Fountainhead, October 26, 1976






THIS ISSUE -
12 PA GES
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over 50 years
CIRCULATION -
8,500
VOL. 52, NO. 13
26 OCTOBER 1976
MUiimawg i iliwili m
IIHI
i mum � p�mi�i
ECU experiences big weekend
WHILE ECU was battling Carolina
Photo by Russ Pogue See related story on oaae 9.
Holshouser: Carter could
totally change the U.S.
By KIM JOHNSON
Assistant r,9ws Editor
Gov. James Holshouser said
Monday he is "afraid of what
Jimmy Carter could do to this
country' in an address to local
Republicans at Pitt County GOP
headquarters in Greenville.
"Things could totally change
in the United States if Carter is
elected he said. Holshouser
accused Carter, Democratic pres-
idential candidate, of leading the
United States to Socialism.
Holshouser, a staunch con-
servative, associated liberalism
with Socialism.
According to Holshouser,
Jimmy Carter is more of a liberal
than Sen. George McGovern. I972
Demoaaticpresidential nominee.
In his informal speech, Hols-
houser claimed a "neck and
neck" contest between Republi-
can President Gerald Ford and
Carter pointing out that Carter's
lead in the polls has dropped from
29 per cent in August to eight per
cent in September.
In an effort to alleviate any
Southern loyalty to Carter, a
Southerner, Holshouser accused
Carter of not "thinking like a
GOVERNOR JAMES HOLSHOUSER
m
Photo by Russ Pogue
mmm
m
m
Southerner.
However, he did not define
what "thinking like a Southern-
er" meant.
According to Holshouser. the
Ford campaign is doing better in
eastern North Carolina than else-
where in the state.
FOUNTAINHEAD asked
Holshouser if he felt President
Ford's statement that eastern
European countries are not under
Soviet Union domination is hurt-
ing ord's campaign.
"No, I don't think so he
said.
Holshouser said he does not
feel Ford's statement was a
mistake.
"I don't feel President Fad
made a mistake in what he said,
anyone in his right mind would
have realized what the President
meant by his statement he
added.
The Governor accused the
press of making too much of
Ford's statement.
When asked to comment on
the charge that Ford has been
leading a slur campaign against
Carter instead of talking the
issues, Holshouser admitted the
Ford campaign has had a "nega-
tive tone" for the most part.
Holshouser told FOUNTAIN-
HEAD he feels Ford will carry
North Carolina in the election but
made no predictions about his
carrying the rest of the oountry.
Holshouser urged the 30 or
more Republicans present to
stress the right to vote in their
efforts.
"Those who don't vote will be
our biggest problem in the
election results he said.
��� i unmm mi
PRESIDENT FORD was speaking at theN.C. State Fair. Photoby Ed
Midgett)
GOP candidate
addresses ECU
By STAN HOLLOW ELL
Staff Writer
Joe Ward , 1st district Repub-
lican candidate for Congress, last
Wednesday night described his
style of relating to "less intelli-
gent" people to ECU Young
Republicans.
Ward's comments came while
describing a conversation with a
janitor in Kinston whom Ward
"doubted" could read.
Ward told the audience of
Young Republicans how he ex-
plained to the man how economic
conditions were affecting his
paycheck, using language that
the man could understand.
Accordinq to Ward, the man
then replied, "Lawsy, captain, I
sho' is glad you came my way
today
Ward then said he asked the
man "is you goin' home an' tell
your friends about it?"
The man then replied "I sho'
is according to Ward.
"And I talk to em this way, I
really do said Ward.
"In my practice as a physician
I literally vary my role aocording
to the people I'm working with
because I think they do better that
way. A lot of doctors will not do
this but I like it
Ward told the audience how
he talked to people who are less
intelligent than you people but
claimed not to be "looking down
on these people
"You can use this on people
who have IQ's down in the 70 to
80 range and it just turns them on
so great you'd be surprised
said Ward.
See WARD, page 6.
ERROR
The picture featured with
Thursday's article on the Home-
coming subcommittee should
have been of Tim Sullivan, not of
William Grantmyre as was print-
ed. The mistake was due to the
printer.
mmm
�mm
mm in i wi






2
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1326 OCTOBER 1976
The Count Election '76 Freshmen
MM
Prince
MM
Concert at Stokes. The SGA
will provide a bus on Sunday Oct.
31, to stop at Mendenhall and
Brewster on the hour to carry
students to and from Stokes. The
bus starts running at 12:00 noon.
Students can pick up their
copy of the 1975-76 BUCCANEER
by bringing their 10 and activity
card to the BUCCANEER offioe
located in the Publications Center
(across from Joyner Library)
between 9-12 and 1-6 Monday-
Friday. Freshmen and transfer
students are not eligible to
receive a copy as these were paid
for with last year's fees. Gradua-
ting seniors can have someone
pick up their book by giving an
old ID or activity card to a friend.
Rease pick up your oopy as soon
as possible as supply is limited.
CINERGY
On Friday and Saturday Nov.
5 & 6 the Films Committee of the
Student Union will present Robert
Redford and Barbara Streisand in
"The Way We Were
Shows at 7 & 9 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Theatre.
Admission: ID & activity card (or
MSC membership)
Spend Halloween with "Rose,
mary's Baby It will blow your
mind. A chilling mcvie of demo-
nic possesion and rebirth of the
devil as a child. Come see
"Rosemary's BabyOd. 31 at 11 30
p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Admission: ID and activity card.
Veterans
The ECU Veteran's Club
needs you desperately. Due to
graduation, the club's enrollment
has decreased significantly. The
continued existence of the club
depends upon your willingness to
participate.
In the past, the dub has held
sodal events, helped with hous-
ing problems, tutored members,
given job counseling, partidpated
in intramural sports, and was
adive in VA affairs. This is your
voice on campus; there is power
in numbers. Don't let it die.
Call 758-2391 a 758-6662 fa
more information. The next meet-
ing ison Od. 27 at 730 upstairs in
Wright Auditorium. We Care!
Michael Murphey, the Fab-
ulous fiddler Vassar Clements,
and the amazing "Mr. Bojan-
gles Jerry Jeff Walker with his
Lost Gongo Band will eledrify
MingesColiseum on Sun Od. 31
at 8 p.m. Get tickets now at the
Central Ticket Offioe in Menden-
hall!
The Count Bassie Orchestra
will Fry the Funk off your face in a
jazz of all decades blast in Wright
Auditorium this Saturday. Get
tickets at the Central Ticket
Office and dance those creases
out of you pants. Don't step on
ants!
MRC
This week at Burger K ing, any
body presenting a MRC card and
purchasing a whopper gets either
another whopper free a french
fries and a coke. This is good only
after 5 p.m.
There will be a Halloween
Costume Danoe Fri Od. 29, 8.
Music and refreshments, prize for
best oostume. Baptist Student
Center .75 cents.
The Recreation Sodety will
have a meeting in Room 221
Mendenhall, Thurs. Od. 28 at
730. Plans for the Asheville trip
will be discussed.
Fletcher Hall will be selling
large yellow Homecoming Mums
for $4.50, Tuesday through
Thurs from 10100 a.m1230
p.m. and 130 p.m5:00 p.m.
Each mum will have a football
ornament in the center, purple
ribbon with ECU, and individual
water vial to keep the flower
fresh!
Elections
On Wed Od. 27th, residents
of Belk, Greene, Tyler, Fletcher
and Umstead are urged to vote
in a spedal one-time-only by-elec-
tion to fill dorm positions in the
SGA legislature. Voting will take
place in the lobbies of these
dorms on Wednesday from 10 to
4.
Model UN
The Model United Nations
Club will meet Thurs. Od. 28 at 7
p.m. in Brewster C-104. All those
interested in international rela-
tions, foreign affairs, diplomacy
and the United Nations itself are
urged to attend.
Plans oonoerning the Model
U.N. Conference to be held at the
University of Pennsylvania in
Philadelphia November 4-7 will
be discussed. The ECU Model
U.N. Club will be sending a
couple of delegations to this
conference. For further informa-
tion, call David Mayoat 758-7578.
WECU will broadcast live the
eledion ooverage Tuesday No-
vember 2nd. WECU reporters
will be in Raleigh Governing the
returns fa the North Carolina
University Radio Netwak. The
seven minute repots will be
broadcast every half hour begin-
ning at 653. Listen to WECU 57
Tues. Nov. 2nd fa the latest news
in Election '76.
Eeta Gamma
Thae will be a meeting of
Eeta Gamma Sigma, hoiaary
sodety fa business ai Wed. 27th
Od. at 315 p.m. in rcom 130
Rawl. All students and faculty
members are invited.
Silver Fox
Charlie Rich will honky tonk
his way into your hearts on Fri.
Od.29in Minges at 8:00. Charlie
Rich started at Sun Recads with
Elvis Presley where the "Silver
Fox" wrote rockers like "Mohair
Sam" and "Wooley Bulley
Charlie is also one of Dylans
favorite song writers. Tickets at
Central Ticket Offioe in Menden-
hall.
Profile '76
Profile '76, a documentary
program sponsaed by WECU
RADIO AND THE NORTH
CAROLINA UNIVERSITY RADIO
NETWORK, will be broadcast
Monday November 1 at 8 p.m. on
WECU radio 57. Profile '76
presents a sampling of the sodal,
economic, and political oonoern
which are common to the people
of Nath Carolina.
Tom Chapin
If you don't know who TOM
CHARN is perhaps you are not
with it. TOM CHARN is on the
move and going places induding
an appearance at ECU on Odober
27 at 8 p.m. Just look!
ILLUMINA
The Joe and Flo Doe Senia
Show is here! This show has been
described in many ways from the
absurd to the absurd. The judges
evaluating the show prefer to
remain annonymous but the Joe
and Flow Doe senia show, in
Mendenhall Gallery, is here.
Everyone oome because Joe and
Flo are leaving. It's about time!
Od. 24-31 in Mendenhall. ILLU
MINA takes no aedit in knowing
that Joe and Flo would adually
show up.
Remainder of Freshman Re-
gistas will be given out with
teleohone diredaies in old C.U
this week Mon. - Fri.
ACT
Two nationally-standardized
tests will be administered at ECU
Nov. 20, the Allied Health
Professions Admissions Test and
the American College Testing
(ACT) Assessment.
Applications to take either test
are available at the ECU Testing
Center, 105-106 Speight Building,
ECU.
Applicants for the Allied
Health test should complete and
mail their applications to the
Psychological Cap P.O. Box
3540 Grand Central Station, New
Yak, N.Y. 10017toarrive by Od.
25.
Pageant
Alpha Kappa Alpha will spon-
sor a Student of the Year pageant
Od. 27 at 7 p.m. in the
Mendenhall Student Center thea-
tre.
NRC
The National Research Coun-
dl (NRC) announces the Research
Assodateship Programs fa 1977.
These programs provide sdent-
ists and engineers with oppatun-
ities fa postdodaal research on
problems in many fields of
atmosphaic and earth sdences,
chemistry, engineering, environ-
mental sdences, life sdences,
mathematics, physics, and space
sdences.
The NRC administers the
Research Assodateship Programs
on behald of and in cooperation
with seleded federal research
aganizatiais, which have lab-
orataies at about 80 geographic
locations in the U.S.
Appointments are awarded
on a competitive basis. The
competition is open to recent
redpients of the dodaate and in
some cases to senia investigat-
ors. Sane programs are open to
non-U.S. dtizensalso.
Approximately 250 to 300 new
awards will be made in 1977.
Stipends (subjed to income tax)
will range from $15,000 upwards.
Grants will be provided fa family
relocation and fa professional
travel during tenure.
Postmark deadline fa appli-
cations is January 15, 1977.
Awards will be announced in
April.
Further infamatioi concern-
ing application materials and
spedficoppatunitiesfa research
is available from the Assodate-
ship Offioe, JH 606-P, National
Research Coundl, 2101 Constitu-
tion Avenue, N.W Washington,
D.C 20418.
"The Student Prince the
first produdion of the 1976-77
season at the East Carolina
Playhouse is currently in rehear-
sal under the direction of Edgar
R. Loessin.
The cast of mae than 50 is
oomprised of students from the
ECU Department of Drama and
Speech and the School of Music.
The title role will be perfamed by
a guest artist, Bill McDonald of
Washington, D.C.
The setting of "The Student
Prince" is Heidelberg in 1860. A
young prince, Karl Franz, has
oome to Heidelberg University to
spend a year. Karl Franz quickly
learns the happiness of student
life and falls in love with Kathie, a
waitress at the local inn.
"The Student Prince" will be
presented in MoGinnis Audita-
ium at ECU Od. 26-30 at 8:15
p.m. Season tickets are still
available. Infamatioi may be
obtained by calling the Playhouse
at 757-6390.
Fish Fry
Psi Chi will have its first
annual fish fry on Sunday, Nov. 7.
All psychdogy majas and psy-
chology staff members are in-
vited. Mark your calendar now
and watch the Psi Chi bulletin
boards and the FOUNTAINHEAD
fa details. Student tickets will go
on sale Tuesday, Od. 26 in the
Psi Chi Library.
Art Show
A seledion of paintings by
Samuel Perry Phillips of Car-
thage, senia student in the ECU
School of Art, will be on display in
the gallery of Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center Od. 24-31.
The show indudes non-
objedive paintings in oils and
aaylics.
Manuscripts
The dosing date fa the
submission of manuscripts by
College Students is Nov. 5. Any
student attending either junia a
senia college is eligible to submit
his verse. There is no limitation
as to fam a theme. Shater
waks are preferred because of
space limitations.
Each poem must be TYPED a
PRINTED ai a separate sheet,
and must bear the NAME and
HOME ADDRESS of the student,
and the COLLEGE ADDRESS as
well. Manuscripts should be sent
to the OFFICE OF THE PRESS.
Table Tennis
Tuesday, November 2 at 8.00
p.m. Mendenhall Student Center
will be sponsaing a table tennis
singles tournament. There
will be a $1.00 registration ree.
mm
mmm
mm
m
mm
mmm





