Fountainhead, October 28, 1976






THIS ISSUE -
24 PAGES
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina Community for over 50 years
CIRCULATION -
8,500
VOL. 52, NO. 14
28 OCTOBER 1976
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 1428 OCTOBER 1976
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 1428 OCTOBER 1976
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'Dry' after 12am. Saturday
Bars to close Halloween night
By BRENDA NORRIS
Staff Writer
In anticipation of Halloween
weekend, the Greenville Night-
club Owner's Association
(GNOA), will stop alchdic bever-
age sales at 12 p.m. Saturday,
Oct. 30, and dose the clubs
Sunday, Oct. 31, according to
E.G. Cannon, Greenville Police
Chief.
"The GNOA submitted a
memorandum to the Greenville
City Council saying that they
would open as usual Fri. night,
stop beer sales at midnight Sat
not open Sun hire four off-duty
policemen for Fri. and Sat.
nights, and have about 20 addi-
tional people monitoring the
streets said Cannon.
According to Tim Sullivan,
Student Government Association
(SGA), President, the SGA will
also have "student watchers"
downtown.
These students are not work-
ing for or with the police, but are
there for three reasons said
Sullivan. "One, to assist students
who might be sick or need to get
help. Two, to assist anyone who
needs to leave downtown in a
hurry, and three, to have sober
people there who can look at the
situation objectively
According to Cannon, the
"Beer is allowed at the
festival, but you have to bring
your own said Sullivan.
"The SGA will provide buses
on the hour starting at noon Sun.
and lasting until almost everyone
has left the farm said Sullivan,
"the buses will stop at the
Mendenhall and Brewster park-
ing lots and the festival
The bands scheduled indude
Super Grit Cowboy, Sutters Gold
Streak, Tumbleweed, Larriat
Sam, Loafer's Glory, and Delias
High said Sullivan. "There will
be a $250. prize for the best
costume
According to Barry Robinson,
Student Union President, on
campus entertainment is sche-
duled as an alternative to down-
town.
"Charlie Rich will be at
Minges Fri. at 8 p.m. and the
Count Basie Orchestra will be at
Wright Auditorium Sat. from 8
until 12 p.m. for a dance and
show said Robinson.
"Sun. at 8 p.m. Minges will
host Michael Murphey, Jerry Jeff
Walker, and the Vasser Clements
Band. Rosemarys Baby will be
See BARS, paged.)
AN ECU STUDENT fights police
intersections of Fourth and Co-
tanche, Fifth and Reade, Reade
and Cotanche, and 'Five Points'
will be roped off beginning at 9
p.m. Fri. night and 7 p.m. Sat.
"There will be no veKides
allowed on the streets, just
walking said Cannon. "This is
so the people downtown will have
plenty of room to enjoy them-
selves and have fun
According to Cannon, the
Mayor and City Manager will be
downtown both nights.
"If there is trouble Fri. night
they have the option to call a
curfew for Sat. night said
during last year's Halloween riot.
Fountainhead file photo
Cannon. "I am in hopes that this
will not oome about
Aocording to Cannon, there
will be 16 officers downtown both
nights instead of the usual eight.
"The bars will be dosed Sun.
night so everyone can attend the
First Annual Outdoor Music
Festival said Cannon.
According to Sullivan, the
festival sight is a 152 acre farm
near Stokes. Adivities will last
from noon until midnight Sunday.
Tickets are $5 in advance and
$6 at the gate. Concession stands
and sanitation services will be
provided.
Hodges and Morgan
to head fund drive
By DEBBIE JACKSON
Co-News Editor
Former North Cardina Gov-
ernor Luther H. Hodges, Sr. and
N.C. Senator Robert M. Morgan
have been chosen fa division
chairman positions on the Ficklen
Stadium fund drive, according to
sources dose to the drive.
Morgan will head the national
drive and Hodges the state
col led ion effort.
The local drive has been quite
successful, according to Dr. Ray
Minges, chairman of the Green-
ville drive.
"The local Pitt County drive
has reached over $500,000 said
M inges.
"We have not started a
general campaign yet, because
we don't want to interfere with
United Fund reaching its goal
According to Minges, the
general drive will begin in
approximately 10 days at which
time the different organizational
leaders will be officially an-
nounced.
"I think the drive has been
exceedingly well received
Minges added.
Homecoming Sale at the
University Book Exchange
Back the Bucs
in their Homecoming Game VS Western Carolina with
ECU Sportswear
Save 20
Reg. Sale
ECUT-Shirts 2.95 2.36
ECU Zipper Front Hooded Sweatshirts 8.95 7.16
ECU Pullover Hooded Sweatshirts 6.95 5.56
ECU Unlined Jackets 9.95 7.96
ECU Polo Shirts ���� 8.95 7.16
ECU Sweat Pants 4.50 3.60
ECU Sweatshirts 5.95 4.76
ECU Jerseys 5.95 4.76
ECU Nities 4.95 3.9f
ECU Women's Tops 4.95 3.96
UBE - Downtown in Greenville
Sale Ends Tuesday Nov. 2nd





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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 14128 OCTOBER 1976
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Homecoming '76
ECU alumni, class of '73 and before, who return to
their Alma Mater for this Homecoming weekend will
discover many changes, both on the campus and in the
attitudes of their contemporaries.
Probably the most startling aspect of Homeooming
for these erstwhile students is the selection of the
Homecoming representative. For all the radicalism
that swept this university during the early '70s,
students in those days were satisfied to call this
person the Homeooming Queen-as these were the
days before "Gay" rights and there was no question
about the sex of the Queen. But this year the Queen is
dead, long live the Homecoming Pi rate-whichever
sex you may be.
Halttime at Saturday's oontest with Western will
also give these alumni a chance to gaze at the powerful
lighting system, which was installed at Ficklen in the
Spring of' 75. M uch controversy surrounded the use of
student fees fa the new lights but alumni should rest
assured that they too can contribute to the cause
celebre-making the Pirates famous, or infamous,
whichever should you prefer.
Plans to double the seating capacity of the stadium
call for needed funds to be raised from contributions.
On a tour of campus after the game alumni will be
treated to a jazzy Count Basie ooncert in Wright
Auditorium. Such entertainment is a far cry from the
JethroTull concert of the 1971 Homeooming. But Tull
was scheduled by a politicized SGA and not by an
independent Student Union that can be concerned
with bringing "quality if not popular, entertainment
to the university.
Housing the College Union on the west end of
campus in Mendenhall Student Center, completed in
1974. This building, modern, clean but not exactly
spacious (cost overruns demanded a cutback in the
floorspace originally planned for the facility) does
provide all student needs except adequate parking.
And should alumni drive their cars to campus this
festive weekend they should be sure and obtain
temporary parking stickers. Only then is one accepted
into the mad scramble of students whizzing about
campus trying to find a parking place. This frenzy is
matched only by the parade of tow trucks dragging
away the less fortunate.
But good 'd EC is ooming into its own. We've
finally earned a four-year med school, the new art
building is nearly complete and we are still only in
infancy. Next year will mark our tenth anniversary as a
full-fledged university.
Fcxintainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for war fifty years
Senior EditorJim Elliott
Production ManagerJimmy Williams
Advertising ManagerDennis Leonard
News EditorsDebbie Jackson
Neil Sessoms
Trends EditorPat Coye
Sports EditorSteve Wheeler
Fountainhead is the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Student Government Association
of ECU and appears each Tuesday and Thursday during the
school year, weekly during the summer.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C.
27834.
Editorial Offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions: $10.00 annually for non-students, $6.00 for
alumni.
mm0mmaeemmm0mt0m
TheForum
Jenkin's veto of Styx blasted
1
To the Fountainhead:
I feel the students of East
Carolina University have been
done wrong by Leo Jenkins'
decision not to have Styx play
here. I know Leo Jenkins is a
learned man, but I believe this to
be one of the stupidest decisions
he has ever made! At the last
Student Government Legislature
meetings the student representa-
tives have expressed conoern over
the lack of campus activities
during this double header week-
end- Homecoming and Hallo-
ween- and urged the officers to
try and do something about it.
Tim Sullivan did an outstanding
job in lining up the idea of having
Styx play on campus for $2,500
(For those who aren't too familiar
with Styx, they usually play for
$25,000). Styx was to fly out from
California to play, but what the
nice thing was that they wanted to
play at ECU. This was to be a free
ooncert fa all ECU Students in
hopes that with on campus
activities that the students would
attend (less students would go
downtown.) True, there is a
Charlie Rich concert on campus
Friday and Count Basie on Sat
but the SGA took a poll during a
legislature meeting one Monday
and out of the total SGA only one
person was going to either
" P � III li i
concert. I think this clearly shows
the total student body's feelings
towards the entertainment pro-
vided this weekend. I am not
trying to slap the Student Union
or the Homeooming Committee
for the entertainment they were
able to line up this weekend. I
know it is hard to draw large,
well-known bands to this area,
but I don't see why the SGA has
been slapped down when they
were able to line up a good band
to oome here fa very little money.
In my opinion Dr. Jenkins has
vetoed Styx's playing just to keep
the conoerts under the Student
Union (where they rightly belong)
and to keep the SGA out of the
Student Union's business. When
the Student Union was split off
from the SGA each was given
distinct duties, and to this I can
Forum Policy
Forum letters should be
typed or printed and they must
be signed and include the
writer's address. Names will
be withheld upon request.
Letters may be sent to Foun-
tainhead or left at the Informa-
tion Desk in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
m
agree. What I can't see is why the
Student Union won't let the SGA
step in and spoisa aie concert.
The SGA is not looking for
publicity fa spaisaing a good
oonoert- the SGA is looking out
fa the students during a bad
weekend when thae could pos-
sibly be a la of trouble if the
students go downtown. This is
what the SGA is fa- helping and
waking fa the students- so I
don't see why Dr. Jenkins is rrot
allowing us to do something fa
the students we represent
I do hope that there won't be
any trouble downtown this year.
Last year it was na a pretty sight-
iust ask those students who were
arrested, harassed, tear-gassed,
bruised, cut, etc. The SGA will
have student watches on guard
downtown, but if thae is trouble
this year- don't blame the SGA!
We have tried our best to aid the
students during a busy weekend
in Greenville, and if something
does happen I don't feel the SGA
should take the blame what-so-
eva! So, Dr. Jenkins I hope thae
isn't any trouble - but it was your
decisiai. Students - we tried!
Jenni Harrison
Day Student Legislata
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1428 OCTOBER 1976
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Due process discussed
AAUP holds conference
tf
Due process for faculty of
community colleges was among
tht topics of reports presented to
the N.C. conference of the
American Association of Univer-
sity Professors in Greenville last
weekend.
Hosted by the ECU AAUP
chapter, the conference drew
delegates from private and public
colleges and universities in North
Carolina.
Representing Democratic
gubernatorial candidate Jim
Hunt, Greenville Daily Reflector
editor David Whichard II answer-
ed questions regarding Hunt's
positions on faculty tenure, due
process and col I ect i ve bargai n i ng.
The representative for Re-
publican candidate David Flaher-
ty was unable to attend the
conference.
Among the activities of a
Saturday morning business ses-
sion were passage of a resolution
re-endorsing the proposed Equal
Rights Amendment to the U.S.
Constitution, presentation of re-
ports on proposed procedure for
due process for community col-
lege personnel, and announce-
ment of plans to monitor hearings
of a General Assembly committee
on salaries for state employees.
Executive Secretary Ann
Brown reported on several cases
of alleged sex discrimination and
academic freedom infringement.
State Sen. Katherine Sebo of
Greensboro, featured conference
speaker, addressed the gathering
at a Saturday luncheon on
changes in public and private
education and stated that the
issue of support for students
attending private institutions of
higher education will probably be
"the most controversial" one for
the next General Assembly.
The proport ion of state funds
for higher education in North
Carolina is greater than in other
states she said. "General As-
sembly support for higher edu-
cation will probably not be ex-
Bell plays taps
(LNS)-Bell Telephone eaves-
drops and records thousands of
private telephone conversations
every day throughout the United
States, reports the Charlotte
Observer. The paper says that
over 430,000 Bell employees have
ready access to telephone lines
in the 48 continental states.
Under federal law and in most
states, the Bell System's eaves-
dropping is legal. Officials for the
company claim the practice is to
safeguard the system from mis-
use of telephone credit card
numbers, fraudulent long dis-
tance calling, and other fraudu-
lent uses of the phones.
panding nor will it receive very
high priority in relation ot other
problems
She also discussed increased
state involvement with commun-
ity colleges and technical insti-
tutes.
"Complexities are developing
now because these institutions
are under the administration of
the State Board of Educationshe
said.
"The Board's efforts have not
been very successful and there is
a question of effective adminis-
tration by a board mainly con-
cerned with primary and second-
ary education
BARS
Continued from page 3.
shown in Wright Auditorium at
11:30that night he added.
"Other events scheduled for
the weekend are the game and
the Homecoming Parade at 10
a.m. Sat said Robinson.
"The parade will start at Rose
High School, march to Fifth St.
and then downtown. There will be
45 entries this year stated
Robinson.
Sullivan predicted a peaceful
weekend. "There shouldn't have
been any trouble last year and
there shouldn't beany this year
he said. "Everyone is going all
out to see that there is something
going on (entertainment) all
weekend
FORYOUR VARIED LIFE,
A VARIETY OF rWCHES
BY SEIKO.

