.
I'm sure that I speak fa all of
the former staff members when I
say that we wanted to produce a
yearbook of which you and we
oould be proud. To do this,
though, you must make the SGA
aware that you, the students,
want such ayearbook; and that the
BUCCANEER budget must first
be approved. Your support is
absolutely necessary.
Thank you,
RobBenton
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6
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO 164 NOVEMBER 1976
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Your Student Govcn
SGA EXECUTIVE COUNCIL
Tim Sullivan, President758-5963
Greg Pingston, Vice President756-2509
Tommy Thomason, Treasurer758-4290
David Whitson
Freshman President
Valerie Chaffin
Sophomore President758-3386
Craig Hales
Junior President758-7640
Lynn Schubert
Senior President752-5035
SGA CABINET
John Jones
Attorney General758-8592
Tim McLeod
Sec. of Academic Affairs752-5325
Kim Taylor
Sec. of Public Relations758-3386
Marshall McAden
Sec. of Minority Affairs
Beverly Barnes
Sec. of Information758-4290
Ray Hudson
Sec. of Student Welfare
Gary Miller
Transit Manager752-9121
Charles Garland
Public Defender752-9148
Stephen Reed Warren
Public Defender752-8982
RULESANDJUDICIARY
Karen Harloe,Day758-0780
Chairperson
Jenni Harrison,Day758-4265
Vice-Chairperson
Libby LeflerCotten752-8879
Kirk EdgertonDay758-7541
David Whitson
Dalton Denson752-5543
Dave McKenzieAy cock758-8891
Gregg BoykinScott
Jane BiddixFleming752-9257
SGA in action
OTHER LEGISLATORS
Donna Cox Clement
AnneGoforth
Rick Asheworth
Carolyn Blackwell
Bill Mirdel
David Eason
John Bauer
Clement
Jones
Fletcher
SJay
Belk
Belk
vjmi
SGASTl :ntL
APPROI m0N
CraHales, Cr f90n
Vale rie Chaffin
Katie Ray
Ron Morrison
Karen Harloe
Debby Boyoe
TinaPadilla
Tommy J. Payne
Anne O'Brien
Randy Bailey
Jerry Cox
'&
emu
H a GA BUSES began serving tt
� fii
campus this quartet
I rntainhead file photo
1 � wh
g Pin
easun
)tO
SPEAKEfFTHEL
Ricky Price
Cindi Whitakei
PA
Karen Harloe
CRETA
AMEN
SAF:ANT.j
Jane Biddix
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO 164 NOVEMBER 1976
�ii W
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mm
mm
mm
mmmmm
i�nment Association
MMWMP
1
7
M
ASTl iNT LEGISLATURE
PPROI vTIONSCOMMITTEE
SCREENINGS AND APPOINTMENTS
ales, O ,rsonDay758-7640Denise VioJetteWhite752-4879
Chaffin758-3386Chairperson
ayDay752-5550Barbara Luciani758-3386
758-7803Lynn Schubert752-5035
rnson756-1467Robert Harrell752-5543
iarloeDay758-0780Tammy De JaggerGarrett752-7391
toyceDay758-4769David Bond752-5543
jillaJarvis752-9153Lynne Hewett
J. PayneDay752-4379Lynne
BrienWhite758-0710Lynne HewettDay752-5035
iaileyDay758-7640Kirby Lashley752-4379
)XScott752-9172
1 fary Tim
SuiHvan ' . )reg pjngston yce President
' easurei I oun tain head I �
photo
'EAKEFpjHE LEGISLATURE
Dr'Ce iy 757-6611,ext.214
758-7640
CRETARY
yhitakei 757-661 l,ext. 214
PA AMENTARIAN
Harl�
SGAHONORCOUNCIL
Jack Jenkins
Wayne Stephenson
Edward Bean
Grace Maynard
Wade Dickens
Lawrence Young
Mark Snyder
STUDENT WELFARE
Sammy Collier, Day
Chairperson
Teresa Whisenant,
Vice-Chairperson
David Rippy
Billy Reynolds Aycock
Phil Barbee
Jeff Yates Jones
Chuck Freedman
752-0501
Day 752-9404
752-4379
758-7086
752-5325
758-8227
752-5543
RICK Y PRICE
SGA REVIEW BOARD
Larry Lakey
Laura Morrison
Gail Howard
David Dubin
Ginger Crews
Hal Shape
Robert Hartley
ATTORNEYGENERAL
John Jones
SAVANT AT ARMS
iddix
Tim McLeod-SGA Secretary of Academic Affairs
FOUNTAINHEAD file photo
mmmmm
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8
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, N O. 164 NOVEMBER 1976
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Charfie Rich plays to small house
Country star shows versatility
By CHRIS FARREN
Staff Writer
Clad in a grey sequined suit,
with his silver hair slicked back
and in place, Charlie Rich
brought his country-western show
to Minges Coliseum on Friday
night of ECU's 1976 Homecoming
weekend.
Playing to a house that was
only a third filled, and an
audience composed almost entire-
ly of non-students, Rich and his
nine piece band proceeded to
prove why he is one of the top
performers in his field.
The show, however, got off to
an extremely slow start when it
began with a stand-up comedian
who called himself Billie Holli-
day. Billie hails from Louisiana,
and this particular Friday night
he not only left his heart but also
his humor there. His act was
sloppy, insulting and just gener-
ally unprofessional, along with
the fact that it contained very
little humor at all. While he did
manage to create a few laughs
throughout his show, it lasted too
long, and any fans he might have
made in the beginning, he had
lost by the end of his thirty
minute act.