HHHHHHHHHHHM
�BHHHBBHH
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1326 OCTOBER 1976
3
tUMtt�tf�M��
SGA survey cont
By JIM ELLIOTT
Senior Editor
Fountainhead, intramurals and the bus system were rated highest
among campus services by students responding to the opinion survey.
On a scale of zero to four, Fountainhead was given the best overall
rating of 3.14, intramurals received a 2.83 and the bus system was rated
2.72.
This chapter of the Student Opinion Survey also examined the level
of student participation in the Student Government Association, mainly
through checks on voting regularity and motivations.
The survey found that 30.5 per cent of the respondents considered
themselves "regular voters 27.5 per cent were ' Occasional s while
"Apathetics" comprised 42.0 per cent of those responding.
"Regular voting is significantly lower among 17 and 18-year olds and
those 22 and older according to the survey. "Voting frequency is
lowest among the graduate students, with only 14.8 per cent ranking as
Regular voters
The survey revealed that most students are motivated to vote
because they believe the issues involved (64.5 per cent) are important
and because they are concerned about how studenWees are spent (62.6
per cent).
Table IV-6. How Studeots Learn of SGA Candidates
Most Not
Important Important Important
1. Posters 45.9 37.5 16.7
2. Newspaper editorials and articles
about candidates
3. Handouts, leaflets, etc.
4. Paid advertisements in campus
media
5. Personal contact initiated by
candidate
6. Personal acquaintance of
candidate
7. Speeches and debates among
candidates
8. Fraternal, departmental or
organizational endorsement ,
m
�I w win
ft
1. Candidate's stand on issues
2. Candidate's campaign tactics
3. Candidate's personality
4. Candidate's appearance
5. Personal committment or promise 16.2
6. Publicity-candidate's name
was most familiar 14.3
7. Persuasion by friends or other
individuals 7.3
42.038.819.1
33.439.626.9
32.740.526.8
23.730.046.4
25.821.052.2
9.420.869.7
8.0 v.26.965.0
ident's Choice of Candidates
MostNot
ImportantImportantImportant
82.813.04.0
42.345.811.9
41.748.010.1
16.944.838.1
16.226.556.1
43.4
31.0
42.2
61.6
Table IV-10. Student Ratings of Campus Services and Programs
(In order of highest to lowest rated)
NO
A B C D F EVAL AVE.
1.FOUNTAINHEAD35.447.813.53.00.41.13.14
2. Intramurals19.351.325.32.21.941.22.83
3. Bus system17.949.822.56.63.224.02.72
4. Athletic facilities
or student use14.845.425.79.015.123.32.55
5. WECU10.045.233.27.33.551.32.52
6. BUCCANEER12.438.532.112.84.113.42.42
7. REBEL17.230.335.211.95.451.12.42
8. Dorm conditions3.627.844.718.06.016.22.04
9. Infirmary5.325.442.915.510.816.01.98
10. Registration4.825.838.215.016.10.41.88
11. Popular concerts5.923.333.223.713.85.91.83
12. EBONY HERALD 5.614.533.122.624.276.51.54
13. Drop-add1.614.134.824.225.45.01.42
14. Eating facilities1.011.728.829.429.26.51.26
15. Campus parking0.21.715.029.953.22.20.65
AVERAGE10.330.130.515.414.122.22.08
"Percentages of letter-grades exclude those who said they were unable
to evaluate subject because they did not know enough about it. All
percentages exclude those who failed to answer the question. These
averaged 22.2 per cent per question.
"Average is the median of the letter-grades with A" counting as 4,
"B" as 3, "C" as 2, "D" as 1 and "F" asO. Averages exclude those
who said they were unable to evaluate subject.
(Editor's note: Numbers represent per cent.)
ERROR
The article dealing with the
approval of free bands fa Home-
corning weekend in the Oct. 21
issue contained an error. The
article confused the dates and the
tends. The subcommittee actual-
ly oroposed scheduling STYX for
Oct. 29 and ARTFUL DODGER
for Oct. 30.
NCASG to
meet here
By DAVID NASH
Staff Writer
The North Carolina Associa-
tion of Student Governments
(NCASG) will meet here Nov. 20,
according to Tim Sullivan, SGA
President.
The body of student govern-
ment presidents will hold its first
meeting at ECU since its incep-
tion in the fall of 1974.
The association consists of
Student Government presidents
from the 16 state-supported
schools.
The body, recently incorpora-
ted for tax purposes, represents
90,000-100,000 students across
North Carolina.
The association is most noted
for its organization of rallies
during the 1975 school year
concerning tuition rate hikes.
"For the rally, ECU had about
3,000 students on the mall, which
beat out' all the other schools
attendance, including Chapel
Hill said Sullivan.
The November meeting at
ECU is open to the public.
Wve got
what you want,