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1st Annual Outdoor HALLOWEEN
Music Festival
Located at Stokes, N.C-
(approx. 10 miles N.E. of Greenville)
Oct. 31 � From 12:00-12:00 mid.
6 Bands: 1-Delias High Band
2-Loafer's Glory
3-Larriat Sam
4-Tumbleweed
5- Super Grit Cowboy Band
6-Sutter's Gold Streak
$250.00 CASH PRIZE to the best Halloween Costume
Tickets available at
Rathskeller
Elbo Room
Tickets are $5.00 in advance
$6.00 at gate
Chapter X
ATTIC
Rock 'N Soul
Tree House
Jolly Roger
Newby's Subs
ATTIC SUNSET
WP
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1428 OCTOBER 1976
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Greenville's newest
brown-bagging club
(Formerly the Captain's Quarters
behindthe Attic)
Open Tuesday through Sunday
� Rock- Beach-Top 40 -Etc.
Live Bands on Wed. and Thurs.
Private membership
applications now being accepted
mm
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Count Basie Charlie Rich FG
Allot us at
U-REN-COwishthe
Pirates loads of luck
against W.C. and hope
this will be E.C.Us most
memorable
Homecoming-
Halloween.
Rent your party supplies and
after-the-party clean-up
supplies from us.
The Count Basie Orchestra
will Fry the Funk off your face in a
jazz of all decades blast in Wright
Auditorium this Saturday. Get
tickets at the Central Ticket Office
and dance those creases out of
your pants. Don't step on ants!
Free flick
On Friday and Saturday Nov.
5 & 6 the Films Committee of the
Student Union will present Robert
Redford and Barbra Streisand in
"The Way We Were
Shows at 7 & 9 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Theatre.
Admission: ID & activity card (or
MSC membership).
Music therapy
MUSIC AND MEDICINE-AN
ANCIENT TRADITION.
All are welcome to the first
meeting of ECU's recently organ-
ized Music Therapy Club. The
program will include a lecture
demonstration on music therapy
techniques for children with
developmental disorders by Mrs.
Rosemay G. Fischer, R.M.T
formerly with the Charles Lea
Rehabilitation Center, Spartans-
burg, S.C.
The meeting is Monday, Nov.
1, at 8:30 p.m. in MB 101.
Stamp Out Black Thumb
With These Great Buys.
ALL PLANTS REDUCED
20-50
3-4' Umbrella Trees and Weeping Figs
now 6" were12b
All 3" Pots of Exotic Tropical Plants
now just 66 were 99
All Hanging Baskets now 488
25 lbs. Brite Bloom Potting soil now 1"
OPEN SUNDAYS 1:30-5:30
kstyqe Qardeti Ceijter
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Charlie Rich will honky tonkhis
way into your hearts on Fri. Oct.
29 in Mingesat 8;00. Charlie Rich
started at Sun Records with Elvis
Kresley where the "Silver Fox"
wrote rockers like "Mohair Sam"
and "Wooley Bulley Charlie is
also one of Dylans favorite song
writers. Tickets at Central Ticket
Office in Mendenhall.
Murphey
The Forever Generation will
meet this Friday evening at 7:30
in the Biology Auditorium (Bio-
logy 103). Why not join us there?
Recreation
The Recreation Society will
meet Oct. 28, 8 p.m. in room 221
Mendenhall. The trip to Asheville
will be discussed. All studentsare
welcome.
Michael Murphey, the Fab-
ulous fiddler Vassar Clements,
and the amazing "Mr. Bojan-
gles Jerry Jeff Walker with his
Lost Gongo Band will electrify
Minges Coliseum on Sun Oct.
31 at 8 p.m. Get tickets now at the
Central Ticket Office in Menden-
hall!
Crusade
Campus Crusade for Christ
will meet this Thursday at 7 p.m.
in Brewster D-20. Come join us
for a time of practical teaching &
fellowship. Everyone's welcome!
Horror show Barbeque
The Horror Late Show this
Sunday Oct. 31 at 11:30 p.m. is
Rosemary's Baby. The Student
Union Films Committee will
present this frightening classic in
Wright Auditorium. Seating will be
slumber party style so bring a
blanket and a companion. Lets all
scream together after the Mur-
phey concert! Admission by ID's
and activity cards.
There will be a barbeque
dinner served Saturday from 11
a.m. until game-time beside the
Pirate Club building. If you don't
feel like cooking, oome on out.
Everyone invited. Only $2.50.
Haunted
Ski club
There is a mandatory meeting
for all persons interested in the
ski team or Ski Club. The meeting
will be Tuesday, Nov. 2, at 4;30 in
Memorial Gym. Officers are to be
elected and plans for long dis-
tance ski trips will be discussed.
Beginners welcome. Approved by
the Association for Skiing ir the
Left foot.
SHEA
The Student National Educa-
tion Association will hold its
second meeting of the year on
Wednesday, Nov. 3 at 7 p.m. in
the Multi-Purpose Room at Men-
denhall. Dr. Jones, Dean of the
Education Department, will be
our guest speaker for the eve-
ning. All interested persons are
invited to attend. Refreshments
will be served.
Model UH
The Model United Nations
Club will meet Thurs. Oct. 28 at 7
p.m. in Brewster C-104. All those
interested in international rela-
tions, foreign affairs, diplomacy
and the United Nations itself are
urged to attend.
Plans concerning the Model
U.N. Conference to be held at the
University of Pennsylvania in
Philadelphia November 4-7 will
be discussed. The ECU Model
U.N. Club will be sending a
couple of delegations to this
conference. For further informa-
tion, call David Mayo at 758-7578.
ili�i��Wii�HlH
Wanna get scared right out of
your skin?
Come to the Jaycee' s Haunted
House on Evans St. beside old
Wilkerson Funeral Home from
7-10 p.m. nitely through Sunday.
The $1 admission will go for
the Jaycee's hospital and charity
fund.
Come and get the daylights
scared out of you.
"The Blob"
The Student Union Video
Tape Committee presents for
your Halloween enjoyment "The
Blob starring Steve McQueen.
Continuous shows daily, the
Lobby of Mendenhall Student
Center. 9 p.m thru 11 p.m
Monday thru Thursday. 9 p.m.
thru 12 p.m. Friday. "The Blob"
par one-Tuesday & Thursday.
"The Blob" part two-Wednesday
& Friday.
Dietetics
The Student Dietetic Association
will hold its monthly meeting,
Monday, Nov. 1. A oookout is
planned for 630; those planning
to attend are asked to bring a
vegetable, salad, or dessert.
Please go by the FNIM
bulletin board in the Home Ec.
building to sign your name and
what dish you will bring. The
meat and tea will be provided.
The oookout will be outside
between the Home Ec building
and the Child Dev. playground.
The regular meeting will be at
7:00 in the Inst. Mngmt Dining
Room. Dues will be collected at
this time; dues are $1.00.
Any persons interested in
food, be it food service manage-
ment, dietetics, or other, is
invited. So oome on and join in on
;he fun!
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 1428 OCTOBER 1976
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Investigation at Marion
reveals prison 'cover-up1
(LNS)lt's a oover-up. The
investigatas didn't tell the pri-
soners when they were ooming to
Marion (Penitentiary), and during
the three days they were th e
(August 18-20), they didn't ev n
talk to the prisoners who we ?
beaten or the prisoners who
witnessed the beatings and re-
ported them in the first place
Audrey Aronson Meyers, co-
director of the National Commit-
tee to Support the Marion Bro-
thers, was commenting on the
recently released government re-
port on beatings in the Long Term
Control Unit at the Marion,
Illinois Federal Prison.
The report, which grew out of
a U.S. Justice Department inves-
tigation into beatings that occur-
red between January and July of
1976, absolved Marion officials
and guards of all responsibility.
The report also denied that
several reported beatings had
even taken place.
"We didn't even know an
investigation had taken place
until two weeks later when we
received copies of the report in
the mail one Drisoner rioted
Another man, one of four
Marion prisoners beaten last
April 27th, commented: "I must
say that the investigation oovered
up everything the officers did.
The investigators tried to justify
the guards' behavior
A spokesperson for the
National Prison Project of the
American Civil Liberties Union in
Washington D.C. expressed dis-
may over the report:
"We are aware of the as-
saults, she said We know they
took place, and we are calling for
a new investigation by an agency
independent of the Justice De-
partment
The Marion Long Term Con-
trol Unit was set up in 1972 to
break a work stoppage at the
prison-the most maximum secur-
ity prison in the federal system.
Since then, the unit has been
used to confine prison activists,
jailhouse lawyers, and members
of the Nation of Islam brought
from other state and federal
prisons in the U.S Puerto Rioo
and the Virgin Islands.
The Justice Department in-
vestigation was conducted at the
request of Congress member
Herman Badillo (DN.Y.) after
he was pressured by many
demands for an inquiry. Witnes-
ses charged that prisoners had
been beaten with blackjacks and
baseball bats and, in some cases,
had had urine thrown on them by
guards.
The report denied six of the
nine beatings reported, and
claimed that in the other three
incidents, baseball bats had not
been used.
Two guards admitted they had
thrown urine at prisoner sand that
"containersof urine were kept in
an office cabinet for such pur-
poses Higher prison officials
claimed they had no knowledge of
the urine-throwing incidents or
the cabinet supply.
Although officials denied that
most of the beatings had occur-
red, they promised that black-
jacks would no longer be used at
the prison. Guards who were
charged with the beatings have
been moved out of the control
unit into the general population,
with no reason given for their
transfers.
'Cinergy1 features thriller
If you're delighted at ghosts,
goblins, and witches during past
halloweens, good for you! How-
ever, that's not what this feature
isabout. "Cinergy the Student
Unin Films Committee, is fea-
turing "ROSEMARY'S BABY"
as a Halloween classic Sunday
night, October 31, at 11 20 p.m.
in Wright Auditorium. Wait
Before you groan and flip the
page, let me try to sell you on the
flick. After all, I have nine
month's experience as a salesman
at Nichols Discount City.
The film is, just basically, a
damn frightening movie about a
woman for whom life becomes a
hellish nightmare. The story
revolves around Rosemary, who
is brutally and savagely raped by
Lucifer (better known as "Old
Scratch"), himself. Presto! Enter
Rosemary's Baby. This hellish
creature, which was edited com-
pletely from the film fa tele-
vision, is a sales pitch for
contraceptives. "It's" guaran-
teed not to inspire you to walk up
and offer to hold it. If you've
survived the EXORCIST, you've
got to "experience" ROSE-
MARYS BABY. This version is
totally uncut, uncensored, and
unnerving. Activity Card,I.D and
a stout heart are required fa
admission. It's advised since
there will not be seats, to bring a
warm blanket and a oool friend a
a oool blanket and a warm friend.
By the way, Rosemary's Baby has
arrived and is under lock and key.
It will make an appearance during
the flick. Screaming is permitted
at regularly spaced intervals.
The choice is simple: on
Halloween night, come to the flick
and have a deep impression make
inside your head; a go to the riot
and have a depression made on
your head. Y'all Come.
. !
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Drop by
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8
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52. NO. 1428 OCTOBER 1976
mt i mi wimi
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Students blame police
for '75 Halloween riots
Music Arts Inc.
Pitt Plaza Greenville
756-3522
W� Flnnce-W� Sarvic
W� T��ch-W� Deliver
Editor's note: This is the last
article of the series on the SGA
funded Student Opinion Survey.
The study was conducted during
the Spring at a cost of approxi-
mately $1,000. The survey is 79
pages long and comprises five
chapters. This final article deals
with Chapter V, Attitudes on
Campus Issues.
Responsibility for the violenoe
in downtown Greenville on Hal-
loween night last year should rest
with the city police, according to
71.9 per cent of those responding
to the Student Opinion Survey.
Another 23.3 per cent felt the
police and the crowd were equally
responsible while the remaining
4.8 per cent indicated that the
crowd was mostly at fault.
"WATCH IT DEFY GRAVITY
AT
FICKLEN STADIUM
Greenville, N.C.
Saturday, October 30
11:00 A.M4:00 P.M.
Jft
�b PRESENTED BY �&
Budweiser King of Beers
?V
"A look at the demographics
of the students who answered this
question reveals that most who
placed the blame on the author-
ities were younger, in age from 18
to 23 the survey states. "The
younger the student and the
lower his classification the more
adamant he was toward placing
the blame on police, it was found.
Seventy-eight and six-tenths per
cent of those 18 and under said
the police were mostly at fault
while students 24 and over took a
more moderate stand which gave
the crowd more blame. Only 27.9
per cent of the older students
placed the responsibility for the
Halloween riot on the police
The survey also found that
46.2 per cent of those polled were
interested in registering and
voting in Greenville.
The survey committee in-
cluded the two last questions:
"What do you like most about
East Carolina University?" and
"What do you like least about
East Carolina?"
The least liked aspect was
parking on campus. "This was
the only category in which
students often underlined, placed
stars, asterisks or used other
drawings to attract special at-
tention to their opinions" the
survey stated.
The students also had very
negative attitudes about the
administration, drop-add, and
registration procedures.