After fifteen more minutes of
waiting, the crowd was finally
greeted by the man they came to
see, the "Silver Fox Charlie
Rich is a man who has paid his
dues, and one can almost sense
that his road to the top has not
ing with "The Most Beautiful Girl
in the World he moved along
mixing up slow oountry ballads,
with some up-tempo strong beat
tunes. He spent most of his time
at the piano and surprised just
been an easy one. His manner is
slow and easy and his rapport
with the crowd quickly creates a
very relaxed atmosphere. Open-
about everyone with his adroit-
ness on that instrument. While
his songs might be simple, his
piano playing is professional and
very outstanding. The band,
comprised of drums, bass, guitar,
organ, pedal steel, and three
female vocalists, also proved to
be exceptionally good and made
the act very tight and polished. If
the sound was lacking in part, it
was not the fault of the musicians,
but because the acoustics in
Minges were so horrid. Not only
were the vocals inaudible at
times, but even when Rich was
talking, one oould barely under-
stand.
Moving steadily through an
act which included all his big hits,
Rich gave a good show to a very
5 unappreciative and unenthus-
iastic audience. As hard as he
tried to generate excitement, the
crowd would not respont. Hits
ike "Lonely Weekend" and
"Mohair Sam" passed by virtual-
j ly unnoticed, but Charlie plodded
'on. In desperate need of some
tielp, Rich emptied his bag, a
ct little earlier than most might have
2) expected, and played his award
winning song, "Behind Closed
Doors Anyone who had missed
the boat on the previous hits,
finally woke up on this one, and
the crowd came to life. Many
more songs followed, including a
rendition of Hank Williams'
"When Will I Be Loved" a-la
Linda Ronstadt, with Charlie's
female counterparts, the "Little
Foxes
While Rich's concert had
many flaws, none of them can
actually be attributed to him or
his band. There is a problem that
arises with all country-Western
music. The simplicity of the music
tends to make all of the songs
sound alike, and even the most
avid country-western fan can not
help but become a little bored
after an hour and a half. Even so,
Rich gave it his best.
Charlie ended up his show
with "Going Home a very full
sounding, slow, country ballad.
"He did himself proud" on this
finishing song, for it was played
with feeling and sincerity as if the
audience had really appreciated
his efforts. It was very evident,
however, that this crowd didn't,
for they failed to attempt to bring
him back for an encore. They
were also out the door before Rich
was off the stage. Despite having
the cards stacked against him,
Charlie Rich is a first rate
performer and did his very best to
give a good concert, under
third-rate conditions. All in all it
made for an enjoyable evening of
music, for Charlie Rich gave a
silver performance.
Here come Leon andMary!
The ECU Student Union Ma-
jor Attractions Committee will
present the LEON & MARY
RUSSELL Show on Sunday,Nov. 7
at 8:00 P.M. in Minges Coliseum.
Also featured on this show will be
RICHIE FURAY, formerly of
POCO and of SOUTHERN HILL-
MAN, FURAY BAND.
LEON RUSSELL has long
been one of the contemporary
rock's more commanding figures.
A triple or even quadruple threat,
he has repeatedly demonstrated
his abilities - writing songs,
arranging and producing, per-
forming as an accomplished ses-
sion musician - on some of the
best records in the history of pop.
Russell's music saga began at
th� tender aoe of 14 in his
hometown of Lawton, Oklahoma,
when he put down classical piano
and picked up a trumpet. While
he was later to make his mark as a
superior pianist, it was playing
trumpet in local clubs and lying
about his age that kept the
teenage Russell in business. By
1959 he had formed his own rock
band, jammed with RONNIE'
HAWKINS, and had been offered
a touring gig with JERRY LEE
LEWIS.
With the Spring of 1976
Russell found a new record label,
married, and released one of his
most inspired collections to date:
THE WEDDING ALBUM by
LEON & MARY RUSSELL. Rus-
sell's new partner is no newcomer
to the vocal sootliaht. As Marv
m
RICHIE FURAY (File photo)
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MoCreary, she had sung with the
best of them: as part of LITTLE
SISTER, she recorded two SLY
STONE produced hits, "Some-
body's Watching You and
"You're the One Her vocals
distinguished albums by Russell,
Streisand and others as well as
two of her own solo sets.
RICHIE FURAY is no stranger
to the world of pop music. His
career first got off the ground
when he teamed up with STEP-
HEN STILLS and formed a folk
group. When this group split up,
Furay teamed with NEIL
YOUNG, DEWEY MARTIN and
BRUCE PALMER to form BUF-
FALO SPRINGFIELD. This group
lasted long enough to reoord
three albums and one hit single.
Furay teamed with JIM MES-
SINA and RUSTY YOUNG to
form POCO. Richie remained
with this band as chief writer and
stage leader for five years.
In 1973 Furay's interest shift-
ed directions and he began a solo
career. This career was short
lived as Furay teamed with JOHN
DAVID SOUTHERN and CHRIS
HILLMAN to form SOUTHERN
HILLMAN, FURAY BAND. Now
Richie has formed his own band
which has met with tremendous
suocess.
Tickets for the concert are
available from the Central Ticket
Office and are priced at $4.00 for
ECU students and $6.00 fa the
public. All tickets sold at the door
will be $6.00. Public tickets may
also be purchased at the Record
Bar located at Pitt Plaza.