We've Got Your Solitaire
The basic design idea is chosen by more
brides than any other. A single diamond,
simple and elegant. We have solitares to fit
every taste, every budget, in your choice
of round, oval, marquise, pear or emerald cut.
Whether you spend a hundred dollars,
or thousands of dollars, we'll give you
unmatched value for every dollar you spend.
Use our Custom Charge Plan, BankAmericard,
Master Charge or Layaway.
Jewel Box
� diamond spioauS's ro� ov�� vj �i��s
Downtown Greenville
On the Mall
Attention
Students and Patrons
The Greenville Nightclub Association is making plans for the upooming Homecoming
and Halloween weekend the last of this month. We have decided voluntarily that we wish to
close Sunday night in order to promote and support what we believe to be a really exciting
event being planned near Stokes-10 miles from Greenville. The First Annual Halloween
Music Festival will start at noon on Sunday and run until midnight. Six non-stop, great bands
and a $250 first prize for the best-or-worst Halloween costume-should make for a terrific
last day of the Homecoming weekend.
The club owners have asked the City to work with them to insure a fun and safe weekend
for students, guests and residents of Greenville. It's really a matter of trust and oommon
sense for all of us. Just think about it and help us help you.
Saturday night we will be open until our regular hours, but we have decided to stop our
refreshment salesat midnight. The City has agreed to block off to traffic Fifth and Cotanche
Streets between Fourth Street and Reade Circle and Evans and Reade. Each club manager
and four of his employees will be outside to help you have a safe and enjoyable evening.
You' II recognize them because of the distinctive arm bands tney' II be wearing. They' II expect
you to conduct yourself as ladies and gentlemen.
We are doing all this out of concern for you. It's your Homecoming and we want to show
the City, people of Greenville and ourselves that we can have a really nice weekend and a
really good time.
We're serious about it though and have given it a lot of thought. Please think about it too
and help us and yourself.
See you Homecoming.
Greenville
Nightclub
Association
mnmm
m
m
ft
�u m � Kill'HH�W
m





4
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1326 OCTOBER 1976
m
mmmm
m
m
m

m
mmwm
Right to low wages
The race for N.C. Commissioner of Labor seems
lackluster even in the shadow of the presidential
elections. But the outcome of the balloting for this post
next Tuesday could have ongoing implications for
North Carolina's 743,000 production workers.
The issue involves a mislabeled statute known as
the-right-to-work law. Essentially, this law prohibits a
labor union from requiring all workers of a particular
shop to join the union. In some of the industrialized
states the law saw brief usage during the early days of
unionization.
But in the South today the law remains and has
been instrumental in keeping workers' wages at low
tide. Figures released last week show this state's
production workers receiving average weekly earnings
of $150.15 in Augustthe national average was
$207.48.
Incumbent Labor Commissioner T. Avery Nye
favors the right-to-work law. Nye's position has fit the
corporate attitude in the state concerning who should
reap the lion's share of industrialization's benefits.
North Carolina has one of the most liberal standards in
the nation for chartering corporations; corporate taxes
in this state also rank well below the national average.
John Brooks, Nye's Democratic opponent, is
taking an apparently objective attitude about the law.
Brooks has stated, "The right-to-work law is not a
concern of the Department of Labor. The only thing is
the department related to unionization is the
arbitration service. The law is a legislative issue and is
enforced bv the judicial branch of government
Nye espouses the right-to-work law as the savior
of jobs. But tne primary benefactors of this archaic
statute are manufacturers who use it to crush unions'
organizing efforts thereby stalling the improvement of
wages and working conditions in this state.
Brook's position is neither pro- or anti-union and
the more palatable to those ooncerned with equitable
distribution of industry's rewards in North Carolina.
No class Saturday
The Pirates' defeat Saturday at the hands of
Carolina's Tar Heels is hard enough to swallow, but
the attitude of many East Carolina fans after the game
is absolutely intolerable.
Before this college can call itself big-time, ECU
fans will have to learn to act accordingly. Judging
from their attitude after the game Saturday,
Carolina's people certainly are worthy of the title.
Fbuntainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over titty years
Senior EditorJim Elliott
Production ManagerJimmy Williams
Advertising ManagerDennis Leonard
News EditorsDebbie Jackson
Neil Sessoms
Trends EditorPat Coyle
Sports EditorSteve Wheeler
Fountainhead is the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Student Government Association
of ECU and appears each Tuesday and Thursday during the
school year, weekly during the summer.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C.
27834.
Editorial Offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions: $10.00 annually for non-students, $6.00 for
alumni.
HOU) L0Nf5UPS W FRANK, SID He jo($ GOiNGT TO
STAT pOrVTOLON ?? r CftrV'T SlT HSRE FORGVB.
TheForum
Vegetarians seek support
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
We are looking for fellow
vegetarian workers. If you are or
would like to be involved in some
sort of vegetarian action on your
campus would you let us know.
Congratulations
Alphi Phi Omega
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
On behalf of the East Carolina
United Fund campaign, I would
like to thank Dave Ross, Alpha
Phi Omega, and all the sorority
pledge classes who helped make
this year's Rock-A-Thon so suc-
cessful.
The campus goal this year for
the United Fund is $17,000 and
the $3,012.22 collected by the
APO's will contribute greatly in
helping us obtain this goal.
Thanks again for an outstand-
ing Rock-A-Thon!
T.R. Pierce, Chairman
ECU Division of the United Fund
This fall there wHI be a
network of UNTURKEY or vege-
tarian Thanksgiving public din-
ners aroung the oountry. Vegetar-
ian Thanksgivings save grain for
some of the 50 million hungry,
save animals from going terror-
ized to an unjust death, save
humans from the food poisoning,
intestinal cancer, kidney disease,
and other hazards of animal flesh.
The laboratories on your cam-
pus, if it is a typical one, are
involved in some of the kinds of
research which have happened
Forum Policy
Forum letters should be
typed or printed and they must
be signed and include the
writer's address. Names will
be withheld upon request.
Letters may be sent to Foun-
tainhead or left at the Informa-
tion Desk in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
elsewhere (e.g at the Univer-
sity of Calif, at San Diego,
pigs are forced to run a
treadmill till they drop of exhaus-
tion.
At Harvard several years ago,
pigs were dropped alive into 800
degr.ee boiling oil for eventual
compilation as research in The
Symposium on Burns. At the
University ot Rochester, at
Wayne State dogs were
strapped into Blalock Presses and
into crash cars, to see how much
pressure oould be taken before
bones broke and skulls were
crushed.
We are animal liberationists,
world hunger activists, and di-
sease fighters. All can be accom-
plished through vegetarian work,
either on campus or with us. We
work for $5 a week and room and
board. Come on aboard.
Sincerely,
Don Wilson,
Nellie Shriver,
Billy Mick
Emma Wood
tmam
m
i
wMamsaBmMsaam
;���- U i M ifS Wk ��:





"lwWWlwmWM
�j(gfK��a
pgijsappHi!
FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 1326 OCTOBER 1976

m
iWW��i

�W�K
0

Wilmington 10 eyewitness
admits making up testimony
(LNS)Four years after ten
civil rights activists in North
Carolina were convicted on
charges of arson and conspiracy,
the state's sole eyewitness, Allen
Hall, has admitted that he was
coerced by the state prosecution
and a federal law enforcement
agent into fabricating his entire
testimony.
The Wilmington 10, as the
convicted activists are known,
include Rev. Ben Chavis, a
well-known civil rights leader;
eight other black men, most of
them high school students when
they were arrested; and Ann
Shepard, a white woman who was
a Vista volunteer.
In response to Hall's recanted
testimony, defense lawyers for
the Wilmington 10 filed a motion
in court on October 13 demanding
dismissal of charges against them
or a retrial. All ten are in jail now
and have demanded to be releas-
ed on bail. They were imprisoned
in February of 1976 after bail for
further appeals was denied.
The civil rights demonstra-
tions that lead to their arrests
began as a non-violent protest in
early 1971, demanding that a
memorial service for Martin
Luther King be allowed at a
Wilmington, North Carolina high
school.
Violence broke out after polioe
and members of the Ku Klux
K Ian attacked protesters who had
rallied at a church. In the
following weeks, two black teen-
agers and a member of the Ku
Klux Klan were killed by gunfire,
and several homes and stores
were burned.
Shortly afterwards, Chavis,
who had been a highly visible
leader of the protests, and nine
others were arrested and subse-
quently convicted. Chavis was
sentenced to 34 years in prison;
three others got 31 years each;
and five got 29 years each.
Shepard was convicted on an
accessory charge and given ten
years.
Notre Dame grad speaks
on world-wide hunger
ByLYNNCAVERLY
Staff Writer
Al Sondej, in his crusade
against world-wide hunger, visit-
ed ECU and the Greenville area
on Oct. 19.
ECU was one of forty oollege
campuses Sondej is touring in an
attempt to establish an awareness
of world-wide hunger.
A 1974 graduate of Notre
Dame, Sondej has already man-
aged to institutionalize this
awarness at Notre Dame. Twice a
day, at meal times, students
stand outside the dining hall
collecting money and petitioning
signatures.
"The problem has to be
overcome from both the economic
and political ends said Sondej.
The money is distributed
world-wide through four agen-
cies, Catholic Relief Services,
Care, UNICEF, and Church
World Services
Signatures are sent to Con-
Frat council
elects
president
Johnny H. Edwards was re-
cently elected President of the
North Carolina-West Virginia
Council of Gamma Beta Phi
Society.
The state convention was held
at Shaw University. Kim Simp-
son, a senior majoring in Physical
Therapy served as the recording
secretary at the convention. She
also served as Vice-president of
the ECU chapter of the Society.
The Gamma Beta Phi Society
is an honor society and service
organization for oolleje students.
Its purposes are to encourage and
reward academic merit, to stand
for and promote worthy character
and high ideals, and improve
education through appropriate
service projects. A member must
rank in the top 20 percent of his
class academically.
gressmen in Washington asking
them to increase and reohannel
developmental assistance to the
hungry on this planet, according
to Sondej.
In two years the Notre Dame
students have raised $25 thou-
sand.
"We are all equally children
of God. And we should try to give
each individual an equal oppor-
tunity to live on this planet. In
order to make this planet more
livable we will have to oonserve
and share our natural resources
with the poor so that they can
help themselves said Sondej.
Sondej talked to interested
students involved in various
religious organizations on cam-
pus. One of the interested
students, Tom Frandsen, would
like to establish a program similar
to the one at Notre Dame but cites
"There are administrative chan-
nels we must go through concern-
ing solicitation violations before
we can begin
This past summer Sondej
worked with the Overseas Devel-
opment Council as a research
assistant involved with food prob-
lems and program implementa-
tion.
Honor Council
suspends two Frosh
Two ECU freshmen who had
pleaded guilty to recent vanda-
lism charges received "suspen-
ded" suspensions from the Honor
Council last Thursday night in
Mendenhall Student Center.
After short deliberation, the
Council gave both students sus-
pended suspensions on the condi-
tion that the two students pay for
all damages caused.
The vandalism incident occur-
red on Fri. night, Oct. 15, and
involved a car parked on College
Hill Drive.
A suspended suspension,
according to the 1975-76 Student
Handbook, is "the period of time
during which the defendant may
not be found guilty of any
violation for which suspension
may be imposed without automa-
tic suspension
The suspended suspensions
will be imposed on both students
until the beginning of Winter
Quarter.
COME SAVE WITH
GIANT
DISCOUNT
HEALTH &
BEAUTY AIDS
429 evans mall
downtown ;rf:enville
EAT FOR JUST
W plus tax MonThurs.
Crabeakes, slaw, french fries plirs
hushpuppies.
V pound hamburger steak, slaw,
french fries and rolls.
Fish, slaw, french fries, hushpuppies.
CLIFF'S
Seafood House ana Oyster Bar
Open 4:30-9:00 MonSat. 752-3172
2 miles east on highway 264
(out 10th St.)
riM i
'� " �'�'�' -OLBROOk
N and BOB
Produced DvW- . �
AW . . .
A Rooen Redtord Aian j Pat
PGi
tMCWoTXSScM
TtOwcaOB � From WarfWf Brt
Warnrr Communications Company
O
mm
m
mm
mmm
mm
mrnrn
NOW AT A THEATRE NEAR YOU.
m