Opinions concerning the
friendliness of students on cam-
pus was by far the category most
frequently written, according to
the survey report. "It seems that
students feel it is easy to make
new friends at East Carolina and
that generally everyone is friend-
ly to each other. There were very
few negative opinions in this
category
NCRAelects Prexy
Dr. Paul P. Alston, an asso-
ciate professor of Rehabilitation
Counseling in the ECU School of
Allied Health and Social Profes-
sions has been elected president
of the N.C. Rehabilitation Asso-
ciation.
Alston was chosen at the
Association's annual conference
Oct. 14-15 in Charlotte.
The NCRA is comprised of
professionals in the rehabilitation
field and is the state division of
the National Rehabilitation Asso-
ciation. Its function is to promote
professional standards for its
members and to lobby for legisla-
tion to better serve handicapped
persons.
A native of Halifax County,
Alston is the associate coordina-
tor of the ECU Department of
Rehabilitation Counseling. He
has been a member of the ECU
faculty since 1969.
Don Vick
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1428 OCTOBER 1976
9
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ECU loses free
entertainment
By DAVID NASH &
BRENDA NORRIS
Staff Writers
STYX and ARTFUL DODGER
will not appear Homecoming
weekend due to funding compli-
cations between the Student
Government Association (SGA)
and the Student Union.
Chancellor Leo Jenkins re-
fused to act on a resolution from
the SGA to intervene in a
stalemate and allow the Home-
coming Steering Committee to
hold a meeting to permit STYX to
appear on campus Friday night
Homecoming weekend.
The rejection came through
Dr. James H. Tucker, Dean of
Student Affairs.
According to rules of the
committee, the co-chairpersons of
the committee would have had to
call an emergency meeting to
permit STYX to appear on
campus Friday evening. Neither
C.G. Brown nor Barry Robinson
would consent to call a meeting
saying there was already ade-
quate entertainment, according to
SGA President Tim Sullivan.
The original committee rules
provided only for an SGA funded
concert on Saturday night.
"We (the sub-committee),
met and the following motion was
made by me: that the sub-com-
mittee book ARTFUL DODGER
for a free concert on Saturday
night and also that the sub-com-
mittee meet to bring STYX Friday
night said President Sullivan.
"STYX agreed to perform for
$2,500 he added.
"STYX agreed to fly in from
California becausj they were
doing it as a favor to ECU to ease
a possible bad situation and to
help seal a new albumsaidI
Sullivan.
"Because they're only charg-
ing us $2,500, they're obviously
not doing it for the money
Sullivan pointed out.
According to Barry Robinson,
Student Union President, the
usual price fa STYX is $25,000.
According to Robinson, the
SGA made appropriations to the
Homecoming Steering Committee
of $7,000 for extra entertainment
on campus for Saturday, October
30, providing the event would be
free and there would be no
alcoholic beverages.
"The money was not turned
over to the Homecoming Steering
Committee until Monday after-
noon said Robinson.
ARTFUL DODGER was al-
ready booked by then.
"The money got tied up in
SGA red tape concluded Rob-
inson.
According to Tim Sullivan, the
$7,000 had to go through the
proper channels.
After the money was approved
at the October 18 legislature
meeting, the requisition had to be
signed by Tommy Thomason,
SGA Treasurer, initialed by Dr.
Jack Thornton, Student Fund
Accounting Advisor, signed by
Joyce Owens in the Student Fund
Accounting Office, and approved
by C.G. Moore in the office of
Business Affairs.
"The procedure usually takes
two to four days said Sullivan,
indicating the funds should have
been approved by Thursday, Oct.
21.
"Thursday, Dean (Rudolph)
Alexander, Asst. Dean of Student
Affairs, made a request that the
requisition be made more flexible
so extra security guards could be
hired for Saturday night said
Sullivan.
At that time, Alexander
assured me it would not delay the
funds he added.
The money was always there
but Alexander refused to sign a
contract with ARTFUL DOD-
GER until themoney was in the
proper account said Sullivan.
"This is why, at this time, we
only have Count Basie scheduled
for Saturday night
According to Dean Alexander
the cost of the three acts
Homecoming weekend is ap-
proximately $35,000.
According to Sullivan, he is in
contact with a group who will be
willing to do a concert Friday
night.
However, the band would
have to be approved by the
Homecoming Sub-Committee in
an emergency meeting, yet to be
called.
North Carolina s Number 3 Rock Nightclub
ATTIC
THURSDAY 1 STEAMBOAT
1 SPRINGS
F�.0� A SpIKEgnd
SATURDAY
McEf
NEXTWEEK-
mon&tues. MORNING SONG
Attention
Students and Patrons
The Greenville Nightclub Association is making plans for the upcoming Homecoming
and Halloween weekend the last of this month. We have decided voluntarily that we wish to
dose Sunday night in order to promote and support what we believe to be a really exciting
event being planned near Stokes-10 miles from Greenville. The First Annual Halloween
Music Festival will start at noon on Sunday and run until midnight. Six non-stop, great bands
and a $250 first prize fa the best-or-worst Halloween costume-should make for a terrific
last day of the Homecoming weekend.
The dub owners have asked the City to work with them to insure a fun and safe weekend
for students, guests and residents of Greenville. It's really a matter of trust and common
sense for all of us. Just think about it and help us help you.
Saturday night we will be open until our regular hours, but we have dedded to stop our
refreshment sales at midnight. The City has agreed to block off to traffic Fifth and Cotanche
Streets between Fourth Street and Reade Cirde and Evans and Reade. Each dub manager
and four of his employees will be outside to help you have a safe and enjoyable evening.
You'll recognize them because of the distindive arm bands they" II be wearing. They'llexped
you to condud yourself as ladies and gentlemen.
We are doing all this out of concern for you. If s your Homecoming and we want to show
the City, people of Greenville and ourselves that we can have a really nice weekend and a
really good time.
We're serious about it though and have given it a lot of thought. Please think about it too
and help us and yourself.
See you Homecoming.
Greenville
Nightclub
Association
HOMECOMING WEEKEND SPECIAL
THUR-SUN
STEAKS LOBSTER
GORMETSALAD BAR
Hours:
Lunch
11:30-2:30
Dinner
5:30-11:00
DAILY
LUNCHEON
SPECIALS
PARTY ROOM
SJ47 � 7 6 Evans St.
Ijgj Phone 758 - 9588
FREE BEER WITH GAME TICKET LIMIT ONE
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 1428 OCTOBER 1976

inning J
Vets to sha
Beginning Jan. 1, armed
foroes enlistees will have to save
part of their military pay in order
to receive federal education aid
after they are discharged, accord-
ing to a government press
release.
This new program is replacing
the monthly government checks
that veterans are now receiving
for education, under the 1944 Gl
Bill of Rights.
After Jan. 1, the federal
government will give $2 for every
re in college costs
$1 Wraman cot ici .4�ll. : in:��� �i
$1 servicemen set aside while in
the service.
Enlistees involved in the
present Gl program will not be
affected by the new program.
The new criteria for govern-
ment assistance in post-service
education is expected to reduce
the number of participants in the
Gl programs drastically and cut
the program's cost by several
hundred million dollars per year.
The new program came about
as a result of the switch to an
SONY
STR-48009n tM STEREOFM-AM RECEIVER
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lloso.
pOWER
ex ON �1 OFF
VOUM
HeAPPHON�S
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Features
' aSFSg�nb"end elec,ronics unitized into tuning capacitor
� FET RF amplifier and uni-phase IF filters
� Pha-e-Locked-Loop IC stereo MPX stage
� Doloy' noise reduction system for decoding Dolbyized FM
broadcasts, and Dolby indicator light
� Center station and signal strength meters
� Easy to read frequency linear FM and AM dial scales and
smooth flywheel tuning action
� Dial pointer with LED station indicator
� FM interstation muting
� Ultra low noise LEC transistor phono equalizer ci.cuit
� Connections for aux, phono and 2 tape decks
� Tape-to-tape dubbing facility
� 20dB instant audio muting
� Acoustic compensator with positions for bass boost
presence and loudness
� High and low filters
� Differential power amp input stage
� Direct coupled, true complementary symmetry Darlinqton
connected power output circuit
� Outputs for 2 pairs of speakers
� 2 AC convenience outlets
� Wooden side panels included
SUPER SAVINGS
ON ALL SONY AT
Harmony
House South
ON THE CORNER- ON THE MALL
BEST PRICE
all-volunteer Army, according to
the Veterans Administration
(VA).
The government no longer
feels a need to help veterans
return to a life interrupted by
voluntary military service.
Ford administration and the
House Veterans' Affairs Commit-
tee agreed with this philosophy
and, in 1975 introduced proposals
to halt all educational benefits to
veterans of the Vietnam war.
Members of the Senate Vete-
rans' Affairs Committee, the
education lobby and veterans'
organizations, however, support-
ed continuing the benefits citing
the following reasons:
Readjustment is still difficult
for veterans. Evidence has cited a
need for readjustment benefits
such as the high unemployment
rate of young Vietnam vets.
Gl educational benefits help
many disadvantage and minority
vets gain access to a higher
education.
Education aid has proven to
be a highly important recruiting
incentive.
The new shared payment
program was a compromise.
Signed by President Ford earlier
this month, it will be re-examined
in five years.
This bill has increased, by 8
per cent, the present monthly
allowance to vets for education. It
also allows for graduate study
instead of just undergraduate
degrees.
The VA has now increased its
maximum annual loan available
for vets' education from $600 to
$2,000.
The bill calls for strict report-
ing from the schools on vets
using the program; those who are
not attending classes or are in any
other way abusing the benefits
will lose them.
Veterans will receive their
education allowance after a
month of classes, not before.
Since 1944, 16.5 million vets
have used up to $40 billion in
financial educational aid under
the Gl bill.
VA officials predict that only
approximately 10 per cent of the
future vets will participate in the
new program.
At least 61.4 per cent of the
Vietnam vets and 50 per cent of
the World War II vets participat-
ed under the present Gl bill.
ECUgets
fed. grant
A total of $208,081 in state
and federal government grants
was awarded ECU during Sep-
tember. The funds are intended to
support four research or service
projects at ECU.
A total of $184,760 was
granted the ECU Developmental
Evaluation Clinic to support a
regional child screening, parent
counseling and referral program.
The funds originated from the
N.C. Department of Human Re-
sources.
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1428 OCTOBER 1976
11

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wmm
mm
ECU readies for homecoming
Greeks sponsor
festivities
By MONICA SUTHERLAND
Staff Writer
Greeks are coordinating the
parade and the Pirate contest for
Homeooming.
According to Bill Benson,
Inter-fraternity council president,
Homeooming festivities are much
more organized than in the past.
"We are not anticipating any
problems except rain said
Benson.
The parade will oonsist of 39
units including eight high school
bands, two high school drill teams
and the ECU Marching Pirates.
The parade will assemble in
front of the Elm St. gym and
proceed down Elm to Fifth St.The
parade will then turn left onto
Fifth St. and march past the
Chancel la's home and the re-
viewwing stand. The route turns
right off Fifth St. and onto
Washington St then down to
Third St. At Third St. the parade
will turn on Reade Circle back to
Fifth St. and disband.
A panel of three judges, all
interior designers not associated
with the university, will judge the
floats, house and dorm decora-
tions. The criteria include origi-
nality, effectiveness, adherence
to theme and creativeness.
The Greeks are also handeling
the Homeooming Pirate oontest
and crowning. Twenty-three girls
are competing for the title which
will be announced at halftime of
the Homeooming game.
Benson feels that this Home-
ooming will be very successful
and even better than those in the
past.
THIS YEARS HOMECOMING PARADE is predicted to be better
organized than even this 1971 edition. Fountamhead file photo
Alumni plan to
5 drink and dance
By DENNIS FOSTER
Staff Writer
ECU'soffioeof Alumni Affairs
hasafull day of activities planned
for visiting alumni this Home-
ooming Saturday.
From 9 a.m. until noon a
registration booth for Alumni will
be located on Wright Circle near
the fountain. Interested persons
are urged to attend. Maps of the
campus wi11 be available for those
not familiar with recent renova-
tions.
A keg social will be held after
the game at the Greenville Moose
Lodge. Admission and beer are
free for alumni.
The Monitors, an Eastern
North Carolina band, will enter-
tain. The Monitors are made up of
m
m
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ECU graduates and graduate
students and feature a female
vocalist. Playing a mixture of
soul, top 40, and "oldie goldies"
the band has been very well
received in past years.
At 8:30 Saturday night there
will also be an Alumni Musical
Extravaganza and Dance, at the
Moose Lodge. Beer, set-ups and
heavy hor d'oeuvres, will be
supplied.
Continuous music of the fifties
will be provided by the "Tarns
the "Clovers and "Maurice
Williams and the Zodiacs
Tickets are $20.00 per couple
and may be ordered through the
Alumni Office. This Homecoming
dance is the meeting place for
alumni during the weekend and
should prove entertaining.
1976 CHEERLEADING SQUAD
Photo by Russ Pogue)
Cheerleaders add pizazz
to Homecoming plans
By HELENA WOODARD
Assistant News Editor
"We may not have won over
Carolina last week, but it sure
doesn't mean we can't win this
"Homeooming" week. We are
urging everyone to come out and
support the team
With those vows of enthu-
siasm, Dawn Williamson, captain
of the ECU Cheerleader squad,
touched off a score of activities
planned for both pre-Home-
ooming and Homecoming festivi-
ties.
Five parachuters, one of
whom will bring down the game
ball, will touch down on the
football field just before game
time.