Ensemble concert
set for Sunday
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A variety of traditional and
contemporary music will be per-
formed by the ECU Symphonic
Wind Ensemble at its fall concert
Sunday, Nov. 7, at 8.15 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium.
Conducted by Herbert L.
Carter, the Wind Ensemble will
begin its program with the
Fanfare from "La Peri" by Paul
Dukas, featuring a complete
brass choir; a four-section ar-
rangement of Russian Christmas
music by Alfrxl Reed, which
includes a harp solo by ECU harp
student Paula Scarangella of
Norfolk, Va. ;and a Henk Badings
setting of "Greensleeves
Vincent Persichetti's "Sym-
phony for Band a work the
composer conducted at ECU
several years ago, will again be
performed by the Wind Ensemble
at its Sunday ooncert.
Its performance of "The Soli-
tary Dancer" by Warren Benson
will be highlighted by a ballet
danced by ECU students Terri
Leggette of Rocky Mount and
Daniel Nichols of Greensboro.
mmrmmm
&
Patricia Pertalion of the ECU
dance faculty choreographed the
dance.
The program will conclude
with the humorous "Grand Sere-
nade for an Awful Lot of Winds
and Percussion by "P.D.Q.
Bach the imaginary Bach fam-
ily composer created by Peter
Schickele, noted music satirist.
The P.D.Q. Bach "Grand
Serenade" was commissioned by
one "Prince Fred of Wein-am-
Rhein said Schickele.
"P.D.Q. had originally want-
ed to write a really big work of 35
or 40 minutes duration, but he
agreed to make it only a third as
long when Prince Fred offered to
triple the fee He notes that the
work was lost fa some years after
one of the Prince's servants used
the pages of the musical scae to
wrap "six large sausages
"P.D.Q. Bach" compositions
were last heard in Greenville
when Schickele appeared on the
ECU Artists Series two years ago.
The Wind Ensemble concert is
free and open to the public.
���
H I - ' ;�. ;s. fag 88
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 164 NOVEMBER 197t
9
Atlanta Ballet in residence next week
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Traveling dance group brings culture
Founded in 1929 by Dorothy
Alexander, THE ATLANTA
BALLET is today the oldest ballet
company in the United 9tates,
and since 1970 is one of the only
four out of over 400 in the country
to be named a Major Company
by the National Association of
Regional Ballet. In February of
"�973, Governc J'my Carter
signed a proclamation initiated by
the Georgia State Legislature
naming THE ATLANTA BALLET
"THE STATE BALLET COM-
PANY OF GEORGIA Having
performed in thirty states and
abroad, with numerous symphony
orchestras in the Southeast, the
company is a lively force in local
as well as regional cultural life,
presenting over eighty perform-
ances per season.
THE ATLANTA BALLET will
perform twice at ECU. The first
will be an evening performance at
800 P.M Tuesday, Nov. 9,1976
and the second, a matinee at 1 30
P.M Wednesday, Nov. 10,1976.
Both perfamances will be held in
McGinnis Auditorium.
Advance ticket prices are as
follows:
Evening performance - Nov.
9, 1976: ECU students - $2.00,
faculty and staff - $3.00, public -
$4.00 and non-ECU students -
$3.00.
Matinee performance - Nov.
10, 1976: ECU students - $1.00,
faculty and staff - $2.00, public -
$3.00, and non-ECU students -
$2.00.
Also available are special
group-rate tickets which are
priced as follows:
Evening performance - Nov.
9,1976: non-ECU students, facul-
ty and staff - $1.50 per ticket in
groups of 20 or more.
Matinee performance - Nov.
10, 1976 - non-ECU students,
faculty and staff - $1.50 per ticket
in groups of 20 a more.
Group tickets are to be
purchased by one individual who
will pay fa all the tickets at one
time and be responsible for
'Odd Couple' opens Theatre
For the first time ever, ECU'S
Mendenhall Student Center is
offering the rich experience of
combining a delicious meal and
an outstanding theatre production
in the form of its premiere Dinner
Theatre. The event, which has
been eagerly awaited by many,
takes place November 11-14,1976
in Mendenhall Student Center
Auditorium 244. With a menu
that reads like a fantasy feast, the
"Dinner" side of the evening
promises to please even those
with the most peculiar tastes:
Carved Round Beef wAu Jus
Turkey Divan
Brown Pecan Rice
Mushroom Stuffed Baked
Tomatoes
Spanish Green Beans
Fresh Fruit Cup
Tossed Green Salad
Rolls & Oleo
Coffee or Tea
On the "Theatre" side, the
renowned producer Stuart Aron-
son has put together a tremend-
ous cast for the Neil Simon,
Broadway hit play "THE ODD
COUPLE His spirited group of
players include:
Oscar Madison Stuart Aronson
Felix Ungar Charlie Jennette
Speed Bob McCutcheon
Murray Terry Davis
Roy Ed Nowak
Vennie David Werdal
Gwendolyn Pigeon CheraHill
Cecily Pigeon Lynn Maladoqitz
This three act play, called by
one critic, "The richest comedy
Simon has written and the purest
gold for any theatre goer is the
classic story of the hilarious
situation that arises when the
compulsive neat fellow, suddenly
facing divorce, accepts an offer to
share an eight-room apartment
with his best friend who is ex-
tremely sloppy. Their attempts to
adjust to each other's way of life
provide many comic moments
that make "THE ODD COUPLE"
one of the funniest plays written
in the last twenty years
The scrumptious meal and the
vivacious play oome together for
you to enjoy the first Mendenhall
Student Center Dinner Theatre; a
bright night to be remembered.