6
FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 1326 OCTOBER 1976
m
m
m
m
mm
m
THE EAST CAROLINA AND PITT COUNTY
YOUNG DEMOCRATS CORDIALLY INVITE ALL
ECU STUDENTS AND FACULTY TO A RECEP-
TION HONORING LT. GOV. JIM HUNT. THE
RECEPTION WILL BE HELD ON SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 30,1976 FROM 11:00 - 12:30, AT
THE WILLIS BUILDING. JIM IS LOOKING
FORWARD TO SEEING ALL OF HIS ECU
FRIENDS ON THIS HOMECOMING WEEKEND.
News and Observers
reported missingThurs.
If you have any questions, contact
Pam Marks at 756-3689.
Approximately 400 News and
Observers were reported missing
from their pick-up location next to
a local restaurant Thursday mor-
ning.
Dorsit Ward, an ECU student
and local distributor for the
Raleigh newspaper, said that
when he went to pick up the 450
papers allocated fa the ECU
campus, he found only about 50.
"The newspapers were deliv-
ered by the News and Observer
carrier at about 2:00 a.m
aocording to a News and Observer
spokesman.
Ward said that the papers
were at the pick-up site at 2:30,
and that he went home to get
some sleep. When he returned
early Thursday morning, most of
the papers were missing.
"Evidently they were stolen
said the spokesman.
Ward said that this was not
the first time the newspapers had
been missing.
"If it happens again we will
have to set up a new drop
location said the News and
Observer spokesman.
Mattress
WARD
Continued from page 1.
"lam ooncerned with what is
happening to paychecks. You
notice I didn't say excessive
spending and deficits and that
kind of thing. For the ordinary
worker who is getting a paycheck
and living sorta' hand and mouth,
by the week, he doesn't like to
hear you talk about high taxes or
deficit spending.
"It means more to him when
you say look, you made $175 and
when they got through taking
(deductions) out what do you
have? And so I say they're taking
too much out of vou paycheck. I
didn' t say your i axes are too high
and he understands this very
well.
"When you talk to those
fellows what you see is what this
fellow, (the janitor in Kinston)
did. His face lit up. I gave him a
little brochure, and I didn't think
he could have read it. Anyhow, he
liked the pretty pictures
Ward also said that Democra-
tic candidate Jimmy Carter, is "in
close" with drugs and people
involved with drugs.
"He has somewhat tied him-
self very closely in regards to
some people who've been fairly
involved in drugs said Ward.
"I don't know how many of
you all know about the story about
how the Allman Band (The
Allman Brothers Band) has raised
something like $500,000 for the
Carter campaign, or anything
about Capricorn Records ex-
plained Ward. "But I have seen
pictures of him wearing an
Allman Band shirt and a Capri-
corn Records shirt both, and he is
in close with those people
Ward lives in Greenville,
N.C and has practiced family
medicine in Ayden. He is making
his first attempt to win a political
office.
ablaze
A mattress which caught fire
in the dorm room (408B Belk) of
ECU student Bruce Beasley last
Friday, was extinguished by two
campus policemen who were in
the area at the time of the blaze.
According to Francis Eddings,
ECU assistant director of secur-
ity. Officers Suggs and Nicholson
observed smoke ooming from the
fourth floor of Belk dormitory at
about 4:50 a.m. on Oct. 22.
"They found the mattress
hanging on a rail on the 4th floor
of Belk smoldering with fire. They
extinguished it Eddings said.
According to Eddings, Beas-
ley said that he had been smoking
in ad which had apparently
caused the blaze. He had carried
the mattress to the outside
baloony, laid it across the rail and
was trying to extinguish the blaze
when the two off icers came along.
There were no charges filed.
1st Annual Outdoor HALLOWEEN
Music Festival
Located at Stokes, IM.C-
(approx. 10 miles N.E. of Greenville)
Oct. 31� From 12:00-12:00 mid.
6 Bands: 1 Delias High Band
2-Loafer's Glory
3-Larriat Sam
4-Tumbleweed
5-Super Grit Cowboy Band
6-Sutter's Gold Streak
$250.00 CASH PRIZE to the best Halloween Costume
Tickets available at
Rathskeller
Elbo Room
Tickets are $5.00 in advance
$6.00 at gate
Chapter X
ATTIC
Rock N Soul
Tree House
Jolly Roger
Newby's Subs
ATTIC SUNSET
nnmmmmmmkmmmmmm
mmmtmmmm
m