Hundreds of pom poms, given
by the Homecoming Steering
Committee, will be passed out
freely at the gates by the ECU
Junior Varsity cheerleading
squad.
A free keg of beer will be
given away by Pabst distributor
Joe Hollow for the best banner
display at the game. An area win
be designated for banner dis-
plays. ("We really appreciate all
the banners brought by students
to the ECU-Chapel Hill game last
week Dawn said.)
According to Dawn, the cheer-
ing squad tentatively plans to " roll
out a red carpet" for the ECU
players to make their entrance on.
ECU fans will be arranged on
either side of the carpet to cheer
the players as they enter the field.
Community merchants have
also taken an active part in ECU
game support. According to
Dawn, free footballs, provided by
the Greenville Pepsi Cola Co
will be thrown out to fans by the
cheerleaders at halftime.
ECU male squad members
were provided with purple and
gold shirts this Fall by
McDonalds on tenth street.
Meanwhile, prior to the
Homeooming game, a happy hour
will be conducted at the Elbo
room on Friday night. At that
time, tickets are expected to be
given away for Sunday night's
concert (Oct. 31.)
Meanwhile, this year's cheer-
ing squad has undergone some
recent changes. Dawn William-
son was elected captain by the
other squad members and has
served in this position since the
beginning of Fall Quarter. She
came to ECU in 1974 from
Chowan College where she also
cheered.
I was a JV cheerleader there
first before serving as Varsity
cheerleader for two years Dawn
said.
The cheering squad also oon-
sist s of four members who
recently taught cheerleader
camps at various high schools
during past summers.
"We practice here three times
each week with two hours practice
per session Dawn said.
Though our stunts are pretty
standard, Squad member Pat
Kinlaw creates all our danoe
routines
The ECU Cheering Squad
consists of Edna Pivott and Mark
Lewis, Leigh Davis and John
Kearns, Freaa Brown and Ftobby
Walters, Peggy Walker and Tom-
my Sexton, Dorothy Harrell and
Pat Kinlaw(the Pirate couple),
and Dawn Williamson and Ken-
neth Lanier.
Boozers face denial
By BECKY BRA DSH AW
Staff Writer
Any person carrying alcoholic
beverages into ECU football
games can be denied admittance
to Fioklen Stadium.
According to Iverson Mac-
Kenzie Security, if a person is
carrying alcohol, they will be
asked to leave it outside the
stadium.
Ice chests, containers, ther-
mos bottles and glass bottles will
be prohibited.
"If we see it, we're stopping
it said MacKenzie.
Nc only is this a university
policy, it is also a state law.
As stated in the N.C. General
Statute 18 A-30(5), section b, "It
shall be unlawful for any person
to make any public display of
alooholic beverages at any athle-
tic contest
The main ooncern in this
matter is the safety of the
spectators, players and of fiaais at
the games, aooording to ECU
Athletic Director Bill Cain.
According to Joseph Calder,
director of Campus Security,
there have been several bottle
throwing incidents resulting in
injuries to fans.
"We may cut down on some
bottle throwing incidents by
enforcing the law said Calder.
He added that there are ABC
officers present at all games.
They have the right to arrest
anyone for public display of
alcohol said Calder.
Usually, however, they will
ask the person to pour out the
aloohol, aooording to Calder.
Bill Cain expressed oonoern
about the safety of spectators.
"We certainly want to protect
students and fans to the utmost,
so we will enforce the law said
Cain.
Students have complained a-
bout being searched as they enter
the stadium.
MacKenzie said, "As far as
the search goes, we only request
a search if we suspect the person
is carrying alcohol. We cannot
demand
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12
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1428 OCTOBER 1976
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The many different spiritio
A journey back through the past
with Homecomings of yesteryear
By MICHAEL FUTCH way to answer this dumb omp- in the place because of mass 1969's Homecoming theme
By MICHAEL FUTCH
Assistant Trends Editor
It's Homecoming again and
ECU appears to be hosting
everyone but the Waltons. The
students are being bombarded
with an overstock of entertain-
ment that's bound to affect the
pocket. On Wednesday, everyone
can "make a wish" with Tom
Chapin; why not wish for some-
one else? Charlie Rich gives us a
view of the way we were on
Friday night. Saturday delivers us
from evil with The Count Basie-
iess Orchestra and a possible mall
conoert sponsored by the Student
Government Association (politics
and music seem to be mixing on
all levels now). There's a lot of
entertainment and recreation
scheduled for Sunday (whatever
happened to the Puritan Ethic and
the day of rest idea?). Stokes is
holding the 1st and probably last
Annual Outdoor Halloween Music
Festival. There is an evening of
oountry-rock awaiting in Minges
with Jerry Jeff Walker and The
Lost Gonzo Band, the Vassar
Clements Band and Michael
"Treehouse" Murphey. Whew
now that's a hell of a lot of music
and money.
Have we ever had it this
"good" before during Home-
coming, one might question him
herself. There's only one possible
way to answer this dumb oilec-
tion: by taking a journey through
the past and see.
Last year ECU joined the
throng of Buy-centennial celebra-
tors with a salute to the U.S. and
its birthday. Ike and Tina Turner
really blew out the candles by not
showing up. They had the nerve
to wait six hours before curtain to
notify the campus; there were
many who would have loved to
roll them down the Tar River. The
students did get a chance to see
Linda Ronstadt, Andrew Gold and
Goose Greek Symphony the Tues-
day before Homecoming week-
end.
The "Rock and Roll Era" was
the theme in '74 and the
highlights were a Marx Brothers
film festival and a "sock hop"
held in Wright with the Spon-
tanesand the Shirelles. Man, did
they get out cheap that year.
Who oould ever forget 1973?
(probably everyone).The timeless
Temptations played on a Friday
night, while Lynard Skynard
almost blew the speakers before
Wet Willie oould oome on that
Sunday. Bluesman John Ham-
mond (although he's never paid
no dueshis father is A&R
executive for Columbia Records)
started the program off. Remem-
ber the problems with Minges
floor after the show? Wet Willie
almost rained out further concerts
in the place because of mass
hysteria, due to excess rock 'n
roll.
Capitol's aging Beach Boys (I
would love to see Brian Wilson try
to skate board) and "The Boy
Wonder Stevie Wonder, offer-
ed their talents-for an unreason-
able sum of oourse-for the 1972
Homecoming weekend.
1971 grabbed Jethro Tull on
the way up (ECU has a knack for
either that or on the way down) to
national popularity. David Gates
and Bread were also offered on a
silver platter for the Homecoming
activities. I wonder how many
crumbs spent money on that
bunch?
At the turn of the decade,
when other campuses were heat-
edly in the midst of protest and
revolution, ECU ocoled its stu
dents off with "the ice man
Jerry Butler. There was more soul
with The Friends of Distinction,
and guess who else? That's right,
from Canada, the Guess Who,
with tunes like "American Wo-
man" and "Share the Land Not
to do injustice to the Homecoming
program, the headliners were
backed up by The Green Lyte.
This path-setting group was
described by the '71 FOUNTAIN-
HEAD as: "Their music spans
the spectrum and is truly of
today I guess they were unable
to adjust to tomorrow.
1969s Homecoming theme
was "Disneyland-A Tribute to
Walt Disney Believe me, Walt
made another classic with this
one. Dionne Warwick and the
Fifth Dimension were the enter-
tainment as the sun shone in on
ECU. This was the same year as
the Dimension had a number one
hit with "Aquarius, Let the Sun-
shine In so this was pretty
serious stuff. Woodstock was just
a shout away.
Remember '68; The Vietnam
War, the Republican Convention
in Chicago, the year McCarthy
had a chance, Bobby Kennedy, a
nation in turmoil and finding the
wrong man to solve its problems?
Well, while this was going on, the
Homecoming oommittee hosted
Paul Anka and what Dean Alex-
ander called the best orchestra he
had ever seen for a pops concert,
yep, Paul Anka and his 17-piece
orchestra. He needed something
to drown out those syrupy vocals.
The Platters also displayed their
magic touch. There was no need
to worry about smoke getting in
your eyes, because there was only
a minority of dope smokers on
campus then. The Shadows and
the Psychotrons played at a street
dance after the pep rally in a
special program emceed by Dy-
namic Dave (whoever the hell he
was).
The Englishmen Chad and
Jeremy played for the '67 crowd
in Memorial Gym; the Happen-
ings (?) provided music for a
danoe in Wright. That was a fun
Homecoming.
The highlight in '66 was the
crowning of the Homecoming
Queen by U.S. Senator Sam J.
Ervin. The Four Seasons "made
it a year" to be soon forgotten.
The Ratters were talent in '65
as the theme was "Roaring
Through the '20's Take it from
me, it didn't take too long. This
group had very few Top 20 singles
in'65.
Ray Charles and orchestra
performed in '64 as students took
pride in the theme of "Meet the
New ECC Ironically the Home-
ooming activities began on Fri-
day, Nov. 13 and it took 3 more
years before the school achieved
University status.
ECU had some very diverse
talent between the years of '61
and '63, such as Dave Astor, the
Lettermen, Johnny Nash and
Frank Gorshin. Could the two
comedians have been a prophesy
of the future, when an entire
student body would take this
place as a joke?
Indeed, 1976 can never com-
pare with the Homecoming enter-
tainment that was held in 1960-
aocording to the BUCCANEER of
that year, "Mr. E. and his Men
provided sounds Now that was
a Homecoming to remember.
Frats heigte
with roung
In thinking of the factors thbine to m
should be, songs of all typesa as imp
cheerleaders, or anything else30
Fight songs have long beercia1 doma
They can range from straight, siented tun
of sexual prowess.
FOUNTAINHEAD oontacUPus fratei
collecting some of these cokings for
Unfortunately, all but two of ths declined
art form. The reasons for submitting
embarrassment at their oolorfJe to an
helping the campus newspape
Our thanks to the two grou took the I
that's where school spirit is re
DELhAPHI
Were a Hell Jw from EC
and we don't damn.
We came to fr break the
and flunk theams.
To Hell withe
To Hell with Jo-
lt you ain't fc'i'ates,
to Hell, toH�you.
TAUKrPSILON
He rambled ii�ven
to see the felloe,
and there they" loafing
around the go'r-
Some were sfT9arettes
and he was ate.
for they were friends of
and frater TEI
He rambled dHades
to see the pocouls.
the ATOsandChis
were roasting coals.
The Delta Taielta Sigs
to burn had Jun.
While all the on velvet s
were watching tun.
Adam was thnan
to ever wear
Solomon wasest
theTEKEShan in.
Samson was t man
but he had ar
If Julius Caee back to life
we'd pledge lof a bitch.

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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1428 OCTOBER 1976
13
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mA
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Ml
m
of ECU Homecoming '76
leicten spirit
oung songs
the factors thDme to make school spirit what it
of all types as important as the team, the
inything else-
ive long beef0"31 domain of social fraternities,
xnstraight, s'ented tunes to bawdy expressions
:AD contacttPus fraternities in the hopes of
f these cdgs for all students to enjoy,
but two of t(Vs declined to offer samples of this
reasons for submitting songs ranged from
t their oolorure to an outright disinterest in
js newspape
the two groU took the time to help us. Maybe
ol spirit is re
DELT,A PHI
ie'reaHelPwfromECU
nd we don'tdamn-
4e came tobreak the rules
nd flunk theams.
o Hell with a
o Hell with �
you ain't fc'rates,
3 Hell, toHyou.
TAUKrPSILON
3 rambled U�ven
see the felloe.
id there they11 loafing
ound the gol'r-
ime were srraoarettes
id he was ate.
r they were 1 friends of his
id frater TEI
b rambled dades
see the pocouls.
e ATOsandCn'S
3re roasting coals,
le Delta TaPelta Sigs
burn had jiJ
hileall the1 on velvet seats
are watching tun.
dam was thfan
i ever wear
jlomon waeest
!eTEKESh3nin.
jmson was i man
jt he had ar
Julius Case back to life,
e'd pledgsiof a bitch.
'Blackbeard's Ghost' remains
in East Carolina's Pirate symbol
By GEORGE A. THREEWITTS
ECU News Bureau
GREENVILLE-fhe pirate, a
symbol of ECU and its athletic
teams, was adopted from the
legend and lore of coastal North
Carolina and was a natural choice
for a nickname when intercollegi-
ate athletics began at the school
more than 42 years ago.
Pirates, fierce and colorful,
were prominent in North Caro-
lina'soolonial period. The state's
Outer Banks which jut far out into
the Atlantic were ideal hideouts
for these legendary gangsters of
the high seas. Many had homes
and families in the small villages
along the Carolina ooast.
Edward Teach, best known as
"Blackbeard" was a resident of
Eastern North Carolina. He had a
house at Ocracoke on the Outer
Banks and an inland home at Bath
on the Pamlioo River.
ECU'S interest in pirates and
sea lore began in 1934. That year,
the Teooan, the yaarbook for what
was then East Carolina Teachers
College, carried pirates as its
theme. The pages were filled with
paintings and sketches of patched
eye figures, tall ships and buried
treasure. The book referred to the
tales of the infamous Teachy the
Pirate" often told by natives in
the nearby historic town of Bath.