Four big performances: Nov.
11 through 14, 1976.
ECU students - $5.00, public -
$7.50 (advance tickets only),
Thursday through Saturday -
Dinner at 7 00 P. M Show at 8 00
P.M Sunday - Dinner at 5O0
P.M Show at 6O0 P.M.
Seating is limited to 100
persons per performance so
tickets should be ordered early.
Reserved tickets must be paid for
before 400 p.m. on November 5,
1976. Tickets are available at the
Central Ticket Office which is
open from 10O0 A.M. to 4O0
P.M Monday through Friday.
Tickets for Thursday and Friday
Dinner Theatre must be pur-
chased at least 24 hours before
each performance. Saturday and
Sunday Dinner Theatre tickets
must be purchased on or before
Kriday, November 12, 1976, by
4O0 P.M. Please direct all mail
orders to: The Central Ticket
Office, Mendenhall Student Cent-
er, East Carolina University,
Greenville, N.C. 27834 (919)
757-6611, ext. 266.
The Dinner Theatres are a
MSC Production.
distributing the tickets to the
members in the group. All tickets
purchased at the door will be
$4.00 fa the evening and $3.00
fa the matinee perfamanoe. All
tickets are available at the Central
Ticket Office, Mendenhall Stu-
dent Centa, which is open from
10O0 A.M. to 400 P.M. week-
days. Mail ader requests fa
tickets must include a self-
addressed, stamped envelope and
be sent to: Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall Student Center, East
Carolina University, Greenville,
N.C. 27834 (919) 757-6611, ext.
40D.
THE ATLANTA BALLET will
grace the ECU campus fa two
beautiful perfamances, thanks to
the Student Union Theatre Arts
Committee.
THE ATLANTA BALLET re-
sidency is made possible with the
suppat of the National Endow-
ment fa the Arts in Washingtai,
D.C a federal agency, and the
North Carolina Arts Council.
'Way We Were' plays
Fa those who love Streisand,
The Way We Were presents her
at her very best. Fa those who
don't, it's still the best flick in
town.
The Way We Were is without
a doubt a love stay in all its
glay. Fa those who want to shed
a tear it really has no peer.
Without using any more bad
rhymes, it must be stressed that
this is the flick to which you take
the girl whom you've dated but
never really reached home base
It's guaranteed to get her in tears
and sobbing on your shoulder.
The perfect chance to find out if
you're really a manone who
neva aies at movies no matter
how sad), a if you're kidding
yourself. You girls watch their
eyes closely. Don't let one sneak
out undetected. Fa whateva
reason, cone to The Way We
Were; it's a good 'un! Almost
faga! You girls take nae. It also
stars Robert Redfad.
G-gT AeQUATKTEVlTlllIs!
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Sideline Chat
with Steve Wheeler
East Carol i rid s root ball team has played in front of seven milestone
crowds in their eight games and is headed fa a record season
attendance mark.
Through eight games, the Pirates have played in front of 193,256
people for an average of 24,157 per game. The Bucs need to average only
11,705 fans in their final three games to break the mark set in 1975 of
20,761 per game. This should be no problem as well over 20,000 are
expected fa the Appalachian game on Nov. 20 in Ficklen Stadium.
In Ficklen Stadium, the Pirates have played befae the first, fourth,
and seventh largest single game aowds in histay this year already.
73,356 people have seen the Bucs win all four home games to date fa an
average of 18,339. They need only 10,996 in the stands fa the game with
the Mountaineers to break the season Ficklen mark.
As fa road games, East Carolina has played befae their two largest
aowds ever this year at N.C. State and NathCarolina and has averaged
29,975 people fa four games. They need only to average 15,394 at
Richmond and Furman to break the old road average of 25,115 set last
year.
East Carolina drew 17,400 against Southern Mississippi to set anew
recad fa a hone-opener aowd. The old mark was against Wake Faest
in the dedication of Ficklen in 1963.
In the second gamethe Pirates and N.C. State played befae 49,700
in Carter Stadium. This was the third largest aowd ever in Carter and
the largest night aowd in the state ever and the largest ever between the
two teams.
Against William and Mary, the Pirates played befae 13,500 at
Williamsburg. This does not represent a real large aowd but was the
Indians' largest at home in a couple of years.
When The Citadel invaded Ficklen Stadium, 18,250 people saw the
game. At the time this was the third largest aowd ever in Ficklen, but
is now the fourth largest.
After drawing 16,200 fa Southern Illinois, the Pirates traveled to
Lexington, Va. to play VMI. The Keydets had been drawing about 3,000
fans per game at home until then, but with East Carolina ooming in, a
aowd of 7,700 saw the game, easily the largest of the year at home fa
the Keydets.
The Pirates then traveled to Chapel Hill and a throng of 49,000
people showed up. This was the most fa any ECU-UNC game by 7,000
people and the seoond largest of the season at Chapel Hill, beat out only
by Carolina's rivalry with State (50,000).
This past week's Homecoming game with Western drew 21,506 in
Ficklen for the largest ever in the 13-year old facility.
This year's attendance recads add much validity to the Ficklen
Stadium expansion fund drive. The Pirates are drawing 21,506 fa
Western Carolina. What could they draw fa South Carolina?