hbhh
mms
FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 1326 OCTOBER 1976
7
Piiwmni .i mtMiMtmi
mm
mmm
m
Major A ttractions 1 ECU 0
Collins shines for quality crowd
By MICHAELFUTCH
Assistant Trends Editor
Judy Collins' mystique en-
thralled a Minges Coliseum
audience of about 1200 persons
last Thursday night. The program
was of a quality rarely seen at
ECU. The slack student atten-
dance merely proves my precon-
oeived notion of the type of
programming that the majority of
this campus wants. Major Attrac-
tions offered a quality oonoert on
a tasteless campus.
Collins relied more on recent
material for her classy perfor-
mance. Her 1975 release,
JUDITH, and last spring's
BREAD AND ROSES provided
the bulk of the two hour program.
Collins displayed her superb gift
for interpretation of other writer's
music. The performance consis-
ted of about 20 songs and poems,
two of those featuring the talents
of her touring band while she
stepped to the side of the stage.
The band consisted of Tony
Levin, bass and tuba; Michael
Ready, percussion and drums;
John Pluttania and Lon Volpe,
lead guitars; Richard Bell, key-
boards; and Kenty Show, key-
boards and musical direction.
The program began with
Collins at the piano. Having had
11 years of classical piano, she
proved to be exceptional on this
instrument. Collins appeared to
be more at ease, however, with
her acoustic guitar strapped
around her shoulder.
Collins virtuoso interpretation
proved to be favorable on an
uptempo version of Steve Good-
man's "City of New Orleans a
song which is linked with Arlo
Guthrie. Her voice was very
distinct as she flowed from one
pitch to another.
After stating that she hadn't
"done a college tour in many
years Collins performed a
Randy Newman tune. There was
satiricfl humor concerning the
U.S. when Collins offered "New-
man's solution to all the problems
in Africa and South America"
�the conclusion was to drop the
big one now Levin's tuba work
on this number was only fitting as
Collins displayed a vaudeville
side.
JUDY COLLINS Photo by Russ Pogue)
Halloween concert in Minges
to include Murphey, Walker
The Student Union Major
Attractions Committee will pre-
sent three outstanding acts to
conclude the homecoming festi-
vities. MICHAEL MURPHEY,
JERRY JEFF WALKER AND
THE LONG GONZO BAND, anti
the VASSAR CLEMENTS BAND
will be featured in oonoert on
Sunday, October 31 at 800 P.M.
in Minges Coliseum.
In the middle of 1973, things
really began to happen for
MICHAEL MURPHEY. He sign-
ed an exclusive recording contract
with Epic Records. With this
came the release of his first Epic
Album, simply entitled
MICHAEL MURPHEY. The al-
bum was received exceptionally
well by critics all across the
country. After a year of extensive
touring around the United Stat
M urphey once again turned to the
studio, and his fourth album,
BLUE SKY THUNDER, was
released in March 1975. This
album contained Michael's hot-
test single to date, "Wildfire a
song whose popularity indicated
that Murphey had finally broken
through to audiences in areas
outside the southwest.
JERRY JEFF WALKER is a
rambler, a street-wise story teller
who sings about what he sees and
lives just about the way he sings;
natural and easy. He did his
growing somewhere in upstate
New York and came out of the
Catskills at 16 to go on the road,
conscience and instinct drawing
him into that proud tradition of
iminstrels and troubadours, poets
and pickers whose odyssey has no
beginning and seeks no end.
Backed up by the LOST GONZO
BAND, Walker's most recent
MCA album,IT'S A GOOD
NIGHT FOR SINGING, was re-
corded entirely in Nashville.
Entering the studio with a surplus
of tunes, the whole album was
completed in several weeks. A
good time was had writing the
songs and recording the album,
and even better time wjll be had
in listening to JERRY oEFF
WALKER and the LOST GONZO
BAND.
VASSAR CLEMENTS is no
stranger to ECU having appeared
here in 1974 with MARSHALL
TUCKER and DICKY BETTS.
Pipe-smoking, gum-chewing, in-
variably dresses in Banlon pull-
overs and casual slacks, Vassar is
the clean-cut country boy in the
midst of a bearded and blue-jean
industry. Even the briefest list of
the groups Vassar has played
with reads like a Who's Who -
THE EARL SCRUGGS REVUE,
NITTY GRITTY DIRT BAND,
DOC WATSON, ROY ACUFF,
MOTHER MAYBELLE CARTER,
JOHN HARTFORD, LINDA
RONSTADT, THE ALLMAN
BROTHERS, THE GRATEFUL
DEAD, LIGHTFOOT, and even
the BOSTON POPS.
Tickets for the concert are
priced at $2.00 for ECU students
and $4.00 for the public. All
tickets sold at the door will be
$4.00. Tickets are available from
the ECU Central Ticket Office.
Public tickets may also be pur-
chased from the Record Bar at
Pitt Plaza.
Technical problems evolved as
the left amp blew in the middle of
Paul Simon's "Something So
Right" This failed to hinder the
show as Collins' voice remained
as effective and crystal dear as
before. The problem luckily was
repaired for the next song, an
ecology piece on whales. It began
with oceanwhale sound effects
which Collins later delivered
over. The number proved to be
haunting when it dissolved into
an organ bridge that was vocally
entered by Collins. It proved to be
very beautiful and received an
overwhelming reaction from the
sparse crowd.
Collins stepped aside while
her band performed solo on a jazz
composition, A Prayer for To-
morrow's Weather" and Solar
Dance The guitar and bass
work were outstanding on this
piece.
Collins returned to say a
prayer for the workingman, dedi-
cated to those who were killed
during the Chilean military junta
that overthrew Allende from
office. Collins remains politically
and socially involved in the 70's
and reflects it during her per-
formance. She spoke of the
continuing U.S. money which is
being sent to Chile and placed a
great deal of the blame on Henry
Kissinger. She also spoke of
Victor Jara, a singer who was
killed during the two day seizure.
The prayer was followed by a
short Spanish rendition.
After a 15-minute intermis-
sion, Collins re-emerged onstage
and seemed to be more at ease.
Her "Song for Duke" was
incredibly done with only Collins
and bass player Levin.
The set moved fast with
numbers like "Someday Soon"
and "Deliver Me Pat Garvey's
"The Lovin' erf the Game" was
described by Collins as her
"philosophical point of view for
life This fast number broke the
overall passive mood of the
second half.
The audienoe was captivated
by keyboard player Show as he
performed two original waltzes.
The audienoe proved its dass as
quiet was only broken by the
piano.
' Bread and Roses , a poem
on the feminist movement, allow-
ed Collins to shine. She was
accompanied by her own vocals,
taped in advance.
Leonard Cohen's "Bird On
the Wire" was performed in a
slow bluesy manner. This oould
have been one of the highlights of
the evening; it however, proved
to be lacking in vocal authen-
ticism. There was an impression
of an overworking of this popular
song, it's a pity that Collins
ended trie second half on a bad
note; she did make it up with her
one song enoore. Collins perfor-
med her 1975 comeback single
from the Broadway production A
LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC. "Send In
the Clowns Aocompanied only
by piano and organ, Collins
overwhelmed the crowd with this
mood-setting number.
Judy Collins proved to be an
exceptional performer in oonoert.
If there were any faults, it was her
inclination to perform recent
material. Missing were her folk
protest songs of the early '60s
and her more popular numbers:
Joni Mitchell's "Both Sides
Now Leonard Cohen's Su-
zanne and the traditionals,
"Maid of Constant Sorrow" and
Amazing Grace' . The evening,
however, was a delight. It goes to
show that ECU doesn't always
have to be screwed over with
choosy musidans concerning oon-
oert location, most of who in a few
years will be unable to be
"picky
Judy Collins was sponsored by
Major Attradions of the Student
Union.
TOM CHAPIN, star of Make a Wish
Wednesday, in Mendenhall Student Theater
will perform at 8ti0
File photo





8
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1326 OCTOBER 1976
mmmm

m


�p
Trends follows actor from audition to opening
By DAVID NASH
Staff Writer
Many people often wonder
(and never get the chance to ask),
what really goes on behind the
scenes when a play (be it musical
or drama) is put on the stage.
To answer this question,
FOUNTAINHEAD decided to
pick an actor - Martin Thompson,
and a show - THE STUDENT
PRINCE, and follow both from
the first audition to opening
night.
The actor we chose, Martin
Thompson, has been involved in
numerous drama productions in
warn ����
his "career" at ECU ("career
because he's been here off and on
since 1971).
Thompson has been associ-
ated with such Playhouse pro-
ductions as, THE BOYFRIEND,
INDIANS, DRACULA, and A
SCENT OF FLOWERS.
With his first major acting role
in MUCH ADO ABOUT NO-
THING, Thompson soon became
one of those rare talents that is
constantly sought for shows.
In THE STUDENT PRINCE,
Thompson portrays Lutz, the
Prince's valet, a demeaning posi-
tion for most, but not to Lutz ("I
hold the prince in the palm of my
Li
A R 77 N TH OM PSON as valet in The Student Prince Photo by
Mick Godwin
hand").
For the part, Thompson "just
went in and sang a songand
wound up with a non-singing
role
Rehearsals began for THE
STUDENT PRINCE in late
September, and continued every
night (and sometimes during the
day( right up until tonight's
opening.
According to Thompson, re-
hearsals begin with a read-
through of the script to let
everyone get acquainted with the
plot and their character. Then
begins the hard task of the director
to "block" or place everyone in
the place he wants them, and
instructs them how they got
there.
" This is one of the things he is
really great at said Thompson,
speaking of Edgar R. Leossin,
directa of the play.
"Edgar is really good at
moving large groups of people on
stage, and making everyone look
good, as witnessed by the many
Summer Theatre musicals he has
done here included Thompson.
In rehearsals, it is the job of
the actor and director to find
"bits" and pieces of business for
a character Lutz.
"The lines are really not all
that funny, so you have to find
mannerisms for this "vaudeville
type character said Thompson.
When an actor reaches final
dress rehearsal, the show is
finished except for final touches
to enhance his character and or
situation.
At the final dress, the director
gives notes or suggestions on
what an actor may do to enliven
his character.
At that final rehearsal before
opening, there is usually an
invited audience to help the actor
in timing and presentation of
lines.
Thompson, having just re-
turned from working with the
N.C. Arts Council will graduate
from ECU the end of winter
quarter.
Already an Actor's Equity
Union member, and with such
talent, and enthusiasm, Thomp-
son should have no problem in the
thing we all fear upon graduation
finding employment.
String Quartet
fills Mendenhall
BySUSYCHESTON
Staff Writer
The world-renowned Guarneri
String Quartet performed for a
sold-out audience at Mendenhall
Theatre last Wednesday night.
The Guarneri Quartet is cre-
oognized as one of the best
chamber ensembles in the world,
and their technical excellence and
musical insight last Wednesday
showed why their reputation is
virtually unsurpassed.
The ensemble proved their
versatility by mastering the re-
fined classical form of a late
Haydn quartet and capturing the
melodic richness of Bartok' s First
Quartet and the lyric beauty of
Grieg's Quartet in G minor.
The four men played with
remarkable intensity throughout
the performance. The continuous
surging motion of Bartok, the
subtlety of attacks and brilliant
use of dynamic contrast in the
Haydn, and the intimacy and
rhythmic vigor of the Grieg
created a feeling of perpetual
motion that didn't relax until the
final note of the conoert.
What really made the concert
exciting was the intensity coupled
with the wonderful intimacy and
the Quartet has developed in their
twelve years of playing together.
Beyond a basic sensitivity to each
other, the Guarneri Quartet has
achieved a unity in tonal color and
a delicate balance that makes the
ensemble concept supreme, and
yet allows each musician to shine
in his own right.
ECU should be proud to have
had such excellent musicians
perform here. Congratulations to
the Artist Series Committee fa
bringing such superb entertain-
ment to East Carolina.
Joh
�1
MBM
�V: i





raEBiiggg g jlffl v
��;�:���: ���'���
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1326 OCTOBER 1976
9
M
�W�

st re-
th the
aduate
winter
Equity
such
homp-
inthe
uation
I
illiant
i the
and
3rieg
�etual
il the
ncert
jpled
' and
their
ther.
each
has
and
s the
and
ftine
have
ians
is to
i for
tain-
� WiMUPfU
Bill Keyes
Don't look back
John next door is a good old guy with whom I've enjoyed playing
Sunday morning quarterback through the first half of this football
season. But this past Sunday was no joy, for instead of talking about the
big pass completions, broken tackles and quarterback sacs for old EC,
we were brooding over fumble recoveries, pass interceptions, and field
goals that helped the cause of the opponents.
Old John and I agreed that one football game doth not a season
make, and one defeat doth not a season break. East Carolina fans feel
tragedy in the Pirates' loss to Carolina, it's true. But when we looked at
it realistically, the loss to Carolina isn't all that bad. (We knew Carolina
had a fine football team.) The real tragedy would be for the Pirates to
lose one of the games which remain to be plaved.
When we said our farewell's for that morning, Old John scratched his
beard, looked at me with his bloodshot eyes, and told me to tell y'all to
remember that ten wins against only one loss is a respectable record in
any league.
Anyway, the ECU-UNC game is history. Let us turn our attention to
er aspects of oollege athletics.
nnyvvay, uic uw vnvyw
other aspects of oollege athlet
ACADEMIC RIGHTSOF ATHLETES
During the short time I've been at ECU I have oome to admire
Chancellor Leo W. Jenkins for three reasons associated with athletics.
One, realizing the positive effect that a strong athletic program has on a
university, he is extremely interested in doing everything necessary to
improve that program. And he makes no apology for his zeal. Two, Dr.
Jenkins does not just say he wants a quality program, but actually works
along with Athletic Director Bill Cain and Faculty Chairman Cliff Moore
to affect positive changes. And number three Leo Jenkins is not
interested only in the oollective program as many in his position are, but
he is concerned about the individuals involved. This last point is the one
which we shall focus on here.
On Tuesday, October 19, Dr. Jenkins addressed the Greenville
Sports Club at their weekly luncheon and expressed conoern for the
student athlete. But as usual, he didn't leave it at that; he offered a
suggestion as to how the plight of the student-athlete oould be improved.
This suggestion was outrageously radical, especially when you consider
on one hand that all of the actions by the National Collegiate Athletic
Association (NCAA) have been taken to avoid what Dr. Jenkins suggests
and oonsider on the other hand that one would guess that Dr. Jenkins,
especially since he is senior chancellor in the state's university system,
would think along the same lines as the NCAA. But not so.
His suggestion is based on his premise that universities should
guarantee for athletes a first-rate education which would prepare him
fa the career of his choice. ECU should tell the football team, for
instance, "We want to beat Chapel Hill, but not on your back
According to Jenkins, athletes should be allowed scheduling breaks.
They would be allowed to work out class schedules convenient to
themselves and the professional staffs.
Jenkins contradicts the NCAA when he says athletes should be
allowed to carry a one-third or one-half oourse load during the season
and make up fa any loss aedits during the summer, if they so choose.
Why not? Present standards are unfair. Jenkins used the baseball team
fa example. Each spring they take a tour through the New England
states, and when they return they are required to oompete on the namal
curve with the aha members of their classes who have listened to the
lectures, visited the library, and oone the assignments.
Jenkins points out that athletes are not semi-employees.
Adjustments should be made in scheduling ratha than have anybody
embarassed when someoie goes to a professa and asks fa a break fa
athletes. That puts the professas ai the spot professionally while we
should be encouraging them to set the same standards fa all.
The NCAA is concerned that unda these circumstances athletes
would in fact be professional. But this writa does na share this fear As
long as athletes were required to accumulate a set numba of semesta
a quarter hours in a twelve month period, they would still be legitimate
student-athletes just as if any of the otha students on a univasity's
campus decided to carry a lowa-than-usual oourse load a oouple of
quarters so they oould work to suppat themselves and make up the
deficiencies during summer sessions. We should realize that oollege
athletes are na maons, but individuals who are as oonoern J about
receiving an education which prepares a qualifies them fa a job as any
aher student. It is oommendable that our chancella, Dr. Leo W.
Jenkins realizes this.
But just as impatantly, Dr. Jenkins should be applauded fa having
the guts to suggest something as radical as this out of oonoern fa the
athletes' welfare.
Heels top Pirates
on late FG, 12-10
By STEVE WHEELER
Spats Edita
Nath Carolina turned three
East Carolina turnovers into field
goals, but needed a 71 yard, ten
play drive and a defensive stand
to upset East Carolina's national
ranked Pirates, 12-10, in a fieroe
dual played in Chapel Hill's
Kenan Stadium on Saturday.
The Tar Heels repeatedly
came up with the big defensive
play to keep the Pirates out of the
end zone until the fourth period
and turned Pirate miscues into
field goals three times.
However, on the first play of
the final quarter, Bucquarterback
Mike Weaver went right on an
option play from the UNC 15 yard
line. Afta faking a pitch to Willie
Hawkins, Weaver turned upfield
and found good blocking to hit
paydirt standing up. Pete Con-
aty's conversion made the soae
UNC-9, ECU-7.
The 5,700 Pirate suppatas
out of the 49,000 throng went wild
as this started the ECU comeback
that would eventually give the
Pirates the lead.
Afta stopping the Tar Heels
midway through the final paiod,
East Carolina took ova on their
17 line yard following a 52 yard
punt by the Heels' Johnny Elam.
On the first play, Weava
faked to fullback Raymond Jones
up the middle and handed off to
Eddie Hicks on the tackle dive
play. Getting good blocking from
the left side of the line, Hicks
broke away from a host of
defendas. But Carolina safety
Russ Conley ran the usual
fleet-footed Hicks at the UNC
Sports
eight yard line. Hicks has had
problems with a pulled groin
muscle of late and it seemed to
keep him from soaing.
After Jones gained one up the
middle, Weava ran an option to
the right side. After turning
upfield and finding what seemed
to be an alley of blocking, Weava
was confronted by Carolina de-
fensive tackle Dee Hardison at
the five.
A third down dive off left
tackle by Hicks netted just two
yards and Conaty came on to try a
19 yard field goal. Conaty con-
nected to give the Pirates their
first lead of the game with just
6:14 left to play.
The Heels would na give up,
however, and came back to have
their best drive of the game to
pick up the win. Afta taking ova
on their 29 yard line, Carolina
tailback Mike Voight gained one
on first down. But Pirate defen-
sive end Cary Godette was called
fa pulling Voight's face mask to
give the Tar Heels a first down at
their 45.
Afta Wayne Tucka lost two
yards on a flanker reverse,
quartaback Matt Kupec went to
the air. He found Tucka on the
left sidelines fa 29 yards down to
the Pirate 28.
Afta Voight hit up the middle
fa aie, UNC was penalized five
yards for off sides. Kupec's
second down pass fell inoompiae.
On third-and-14 from the 32,
Kupec again went back to throw.
Just as Godette hit the freshman
quartaback he tossed the ball.
Split reoeiva Walka Lee made a
miraculous catch at the Pirate
eight to give the Heels a first and
goal situation.
Two bursts into the line by
Voight gave Carolina seven
yards, leaving a third-and-one
situation. Voight hit off right
guard, but reserve Pirate line-
backa Tanmy Summer stopped
him inside the one.
Tar Heel coach Bill Dooley
decided to go fa the three-point-
a on fourth down instead of
trying to move the Pirates' brick-
wall. Dick Biddle, who had kicked
two of the three earlia field
goals, came on to attempt a 17
yarder. Biddle hit togive Carolina
their margin of victay.
Thae was still 217 left on the
See FOOTBALL, page 10.
DEFENSE was the name of the game as UNC and
ECU met Saturday in Kenan Stadium in Chapel Hill.
The Tar Heels won 12-10 when Matt Kupec directed
a 71 yard drive that culminate! in a 17 yard field goal
by Dick Biodle. Photo by Russ Rogue)

SCORING SUMMARY:
FINAL TEAM STATS
ECU
First Downs14
Rushes-Yards58-249
Passing Yards72
Return Yards0
Passes (A-C-l)12-7-1
Punts-Avg.5-33
Fumbles-Lost3-3
Penal ties-Yards1-15
ECU
UNC
10-10
3-12
UNC
13
56-149
110
13
13-5-0
6-43
4-2
6-41
UNC-Biddle FG 31
UNC-Biddle FG 25
UNC-Arnold FG 49
ECU-Weava 15 run-Conaty kick
ECU-Coiaty FG 19
UNC-Biddle FG 17
A-49,000
��WW
90m
mmmm
m
mnunn
m
mm
M
mmmm