The men's varsity team, at
the time, was known as "The
Teachers a lackluster band of
athletes who had won only two
football games in three seasons of
existence. But the student body
interest in pirates quickly result-
ed in changing the name of the
team to capture the romantic
appeal of the early sea advent-
urers. The change brought so
much enthusiasm that in the
following year, 1935, the Pirate
football team had a much better
season, winning three of its six
games.
The 1932 team, the first men's
team in thie history of what had
been mostly a teacher training
school for women, was called the
"Co-ed" team. But the Coeds
had an unspectacular first year
losing all five of their games by an
average score of 37.4 points per
game.
Prior to the introduction of
athletics for men, the ECTC
Athletic Association, comprising
women athletes in basketball,
tennis, baseball and archery were
content with the more classical
nicknames. A 1930-31 Handbook
fa ECTC listed the two teams
that made up the Athletic Associ-
ation as the Olympians and the
Athenians. Their colors were
purple and gold (the same as
today's colas) and the mascot
was a wildcat.
Fa a number of years a Great
Dane was the otfioial mascot fa
the Pirates. The dog was pur-
chased in 1959 by the student
government association who built
him an A-frame house and pen
behind Memorial Gym and
named him Buc (shat fa Buc-
canea). Mrs. Agnes W. Barrett,
an observer and recader of ECU
history since 1930, and the
secretary-administrative assistant
to six presidents, described Buc
as handsome and loveable. But
she said he let the Pirate team
down as a masoot.
"He liked milk and disliked
the smell of beer; hated the band
and was terrified of aowds. To
see him being led, almost drag-
ged, around the football field did
little to whoop up enthusiasm in
the stands she said.
The latest pirate mascot,
1972-74, was an albino dog
resembling "Pete" in the Little
Rascals films. The animal had a
mae propitious nature and was
named Wild Dog in hona of the
Pirate defensive unit called "The
Wild Dog This name was
aiginated in 1972 by Dick Jones,
local area spats announcer who
referred to the players as " a pack
of wild dogs as he broadcast the
play by play early in the season.
Wild Dog appeared to take
great pride in h:3 role as masoot
and enjoyed parading around the
playing field with his name
painted on his sides and a black
circle drawn around his left eye.
In 1974, the pirate fans attending
the N.C. StateECU game in
Raleigh displayed uproarious ap-
proval as Wild Dog took an
immediate dislike to State's wolf
masoot and made evay effort to
attack the more docile wolf
throughout most of the pregame
activities.
Other uses of the pirate theme
began in the 1940s with a literary
magazine named "Pieces of
Eight The name, however, was
lata changed to "Rebel
The college yearbook became
the "Buccaneer" in the 1950s
and the pirate symbol, the face of
a bearded, patched eye character
with a crossed bone emblem on
his hat was added to the school
seal in the mid 1960s.
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1428 OCTOBER 1976
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Homecoming games of past
By STEVE WHEELER
Sports Editor
East Carolina comes into the
1976 Homecoming game with a
five game Homecoming streak.
The Pirates have won all the
Homecoming games since 1971
after dropping the four previous
matches.
East Carolina has had four
coaches since 1969 and has won
five of seven Homecoming games
since that time.
The games have played in
Ficklen Stadium, as have all Buc
home games since 1963. ECU has
a home record of 51-19 in Ficklen
LOST IN 1969
In the 1969 Homecoming,
ECU lost to Davidson by a 42-27
count after leading at halftime by
27-7. Billy Wrightman. who rush-
ed for 835 yards during the
season, ran roughshod over the
Wildcats in the first half to give
the Pirates the big advantage.
Wrightman rushed fa a school
record 245 yards in the contest.
The defense keyed on Davidson
all-America quarterback Gordon
Slade in the first half and held
him down.
However, in the second half,
Slade tore up the East Carolina
secondary and threw for four
scores to bring the three-touch-
down favorite Wildcats back to
victory.
1969 marked the end of the
Clarence Stasavich era in Pirate
football. Out with Stas went
much-maligned single-wing
offense that won Stasavich 170
games against only 64 losses in
his 27 year coaching career at
Lenoir-Rhyne and East Carolina.
MCGEE LOSES IN 1970
Mike McGee took over the
reigns of the Bucs in 1970 and
suffered through a 3-8 season.
The Pirates were 0-5 coming into
the game after losing in their first
ever meeting with N.C. State.
The Bucs bowed in the
Homecoming affair against
Southern Illinois by a 14-12 count.
However. Dick Corrada caught a
school-record 14 passes in the
game, a mark that still stands to
this day
McGee lasted less than a year
before moving on to his alma
mater Duke University, to coach.
RANDLE BEATS DAVIDSON
Sonny Randle, the controver-
sial ,amer all-Pro wide receiver
with the St. Louis Cardinals,
came on to take over the Pirates
and try to stop the three-season
streak of losing records. He failed
to do this, but the Pirates
registered their first victory on
Homecoming in five years. The
outspoken coach also beat N.C.
State in what was called the
' biggest ECU win ever up to that
time
On Homecoming, the Pirates
faced a supposedly weak David-
son squad, which was a three-
touchdown underdog coming in.
The game was nip-and-tuck all
the way as the teams were tied at
six and 13 in the first half. After
the Wildcats took a 20-13 lead
ECU came back with a touchdown
and two-point conversion to take a
21-20 lead. However, the Wild-
cats scored with just 4:10 left in
the game and missed their try for
two. But, the Pirates were not
dead
Quarterback John Casazza
found split receiver Tim Darner on
in the end zone with just under a
minute left in the game to register
a 27-26 win.
WILD DOGS" BORN
Randle turned out to be a good
find for the Pirates and in 1972
came up with a big winner. The
Bucs finished the season with a
9-2 mark, losing only to ACC
powers State and Carolina by
38-16 and 42-19 scores.
The Wild Dogs' were born
during the early part of this
season. Wild Dogs was a
phrase Dick Jones. Pirate play-
By BILL KEYES
Sports Features
Correspondent
The Catamounts of Western
Carolina University come into
Ficklen Stadium to play a big
non-conference contest against
the Pirates of East Carolina
Saturday for Homecoming.
Just as ECU lost a heart-
breaker to North Carolina last
week, WCU suffered a disap-
pointing defeat at the hands of
Wofford College. And just as
ECU was accused of looking past
VMI to the Carolina game two
weeks ago, the d. amounts stand
accused of taking Wofford for
granted as they looked ahead to
their grudge match against ECU.
The Catamounts remember
their 42-14 loss to the Pirates in
Ficklen Stadium last season and
will bring a team to Greenville
Saturday which is not very
impressive on paper but is quite
capable of upsetting an oppo-
nent s equilibrium on the field.
Offensively, the Catamounts
have two key weapons - their
running game which features an
outstanding l-formation tailback
and their passing game which
benefits from two years Head
Coach Bob Waters spent as a San
Francisco Forty-Niners' quarter-
back.
When the Catamounts run,
there is around eighty percent
change their 5-8, 195 pound
tailback Darrell Lipford will carry
the ball. He rushed 36 times in
the opener and 41 times in their
second game. When he is not
running wide, Lipford is led
through the middle and off tackle
by 5-11, 210 pound fullback Andy
Jordan. The quick offensive line
is led by strong-side guard Joe
by-play man used to describe the
gang-tackling Bucs, led by line-
backer Danny Kepley.
East Carolina was 6-1 coming
into the Homecoming match-up
with Chattanooga. Quarterback
Carl Summer all passed for 152
yards and two touchdowns, while
running backs Carlester Crump-
ler and Ben Howe rushed for 153
and 88 yards, respectively.
PIRATE POWER CONTINUES
East Carolina had another
tough team in 1973. running off
another 9-2 season, again bowing
to State and Carolina.
The Pirates opened with N.C.
State and was literally blown off
the field. State ran off a school
record 585 yards total offense and
thrashed the Bucs 57-8. The team
could have folded after that
game, but instead showed class
and finished with a fine season.
The Pirates lost a controver-
sial 28-27 decision to North
Carolina but won their Home-
coming game by 44-14 over
Richmond before almost 22,000
fans in Ficklen, the record high
that still stands. Crumpler and
company had a field day with the
Spiders.
With a 22-10 record over three
seasons, Randle bowed out much
like McGee, opting ECU for his
alma mater, Virginia.
DYE COMES FROM BAMA
Pat Dye was the new Pirate
coach and even though the team
suffered through a less than great
7-4 season, they won their
Homecoming game against The
Citadel.
The Bucs won their first three
games before dropping a heart-
breaker to N.C. State on regional
TV. But, against the Bulldogs,
the Pirates ran for 366 yards
rushing with Don Schink getting
three touchdowns. The 19,450
was the second largest Ficklen
Stadium crowd ever.
ECU 2. ACC 1
After a bad start in 1975 the
Pirates came on to beat North
Carolina 38-17 and Virginia 61-10
D'Alessandris and strong tackle
Gary Henderson, who Waters
calls the best offensive lineman
thay have had at WCU in his eight
year career there.
When the Catamounts go to
the air-and they like to pass 35 or
40 times per game - look for split
end Wayne Tolleson to be on the
receiving end. He has missed the
last two weeks due to injury but is
reportedly ready for this week's
encounter with ECU. Though he
has missed two games, Tolleson,
who is starting for his third
season as a junior, is still their
leading receiver. But they also
throw to tight end George Plott
and flanker Wayne Smith.
Sophomore Keith Scoggins
has started every game at quart-
erback fa WCU to date, but
played poaly last Saturday a-
gainst Woffad. Kent Briggs, who
was redshirted as a freshman last
season, played well in the fourth
quarter and could possibly start
instead of Scoggins against ECU.
Briggs is bigger, straiger, and a
better passer.
Defensively. WCU never
gives you the same look twice.
They use a multiple defense, in
the fullest extent of the wad. The
smallest defensive team ECU
faces this season, they make up
fa size by changing their froit,
stunting, and changing their
secondary. And while they are
smaller, the Catamounts are
quicker than any team ECU has
faced so far this season. With
their shifting and stunting op-
posing linemen stay confused
over who to block.
The defensive line is small but
exceptionally quick. Strong-side
end Bob Jaclonski is their best
to cap an 8-3 season.
After opening losses to State
and Appalachian State, the Bucs
walloped Southern Illinois and
William and Mary. Then came a
loss to Richmond 17-14 in Ficklen
Stadium and a 3-0 win over The
Citadel in Charleston.
Homeooming was next fa the
Purple and Gold and it was a big
one. The Bucs intercepted seven
Western Carolina passes, with
Jim Boldmg getting three of these
and Ernest Madison returning
one 29 yards fa a touchdown.
Split receiver Terry Gallaher
caught two touchdown passes of
64 yards each to lead the Pirates
past the Catamounts.
WCU AGAIN
The Pirates will enter Satur-
day's Homecoming against the
Catamounts a decided favaite.
They have run off a 6-1 mark with
the 12-10 defeat at the hands of
North Carolina the only blemish.
Maybe, six Homecoming wins in
a row
and present
Photo by Kip SJoan)
defensive player according to
press releases. The 6-1, 190
pound senior is a three-year
starter. Strong-side linebacker
Mike Wade, an academic all-
America, was moved from end
this year and has played well.
The Catamounts most often
play a five-man front with a four
deep secondary, but they some-
times position the strong safety
where he becomes a deiensive
end. Their top secondary per-
famer is free safety Harvey
Walker, who has intercepted
seven passes this season and
twenty-three in his three and
one-half year career. Roaming
around with a free hand, Walker
can be effective against both thr
pass and the run. Against Jack-
sonville State three weeks ago, he
returned the opening kickoff 103
yards fa a touchdown. He is also
a fine punt returner.
The WCU defensive back who
gets the most attention is senia
Mutt De Graffenreid. At 5 feet 4
inches tall and oily 152 pounds,
he is the only canerback East
Carolina's split end Terry Galla-
her can look down on.
Offensively, the ECU Pirates
are expected to go with the same
players who have started
throughout the season.
The Pirate defense is ranked
second in the nation by limiting
opponents to 200 yards per
game total offense, seventh in
rushing defense (104.7 yards),
and eighth in scaing defense (9.3
points per game).
Punter Tom Daub has punted
34 times fa 1271 yards this
seasoi fa a 37.4 average.
FOUNTAINHEAD thanks as-
sistant coach Al Kincaid fa his
assistance in preparing this scout-
ing repat.
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FOUNTAINHEADVQL 52, NO. 1428 OCTOBER 1976
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FrL, Sat, and Sun.
Homecoming 76; collage of entertainment
By PAT CO YLE
Trends Editor
The various committees of the
Student Union have really out-
done themselves in bringing a
great and diverse number of
entertainers and special pro-
grams to the campus fa Home-
tomorrow night, when Charlie
Rich comes to Minges Coliseum.
Rich, known by his fans as the
"Silver Fox has been a profes-
sional musician for many years.
He composed for many Nashville
stars, and has traveled a long,
hard road to the game he enjoys
today.
Rich will be at Minges at 8
day night that should be of appeal
to alumni of all ages and to
anyone who appreciates the in-
novative style of a group who has
remained on top fa many years.
The Basie Orchestra show and
dance is scheduled fa Saturday
at 8 o'clock in Wright Auditaium
and is expected to last until
midnight. Tickets are two dollars
in advance fa students, and four
dollars fa the public, and at the
doa.
MURPHEY AND FRIENDS
Homecoming weekend ends
with a real boogie session Sunday
night that should really please
almost all musical tastes. The
conjjejvjhicfilhDlanMinaes
CHARLIE RICH
coming '76.
The festivities started Wed-
nesday night with Tom Chapin's
fabulous concert in Mendenhall
Theatre. Chapin promises a good
night of entertainment fa those
who get into the folk-rock genre.
CHARLIE RICH
The next concert will be
Fountainhead file photo
o'clock Friday. Advanced tickets
fa students are available fa four
dollars at the Central Ticket
Office. Public tickets and those
sold at the doa will cost six
dollars.
COUNT BASIE ORCHESTRA
The Maja Attractions Com-
mittee is bringing a show Satur-
at 8 o'clock, will include many
artists.
Headlining will be Michael
Murphey, a performer whose
fame is relatively recent. Mur-
phey, best known fa his single,
"Wildfire has recaded two
popular albums, and has been
well-received by college and
regular audiences throughout the
country.
Jary Jeff Walka, who will
also appear, is a perfama who
has been called "a street-wise
stay teller who sings about what
he sees and lives just about the
way he sings; natural and easy
Also appearing will be Walka's
backup group, the Lost Gonzo
Band.
Vassar Clements will be mak-
ing his second appearance at ECU
(the first with Marshall Tucka
and Dicky Betts in '74).Clements,
who appeared in the Robert
Altman film, "Nashville is the
clean-cut country boy in the midst
of a bearded, blue-jean industry.
He's played with such varied
notables as Earl Sauggs, Linda
Ronstadt, the Allman Brothers
and even the Boston Pops.
Tickets fa Sunday night's
grant finale will be two dollars in
advance fa students, and all
aha tickets are selling fa four
dollars. These concerts have been
planned for you, SO ENJOY!
�Hmtatmtjs
where dining is a distinct pleasure
Featuring Our Tamous Salad Ba
MICHAEL MUHHHEY
Fountainhead file photo
Featuring the finest Steaks,
Lobsters and Alaskan King
Crab.
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
Open immediately after Homecoming
Ball Game
GOOD LUCK PIRATES!
J. HOUSTON TUC KKR, JR.
Proprietor
Phone 919) 756-6401
2226 Memorial Drive
P. O Box 976
Greenville, N.C. 27834
RAZZ JAZZ HAPPY HALLOWEEN
RECORDS
Cotanche St. Across From Clement Dorm
6.98 LIST
ALBUMS
4.
59
Head Equipment, Jewelry & More
7.98 LIST
ALBUMS
5.
49
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1428 OCTOBER 1976
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Wve got
what you want.
Electronic Studio presents
Halloween horrormusic hour
These Chains Are Here To Stay
A bright note for Fall fashion. Precious
14K gold chains to wear high, low, alone or in
clusters. Even the tiniest chain becomes
an important fashion statement when worn
with the "naturals" for 1976. Our selection
is spiced with lengths from 15 to 30 inches
and prices start at a low $19 95. Use our
Custom Charge Plan, BankAmericard,
Master Charge or Layaway.
410 Evans Street
Greenville, NC 27834
MASTERGHARGE
DAKS
Students from the School of
Music's Electronic MusiG Studio
have joined foroes to present a
special far-out Halloween concert
of Moog synthesizer sounds, tape
music, live performance and
visual effects that promises to be
serious, spooky and amusing at
the same time. This collective
effort represents years of work
and includes almost every i-
maginable category and style of
electronic music, from tape mani-
pulation to synthesizer realiza-
tions and live performance.
David Winstead's You'll
Scream Bloody Murder and De-
nise Hodges' Chasm are tape
manipulation pieces, composed
with tape loops and razor blades.
Eldred Spell's Seascapes and
Occurence at Owl Creek and
Alex Holton' s Under the Rook and
Three Omens were oomposed on
the Moog Electronic Music Syn-
thesizer.
In the category of electronic
realizations are Winstead's ver-
sions of Sammartini's Symphony
No. 10 and Liszt's Hungarian
Rhapsody in C Minor, Spell's
version of Faure's Pavanne and
Holton's interpretation of Urban-
iak's Butter flies, is adapted from
Robert Ashley's 1964 avant-garde
classic, Wolfman, which uses
microphone feedback.
Among the special visual
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(Closed after 12:00 on Homecoming
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URGE SELECTION OF JUNIOR CII-MjijiMTrg
TffllRS, FRI, M0 SAT. ONLY
POWWTOWa 6BEEMVILLE ON THE MALL
effects will be color organs, cdor
wheels, slides, kaleidoscope and
lenticular projectors, strobe
lights, and a host of other
mind- and eye-boggling devices.
The concert will be held in the
A.J. Fletcher Music Center Re-
cital Hall on Sunday, October 31 st
(Halloween) at 8:15 P.M. Come
and bring a friend!
Would you believe
Homecoming
alternatives
ByPATCOYLE
Trends Editor
Here we are at Homecoming again; my how time flies. Homecoming
epitomizes everything that has traditionally been connected with college
life; the cheering crowds at the football game, a multitude of special
entertainment features, corsages, a dance, the whole schmeer.
The only problem with Homecoming is that it hasn't really changed
with the times. Here we are in the seventies, with free love, freaks, and
the laid back way of life all around us, and Homecoming is still lost
somewhere between World War II and American Graffiti.
Being the intelligent, considerate being I think I am, I have
endeavored to innovate a little, to aeate some activities fa those of you
who just can't get into Charlie Rich, Count Basie, and the Pom
Pomettes.
Take for instance the football game. Even the most hard-core
inhabitants of Ripple City could enjoy the all-American sport if they just
went in with the right attitude (and the right accesories). All you have to
do is take your GE portable cassette plaver with the two-inch speakers.
Insert your Pink Floyd tape, utilize your E-2 Widers to the max, close
your eyes, and enjoy, in addition to being an incomparable source of
fresh air, Ficklen and 50 thousand drunk frat rats really help you travel
incognito.
The game could also be heaven for the sado-maso freaks out there in
Pirateland. I'll bet you didn't know that it has actually become socially
acceptable to throw bottles at people and step on their toes going to and
from your seat.
Then oomesthe Count Basie Orchestra concert Saturday night. Now I
know you can not imagine anything that would make this event a trip for
your average head. Well I'm sure the orchestra will come to Greenville
via chartered bus. How long has it been since you've laid under a
Greyhound and inhaled the fumes? Now that's what you call a
high-octane high.
If you're worried about how to spend Friday night, Charlie Rich is not
your only alternative. The Friday free flick is The Way We Were so
just stand outside the Mendenhall Theatre and put the make on the
crying females as the movie ends.
Finally, if you are going to participate in all Homecoming activities as
if you were just the average Joe College, don't worry about your lack of
familiarity with the traditional social scene, and don't worry about going
to some expensive florist for your lady's corsage. A corsage handmade of
certain dried grassy substances is not only natural, attractive, and
aromatic, it will also make a Hell of a good smoke after Homecoming is
over with. Happy trails to you
COME SAVE WITH
GIANT
DISCOUNT
HEALTH &
BEAUTY AIDS
429 EVANS MALL
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE





FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1428 OCTOBER 1976
17

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MARQUEE revewer deposes 'Student Prince'
By DAVID BOSNICK
Staff Writer
I would like to preface this
review by stating that this article
does not condemn any of the
performers as creative indivi-
duals. This critique is concerned
with the time the players spend
exhibiting their talents fa aud-
ience edification. One must be-
lieve that, with the amount of
time spent on the production,
there was a sincere sense of
positive creation on the part of
some of the players. Would that
the director had similarly in-
volved himself.
With a lead character who was
made to look more like a geriatric
Prince Machiabelli than a student
king, ECU'S drama department,
directed by Edgar Loessin, ren-
dered an almost telling blow to
the musical comedy genre.
"The Student Prince a
sloppy, poorly choreographed
production, makes one question
the ability of a director whose
sense of execution will allow a
production in which the curtain
strikes performers as they bow,
with the scenery nearly collapsing
and the players constantly oon-
fusing their lines.
After enduring a tired and
monotonous overture, the show
opens with the Prince, (Bill
McDonald) being sent to Heidel-
berg to study at the University.
The Prince is paired with Doctor
Engle, (Edward Glenn) as his
tutor, and one is conscious of the
directorial attempt to parallel the
tenor of McDonald with Mr.
Glenn's baritone. Glenn unfor-
tunately chose to sing from his
lower intestines with McDonald
sounding as if he escaped, but not
unscathed, from the Vienna boy's
choir. (Glenn's lyrics are lost in
his Basso tremor, as if upon
gargling with Drano, he decided to
perform.
The Prince then matriculates
to Heidelberg where at an Inn he
encounters the Student Saxony
oore, who, but for a few moments
when they are ensemble, look like
Buster Brown and sound like
Tiger.
The chorus is led by Count
Hugo Von Detlef (Steve Walence)
Von Asterberg (John Shirley),
and Lucas (Bill Vann).
Shirley wasa virtual nonentity
as perhaps Walence should have
been. Walence plunged through
his dialogue with none of the con-
viviality one would expect from a
raucous college student. While
posessing a fine voice he seemed
uncomfortable having to sing and
move simultaneously. Walence's
awkwardness was more apparent
as he played near an animated,
while not vocally talented, totally
enthusiastic, Bill Vann. Vann was
the spark behind whatever mea-
ger energy the chorus managed to
exude. It is at this same Inn that
the Prince meets Kathie (Christy
Sluss) and immediately falls in
love. Sluss is a far too breathy
soprano who seems unable to
overcome the poor acoustics of
McGinnis auditorium. Most of
her lyrics were either lost in her
own efforts at tonality or engulfed
by the orchestra.
The Prince is engaged to a
princess (Shauna Holmes), and
while she is attended by the
Grand Duchess (Rosalie Jacobi),
he is called back to court as the
aging King dies. Jacobi does an
adequate job of playing the
Duchess with occasional flashes
of comedic excellence. Miss
Holmes is beautiful, yet her
lilting soprano could not pene-
trate the orchestral ministrations.
Despite her vocal inequities,
"Just We Two" with Capt.
Tarnitz (Rodney Freeze) was the
best number of the show.
Freeze s facial contortions carried
the scene when the lyrics were
lost and his expressions added
urgency to their painful separ-
ation.
The one bright spot in the
show were the performances of
Martin Thompson as Lutz and
Marshall McAden as Hubert.
Thompson was excellent as the
foppish valet with McAden as his
obsequious attendant. Perhaps
Thompson felt desperate at being
trapped in this "Wreck of the
Hesperus" production, for he
made obvious and unfortunate
attemptsat ad-libbing. Hisefforts
forced him out of character as his
constant and amateurish audi-
ence awareness lead him further
from the actual script. McAden
played his role with aplomb and
was the most poised of this weak
and terribly directed cast.
This reviewer does not believe
it is proper to bring in a
professional in what is to have
been a student production. It is
my opinion that Loessin attempt-
ed to "shore up" a poor
production choice by importing
talent. There must be a vindica-
tion for that type of creative
cowardice, but I cannot think of it.
If this production is an indication
of Loessin's incisive directorial
talents then perhaps he might
best serve the future of ECU
dramatical interests by opening a
hardward store in Ghana.
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� � � �'�� �'�:
�W�m
BHBHBHnVBMBm
18
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1428 OCTOBER 1976
mmmmmmm
wm
mmm
mm
McVeigh tops Hoeppel for title
j� in the Georgeiow n Shoppes
Serving Breakfast, Lunch
and Dinner
A pleasant atmosphere
and good food at reason-
able prices.
OPEN
6:30-11:00 pm
Sun -Thur
6:30-12:00 pm
Fri - Sat
For Take-Out Dial 758-2929
By JOHN EVANS
Staff Writer
Janice McVeigh is the new
intramural women's tennis
champion.
McVeigh defeated Janet Hoep-
pel 7-5, 6-3 in the finals on
Tuesday, taking her fourth
straight two-set victory.
McVeigh outplayed Hoeppel
with a varied attack of lobs and
drops which forced the loser into
several mistakes and gave Mc-
Veigh an early advantage.
Early in the match McVeigh
drew Hoeppel to the net with
short volleys and then followed
with lobs to the back of the court
where her shorter opponent could
not reach them.
Hoeppel played even through-
out most of the first set, but chose
to play back off the net after being
beat by the early lobs. McVeigh
countered this strategy by contin-
ually placing her shots in the
short court and forcing Hoeppel
to run in to return the shots. This
strategy eventually gave Mc-
Veigh the first set, 7-5.
In the second set Hoeppel got
ff to a bad start, falling behind
3-0, before winning a game. The
factor that hurt Hoeppel most of
all throughout the match was her
inability to place her first serve
successfully over the net, which
forced her into a powerless
second serve that was easy for
McVeigh to return
McVeigh also had trouble
serving and returning what shot
Hoeppel did return and left
herself vulnerable many times.
But on most of those occasions
Hoeppel's return would be too far
past the backline or not strong
enough to clear the net.
McVeigh thus finished Hoep-
pel off easily in the second set,
6-3, for her eighth straight set
victory. Hoeppel, too, played well
in advancing to the finals, losing
only one set in five matches.
Tuesday, though, McVeigh
seemed to be more on her game
than Hoeppel. That was enough
to spell the difference between
which women would be cham-
pion.
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R HE WIGHT OF YDUUFE
with Kurt Hickman
Last Saturday's defeat at the hand of UNC has prompted many ECU
faithfuls to feel disappointed towards the overall performance of the
Pirates against the Tar Heels.
ECU's unblemished record and invasion of the Associated Press Top
20 had "Pirate Fever" at a pinnacle last week. This spirit apparently
died as approximately 5,700 Buc supporters stood in silence and watched
the two teams leave the field after UNC's 12-10 triumph.
A standing ovation for the purple and gold from the ECU supporters
would have been just ending to the most exciting week in the history of
Fast Carolina athletics.
However, it never happened. Coach Pat Dye, his staff, and players
have demonstrated nothing but class this season both in victory and
defeat. They should be congratulated, for this is easily the best football
team this school has ever had. They will recover from thisdefeat and it is
hopeful that the fans will also and go back to being the enthusiastic
followers they have proven to be in the past.
The Pirates have absolutely nothing to be ashamed of. There is only
one man to blame fa the disappointing loss and he is UNC head coach
Bill Dooley. Dooley did an excellent job of preparing the Tar Heel
defense for this game. His defensive teams have had a history of success
against option offenses. This success has been brought about for the
most part by the 4-4 defense from which UNC abandoned two years ago.
Against the Pirates' high powered offense, UNC used a defense
similar to the 4-4 on several oocastions. The strength of such a defensive
scheme is that the defense outnumbers the offense on the line of
scrimmage. Seven men can not effectively block eight or nine men on the
lineof scrimmage and this hurts the running game. Most football games
are won on defense and Saturday was no exceDtion.
It was an emotional confrontation and it reflected what this series has
developed into. North Carolina has a sound football program but ECU
has given them more than they care to handle in three of the four games
played between the two schools. ECU athletics will continue to grow and
future games with the Tar Heels promise to be memorable. The rivalry is
here and doing well.
Stas inducted
into ECU Hall
The man most associated with
athletics at ECU and Lenoir
Rhine College will be inducted
posthumously into the East
Carolina Sports Hall of Fame
October 30. That man, of course,
is Clarence Stasavich, the master-
mind of the single wing offense
for 24 years between the two
institutions.
Stasavich came to East
Carolina in 1962 as head football
coach. He held that position for
eight years and compiled a
50-27-1 record, tying Jack Boone
as the winningest coach in ECU
history. That followed a 16 year
stay at Lenoir Rhyne were he had
a record of 120-37-7.
With a combined career re-
cord in coaching of 170-64-8,
Stasavich retired in 1969 as the
third winningest active coach in
the country, ranked behind Bear
Bryant of Alabama and
Johnny Vaught of Ole Miss.
During his eighteen years as a
head coach, Stasavich won nine
conference championships for
Lenoir Rhyne, seven straight
from 1955 through 1961, the
NAIA National Championship in
1960 for Lenoir Rhyne, had three
consecutive bowl teams at East
Carolina in 1963, 1964, and 1965
with records of 9-1 each year and
tied for the Southern Conference
title the first year East Carolina
was in the league.
His devotion to the Southern
Conference resulted in the annual
football championship trophy be-
ing named the Clarence Stasavich
Memorial Trophy, that to be
effective this year for the first
time.
In 1963, Stas assumed the role
See STAS, page 19.)
m
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���������������H
!����
HHHB
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1428 OCTOBER 1976
19
MM
m
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�n ��
Women's swim team
wins third match
By DAVID ROBEY
Staff Writer
ECU'S women's swim team
made an excellent showing this
past Tuesday when they beat St.
Mary's, 103-26. Now launched
well into the season, the team has
won three and dropped one.
In the 200 yard medley relay,
Ellen Bond, Sharon Burns, Jan-
ette Inman and Cindy Sailor of
ECU, combined their times to win
in 2:03.17. St. Marys finished
with 2:18.91.
ECU's Karen Crawford and
Helen Waldrop won first and
second spots in the 200 yard
freestyle with times of 2:19.37
and 223.74, respectively.
Sharon Burns won the 100
yard individual medley with a
time of 1 08.49 and Mary Orr came
in third in 1:18.56.
Patty Redeem and Cathy
Callahan proved themselves on
the diving boards again, with
Redeem taking the number one
spot on the 1 and 3 meter boards.
CaJlahan was third on the 1 meter
KATHREEN CHANDLERstarts in the 50 yard breaststroke, an event
she finished second in. Photo by Kip Sloan
STAS
Continued from page 18.
of athletic director for bast
Carolina and became the main
driving force for the development
of a Division I, major university
athletic program. Under his
guidance, East Carolina was
classed a Division I school in
football in 1966, following the
induction of the Pirate program in
1964 into the Southern Con-
ference.
Facilities development
changed the total complexion of
the ECU campus. Minges Coli-
seum was built, along with
Fickien Stadium, Scales Field
House, Harrington Field and the
Bunting Track during the Stasa-
vich era.
in 1969, Stasavich relin-
quished his duties as head
football coach to devote all his
time to the athletic directorship.
He served in that capacity until
his death on October 24,1975, the
day before his longtime dream
came true. That was a victory
over the University of North
Carolina in football, which the
Pirates got on October 25 in
Chapel Hill, 38-17.
His accomplishments as a
coach resulted in his induction
into the Helms Hall of Fame and
the North Carolina Sports Hall of
Fame.
He was twice honored as
national Coach of the Year in 1959
at Lenoir Rhyne and in 1964 at
East Carolina. Five times he was
named District Coach of the Year.
Stasavich's induction will oc-
cur during halftime activities of
this year's Homecoming game
against Western Carolina Univer-
sity.
Stasavich was born February
9, 1913, in Georgetown, III. He
graduated from Georgetown
Township High School in 1931
and earned an AB Degree in
science from Lenoir Rhyne Col-
lege in 1935. He received his MA
Degree from the University of
North Carolina in 1946.
The ECU Spats Hall of Fame
originated in 1974, with ten initial
inductees. Four were inducted in
1975.
Harriers
ninth
at State
East Carolina's cross countr
team finished ninth in a field of 12
in the North Carolina State
Cross-Country Meet Saturday in
Raleigh.
The University of North Caro-
lina won the meet and the Tar
Heels' Ralph King was the
individual winner.
ECU sophomore Jim Dill was
the best Pirate finisher, placing
40th in a field of 120.
ECU's next meet is November
6 at the Southern Conference
Championships at Boone, N.C.
and grabbed second on the 3
meter board.
In the 50 yard backstroke,
EC's Inman and Lynn Uteguard
came in first and second with
times of 33.51 and 34.55 respect-
ively.
Also winning first and second
was Bond and Chandler in the 50
yard breaststroke. Bond won in
35.89 while Chandler was second
in 37.44. Bond also won the 100
yard breaststroke with a time of
1:19.21.
In the 500 yard freestyle,
Mary Orr of ECU won first place
in 6:33.23, while Sharon Nock
came in second with a time of
7:36.92.
Burns won the 50 yard free-
style in 27.16 while Crawford
placed second in 27.85. Burns
also won the 100 yard freestyle in
1 02.02.
Cindy Sailor won the 50 yard
butterfly in 29.07 and the 100
yard butterfly in 1.07.93.
The Lady Pirates will see their
next action on Nov. 5 when they
tr el to Boone to compete in the
Lady Appalachian Relays.
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20
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1428 OCTOBER 1976
mm
m
mmumm
m
m
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SAAD'S
SHOE
SHOP
Across from
iherwin William:
113 Grande Ave.
758-1228
Time- Outs ousted
Intramural upsets
By JOHN EVANS
Staff Writer
The Pack and the Rugby
Rl gers will meet this afternoon
Whole Flounder
All you can eat
$
2.49
Popcorn Shrimp
$2.99
All you can eat
Mon. - Thurs. 11:30AM - 2:00PM
Cr4:00PM-9:00PM
Fri.CrSat. 11:30AM - 10:00PM
Sun. 11:30 AM-9:00PM
We have changed back to the
conventional way of serving.
New Menu Additions
Include: Scallops
w
PIER FIVE
264 By-Pass
Next to Pitt Plaza
at 4:30 for the intramural football
championship of East Carolina.
Neither team was expected to
be in the finals when the playoffs
began last week, but a pair of
upsets helped the two teams.
The Pack, last year's champ-
ions breezed through the Inde-
pendent finals by downing Last
Chance 24-0. In the all-campus
semifinals on Tuesday they upset
a favored Schlitz Blitz team 28-0.
Schlitz Blitz had earlier de-
feated the top-ranked Scott Time
Outs 15-14 in an overtime victory
for the Dormitory championship.
In that game the Blitz came from
behind to tie the game at 14-14
and then won on penetration in
the overtime period. The loss was
the first for the Time Outs, who
had averaged over 50 points a
game during the playoffs and
regular season.
The Rugby Ruggers had fin-
ished second in the Club division
during the regular season, but
after Phi Sigma Pi pulled a 20-16
upset to defeat regular season
titleists Phi Epsilon Kappa, the
Ruggers had the way open to the
finals.
In the Club championship the
Ruggers downed Phi Sigma Pi
28-0 and followed with a 12-8
oome-from-behind win over Tau
Kappa Epsilon. �
The Tekes had beaten Kappa
Alpha 26-6 for the Fraternity title.
The KA's stayed with the Tekes
most of the game until quarter-
back Robert Guy was injured and
left the game. At the time Kappa
Alpha trailed 12-6 and their
offense proved powerless the rest
of the way.
H. L. Hodges & Co Inc.
100 Heavy Cotton
official
Rugby Jersey
with four inch
purple and gold
stripes
made in England
Sizes 38 to 46
48 due in
Sideline Chat
I with Steve Wheeler
Team shows class
East Carolina has no reason to be ashamed of their football team's
play last Saturday against the University of North Carolina. But, they
have plenty to regret as far as the way some of the Pirate fans acted after
the game.
The football team had been in a close battle and had lost. But, as they
crossed the Tar Heel athletes going to the dressing room after the game,
they were shaking hands and genuinely taking the loss with a good
degree of class.
Some of the ECU followers should have looked down onto the field to
see how they should have conducted themselves. They had been the bes
fans in the world during the game-getting up and yelling when the
defense or offense needed the big play and generally out-hollering the
Tar Heel fansbut after the game, some showed no class.
And that is exactly what Carolina fans wanted us to do. They have
been saying sinoe we beat them last year that we had no class, and some
of the Pirate faithfuls after the game gave them some more fuel to burn
the issue even longer.
Also, this writer has heard many snide remarks to the effect that
Coach Pat Dye is the only reason the Pirates lost, saying that had Dye
passed more against the porous secondary of the Tar Heels ECU would
have won. This is not necessarily so. East Carolina has been winning all
year with the run and had only passed when the running game was
established.
There is no reason to think that Mike Weaver would have had the
success that Army's Leamon Hall had against North Carolina. Hall
averages throwing 40 passes a game while Weaver throws just over
eight per contest.
The wishbone offense is not the offense to be throwing out of
anyhow. To throw consistently out of the bone, Weaver would have to
split out a couple of receivers plus putting a back into the slot and this
would give plenty of warning that the ball would be put up.
There is no reason to put down Dye for the loss. Just about everyone
on this campus, including this writer, saw virtually no chance of getting
beat by the Tar Heels Saturday. This kind of atmosphere had to carry
over the the players going to class everyday. Everybody on campus was
just a bit over-confident going to Chapel Hill on Saturday and Carolina
was sky high. When two rivals like Carolina and ECU get together, you
can throw the records out because there will be enough emotion to keep
the game close.
Pat Dye has accumulated a 21-8 record since coming to East Carolina
and is 3-3 against ACC teams. He is doing this with approximately
one-third of the budget of State or Carolina. To be able to play State or
Carolina is a major accomplishment for this school. And beating one of
the two and losing to the other by just two points is nothhg to be
ashamed of.
Dye started 22 players Saturday that both State and Carolina turned
down. Looking at that fact, ECU should not even have gone to Chapel
Hill Saturday, much less given Carolina a good game. But, Dye and his
staff have molded the players they have recruited and made them into
A-grade ballplayers and individuals.
Dye should get a pat on the back fa doing this, not be put down.
Dye has called ECU students and other Pirate fans the "best I've
ever seen
East Carolina could give up after losing to Carolina and finish with a
less than good season, but this writer does not think this will happen.
But, to end up with a good season the team will need the moral support
of every student and fan.
So, come out in force Saturday and give the team all the moral
support you can, because as Pat Dye says, you're the best fans around.
OLD BALL DIFFERENCE
A 20-year old football proved to be the difference last Saturday in
UNC's 12-10 win over the Pirates.
The old football was one found stored away in Carolina's equipment
room by place-kicker Tom Biddle. He and Jeff Arnold combined to kick
four field goals with it, scoring all the Tar Heel points.
"I read in the paper that Jay Sherrill of N.C. State uses an old ball
says Biddle. He gets such distance on his kicks that I thocght I should
try it.
"Sol got an old one out of the equipment room and used it in practice
all week. I really believe it works. My kickoffs were deeper than ever and
I made three field goals. I'm going to use it from now on
Biddle, who thinks the old ball is better fa kicking because it is not
as stiff as the regular game balls, made field goals of 31, 25, and 17
yards in the game, while Arnold boomed a 49-yarder fa the Heels.
Punter Johnny Elam, who came into the game with a 38 yard
average, punted six times fa 43 yards. His kicks were so high that East
Carolina, the nation's third leading team in punt returns, attempted only
one return and got zero yards on that effat.
Pete Caiaty and Ton Daub: maybe something to take note of?
mm





nnni
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1428 OCTOBER 1976
21

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mmmt
m
m
w
Angus leads booters
to end soccer career
ByANNEHOGGE
Staff Writer
Pete Angus, an outstanding
soooer player at ECU for the past
four years, will be going into his
final game this Saturday against
William and Mary.
Angussaid, "I'd like to go out
a win. I'd like to remember
winning my last game. But it will
be difficult. Scott Balas will
probably be out, and William and
Mary is a tough team.
"I feel I've oome a long way.
I feel I've improved. I feel both
relieved and sad coming into this
last game. I have really enjoyed
playing
Angus is a 21-year-old Art
Education major. His home is in
Denville, NJ. His hobbies in-
clude many different sports and
art.
Angus was introduced to
soccer in the 5th grade and began
playing in the 6th.
He attended Morris Knolls
High School, where besides soc-
cer, he played baseball, basket-
bail and ran track. In high school,
he was selected all-Country and
SC ROUND-UP
all-State for soccer and won a
double award for his basketball
and soccer skills.
Angus came to ECU having
been promised a scholarship. But
once he got here, the then soccer
coach was gone and so was his
scholarship.
"I was under the impression
that ECU was a soccer school. I
soon found out it wasn't
Angus proceeded to play
soccer, but with his team having a
0-6 record during his Freshman
year, he thought of transferring,
but decided to stay, mainly due to
ECU's art program and to im-
prove his soooer game.
His Sophomore year was what
he daims to be the best he has
ever had. The team had a 7-4
record and was ranked 10th in the
South.
This year Angus feels the
team has faced some tough
scheduling. He feels next year
they should get better, especially
if they get some good recruits.
"The soccer program would
improve if more money was put
into it. This would bring about
more scholarships, which would
bring better players
' His last game will be a tough
one, facing William and Mary.
The Pirates have already lost to
them once this year and lost badly
to them last year.
Angus would like to oontinue
his soooer playing on a profes-
sional level. If this doesn't
happen, he will probably teach art
and be a soccer coach.
A halfback, Angus tries to set
up himself and other players to
score. When it comes game time,
Angus claims I have to be sure
my shoes are tied right or I can't
play
While at ECU, Angus has
been selected to the all-South
team, and for two years to the
all-Southern Conference team.
He was also selected to the
allTournament team at the OOU
tourney earlier this Fall.
Angus will be ending his
collegiate career Saturday, so the
emotions will be running high to
try to beat William and May. The
Indians are tough, but do not bet
against Angus and company.
Conference teams face
'must-win 'situations
For four Southern Conference teams this
weekend will be a must win weekend and for a fifth
team it oould be an even bigger weekend as far as
the conference title is concerned.
In conference action this week Appalachian
State, 1-0-1 in the loop, takes on The Citadel and
Furman collides at home with William and Mary.
For Appalachian, the game with The Citadel is an
important matchup since the Mountaineers are only
half a game behind the leading East Carolina
Pirates, who are 3-0 in the conference with two
games to play.
Fa The Citadel, too, the game is a big one. The
Bulldogs are 1-1 in the conference, 5-2 overall after
a 26-7 win over Air Faroe, and have aireaay ios to
ECU. To stay in title contention the Bulldogs must
win.
" It is really an uphill battle fa us said Bulldog
coach Bobby Ross. "We still think we have a chance
but ECU has to be considered in the driver's seat at
this point. We have had a pretty good season so far
and beating Appalachian State would make it that
much better as far as I am conoerned
In Greenville, S.C Furman, already 0-2-1 in the
Southern, can eliminate William and Mary. Last
week the Paladins dropped to 3-4-1 overall after
losing to the Richmond Spiders. Fa the Paladins it
has been an up-and-dovn season after an
impressive first-game win over North Carolina State
and a 14-14 tie with Appalachian State. The Indians
are 1-1 in the SC and 5-2 overall.
Our team has been a mystery to me this year
said Paladin coach Art Baker, and he called last
week's game, "the wast emotiaial game we've
ever played. We had every reason to play well but
we had turnovers at aucial times that cost us the
game. I was pleased with our defense until the final
drive, but you have to give Richmond some aedit fa
that drive, too
The drive Baker was talking about was the
Spiders' game-winning drive in the fourth quarter in
which they went 80 yards fa a soae.
While those four teams collide East Carolina will
nurse its wounds at home after a disappointing 12-10
Mill! I I 1I i H ' IUIHI nn
loss to North Carolina. The loss na only ended the
Pirates' 12-game winning streak and chances fa
an unbeaten seasai, but it also hurt the team's
chances fa a post-season bowl bid.
"I hope this loss doesn't hurt this team's
chances at a bowl game invitation said Dye
following the loss because we deserve a chance to
go.
"We played a fine football team and didn't back
off. They (Carolina) could have folded when we
came back to lead (10-9) but they didn't. We have
oome a long way just to be here
The Pirates will meet Western Carolina in a
Homecoming matchup in Greenville. The aher SC
member, VMI, will meet state-rival Virginia in
Charlottesville. Last week the Keydets surprised
Delaware, upsetting the Blue Hens 10-6 to move
their reoad to 2-5-0.
"I couldn't be prouder of those guys said VMI
coach Bob Thalman. "After the losses we've had, a
la of teams would have quit. We said we were going
to win our last four games.
"As far as I am conoerned we are 1-0 and with
Virginia this week thae won't be any problem
getting up fa the game. I'm looking fa arwtha win,
but it won't be easy. They will have a lot of
inspiration after their win last week and all that has
happened with them lately
SC STANDINGS
TeamLeagueAll
WLTWLT
East Carolina300610
App. State101521
Wm. and Mary110520
The Citadel110520
VMI130250
Furman021341
�Davidson000131
�W.Carolina000530
UT-Chatanooga000330
'Marshall000520
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BHHMIHHHMHMHl
22
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1428 OCTOBER 1976
mmmmm
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THIS WEEK ATTHE ELBO ROOM
Thursday
Friday
"CATS MEOW
n
Saturday TOP 40 FUNKY FROM VIR
GINIA BEACH
PONT FORGET
FRIDAY at 3:00-BE THERE (H.H.)
SUNDAY is Ladies Nile
SKI WEAR
Skies will be in
December
Special Prices For
Students
Large selection of used
golf clubs.
Available Through
Gordon Fulp, Golf Professional
Located At
Greenville Golf & Country Club
Phone 756-0504
Tom Long plays soccer
�M.A
'because I really like it
By ANNEHOGGE
Staff Writer
"I play because I enjoy it, not
because I'm forced to
This is fullback Tom Long's
attitude towards the game of
soccer.
Long, a 20-year-old business
major, is in his sixth year of play.
He is a Senior, but with one year
of athletic eligibility left, will
return to ECU next Fall.
Being in an Air Force family,
Long has moved 14 times since
his birth in Cape Cod, Mass. He
has lived all over the U.S. and has
spent three and one-half years in
Europe. His home is now in
Hampton, Va.
Long's hobbies include sports
other than soccer (especially table
Exclusive dealers fa
Pollack Greek Jewelry
Come in and sm our complete line
of Fraternity � Sorority Jewelry.
Phone: 758-2452
Floyd G. Robinson Jewelers
Downtown Greenville
on the mall
Broun Bogging Permitted
Fine Wines & Champagne
Banquet Rooms
Hours: Fri. 6 a.m. 9:00 p.m.
Sat & Sun. - 7 a.m9 p.m.
Restaurant
2725 Memorial Drive �Greenville, N.C. 27834
Phone 756-2414
Featuring: Breakfast,
Lunch and Dinner
Gourmet Salad Bar,
Steaks, Seafood
and Other Dinners
Our goal is to make your
din it! n trith -us q pleasure,
with the best in food ana1
service.
A Special Thank You lor
your patronage . . .
Woody and Janie Smith
Your Has t and Hos tess
tennis), music and collecting old
things, such as books and bottles.
Long began playing soccer in
the eighth grade in Sumter, S.C.
He played there through his
Sophomore year in high school,
when he was captain and MVP of
his team.
He then moved to Goldsboro,
where he attended and graduated
from Eastern Wayne High
School. They had no soccer
program there but Long remained
involved in sports. He was a
starter on football and baseball
teams, being selected captain and
all-conferenoe in baseball.
Long came to ECU expecting
to play baseball. He made it until
the final cut. He was feeling
discouraged when a friend, Pete
Angus, talked him into trying out
for the soccer team. He made the
team and has been playing ever
since.
During the summer Long
plays in the Tidewater Soccer
League in Virginia.
Long feels he's improving his
playing ability each year, this
being his best season so far. Last
year he was selected to the
all-Southern Conference second
team and was an all-South
Honorable Mention pick.
Speaking on soccer, Long
feels "people watch offense, not
defense. But good defense is
important and has helped our
team greatly. Also, soccer is a
game which develops skill. You
have to concentrate on using your
feet instead of your hands
Before a game, I oonosntrate
on the game itself and what I
need to do to play a good
defensive game. During a game,
my main objective is to back up
the other fullbacks and try to keep
the game between myself and the
goal
As for the 1976 team, Long
feels "we're better than our
record shows. We've had a tough
schedule. We haven't scored
much, so we've been busy on
defense.
"Thisyear we'll be losing only
two seniors, so next year's team
won't be hurt by graduation too
much. Hopefully we'll be even
better
Long likes ECU, feeling it has
a good business department and
good athletic program. And with
another year of eligibility left,
ECU'S soccer team should be in
good shape.
m
m





FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1428 OCTOBER 1976
HW�i
m
ii�imtinwi
23
YEARBOOK PORTRAITS
We have a date to
don't forget
appointment
for your
YEARBOOK PORTRAIT
To make it easier for you to get your portrait made we are bringing the
photographer to you. Stevens' photographers will be at two different
locations for your convience from 9-12 and 1-5 daily for two weeks Fall
quarter. A photographer will be in the lobby of Fletcher Dorm from
October 25-29 and November 1-5. A second photographer will be located
at the top of Wright Auditorium in the old Fountainhead office during the
same two week period.
Appointments may be made by calling 757-6501 between the hours of 9-12
and 1-4 or by coming up to the BUCCANEER office located on the second
floor of the Publications Center.
There are no plans for the photographers to return to campus any time
this year so please call and schedule an appointment now. The dates are
October 25-29 (Homecoming Week) and November 1-5 and the locations are
Wright Auditorium and Fletcher Lobby.
NO SITTING FEE!
SCHEDULE APPOINTMENT NOW!
9
im�i�
mm
mm
mm
mm
mm





FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1428 OCTOBER 1976
�RRTN,WIND&fiae
Spirit
including
Getaway Saturday Nite On Your Face
Imagination Burnin Bush
fet
��?
is iH
i �
including
You re The One
You II
Never Find
Another Love
Like Mine
From Now On
This Song Will
Last Forever
Groovy People
HARVEST FOR THE WORLD
including
Who Loves You Better People Of Today
(At Your Best) You Are Love
Let Me Down Easy You Still Feel The Need
BOSTON
including
More Than A Feeling Peace Ot Mind
Foreplay Long Time Rock & Roll Band
Smokin Hitch A Ride
HAROLD MELVIN
& THE BLUE NOTES
(OLLrX TORSTIIM
All Their Greatest Hits:
The Love I Lost Bad Luck
If You Don t Know Me By Now
Wake Up Everybody I Miss You
V
got
rtiythm
CHICAGO X
including:
Another Rainy Day In New York City
If You Leave Me Now Once Or Twice
You Are On My Mind Skin Tight
lite QJG4fA.
MESSAGE IN THE MUSIC
including:
Darlin Darlin Baby (Sweet, Tender. Love)
Desire MeMake A Joyful Noise
I Swear, I Love No One But You
Message In Our Music
� � � and blues
MANHATTANS
includg:
Kiss And Say Goodbye
La La La Wish Upon A Star'Searching For Love
How Can Anything So Good -a So Bad For You?
Reasons
ofcV
HERBIE HANCOCK
SECRETS
including
Dom It Cantelope Island Gentle Thoughts
Spider People Music
Records
$4.99
Tapes
i te '
iv
SILK DECREES
including
It s Over Georgia What Can I Say
Lido Shuffle Jump Street
fp m
WILD CHERRY
including
Play That Funky Music 99 NowhereToRun
What In The Funk Do You See Hold On
ItyU'ammeAJ
mi luding
Rot V Mr Arms
Dream Weaver Neo Terra (N-w Land)
f eelings Touch Me B.itjy
m �
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Bob Dylan
Hard Rain
including
Shelter From The Storm
Lay. Lady, Lay
W!�Maggies Farm
1 mYou re A Big Girl Now
mm mIdiot Wind
Vklttjk :&$&I i
m'tmm
MOTHER'S FINEST
including
Fire Give You All The Love (Inside Of Me)
My Baby Fly With Me (Feel The Love)
Dontcha Wanna Love MeRain
TYRONE DAVIS
LOVE AND TOUCH
including
Give It Up (Turn It Loose) Close To You
Put Your Trust In Me Wrong Doers
Beware Beware
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Title
Fountainhead, October 28, 1976
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 28, 1976
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.420
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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