SEASONS DRA WING TO CLOSE
With women's tennis, women's golf, and soccer seasons about over
and two mae women's seasons ending this weekend, just football
and women's swimming will be left to oontinue during November.
ECU'S field hockey and volleyball teams will be competing in
championships this weekend.
The Deep South Conferenoe in field hockey will be having their
tournament this weekend on ECU'S campus behind the Allied Health
building.
Duke University will host the NCAIAW volleyball tournament in
Durham this weekend. East Carolina will be competing.
Teams that will be here fa the field hockey tourney include:
Appalachian State, Catawba, Coker, Converse, Davidson, Duke, East
Carolina, Furman, UNC-Chapel Hill, UNC-Greensboro, Pfeiffer,
Tennessee, Wake Faest, University of the South, Winthrop, Durham
Club, North Carolina Club, and South Carolina Club.
OTHER TEA MS TO STA RT
Wrestling, men's swimming, men's and women's basketball, and
indoa track, ail winter quarter sports, will be practicing during
November, with men's swimming and basketball starting their
schedules.
Sports
Pirates face Richmond
in key football clash
By BILL KEYES
Spats Features Carespondant
Caning into Ficklen Stadium
and defeating East Carolina was a
big stepping stone fa the Rich-
mond Spiders capturing the
Southern Conference football
aown last season, as the Pirates
are well aware of.
The Pirates are also oonscious
of the fact that Richmond is better
than their 3-5 recad. They lest
their first two games of the
season to Tulsa, who leads the
Missouri Valley Conferenoe, and
Maryland, presently ranked num-
ber six in the nation. They
walloped VMI 43-0, and then lost
to West Virginia 9-6 in a game
which could have gone either
way. In game five, they defeated
Villanova 24-7, but lost to the
Citadel 20-7 the following Satur-
day. Two weeks ago they beat
problem-ridden Furman 13-9.
Then last Saturday the Spiders
lost to Tennessee-Chattanooga at
home in a game they should have
won.
If they had beaten Chattanoo-
ga and won that dose game
against West Virginia, their re-
cad would be a more respectable
five and three.
But no matter what Rich-
mond's reoad reads, the Pirates
know they will have their hands
full this Saturday afternoon at
Richmond's City Stadium.
UR OFFENSE
The Spiders have an exper-
ienced offensive team, with nine
of eleven of last year's starters
returning. Only the fullback and
one tackle are new. But as ECU
assistant coach Dick Kupec points
out, "They're all experienced
after eight games
One of the big guns fa the
Richmond offense is 6-1, 190
pound senia tailback Ed Kreilis
who lines up behind tough-block-
ing fullback Milton Ruffin in the
Pro-I formation. As with all
l-famatioi teams, they will give
the ball to the tailback a great
percentage of the time on sweeps
and power leads off tackle. ECU'S
Kupec likens Kreilis to UNC's
Mike Voight - a strong, aggres-
sive runner with good speed.
The quarterback is Larry
Shaw, a good passer who will
throw to two outstanding wide
receivers. The number one re-
ceiver, spl it end Job Call has good
speed, good hands and an
uncanny ability to get open in the
secondary. The flanker is Rickey
Brown. Both are 200 pound
senias.
Aooading to Kupec, the UR
line may be the best ECU has
faced to date. All of the 1975
starters return except one tackle.
CARYGODETTE
leads defense
UR DEFENSE
The Spiders' defense is not
quite as big as their offense, but
they are strong, physical, and
aggressive with good technique,
and capable of being intimidat-
ing. Seven of eleven starters
return.
In the secondary, sophomae
oanerbacks Ricky Crawfad and
Dave Haynie are new. But senia
straig safety Mike Andrus and
free safety Jeff Nixon are re-
turnees.
In the line, Dickie Childress
and Gary Edwards, both 220
pound senias, have swapped
positions from last year. Child-
ress is now middle guard as
Edwards is a tackle. The other
tackle is 250 pound sophomae
Bill Cheshire, the oily newoomer,
but biggest member of the line.
The front is oompleted by ends
Mike Copley and Ray Chase.
Though Copley only weighs 215,
Kupecreferstohimasoneof the
best ends ECU will face this
season.
Or I and us Branch was injured
when the Spiders came to ECU
last season, but the 6-3, 230
pound linebacker is completely
healthy and ready to play against
the Pirates. The other linebacker
is 200 pound sophomae Ray
Kelly.
The Pirates are approaching
this game as the beginning of the
second half of their season. They
haven't beaten Richmond nor
Appalachian State in the past two
seasons, and Furman is capable
of giving the Piratesa tough time.
See the Pirates begin the second
half of the season at Richmond
this Saturday. Kickoff is at 1:30
P.M.
Deep South tourney
Field hockey teams
converge on ECU
mm m i niffii
ByANNEHOGGE
Staff Writer
This weekend, ECU'S Fieid
hockey team will play host to the
Deep South Field Hockey Tourna-
ment.
A total of 18 teams will oome
from Geagia, Nath Carolina,
South Carolina, and Tennesse to
play in the tourney. All teams
involved are members of the
Deep South Field Hockey Asso-
ciation.
The purpose of the tourna-
ment is not to produce a
conferenoe champion. Instead, a
panel of judges watches the
games and choses a number one
and number two team. These two
teams play in the regional tour-
nament. At the end of this
tournament, the judges select a
South East team, which goes into
li mail mm win i
the national tournament.
The matches will begin at 9:00
a.m. on Friday and 830 a.m. on
Saturday and last until 530 p.m.
on both days. There will be
continuous play on both days.
The games will be played on
the field behind the Allied Health
building and on the baseball
practice field. They are free to
students and .25 to those with no
college I.D.
ECU field hockey coach Lau-
rie Arrants is looking faward to
the tournament. "We are a young
team, but should win at least
three of our four matches The
team now has a 4-6-1 recad.
On Friday at 10:00 ECU plays
Coker College of S.C. and at 3.00
faces UNC-G, whom Arrants feels
"will be our strongest competi-
tion Both qames will be played
IKmi i mm i
on the Allied Health Field.
On Saturday, ECU faces Con-
verse College. This game will be
played at 1050 on the baseball
practice field. The Pirates final
game will be at 330 against
Davidson on the Allied Health
Field.
Sizing up the teams involved
Arrants said, "I think Appala-
chian and UNC will be the teams
to watch. They are strong oompe-
titas
The Pirates will be led by Gail
Betton and Moira Devlin, the
team's two Senia ocaptains,
and Linda Christian on offense.
Defense will be headed up by
Montine Swain, Sharon Lauden-
slager and goalie Diana Mil lick.
Coach Arrants hopes everyone
will oome out and enjoy the
tournament.





FOUNTAINHEADVOU. 52, NO. 164 NOVEMBER 1976
11
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Bolton: Kerbaugh our
best all round player
By DAVID ROBEY
Staff Writer
" Gale Kerbaugh is our best all
round player. She is a smart
player, who works hard to im-
prove herself and to help the
team. She is consistent in all
aspects of the game and does
everything well That is Coach
Catherine Bolton's opinion of
Lady Volleyball player Gale Ker-
baugh.
Kerbaugh, a native of Ra-
leigh, has started her second year
of school here at ECU. Last year
she played on the women's
volleyball and basketball teams
and she plans to continue her
sports life for her duration here.
She is hoping to play softball if a
team can be gotten together.
A P.E. major, Kerbaugh likes
all aspects of athletics but prefers
team competition. She prefers to
be a part of a team because she
enjoys working with others and
feels sportsmanship is important.
She would also like a double
major in music but the times
conflict so she can't play sports.
Kerbaugh still plans on taking
music courses though, because
music isa part of ner life she wants
to perform.
-Tennis-
finishes
winning
ByKURTHICKMAN
Assistant Sports Editor
East Carolina's women's ten-
nis team dosed out its season
Tuesday in Raleigh with a 6-3
victory over Meredith College.
It was the sixth straight win
for ECU and left the Lady Pirates
with a 10-3 record for the season.
For ECU, Dorcas Sunkel,
Cathy Portwood, Susan Helmer,
and Leigh Jefferson gathered
wins in singles play.
Sunkel beat Meg Rendle, 6-4,
3-6, 6-1, Portwood defeated Leigh
Welborn, 6-1, 6-2, Helmer was a
6-2, 6-4 winner over Linda Ix, and
Jefferson topped Julia Breedlove,
3-6, 6-1, 6-2.
Meredith's victors in the
singles were Linda Whitley and
Rene Holoomb.
Whitley defeated Patty Col-
lins, 6-1, 6-3, and Holoomb took
Karen Clark, 6-1, 6-3.
In the doubles competition,
ECU won two of three matches as
Sunkel and Portwood beat Rendle
and Welborn, 9-7, and Helmer
and Jefferson won over Holoomb
and Brooks, 9-7.
Meredith's lone doubles
victory came as Summers and
Hooper defeated Collins and
Ginny Gainey, 8-3.
As far as sports go, she wants
also to be a coach.
Her interest in sports stem
from her high school years. While
attending high school she played
volleyball, basketball and soft-
ball. She played on the basketball
team that won the women's state
championship for two years. She
developed her mechanics of vol-
leyball in high school and is now
trying to perfect them.
"The high school experience I
got really helps me now because
we really had a good coach
"commented Kerbaugh. "I'm
glad to be playing volleyball now
for it really is fun and it's good to
have Coach Bolton to help me
improve. I really enjoy the game
and I got a real thrill in spiking
the ball.
"Concerning the team, we
have a lot of talent and potential
and I feel if we can put it all
together, we should do well at the
state championships We travel to
Duke to take on State this Friday
and I really would like us to put
everything together and beat
them. I think we stand 8-12 now
but I feel we can do good against
State
With the vigor and enthu-
siasm Gale Kerbaugh has, she is
sure to be of great aid to the
team when they take on State.
And there is the future to think
about, for Kerbaugh will be here
two more years and should be a
great boost to the volleyball team
in the future years.
GALE KERBAUGH
NCAIAWnext
V- ball team



ECU'S volleyball team played
Chowan fa the second time this
year and .defeated them. The
team record now stands 8-12
going into this weekend's
NCAI AW Championships.
The varsity team won the first
game 15-9, dropped the second
14-16 and put it together to win
the third game 15-10.
The J.V. team then won two
games in a row against Chowan
15-5, 15-11.
"I don't feel we played
seriously enough against Cho-
wan said Coach Catherine
Bolton. "I feel we should really
buckl3 down fa our next match
which is against State
The team travels to Duke to
compete against State in the
championship matches. The
winner of that game will play
Duke and then play against the
winner of Division II which
consists of Carolina, UNC-G and
Appalachian.
CLASSIFIEDS
MENI-WOMEN!
JOBS ON SHIPS! American.
Faeign. No experience required.
Excellent pay. Waldwide travel.
Summer job a career. Send $3.00
fa infamatiai SEAFAX, Dept.
Boc 2049, Pat Angeles, Was-
hington 96362.
If you have something to buy
a sell come to the Red Oak Show
and Sell; We sell on consignment
anything of value, excluding
clothing. Open Mon. - Sat.
11.00-6 00 Sun. 2-6, closed Thurs.
Located 3 miles west of
Greenville at the intersection of
264 and Farmville Highway in the
old Red Oak church buildina.
LOST: Gold Hamilton watch,
inscribed Minnie Allison. $100.00
reward. Call 757-6012 a 752-4490
and ask fa Daa Howell.
FOR SALE: 1975 Yamaha 500,
sissy bar, crash bar, luggage
straps, semi-knobby tire, low
mileage. Excellent condition, 756-
1857 any afternoon a night.
FOUND: Man's watch at club
football game Sunday, Oct. 10. on
intramural field. Call 752-8825.
Do you have problems? Do
you need a caring listener? Call
758-2047.
FOR SALE: Custom made water
bed frame, heater & thermostat.
Price negotiable. Excellent oond.
Call Woody, 756540 after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: Fastback Mustang,
302 V-8, automatic, AM radio &
tape, Mags. $1000.00. 756-1857
any afternoon a night.
FOR SALL: AR2AX loud speak-
ers. $220.00. Excellent condition.
Serious inquiries only. 758-5150.
LOST: Checkbook with dark
brown textured cover, Biff a
Karen Brean, oi Oct. 20 in the
vicinity of Austin. 758-4126.
FOR SALE: BSR Auto-Manual
turntable equipped with cueing,
anti-skate, new stylus. I35.00.
409 B-Belk.
FOR RENT: Private room aaoss
from ECU at 410 B Student St.
752-7032. Prefer senia a grad-
uate student.
FOR SALE: 240 Z, 1972, self-
cared fa, fog lights, dual mag
wheels, CD, air, AM-FM, 756-
0417.
SMALL SCALE masonry, brick,
block, concrete repair a aiginal
work. Rex Bost 758-7569.
FOR SALE: FG 200 Yamaha
guitar - 6 string acoustic, soft-
shell case, leather strap and new
Schoder perasion machine heads.
Other accessaies available. In-
stitution books and 2 Beatle song
books included. 1135.00. Call
758-7690.
LOST: Contact Lenses in a green
case. Between Brewster atd
Rawl. Reward, Albert McMicken,
758-5074.
NEED A PAPER TYPED? Call
Alice, 757-6366 or 758-0497.
Eight years of experience. I need
the money. Only 50 cents a page.
USED 8 track tapes, variety of
rock by Bob Dylan, Elton John,
Led Zeppelin and others. $2.50
each a lot of 45 fa I85.00.
758-1314 after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: Sony 6046 A 20 watt
receiver. 6 mo. old $190.00.
758-7884.
PIANO AND GUITAR lessons.
Daily and evenings. Richard J.
Knapp, B.A. 756-3908.
LOST: At ECU-WCU game on
WCU side - Men's "Levi" Navy
Caduroy ooat wpile lining and
collar. REWARD! Call Bob at
752-9963.
FOR SALE :1974 Yamaha
DT125A. Only 1600 miles. Used
as commuter, never in dirt. Call
756-7275.
NEEDED: Female student with
auto2hrs. daily from 1 30 to330
to pick up 2 boys at Wahl-Coats
and sit with them until 330. Gas
will be furnished and pay will be
discussed. Call 758-9467 between
12 and 1 M-F only.
RENT: Private and semi-private
rooms with kitchen privileges-
available Winter-Spring terms.
756-2459.
YARD SALE: Saturday Nov 6,
1976. 2101 E. 5th St. 8O0-2.00
Great bargains!
NEED TYPING? Call Gail Joyner
at 756-1062 fa professional typ-
ing and related services. All wak
guaranteed!
FOR RENT: Efficiency apartment
fa 2 - utilities furnished aaoss
from college, 758-2585. Com-
pletely furnished with air cond-
itioning.
FOR SALE: Stereo - Pioneer
SX-1250 -100 watts per channel.
620 Bose 901s. Sony TC-580
remote Servo Reel to Reel. Call
752-1235.
FOR SALE: 1959 Fad pickup.
Cane to see my old green truck
parked across from 510 E.
Twelfth St. on the caner of
Lawrence and Twelfth. Call Joe
Bennett at 752-7798 after 6 and
weekends.
WANTED: To rent small apt. Call
758-0870.
FOR SALE: 1970 Fad Fairlane
500, 5 new tires, new starter, new
Cobra CB just put in, others.
$700.00. Call Larry at 758-8524.
Plus 2 new CB (never used)
converters - reg. price $16 each -
fin
NEEDED: Female roommate fa
large oondominum. $50.00
month. Freedom of house in
exchange fa light housekeeping
duties. Pool, tennis courts and
sauna available. Board not in-
cluded. 756-5423.





12
FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 164 NOVEMBER 1976
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Senior co-captain
Betton enters last field hockey games
By ANNE HOGGE
Staff Writer
"When I say I play hockey,
the first thing people think of is
ice hockey. It's taking the South a
while to become accustomed to
field hockey
This is the most common
misconception Gail Betton, a
co-captain of this year's field
hockey team, runs into.
Betton is a 21-year-old senior
from Millsboro, Del. She majors
in music therapy and has a 3.0
average. She enjoys all sports,
camping, concerts and playing
the piano, and has been involved
in the Campus Crusade for
Christ.
Betton began playing field
hockey in the eight grade, making
the varsity team. She continued
playing field hockey through high
school, along with basketball and
tennis. She was captain of both
her field hockey and tennis
teams.
At her high school, Sussex
Central in Delaware, she was
selected all-conferenoe in both
field hockey and basketball for
three years
Betton came to ECU after
hearing about its music therapy
program. During her freshman
year she again began playing
field hockey, basketball and
tennis. But because her major
took up so much of her time, she
eventually had to drop tennis and
basketball.
This being her last season,
Betton feels "we could've done
better. I hope we'll do well in the
tournament this weekend, that
way we'll go out a winner. We
have a small team, so there's
little room fa substitution, which
isn't good since field hockey is a
continuous running game.
"So many people associate
field hockey with ice hockey. They
Talking Sports
with Kurt Hickman
ECU, following a 24-17 victory over Western Carolina, oould be in for
its toughest test to date this Saturday as the Pirates face last year's
Southern Conference champion, the Richmond Spiders.
Coach Jim Tait's teams have always given the Bucs a hard time.
They have won the last two games, winning in 1974, 28-20, and 17-14 in
'75. Last year's loss to UR broke ECU'S 18 game home winning streak
which dated back to 1971. That year the last home loss fa the Pirates
was also to the Virginia School.
The Spiders will get a good scouting report on ECU. One of Tait's
assistants, Laurin Collins, is the brother of Bobby Collins, head coach at
Southern Mississippi. The latter saw the Pirates at their best in ECU's
48-0 season opening win over the Golden Eagles in September.The
Richmond assistant will no doubt be in touch with his brother this week
and the topic of conversation will be Pat Dye's Pirates.
HELMERLEADSTENNIS
The mina spats program at ECU has always been a source of pride
fa the Pirates. Susan Helmer of the women's tennis team is a leading
candidate fa Athlete-of-the-Month awards as she had an 11-1 reoad fa
the maith of October.
NBA SEASON BEGINS
Although the National Basketball Association season has just
started, the league's favaed teams have faged to the top of their
divisions with the exoeption of Golden State and Washington.
Boston and Denver may be the best teams in the NBA this year and
bothshouldwin their divisions. The Nuggets are in a weak division and
their road to the playoffs appears to be easy. Boston will have problems
with the revamped Philadelphia 76ers but their experienoe should pay
off.
Golden State will be heard from but Phoenix and Patland are quality
teams and the Warrias will have to earn the Pacific title. Phoenix has
shown that they can play and Patland is expecting an outstanding
season fron Bill Waltoi.
Washingtai, the NBAs most talented team, has had attitude
problems. The Bullets made coaching change and obtained Dick Motta,
a strict diciplinarian. It will be interesting to see how well Motta can
handle this moody bunch.
Washington has started slow and this they can not affad to do
because the Cleveland Cavaliers are in the same division and they are a
first class ball club. If coach Bill Fitch'sfeuds with owner Nick Miletti do
not carry over to the players the Cavsare going to be a very tough foe fa
anyone.
This season should be a most interesting one since the NBA becomes
more balanced every year. The Boston Celtics will be well equipped to
defend their 1975-76 title, but all the other clubs are capable of capturing
the championship.
expect to see us fighting and all
that. But this isn't the case. It's a
fast-moving game which is physi-
cally demanding
Betton said her four years at
ECU "have been good ones. It's
difficult to combine music and
spats because both take up a lot
of time. But it's been wath it
Rugby teams loses to State
By BOB DA VIS
Staff Writer
The ECU Rugby team traveled
to Raleigh Sunday to pLy the
N.C. State Club Rugby team and
onoe again came out on the shat
end of the scae, 25-4.
N.C. State was first to scae
with just little over 5 minutes
gone in the game on a 5 yard
plunge by Pete Johnson, Jim
Kellenbergs' extra point kick was
no good, and State led 4-0.
With about 15 minutes gone in
the half State added 3 mae points
on a 20 yard penalty kick by
Kellenberg to go ahead 7-0 with
10 minutes to go in the half. State
scaed another tri on a 20 yard
run by Kellenberg, who also
made good on the extra point to
put State ahead 13-0.
In the second half it was na
much different as State scaed
three mae tris ai runs of 15
yards, 25 yards and 20 yards. All
the extra point attempts were no
good, and State was able to ooast
to a 25-4 victay.
ECU's next match will be
away at Duke, Sunday, Nov. 7 at
2O0P.M.
obc) southeastern 7Zauu
PITT
Starts FRIDAY!
SHOWS
in the middle of a robbery-
Mama comes to help
An obscene phone call. �.
Pizza for everyone
Weird things can happen on a
DOC DRY RFTERNOON
THE GREAT ABC LATE SHOW
FRIDAY & SATURDAY 11:30 PM
1 st RUN IN GREENVILLE EVER
MARLON BRANDO
LAST TANGO IN PARIS
Don't miss this great celebration.
Help Greenville finally
welcome this GREAT CLASSIC TO TOWN
SHOW STARTS 11:30 PM

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Title
Fountainhead, November 4, 1976
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 04, 1976
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.422
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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