io
FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 1326 OCTOBER 1976
mm
m
i
m
m
mm
mm
m
mmm
mm
mm
FOOTBALL
Continued from page 9.
clock when Willie Hawkins re-
turned Biddle's kickoff to the 14
yard line. After Weaver pitched
out to Hawkins on first down for
no gain, he threw 13 yards to
Terry Gallaher over the middle
for a first down at the 27.
After two plays netted just a
yard. Weaver again threw to
Gallaher, this time for 25 yards
down the left sideline. Gallaher
was injured on the play and this
seemed to take the life out of the
Pirates' passing game.
Raymond Jones gained three
yards on first down to give the
Pirates a second-and-seven at the
UNC 44 yard line. Two passes by
Weaver fell harmlessly to the
ground putting the Bucs in a
fourth down situation. Weaver
again went back to pass but his
throw was batted up into the air
by UNC lineman Bunn Rhames.
Weaver caught the pass but was
dropped for a four loss, giving the
ball back to Carolina with just 57
seconds to go.
Carolina got the first score
with just 1:15 left in the half on
Biddies 31 yard field goal. This
followed a fumble recovery by
middle guard Dave Simmons at
the ECU 44 yard line.
Biddle then kicked the ball out
of the end zone on the kiokoff and
ECU started on their 20. After
two plays netted six yards,
Weaver had a bad pitchout to
Willie Hawkins and defensive end
Ken Sheets recovered at the 17
yard line.
Three plays put the Tar Heels
on the eight line where Biddle
came on to hit on a 25 yard field
goal to give UNC a 6-0 lead
Midway in the third period,
Carolina got to the ECU 32 yard
line after a turnover but had a
fourth-and-four situation staring
them in the face. They brought on
freohman Jeff Arnold, a soccer-
style kicker, to try from 49 yards
out. Arnold kicked a line shot that
kept rising and made it over the
cross bar to give the Heels a 9-0
lead.
Hicks was the game's leading
rusher with 129 yards in 17
carries, while Weaver picked up
48 for the Bucs in 17 rushes.
Voight led the Heels with 112
yards in 31 attempts while 6-1,
245 pound fullback Billy Johnson
bulled his way for 36 in eight
carries.
Even in a losing effort, Pirate
coach Pat Dye was proud of his
troops.
"We got beat by a fine
football team Dye said follow-
ing the game Coach Dcdey and
his staff deserve a lot of credit.
They were well prepared to play.
We'll be back to fight another
day.
"They (UNC) had a chance to
fold when we came back and went
ahead, but they didn't. We
moved the ball well, but not
consistent enough. I'm proud of
our people. We've oome a long
way to be able to play UNC here.
We did not back off. We
challenged them all the way
Carolina coach Bill Dcdey was
also proud of the way his team
came back to get the win.
"We beat a good football
team today, make no mistake
about that said Dooley. "East
Carolina has nothing to be
ashamed of. They came back after
being down 9-0 and that's the
mark of a good team. But, we
showed a lot of determination too,
coming back after falling behind.
The Pirates must now regroup
for Saturday afternoon's Home-
coming match-up against West-
ern Carolina, now 5-3 on the
season.
Cone makes fabrics people live in.
CONE MILLS I 1440 BROADWAY NEW YORK N Y 10018
�urtim nitf ii mut mi ii uiiij, m m �� i hwm iinn i mwmi i m Mm iminu mmmnn u
Intramurals
by John Evans
Six champions will be decided sometime this week in Intramural
competition.
Team play in the men's and women's touch football competition,
co-rec tennis mixed doubles and team tennis all will have champions by
the end of the week. Individual champions in horseshoes, women's
tennis singles and one-on-one basketball will also be decided.
Two championships were to be decided on Monday. Robert Guy and
Gary Kerr were to meet in the final of the 6-1 and under one-on-one
division and Janet Hoeppel and Janic McVeigh were to meet in the finals
of the women's tennis singles.
The individual horseshoe champion should be decided later in the
week, as will be the men's and women's touch football champions and
the oo-rec mixed doubles champion.
At the same time competition in three other sports, men's and
women's volleyball and water basketball will continue. Team tennis
champions will be decided on Wednesday.
In touch football several upsets occured as eight teams reached the
divisional finals.
The biggest upsets came in the fraternity and dub divisions where Pi
Kappa Phi and Phi Epsilon Kappa were dropped by weaker opponents.
Pi Kappa Phi was beaten 6-0 by a defensively-minded Sigma Nu
team. Sigma Nu scored on its first possession and stopped the Pi Kapps
on two drives inside their 15-yard line.
Phi Epsilon Kappa had breezed through the Club division all year
and went into the finals after a three-week lay-off with a 7-0 record. Phi
Sigma Pi caught the leaders off guard, though, and took a 20-16 win to
advance to the divisional finals against the Rugby Ruggers. With Phi
Epsilon Kappa out of the way the Ruggers, 7-1 after a 30-0 win over the
P.E. Majors, are heavy favorites for the club championship.
The Dorm championship will match the strong and remarkable Scott
Time Outsagainst the Belk Schlitz Blitz. The Time Outshad little trouble
reaching the finals in their division, winning by scores of 76-6, 40-12 and
46-6 in the playoffs. The Schlitz Blitz advanced with a 20-14 win over the
Yellow Jackets and a 14-10 win over the Assassins.
The Fraternity final matched Tau Kappa Epsilon and Kappa Alpha
while the independent championship game will find the Pack squaring
off against Last Chance. Both title games promised to be real
donnybrooks.
The four divisional winners were scheduled to begin the All-Campus
championship today, with the finals to be played on Thursday at 4 p.m.
The women's football playoffs find Tyler I and Tyler II favored in
their matches against Tyler III and the Fleming Floozies. The title game
in that competition is scheduled fa Wednesday at 4;30.
In her semifinal win over Mary Sawyer, Janet Hoeppel came within
one point of losing the match. Sawyer took a 6-3 win over Hoeppel in the
first set and was ahead early in the second set. Hoeppel, however,
fought back from behind to tie the second set at 6-6 and foroe a
nine-point tiebreaker. In the tiebreaker the two women played to the
final point before Hoeppel won the set.
In the final and deciding set Hoeppel returned to form and won 6-1.
Janice McVeigh had little trouble defeating Delores Ryan in two sets,
6-4, 6-3, to make the finals. Watch the FOUNTAINHEAD later in the
week fa an acount of their championship match.
Men'sand women's volleyball is into its third week 24 teams remain
unbeaten, nine in the women's division and 15 in the men's division.
In the men's competition Pi Kappa Phi started off with three wins to
go after a defense of its Campus championship. The Volley Follies, the
BSU Bullets, Kappa Alpha and Evury Mother's Sons seem to present
the biggest challange to the Pi Kapps.
In the women's competition Alpha Phi swept to three runaway wins
to take the early lead. Fielding good teams that could challange the
Alpha Phis are Chi Omega, Hypertension, Fletcher BigSubsand Greene
I.
Water Basketball was hampered by several fafeits which gave wins
to several of the weaker teams in the league. Leading the league are
Rooky's Best, the Neaomakers and the Moikberry Moon Delight. All
have 3-0 recads. Tied fa fourth were Don't Tell Me Your Problems and
the Intramural Staff at 1-1. In sixth place was Afternoon Delight at 1-2
and the Dolphins were last with an 0-4 recad.
The leading scaers after the first two weeks of play were Gwen
Trevasso with a 23.0 point average and Jean Evans with a 21.0 point pef
game average. The strongest team so far seems to be the Monkberry
Moon Delight, who have won by scaes of 64-16, 82-20 and 24-16.
Registration fa wanen's racquetball singles and oo-rec twoon-two
basketball runs through Thursday so oome by the Intramural office in
Room 204 Memaial Gym and sign up.
There will be a mandatay Intramural Council meeting this afternoon
at 4 p.m. in Room 104 of Memaial Gym. There must be a representative
fron each aganizatioi present.

mm
mmmmm





FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 1326 OCTOBER 1976
11
�tf
m
m
mm
m
tmm
tramural
ipetition,
pions by
women's
t Guy and
ne-on-one
the finals
tter in the
ipions and
nen's and
am tennis
cached the
s where Pi
opponents.
Sigma Nu
3 Pi Kapps
xi all year
eoord. Phi
)-l6 win to
With Phi
in over the
able Scott
ttle trouble
, 40-12 and
in over the
ippa Alpha
k squaring
0 be real
kll-Campus
1 at 4 p.m.
favored in
title game
ame within
sppel in the
, however,
id foroe a
lyed to the
d won 6-1.
n two sets,
later in the
ams remain
s division,
iree wins to
Follies, the
to present
naway wiru
allange the
and Greene
t gave wins
league are
Delight. All
oblems anc
slight at 1-
were Gwer
.0 point
Monkberrj
24-16.
; two-on-two
iral office in
lis afternoon
present at ive
Big win
Netters top Duke JV's
ByKURTHICKMAN
Assistant Sports Editor
ECU'S women's tennis team
had its biggest win of the year last
week by defeating the Duke JV's,
5-4, here Thursday.
Aooording to ECU ooach Ellen
Warren, the Duke JV squad may
be the strongest team the Lady
Pirates have seen this season.
ECU had to make a strong
comeback against the Blue Devils
as Duke had a commanding 4-2
lead going into the doubles
matches.
The Lady Pirates fell behind
as only Dorcas Sunkel and Susan
Helmer could pull off ECU wins in
the singles competition.
Sunkel beat Ann Tyrrell, 6-2,
6-2, while Helmer topped Anna
Neal Blanchard, 6-3. 6-3.
Duke took the lead as Bet
Wannamaker defeated Cathy
Portwood, 6-4, 6-4, Jan Gittleman
took Leigh Jefferson, 6-2, &0,
Janie Short subdued Marie Ste-
wart, 6-2, 6-4,and Kathie Johnson
overcame Vicky Loose, 4-6, 6-2,
6-1.
Booters
defeated
ByANNEHOGGE
Staff Writer
ECU'S soocer team lost Satur-
day to VMI, 4-2.
The Pirates had 16 shots on
goal toVMI'sH. VMI had eight
saves to seven for ECU.
All the Pirate scoring came
from halfback Pete Angus and
wing Phil Martin.
Angus and wing Jeff Karpo-
vich were each credited with an
assist.
Coach Curtis Frye was disap-
pointed with his team's play.
"They had Carolina Football
instead of Pirate soccer on their
minds said Frye.
The Pirates, now 3-9-1 overall
and 2-3-1 in conference play,
UNC-W here Wednesday at 3:30-
Clubbers
unbeaten
ECU's undefeated dub foot-
ball team defeated UNC Friday in
Chapel Hill, 19-12.
Quarterback Terence Tully
directed all the Pirates' scoring
drives.
ECU touchdowns were scored
by Lee Hawaii, Cam Cameron,
and Steve Doabler.
Tight end Alvin Frazier was
the Bucs' leading receiver with
four receptions.
UNC s veer attack was held to
150 yards total offense.
The club team plays again
Sunday here against Duke on the
football practice field.
mm i in hi Willie �ipiaiwiirtiiin mp
ECU rebounded impressively
as they swept the doubles match-
es.
Sunkel and Portwood beat
Gittleman and Short, 6-3, 5-7,
6-2, Helmer and Loose routed
Tyrrell and Wannamaker, 6-2,
6-2, while Patty Collins and Kathy
Harry defeated Johnson and
Blanchard, 6-4, 2-6, 6-5.
� ECU is now 7-2 on the season
with two matches left to play.
� Their next match is Thursday
as they travel to UNC-Wilming-
ton.
Tankers top
UNC-G again
By DAVID ROBEY
Staff Writer
ECU's women's swim team
swam to victory again as they
overwhelmed UNC-G, 77-74,
Saturday.
Ellen Bond, Lynn Uteguard,
Cindy Sailer and Sharon Burns
combined a time of 206.5 to win
the medley relay.
In other events, ECU won
both the first and second spots in
the 100 butterfly. Cindy Sailer
took first with a time of 1 08.6,
while Katherine Wade took the
number two position in 1:11.6.
In the 100 backstroke, UNC-G
took first and third while ECU's
Janette Inman won the number
two spot with a 1:14.9 clocking.
Anne Miller of UNC-G came
in first in the 100 backstroke with
a time of 6:35.0.
ECU'S Katherine Chandler
won first place in the 100
breaststroke in 1 23.5.
Cathy Callahan won the diving
as she oombined a score of 152.45
on the one meter board.
In the 50 yard breaststroke
Ellen Bond, with a time of 36.1,
took first place and Katherine
Chandler took second in 39.1.
Cindy Sailer grabbed first and
Katherine Wade took second in
the 50 yard butterfly with times of
29.3 and 32.3.
"We did well and I'm
pleased commented coach
Stevie Chepko. "The times were
not that good but I feel we can
improve them. The pool was slow
due to its depth which accounts
tor our times
The lady Pirates will go
against some stiff competition
today when they face St. Mary's
here at 7 O0.
Rugby team loses
By BOB DAVIS
Staff Writer
iECU' s Rugby Team journeyed
north this past weekend to battle
Hampden Sydney College. Play-
ing with conditions that were far
from desirable with over an inch
of rain falling the night before,
this greatly hampered ECU'S
outside speed and the Ruggers
lost 9-3.
ECU lost the toss and kicked
to Hampden-Sydney. The game
remained scoreless through the
first 15 minutes of the first half
due to ECU's tough defense.
Hampden-Sydney was first to
score on a 15 yard penalty kick
and led 3-0 with less than 10
minutes left in the half Hampden-
Syndey scored on a 10 yard run,
to make the score 7-0. On the
extra point kick, ECU'S Bob Davis
blocked it but was called for
obstructing the kicker, one of
many penalties that marred
ECU'S play in the first half. The
kick was attempted again and
made; the score was 9-0.
In the second half ECU took it
from Hampden, but the ball was
never in EC's end of the field fa
more than a minute. ECU got a
lone 3 pointer on a penalty kick by
Pat McKinney from 25 yards ou
but Sydney still led 9-3. ECU was
within 5 yards of goal several
times but was unable to take it
over. With 15 minutes left in the
game McKinney tried a 15 yard
penalty kick but it was wide to the
right. ECU did not give up
however and oontinued to try to
score but to no avail; the goal line
oould not be crossed. ECU was
unable to score in the remainder
of the game and the final score
was Hampden-Sydney-9 ECU-3.
SAAD'S
SHOE
SHOP
Across from
Sherwin-Williams
113 Grande Ave.
758-1228
REMEMBER
Ring
Day
Today
and
Tomorrow
CLASSIFIEDS
MENI-WOMEN!
JOBS ON SHIPS! American.
Foreign. No experience required.
Excellent pay. Worldwide travel.
Summer job or career. Send $3.00
for information SEAFAX, Dept.
Boc 2049, Port Angeles, Was-
hington 98362.
If you have something to buy
or sell come to the Red Oak Show
and Sell; We sell on consignment
anything of value, excluding
clothing. Open Mon. - Sat.
11 O0-6 OO Sun. 2-6, closed Thurs.
Located 3 miles west of
Greenville at the intersection of
264 and Farmville Highway in the
old Red Oak church building
LOST: Gold Hamilton watch,
inscribed Minnie Allison. $100.00
reward. Call 757-6012 or 752-4490
and ask for Dora Howell.
FOR SALE: Md. Parway W
diving wetsuit. 752-9461.
NEEDED: Female roommate.
Call 756-7375 after 8O0.
FOUND: Man's watch at club
football game Sunday, Oct. 10. on
intramural field. Call 752-8825.
Do you have problems? Do
you need a caring listener? Call
758-2047.
FOR SALE. Custom made water
bed frame, heater & thermostat.
Price negotiable. Exoellent oond.
Call Woody, 756-1540 after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: 1970 Honda CL-175,
very good condition; asking $300,
includes two helmets. Cal
758-9322.
FOR SALE: Girls bike, 10-speed
Raleigh Record. White 1975
model like new, in very good
oondition. Call Jane 746-4990.
FOR SALE: Realistic stereo com-
ponent. Best offer. Call Jack
752-7596.
PIANO AND GUITAR lessons.
Daily and evenings. Richard J.
Knapp, B.A. 756-3908.
STUDENTS serving students!
Order corsages now. Done by
professional floral designers for
you at $4.50. Call 758-0022 before
Wednesday. Buddy and Steve.
FOR SALE:1974 Yamaha
DT125A. Only 1600 miles. Used
as oommuter, never in dirt. Call
756-7275.
FOR SALE: Mustang-loaded with
value. Power steering and power
disc brakes, factory air, radio,
automatic floor shift, mint oon-
dition. Owner will accept best
offer. Phone days 757-6961 or
after 6 p.m. 756-6552.
For Sale: 65 MGB Good
Condition. Call 758-0984.
FOR SALE: Matching sofa and
chair, green. Excellent condition.
Call 752-0896.
FOR SALE: AR2AX loud speak-
ers. $220.00. Excellent condition.
Serious inquiries only. 758-5150.
NEED SPENDING MONEY: Stu-
dents desiring part-time work,
hours 5 p.m10 p.m Mon. -
Thurs. No experience needed.
Finishing fiberglass boats. Call
today, 758-9901.
LOST: Checkbook with dark
brown textured cover, Biff a
Karen Brean, on Oct. 20 in the
vicinity of Austin. 758-4126.
FOR RENT: Private room across
from ECU at 410 B Student St.
752-7032. Prefer senior or grad-
uate student.
FOR SALE: 240 2, 1972, self-
cared fa, fog lights, dual mag
wheels, CD, air, AM-FM, 756-
0417.
PORTRAITS by Jack Brendle.
752-4272.
SUPER DEAL: Sony HST-110
Receiver, BSR 8 track player,
recorder, deck, Garrard X-10
turntable, 2 Woodstock air-
suspension speakers. Exoellent
oondition. $225.00. Matt
758-3763.
SMALL SCALE masonry, brick,
block, concrete repair or original
work. Rex Bost 758-7569.
WANTED: Twin a bunk beds
and dresser. Call 756-2459.
NEED TYPING? Call Gail Joyner
at 756-1062 for professional typ-
ing and related services. All work
guaranteed!
REWARD-$20.00for return of
class ring lost in stands at
ECU-Citadel game, Oct. 2. Silver,
blue stone, East Forsyth Senior
High. Contact Ronnie A. Lennon
426 Aycock 752-1068.
WANTED: Inflatable rubber ddl
for Oct. 30 & 31st. Plase contact
David Winstead at 752-4673.
Need for stage production.
FOR SALE: 1959 Fad pickup.
Come to see my old green truck
parked across from 510 E.
Twelfth St. on the caner of
Lawrence and Twelfth. Call Joe
Bennett at 752-7798 afta 6 and
weekends.
WANTED: To rent small apt. Call
758-0870.
FOR SALE: 1970 Fad Fairlane
500, 5 new tires, new starter, new
Cobra CB just put in, others.
$700.00. Call Larry at 758-8524.
Plus 2 new CB (never used)
converters - reg. price $16 each -
NEEDED: Female roommate fa
large condominum. $50.00
month. Freedom of house in
exchange fa light housekeeping
duties. Pool, tennis oourts and
sauna available. Board not in-
cluded. 756-5423.
mmm
utmtthht
m
m
h mmMmm
mmmmm





12
FOUNTAINHEADVQL. 52.NO. 1326 OCTORFF, 1976
Eastern Carolina's Newest Sports Shoo
BOND'SSPORT.NGGOODSopensupanewworldofsportinaooodsin JT
BOND'S SPORT.NG GOODS opens up a new world of sporting goods in
EASTERN CAROLINA.
Summerisgoneandit'stimetolookaheodtofollandwinter. ,fyou like
to hunt, fish, play tennis, golf, basketball football, outdoor activities then
you need to pay us a visit. We have all the sports equipment you'll need to
completeyouractivities. Here at BOND'S we say, The name of our game is
service, 'and thats what wemean. Make shopping a sporting adventure at the
all new BOND'S SPORTING GOODS.
"The Name Of Our Game Is Service
PLENTY FREE PARKING
OPEN MONDAY Thru SAT 9-6PM AND FRIDAY TIL 9PM
218ARLINGTON BLVD. GREENVILLE N.C. PHONE756-6001





Title
Fountainhead, October 26, 1976
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 26, 1976
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.419
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy