Fountainhead, October 5, 1976






THIS ISSUE -
12 PA GES
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
Fcuntainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over 50 years
CIRCULA TION -
8,500
VOL. 52, NO. 7
5 OCTOBER 1976
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Price re-elected SGA Speaker
By DAVID NASH
SGA Correspondent
Rickv Price was unanimously
elected to his second term as
Speaker of the Legislature in the
first meeting of the Student
Government Legislature Monday
:K Y PRICE
evening.
Price, running unopposed,
was elected after minimal debate.
Duties of the speaker include
serving on various SGA commit-
tees, making appointments to
oommittees, and presiding over
the legislature during session.
The speaker also has authority to
call emergency legislative meet-
ings.
Tommy Thomason, SGA
Treasurer, gave the present bud-
get.
Aocording to the budget, the
SGA has $17,744.43 in checking,
$134,204.73 in savings, and
$149,751.81 in appropriations,
leaving a sub-total of $2,179.35.
Additional revenue is expect-
ed to be $161,500.00. This figure
does not include revenue from
FCUNTAINHEAD a the ECU
Playhouse.
Thomason urged the legis-
lature to budget the money
carefully, and beware of large
appropriations at the beginning of
the year.
One bill, the Appropriation to
the League of Scholars, passed
unanimously after suspension of
the rules. The bill grants the
League of Scholars $62.85 to print
the alma mater of ECU on
wallet-sized cards, to be distri-
buted to students at home games.
Other bills included Appro-
priation to the School of Music
and Appropriation to the ECU
Ceramics School of Art, both
passed to the Appropriations
Committee.
Committee appointments will
be made the week of Oct. 4 to the
following. Rules and Judiciary
Committee, Appropriations Con
mittee, Screenings and Appoint-
ments Committee and the Stu-
dent Welfare Committee.
Speaker Price also announced
an orientation session Monday,
Oct. 11 at 400. This is to provide
new legislators with the rules of
parliamentary procedure and in-
struct them in legislative proce-
dures.
SGA VICE PRESIDENT GREG PINGSTON addresses the first assembly
of the new Legislature.
Administration reshuffles for accessibility
BvDAVID NASH
SGA Correspondent
Recently proposed changes in
the administration 'line-up' of
ECU were necessitated by the
complexity of reaching proper
administrative personnel, ac-
cording to Chancel la Leo Jen-
kins.
"The line of oommand went
through too many channels be-
fore, said Jenkins.
According to the proposed
plan, which must still be passed
by the Board, Edwin W. Monroe
will move to Vice-Chancel lor of
Health Affairs; Provost John M.
Howell will move to Vice-
Chancellor Academic Affairs, and
Robert L. Holt will become Vice-
Chancellor for Administration
and Planning.
Jenkins added, however, that
faculty members are always wel-
come to talk directly to him about
any problems they may encount-
er. This point is made each year
at the faculty meeting held in
early September.
Jenkins also discussed how
his successor will be picked when
he decides to retire a resign,
whether in the near future or not.
Jenkins, ECU Chancellor for
16 years, is the Senior Chancellor
in the state. A surprising aspect
of the job of Chancellor is that he
is not on tenure, as many
professors and department chair-
men are.
"I have my job mrough the
pleasure of the UNC Board of
Trustees said Jenkins. In
theory, Jenkins could be, at any
time, removed from his office fa
any number of reasons, should
the Board choose.
In choosing Jenkins' succes-
sa, whether he ret ires a resigns,
(all state employees must retire at
age 65), the UNC Board of
Trustees will set up a oommittee
consisting of students, faculty,
alumni and its own membership.
This committee will advertise
nationally and write requests to
various universities in the country
fa suggestions on candidates.
The committee usually re-
ceives 300-400 applications fa
one position. These people will, in
turn, be screened and two
applicants selected by the com-
Funeral for Dr. Pignani held Saturday
Dept. head dies of heart attack
By CINDY BROOME
Staff Writer
Dr. Tullio J. Pignani, chair-
man of the department of mathe-
matics, died of a heart attack
Thursday.
Dr. Pignani suffered an attack
Wednesday night, and one Thurs-
day which was fatal.
Dr. Pignani was chairman ol
the math department since 1964.
He received a bachela's degree
at Indiana State College in 1948,
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master's degree at Bucknell
University in 1949, and doctaate
degree at UNC in 1955. He began
teaching at Loyola University in
1954.
Dr. Pignani specialized in
adinary differential equatiois
and also waked with oelestial
mechanics.
In the early 1960s he was a
member of a four-man research
team waking fa Natiaial Aero-
nautics and Space Administation
at Marshall Spaceflight Center in
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Alabama where he was aedited
with the idea of "patched conic"
calculations. This enabled a com-
puter aboard the Apoiio space-
aaft to plot the course which
carried man from Earth to the
Moon.
Dr. Katye Sowell, mathema-
tics professa, said, "I think
certainly nat the standards of
perfamance on the part of the
students have certainly inaeased
under his leadership. He will
certainly be missed
Dr. Sallie E. Pence, famer
mathematicsprotessa, said, "He
was a man of the utmost integrity.
I think that was one of his
outstanding characteristics. You
could absolutely depend on him
A rosary was said Friday night
at 7:30 at the Wilkerson Funeral
Home. The funeral was held
Saturday at 11:00 at St. Peter's
Catholic Church.
Surviving are Mrs. Hattie M.
Pignani of the home and one
daughter, Babetta Pignani.
mittee fa recommendation to
President William Friday. He will
select one to present to the Board
of Governas fa the position.
Having waked in a previous
administrative capacity at the
particular university will have no
bearing on the choice fa Chan-
cella.
Jenkins has seen ECU grow
over the past years from a small
teacher's college to a university
which includes curriculum in arts,
business and education.
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DR. TULLIO J. PIGNANI





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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 75 OCTOBER 1976
N
news
FLAS
Volunteers
ECU Student Volunteer Asso-
ciation will meet W�3d Oct. 6, at
8 p.m. in the Mendenhall Multi-
purpose room. Anyone wanting to
do any type of volunteer work is
encouraged to attend. Faculty
and graduate students are also
urged to attend.
Rho Epsilon
Tuesday Oct. 5, a meeting will
be held in Mendenhall Rm. 224
members of Rho Epsilon ECU'S
professional Real Estate frater-
nity. All members should bring
$6.50 for the symposium banquet
dinner.
Honor Society
Gamma Beta Phi, national
honor society, will hold its regular
meeting Oct. 7 in Rm. 221,
Mendenhall at 7 p.m. All mem-
bers are urged to attend and
bring $2.00 for fall quarter dues if
it has not been paid. The active
roll for fall quarter will be made
up at this meeting.
Veterans
The Vet's dubwill meet Wed.
night, 7:30 p.m. over Wright
Auditorium in the Veteran's club
offioe. All veterans are invited to
come.
Tennis Team
Attention ECU tennis team.
For those who missed the first
meeting, we will meet Thurs
Oct. 7 in Rm. 142, Minges.
Coffeehouse
The Coffeehouse Committee
is looking for an industrious and
creative stuent who would like to
maorame, paint, tie die, batik, etc
a backdrop for the stage. If you
can come up with an interesting
idea and approximate cost, drop
this information by the Student
Union office with your name and
local phone number.
Science Ed
Mr. Owen Kingsbury, glass-
blower, will highlight our next
Science Education Club meeting,
he will demonstrate his expertise
while discussing the many as-
pects of his profession. At the end
of the demonstration, a drawing
for his works will be held.
We will alsodiscussa possible
field trip and the upcoming state
science convention. Wed Oct. 6,
4,00 p.m. in Flanagan, rm. 303.
Come and bring a friend.
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DSA
Wed. Oct. 6, Disabled Student
Association will hold its next
meeting at 7:30 p.m. in room 221
Mendenhall. Any and all student
staff and faculty members are
cordially invited.
Rape Forum
There will be a Rape Forum
held in the lobby of White Hall on
October 12 at 7O0 p.m. A variety
of speakers will be present to give
information about what to do if
you are raped, what to expect at
the hospital, and what to expect
from the authorities. EVERYONE
IS INVITED!
NCSL
The East Carolina Delegation
of the North Carolina Student
Legislature (NCSL) has big plans
for the upcoming school year. Be
a part of all the action while
shaping a part of North Carolina's
future.
The delegation invites all
those interested in the legislature
process and how it can work fa
you to stop by room 247 Menden-
hall 730 p.m. Monday night
October the 11th. Its an opportun-
ity you'll never forget.
Computer Van
The computer van from NCSU
will visit ECU Tues Oct. 5. The
van will park in front of the old
CU, between Wright Annex and
Rawl. The van will be open from 9
a.m5 p.m. This van has several
working computers, plus displays
including computer technology.
Cancelled
Due to the Fall oonference, IC
will not meet this Sunday night.
We will, however, meet next
Sunday night at the Afro-Ameri-
can Cultural Center.
Phi Sigma
Phi Sigma Pi National Honor
Fraternity will hold its regular
monthly business meeting Wed
Oct. 6, in Rm. 205 Austin at 6
p.m. All brothers are urged to
attend.
Auditions
Coffee house auditions for
local talent will be held Oct. 15
and 16. Those who wish to
perform should leave their name
and local phone number as well as
a short description of their act
with Ms. Conway, the Student
Union secretary, no later than
Oct. 12.
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Inter-Varsity Law Society Bill Hiatt
Do not forget that I.V. will
meet this Sunday night instead of
this Wednesday night.
SNEA
The SNEA (Student National
Education Association)- organiza-
tional meeting will be held Wed
Oct. 6, at 7:00 p.m. in room 244,
Mendenhall. Dues of $8.00inc.
local, state, and national) may be
paid at this time.
Free Flick
At 8:00 p.m. Wed. October 6,
the Student Union Film Commit-
tee presents "The Autobiography
of Miss Jane Pittman" in M.S.C.
Theatre. Come to the Black Arts
Show rec eption at 7;00 p.m. and
see a free movie at 8XX) p.m
Testing
The Allied Health Professions
Admission Test will be offered at
East Carolina University on Sat-
urday, Nov. 20,1976. Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to The Psychological Cor-
poration, P.O. Box 3540, Grand
Central Station, New York, New
York 10017 to arrive by October
25, 1976. Applications may be
obtained from the Testing Center,
Rooms 105-106, Speight Building,
East Carolina University.
Sign-Up
HAVE YOU SIGNED UP TO
GOT TO EITHER NEW YORK
OR WASHINGTON OVER THE
THANKSGIVING BREAK? Time
is running out on this opportunity
of a lifetime. Register by Oct. 15
for the trips. New York for only
$69 or Washington for only $59.
SIGN UP TODAY!
APG
Alpha Phi Gamma will
hold a short meeting Tuesday,
Oct. 5 at 7XX) in the BUC-
CANEER office. All members
are urged to attend.
Seminars
The oomputer center announ-
ces the resumption of its mini-
seminar series. The first seminar
will be given in three portions on
Oct. 4, 6 and 8; and will discuss
using the SPSS statistical pack-
age. All mini-seminars will be
given between 2.00 p.m. and 3XX)
p.m. in Austin-201. All interested
persons are welcome to attend.
The ECU Law Society will
meet Tues Oct. 5 at 7 p.m. in
Brewster B-102. The meeting will
include making plans for Happy
House and the picnic. Members
should bring $5 dues.
Come out and meet the
G.O.P. candidate for Lt. Governor
-Bill Hiatt at Mendenhall Student
Center - 300 p.m. Thursday
October 7, 1976. The public is
cordially invited.
Epsilon Delta Table Tennis
Alpha Epsilon Delta, honorary
pre-medical fraternity, will meet
at 7:30 p.m. in Flanagan Chemis-
try 201. A short film will be
shown. All pre-meddent stu-
dents and any interested persons
are invited to attend.
Buccaneer
All campus organizations de-
siring to be covered in the 1977
BUCCANEER should pick up an
organization information sheet in
the BUC offioe between 1-4 p.m.
this week if they have not already
received one through campus
mail. For further information, call
757-6501 during the above hours.
If you enjoy playing table
tennis stop by the Mendenhall
Student Center Table Tennis
Roomstonightat8.O0p.m when
the ECU Table Tennis Club will
hold its first meeting fa fall
quarter. All levels of ability are
invited to participate.
WECU News
News programs are now being
broadcast over WECU RADIO at
10:40, 3:40, and 6:40 Monday-Fri-
day. If you are interested in
working with the newscasts (re-
porting, announcing, re-writing,
or just helping out), stop by
WECU and sign up.
Psyc Briefing ACT
Psychology students-help is
here The Winter quarter Psy-
chology Dept. and Psi Chi brief-
ing will be held at 7:30 p.m. on
Thurs Oct. 7 in Rm. 129,
Speight. MEET THE PRO-
FESSORS: Hear courses de-
scribed, ask questions, decide on
your Winter quarter. Schedule for
Psychology. Hear it all Thurs.
evening. Psi Chi members will be
present to provide the inside
scoop. See you there!
ILLUMINA
Currently displayed in extra-
vangantly oomfortable Menden-
hall Gallery is this year's Black
Arts Exhibition. The show is
presented by ILLUMINA, the
Student Union Art Exhibition
Committee.
On Wednesday Oct. 6, at 7.00
p.m. a reception for the show will
enable human beings to eat, see
and celebrate together. Come!
FG
Want to know more about the
Christ'an life? Want to have some
fellowship and fun? Then why not
join us-the Forever Generation-
this Friday night? Our meetings
include a study or challenge from
the Bible, singing, refreshments
and warm fellowship.
This week we will be meeting
in the Biology Auditorium (Bio-
logy 103) at 7;30 p.m. Friday. We
sincerely invite and encourage
you to join us. Hope to see you
there!
� � i ntii HUMm
The ACT Assessment will be
offered at East Carolina Univer-
sity on Sat Nov. 20, 1976.
Application blanks are to be
oompleted and mailed to ACT,
P.O. Box 414, Iowa City, Iowa
52240 to arrive by Oct. 25, 1976.
Applications may be obtained
from the Testing Center, Rooms,
105-106, Speight Building, East
Carolina University.
Model UN
The Model United Nations
club will meet Thurs Oct. 7 at 7
p.m. in Brewster C-103. The
meeting is open to all interested
in the United Nations, Foreign
Diplomacy and International Re-
lations.
Call David Mayo at 758-7578
for more information concerning
the Model U.N.
Chess Club
The ECU Chess Club will hold
its regular meeting tonight at 7 30
p.m. in the Mendenhall Student
Center Coffeehouse. Competition
is at all levels and participation is
increasing weekly, so drop by and
join in.
Belta Epsilon
Omicron Delta Epsilon will
hold its first meeting Thurs. Oct.
7, 1976. Room-Rawl 202 at 4:00.
Election of officers and the
program for the year will be
decided at this meeting. All
members are urged to attend.
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 75 OCTOBER 1976
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Election results
Class officers
CLASSOFFICERSVOl
Freshman presidentDavid Whitson Bill Szostak267 266
Fresh. Vice-presidentDonna Hurse David Goodwin350 123
Soph, president Soph, vice-pres. Junior president Junior vice-pres.Valerie Chaff in Lynn Hewett Larry Zaky Craig Hales Randy Bailey Clint Cooke429 264 17t 294 219 85
Senior presidentLynn Schubert Ron Morrison197 95
Wanda Gunter48
Senior vice-pres.Kathy Myslinski252
Referendums
REFERENDUM
DECISIONS VOTES FOR
On the Student Union
president being elected
instead of selected as in
the past. 1186
On the Reserve Funds
going to Ficklen
Stadium expansion. 1662
On the SGA petitioning
the N.C. Dept. of
Transportation for a
pedestrian overpass at
the corner of 10th Street
and College Hill Drive. 1826
On the adoption of the
proposed new SGA
Constitution 876
Day legislators
AGAINST
913
488
349
1167
Teresa Whisenant
Ricky Price
Jenni Harrison
Kirk Edgerton
Tommy Joe Payne
Kattie Ray
Karen Harloe
Randy Barley
Lynn Hewett
Sam Collier
Debbie Boyce
Dorm legislators
Scott-Jerry Cox
Scott-Greg Boykin
Clement-Donna Hix
Clement-Anne Goforth
Jones-Jeff Yates
Jones-Rick Asheworth
Aycock-Bill Reynolds
Aycock-Dave McKenzle
Fleming-Jane Biddlx
Fletcher-Carolyn Blackweil
Slay-Bill Mindel
Cotten-Libby Lefler
Belk-John Bauer
Garrett-Tammy DeJaager
Jarvis-Tina Padilla
White-Ann OBIen
White-Denise Violette
NOTE: Some dorm legislators'
positions to be filled through
screening.
Karen Yormes
Kirby Lashley
Ron Morrison
David Rippy
Dalton Denson
Bobby Harrell
Phil Barbee
Chuck Freedman
David Bond
Barbara Lirctani
ECU to face show-down
with Title IX decisions
ByMONIKA SUTHERLAND
Staff Writer
ECU has just completed an
in-house study to comply with
Title IX according to Dr. David
Stevens, compliance officer.
The nine month study at the
estimated cost of $30,000 was
conducted by over 350 people
serving on 12 sub-committees.
Each of the committees made
several recommendations within
their particular area to bring ECU
into compliance by the July 1976
deadline.
Over 60 recommendations
were made and all but a few have
been acted on. A common re-
commendation was the re-writing
of publications which makes useof
genitive pronouns. According to
Title IX there can be no discrimi-
nation on the basis of sex, so all
references must be removed.
Dr. Stevens said that all
academic programs are in com-
pliance with Title IX however,
some areas are trying to recruit
more members of the opposite
sex such as Home Economics.
"So many people think Title
IX is just for women but the
program works in both direct-
ions said Stevens. "It elimi-
nates discrimination against eith-
�r 3sx.
Stevens also noted that ad-
missions and enrollment gave no
indication of sexual discrimin-
ation.
One area where there was a
problem of compliance involved
student activities, particularly
student organizations.
"With the exception of social
organizations such as the Greeks,
all university supported organi-
zations must eliminate single-sex
membership requirement before
they can be recognized on cam-
pus said Stevens.
This involved such organi-
zations as Phi Sigma Pi honor
fraternity, the Married Women's
Association and some service
organizations.
"These organizations must
open up membership to all
BIGGS DRUG
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!�T FREE PRESCRIPTION
fpiaAlfMlfc piCKUP AND DELIVERY
Prescription Dept. with medication
profiles: your prescription always at
oar fingertips, even though you may
lose your HL bottle.
persons regardless of sex or they
will not be supported by the
university nor be allowed to meet
on university campus Stevens
said.
The Title IX ruling also
prohibits any single-sex contest
such as the traditional Homecom-
ing Queen which is popular on
moot campuses. Fa the first time
in the history of ECU, males can
run for the title of Homecoming
Pirate.
Housing has become another
area that is undergoing changes
to eliminate any sexual dis-
crimination. Recommendations
by the sub-oommitte on housing
regarded the security status,
visitation and curfew hours In
dorms. Presently women's dorms
are locked at night and men's
dorms remain unlocked. Visit-
ation and curfew regulations were
made the same for both sexes
beginning in fall quarter of 1976.
Sew Fall Merchandise
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ITEMS
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SHOP MON-THURS 10-6 PM
FRIDAY 10-9 PM AND SATURDAY 10-6PM
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 75 OCTOBER 1976
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Apathy problem
Judging from the turnout fa the SGA election
last week, around 20 percent of the eligible voters, it is
evident that students on this campus are in generaf
unconcerned about the activities of their student
government.
Mae than three-fourths of the students on this
campus do not even take the time to vote. This is the
minimum activity it takes fa a democracy to
survive-no protesting, letter-writing or banner
waving. But 80 per cent of the student population
remains complacent, as it has been fa several years
under the present coistitutiai.
But the problem is not totally one of apathy. Fa
the mae than 5,000 day students 21 legislatas are
elected at large. It isseldon that the average student
will have an oppatunity to speak to his a her
representatives, much less try to influence their vote.
Most students know neither their representatives'
names nor their address a phaie number. The real
problem with low voter turnout is that legislatas lack
a clear constituency to which they should be
accountable.
The logical remedy to the constituency dilemma
would be to elect representatives with whom students
share some degree of commonality. This could be
easily accomplished by having legislatas elected by
students of a particular school rather than by domicile.
Under this scheme students would have a much better
chance of coming into contact with their legislatas.
They would share oommon political interests that
could be expressed through legislation. And, a maja
benefit would be that when vacancies occur in the
legislature an immediate election could be held. In the
current legislature when a seat becomes empty the
vacancy is filled by a "volunteer" who faces the
Saeening Committee befae being approved by the
full body. There is hardly a semblance of democratic
representation to a student constituency in such a
replacement process.
If the framers of the revised constitution, which
was rejected as part of last week's SGA ballot, are
sincerely committed to implementing a constituion
compat ible with the semester system and palatable to
the student body, they will authaize a revisioi
conmittee brand new. Should the present constitution
be left intact, it will be quite evident that those
returning SGA officers and legislatas who last Spring
directed the revision committee that drew up the
Droposed coistitutiai were committeed oily half-
neartedly to the best interests of ECU a oily to
self-interest.
fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community tot war fifty years
Senior EditorJim Elliott
Production ManagerJimmy Williams
Advertising ManagerDennis Leonard
Business ManagerTeresa Whisenant
News EditorsDebbie Jackson
Neil Sessoms
Trends Editorpat Coyle
Sports EditorSteve Wheeler
Fountainhead la the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Student Government Association
of ECU and appears each Tuesday and Thursday during the
acheol year, weekly during the summer.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C
27934.
Editorial Offices: 757-0 7574X7, 7574309.
Subeoriptions:$10.09armusHy far non-studmntt, M.OOfor
mtdtdtw
TheForum
Athletics dominates university
To Fountainhead:
We're not quite sure what Dr.
Prewett or anyone else here at
ECU that advocates expansion of
Ficklen Stadium must be think-
Election results good, bad
ing. How can anyone say ECU has
not put enough emphasis on
athletics? ECU, or at least the
administration controlling ECU,
puts emphasis on nothing else!
There are other areas of this
To Fountainhead:
1.1 think it's fantastic that we
have finally awakened & voted to
elect the Student Union Presi-
dent. The Student Union may well
affect more students than any
other campus organization and
yet every position in the entire
union is by appointment - ap-
pointment by the students who
are already in - which of course
makes for a real cozy family.
2.1 think it'sa shame the SGA
constitution failed. The maja
cause for the failure was the
"supreme power" dause, which,
in my opinion, has every rightto
be there. SGA is the only
university sponsored organization
which is not prejudicial in its
membership. WRC and Student
Union complain about the clause
and yet to be in WRC or MRC you
must live in a dorm, to be on
Panhellenicand IFC you must be
Greek and, as, previously stated,
all positions in Student Union are
appointed which make it the
elitist group of all.
Anarchy is the state of society
where there is no law or supreme
power - a state of confusion or
disorder. If you take the supreme
power dause from SGA who are
you going to give it to to avoid this
confusion and disorder.
3.1 think the Marching Pirates
should be commended on a lot of
hard work in manning the polls
and tabulating the results. How-
ever, I think it's pathetic that the
members of the Marching Pirates
have to hire themselves out in
order to maintain a basic operat-
ing budget. The marching band is
supposedly financed totally by
athletics, yet, if they tried to
operate on what funds the athletic
department scrapes together for
them they wouldn't have a bass
drum to stand on. The Marching
Pirates are the best band in this
state and beyond. Bill Cain and
the rest of those football maniacs
wouldn't know what a terrific
marching band looked like if one
was to march up their noses.
Respectfully,
Elizabeth Weeks
Student Union Member
Forum Policy
Forum letters should be typed
or printed and they must be
signed and include the miter's
address. Names will oe withheld
upon request. Letters may be sent
to Fountainhead or left at the
Information Desk in MendenhaJI
Student Center.
mm
university that deserve money
and attention that have been
denied both because of the
all-powerful ECU athletics. For
example, the ECU "Playhouse"
has been denied a very badly
needed new theatre for years
because of Ficklen Stadium and,
recently, because of the med-
schcol. McGinnis Auditorium is
falling down around our ears; it is
absolutely unsafe to work in. Yet
there are those who feel a little
added space to Ficklen is more
important than contributing to
one of the fine arts. Afterall, we
thought ECU was supposed to be
known fa its concentration on at
least the liberal arts. Why in hell
do we have to try to be like
Carolina a State? Is there no
value in uniqueness? The "Play-
house" is by far not the only
aspect of this university in need of
finandal assistance. As we see it,
the administration here is mae
concerned with politics than
education. Why else would ath-
letics , "games be given so
damned much attention over
everything else? To our know-
ledge, ECU means "liberal arts"
to outsiders. Why not capitalize
on this and make ECU different
from all the other big-sha schools
in N.C.? Keep the money in
education and out of politics!
ChariateS. Cheatham
Renee McLaurin
huck Giles
Shauna Holmes
Carolyn Shipman
Terry C.Rckard
I
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 75 OCTOBER 1976
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Action taken to open records
By JACK LAIL
Staff Writer
ECU is establishing policy for
implementation of the Buckley
Amendment of the Family Educa-
tional Rights and Privacy Act
(FERPA) of 1974, aocording to
David B. Sevens, ECU attorney
advisor and implementation com-
mittee chairperson.
"The Buckley Amendment
deals with student records and
how they are to be maintained
said Stevens.
The policy is in compliance
with Health Education and Wel-
fare (HEW) regulations and has
been approved by the chancellor.
It will take several months to
achieve full implementationof the
program.
Copies of the new policy are
being sent to all deans, depart-
ment chairpersons, and faculty
members.
The policy states that present
and former students have the
right to see their educational
records. The University must
respond within 45 days.
Major Attractions
cites budget surplus
By LOUIS TAYLOR
Staff Writer
Budget surplus and Home-
coming entertainment were the
main topics of discussion at the
Sept. 30 Major Attraction Com-
mittee meeting of the Student
Union.
Bob Serleva, committee chair-
man, opened the meeting by
announcing a six per cent surplus
in the 1975-76 budget. The
surplus was largely due to a .75
per cent increase in attendance at
major attractions. Serieva added
that this is the first time the
committee has been self-sustain-
ing to his knowledge.
The oommittee unanimously
approved the Count Basie Or-
chestra for Saturday entertain-
ment during Homecoming week-
end (Oct. 29-31). Due to a recent
heart attack, the Count will not
appear with the orchestra. How-
ever, the Willard Alexander
Agency, who books the band,
promised to provide a "top-name
band leader" to replace Basie,
according to Ken Hammond ,
advisor to the oommittee.
Other Homecoming entertain-
ment affirmed were Charlie Rich,
"The Silver Fox for Fri Oct.
29 and the Michael Murphy-
Cheech and Chong show for
Sunday, Oct. 31.
Serieva also announced Major
Attractions had been awarded
$2,287 by the executive board of
the American Federation of M usi-
cians to by paid by the Ike and
Tina Turner Show fa last year's
Homecoming cancellation. That
amount includes expenses for
publicity, technicians, etc.
Among other entertainment,
Judy Collins has been affirmed
fa Oct. 21, and Beach Club
Productions is sending a contract
fa Leon & Mary Russell and J.J.
Caleoi Nov. 7.
SAAD'S
SHOE SHOP
Material and.
Workmanship
Guaranteed
Prompt Service
113 Grande Ave.
758-1228
THE
EARL SCRUGGS REVIEW
starring EARL SCRUGGS
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1976
GATES OPEN AT 8 a.m.
FORMAL PROGRAM- I p.m.
Directions: 5 miles south of War-
renton, N.C. on Highway 401.
45 miles north of Raleigh on High-
way 401.
ADMISSION $5.00
NO RAIN DATE
Concessions by Warren County Jaycees
m

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The registrar maintains a
schedule of fees and official
custodians of student records.
Any student desiring to see
their records should make a
request to theoffidal responsible
fa maintaining their records.
Students have the right to
obtain a copy of their educational
transcript at a reasonable cost.
The University will not dis-
close personally indentifiable in-
famatioi fron student recads
without pria written consent,
except in the cases noted below.
(1) Disclosure to aher school
officials who have a legitimate
educational need fa the informa-
tion.
(2) State and federal officials
and state educational authaities
as designated in the Privacy Act.
(3) Infamatioi in connection
with financial aid applications.
(4) To state and local off iciais
to whom infamatioi may be
furnished by law.
(5) To federal and state, local
and independent organizations
conducting studies regarding the
validity a administering of pre-
dictive tests.
(6) To parents who claim
students as tax dependents.
(7) To comply with court order
a subpoena.
(8) To appropriate authaities
in the event of a health a safety
emergency.
(9)Directay information on
currently enrolled students unless
students notify the registrar office
within seven days after registra-
tion that no information be
released.
The University will infam
students yearly of their privacy
rights.
Students may waive their
right to see confidential letters,
recommendations, a statements
concerning admission to the
University.
Students may challenge the
accuracy of their recads.
The University will destroy
records periodically when the
University feels recads are no
longer needed.
The University will transfa
student recads to other educa-
tional institutions which a student
intends to enroll only upon
written request.
Any student who believes that
their rights have been violated
under the FERPA may file a
complaint directly with the
FERPA Office, Department of
HEW, 330 Independence Avenue
S.W Washington, D.C. 20201.
Students are asked to discuss
grievances with the University
FERPA coadinata, 214 Wright
Annex, Ph. 757-6940 pria to
filing a complaint with HEW.
East Carolina
Kennels
Will be sponsoring
in Basic Obedience Training.
starts Oct 7th.
Cost 30.00
Call Ed Perry 752-9654
fa more infamation
Rt. 7 Box 128 Greenville, "N.C.
a
CESSNA PILOT CENTER
Instruction
V.A. and F.A.A. Approved
Give yourself that extra edge you need to succeed in
today's competitive job market.
For more information call 758-2000
ISO AERO SERVICE, INC.
jt If you haven't been down to
Al the Tree House lately, now
� is a good time. We have
the finest pizza and salads
in town.
The Tree people also want
you to try their fine salads.
(Salads are V? price every
Wednesday from 12 - 4 P.M.)
Coffee house music every
night - no cover.
The Tree House -
An Alternative Restaurant and Nightclub
Corner of Fifth and Cotanche
krtfcui1'
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6
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 75 OCTOBER 1976
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Robinson doubts students' understanding
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Union president questions Referendum 7
By DEBBIE JACKSON
Co-News Editor
Barry Robinson, Student Un-
ion president, Friday said that he
felt many ECU students did not
fully understand the Student
Government Association (SGA)
referendums as stated on the
election ballots.
dp this coupon
i
i
And get three games for only $1.25.
Bring three friends along. We'll let r
them in on the deal, too.
WASHINGTON HWY
GREENVILLE, N.C
Expires Oct. 31, 1976
"I was particularly concerned
with the approval of Referendum
1, " said Robinson.
According to Referendum 1,
the Student Union president
would be elected by the students
and not appointed by the Student
Union Board of Directors as has
been the practice.
"From what I understand, the
referendum passed by a narrow
margin. I think it shows that a
great number of students still have
some reservations about the
election of the Student Union
president said Robinson.
The referendum passed 1186
votes to 913 votes.
"Most students believed that
if they voted 'yes' the president
would automatically be elected.
However, the Student Union
Board of Directors decides on any
Student Union Constitution chan-
ges said Robinson.
The Board of Directors con-
sists of eight voting members and
two non-voting ex officio mem-
bers, according to Robinson.
Voting members are Toni
Britt, Women's Residence Coun-
cil (WRC) president; Steven
Price, Men's Residence Council
(MRC) president; Nancy Moore,
Panhellenic president; Tim Sulli-
van, SGA president; Tommy
Thomason, SGA treasurer; the
speaker of the SGA Legislature;
Ray Elmore, Faculty-Senate rep-
resentative; and Dr. James Tuc-
ker, appointee of Dr. Jenkins.
"I serve as an ex officio
member along with Dean Ru-
dolph Alexander, who is the
Student Union advisor said
Robinson.
According to Robinson, a
board meeting was scheduled fa
the second week of school but
only three voting members were
present, and the acting chair-per-
son was not.
Robinson said that he was
against the Student Union pres-
ident being elected because of the
"problem of getting someone
inexperienced in the office
"As with aiy election, the
person who publicizes his name
well and who has the better
position on the ballot is the one
that students will vote for said
Robinson.
According to Robinson, a
common argument for the elec-
tion of the president was that
there would be more student
input to the president.
"Students already have that
input. There are probably more
students involved in the Union
than the SGA as it is now. The
president does not have supreme
right to book programs on his
own, rather students whD make
up committees select the pro-
grams said Robinson.
"Let me reiterate that politics
does not work in programming
SGA transit system
running overcrowded
By BECKY BRA DSH AW
Staff Writer
The SGA Transit system has
experienced overcrowding on its
Purple route which serves the
apartments, according to Gary
Miller, transit manager.
Miller said, "the overcrowd-
ing only occurs between 9 and 10
a.m.
By the time the bus picks up
passengers at Kings Row, it is
completely full with no room to
pick up passengers at Village
Green said Miller.
In order to remedy the situa-
tion, Miller now sends the Brown
schedule bus out a few minutes
early in the mornings and it stops
at VillageGreen twice between 9
and 10 a.m.
The system has received
excellent response this year,
according to Miller.
He estimates that twice as
many persons are using the Gold
schedule bus as did last year.
The Gold route serves Minges
and Allied Health.
Miller said there have been a
few problems getting the new
buses broken in, but he hopes to
have some minor repair work
done on them as soon as possible.
"I hope to have everything
squared away within the week
said Miller.
Miller said service on the
Brown route had been inconsis-
tent due to repair work being
done on the backup bus, but
service on that route should begin
to run smoothly by the end of the
week.
Miller said the new buses are
far superior to the old ones and
they should give the students
better service.
He feels the system will be a
success this year.
OLDE TOWNE INN
117 E. 5TH ST. 758-1991
Eat a home cooked family style dinner with us.
One entree (choose from three) and all the vegetables
you can eat - served family style (tea or coffee included)
ONLY 22B (PLUS TAX)
SUNDAY-THURSDAY
4:30-7:30 P.M. REAR DINING ROOM
ARTISTS AND WRITERS
The East Carolina University Literary and Art Magazine
is now accepting submissions. The magazine is
interested in poetry, prose fiction, plays, and all genres
of the visual arts. Submissions can be turned in at the
Rebel office in the publications center (old east cafeteria)
across from Joyner library. All works accepted for
publication will be financially supplemented
All student submissions will automatically be entered in
the Annual Attic Art and Literary Awards contest.
This contest is made possible by a large donation from
the Attic.
I





FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 75 OCTOBER 1976

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Logan's Run
By DA VID R. BOSNICK
Staff Writer
This week in Greenville is the type that gives movie critics the idea
that they would have been better off being a shoe salesman with ugly
children. Of the four films playing in Greenville, only one remotely
attempts to justify the immense expense of its creations. The others, to
be mentioned briefly at the close of the column, indicate that it is a great
week for T.V.
Sauls David's production Logan's Run is a much publicized attempt
at classic science fiction. It is decidedly minor-league, and the city of the
future resembles a precocious child's Lego-bloc creation.
Science fiction has gone beyond short-skirted women and vacuum
tube travel. There must now be technological rationales fa the devices
and concepts man is supposedly going to create. There are none of these
rationales in the film. The only alternative that sci-f' has then, in the
cinema genre, is to dazzle one with the ingenuity of their special effects.
One looks nect to see the possible change of morality in this "world
of the future" and we are left with little more than a domed singles bar.
In this work the effectsare not poorly done, they are badly oonceived and
connected. They range from a mediocre scene where those to be
� renewed" rise to explode, to an attack by "Boxx who is a
silver-glazed filing cabinet with a penchant for Cryogenics.
Michael York is "Logan-5" and it his job as a "Sandman" to
terminate all those who don't agree to be renewed at age thirty. His
run is to freedom, and a non-existent sanctuary in the outside world.
He is helped and eventually loved in his efforts by Jessica (Jennifer
Agutter), who does an excellent job of convincing me she has wandered
onto the wrong set. She is dazed throughout much of the picture and
since it keeps her from speaking, that is a benefit.
The work is not bad, for it is technically excellent. The soundtrack
and photography are good and there are legitimate attempts made at
symbolism. It is far too heavy handed to be effective, but the attempt is
made. The film's major flaw is that it is monumentally weak. The why of
this culture is never explained, or even broached. A society based on
youth, and ethical suicide simply does not evolve. There is no mention
made of the technocracy that must have existed to have given rise to this
society.
The low point of the film is the embarrassing role of Peter Ustinov as
the old man. Ustinov is a fine actor and if he has come to playing the role
of a survivor who speaks only to cats, then he and I can open that shoe
store together.
A minor work with a hefty budget, I give "Logan's Run" one star,
because it was in English.
OTHER THEA TERS
PARK: Three the Hard Way Bruce Lee - The Dragon.
The first is a film where three macho black guys wipe out several
thousand whites for various reasons. Not to be prejudiced, Bruce Lee
does virtually the same to several races. Don't bother. 11A star because
the film broke and I got to leave early.
PLAZA TWO: Slumber Party '57
An attempt to cash in on the success of American Graffiti. A few
humorous moments but that weren' t we a bunch of just crazy kids bit
is wearing thin. One star.
PITT: Aloha Bobby and Rose
A good soundtrack by Elton John and other name preformers. It's a
take me to Honolulu if you love me' type, and he does, so he does, but
he can't afford it. An older film (1971). This is the worst oopy of any film
I have ever seen in Greenville. If you have a great deal of trouble with
the viewing, as I did, demand your money back.
Student Union Theatre Arts
presents Broadway play
Broadway comes to ECU in
the form of the hit musical revue,
"DON'T BOTHER ME, I CAN'T
COPE" on October 7,1976 at 8 �
P.M. in Wright Auditorium. As
T.E. Kalem expressed it in Time
Magazine, "All heaven breaks
loose on stage. This cast is so
agile that it defies gravity, and
the singers have such richly
reasonant voices that they could
bring down the walls of Jericho.
This is the kind of show at which
you want to blow kisses
"DON'T BOTHER ME, I
CAN'T COPE" is recently com-
pleting a three year stay on
Broadway with companies in
Chicago and on the West Coast
for a year each. "DON'T BOTH-
ER ME, I CAN'T COPE" won
four Tony Nominations, two Obie
Awards, two New York Drama
Desk Awards, two Outer Circle
Critics Awards, four Los Angeles
Drama Critics Awards, and the
Grammy Award for Best Broad-
way Cast album.
"DON'T BOTHER ME, I
CAN'T COPE" is lively and
infectious entertainment. It has
nifty tunes and lyrics which are
performed in brassy, roof raising
style. The spirit of this show is in
its songs and dances which create
as much energy per square inch
on the stage as any show you have
'Tr seen.
"DON'T BOTHER ME, I
CAN'T COPE" is part of the ECU
Student Union Theatre Arts
Series fa 1976-77. Also appear-
ing in this series is THE
NATIONAL THEATRE OF THE
DEAF on March 15, THE AT-
LANTA BALLET on November 9
and 10, and THE RED ROGERS
DANCE COMPANY on March 9
and 10. Season tickets are avail-
able fa all series at the Central
Ticket Office located in Menden-
hall Student Center. The spark of
life wants to light you up!
Tickets priced fa "DON'T
BOTHER ME, I CAN'T COPE"
are as follows: ECU Students -
$2.00, ECU Faculty and Staff -
$3.00, and Public - $5.00. All
tickets at the door will be priced
at $5.00. Tickets purchased in
blocks of 20 a mae will be priced
at $3.00 each. All tickets are
available at the Central Ticket
Office in Mendenhall Student
Center, which is open weekdays
from 10fl0 A.M. to4flOP.M.
DON'T BOTHER ME, I CAN'T COPE, a long-running Broadway srtow
will bring its lively cast to Wright for one performance.
Pinder shines on new LP
By MARK LOCK WOOD
Staff Writer
There is little doubt that the
Moody Blues played an integral
part in the tarnation and pro-
gress of British rock in the 60 s
and early 70" s.
From the years 1965 to 1973,
the group produced hits ranging
from the Penny Laine penned,
"Go Now to the single from
their last album SEVENTH SO-
JOURN entitled, "I'm Just a
Singer in a Rock it Roil Band
Such long lived prominence is
remarkable by a group of such
diverse talents.
Michael Pinder was a distinct-
ive member of the Moody Blues
from 1965 until"the break up" in
1973. Since then he has remained
productive in oonceiving a new
solo album entitled THE PRO-
MISE. This is a concept album
that Pinder has wanted to pro-
duce "fa nine years
"Free As a Dove" begins side
one with some good guitar by
Steve Beckmeier, who plays in a
style very reminiscent of farrter
Moody Blues member, Justin
Hayward. This first cut is fast-
paced and features some good
vocals by Michael Pinder. Sur-
prisingly enough, Pinder plays
little keyboard (his forte) but
relies mainly on 12-string guitar,
something he did little of with the
Moody Blues. The only drawback
is an overabundance of female
background, which distracts from
Pincter' s aystal dear vocals.
"You'll Make It Through"
follows in a mellow manna.
Again, the song contains sane
rather needless female back-
ground, but remains pleasant
throughout. It features some good
piano and arp by Pinder.
"I Only Want to Love You" is
a poignant romantic interlude,
reminiscent of "Lost in a Lost
Wald fran the Moody Blues'
SEVENTH SOJOURN album.
Basically an acoustic piece, this
song also features some beautiful
harp playing by Susan McDonald
and good meilotron background
by Pinder. One notes a Spanish
flair to this song.
The next song, "Someone To
Believe In is a bluesy, John
Mayallish tune. Joel Dibarteilo
excel Is on both tena sax and flute
in this song. The upright bass by
Bill Bag fits in pafectly, and
Pinder's vocals are excellent. He
projects an emotive quality that
only the blues can convey.
"Carry On" features some
mae bearable female backup
vocals, and Pinder comes through
with some good, solid vocals on
this fast-moving number; Smitty
Smith adds some good agan
runs. Once again, Pinder a-
bandons the keyboards and plays
(MWMMMMMHI
acoustic guitar.
The following tune, entitled
"Air is a vay engaging instru-
mental piece composed by Pind-
er It features some good acoustic
guitar work by Jim Pillon and
excellent flute work by Dean
01 ch. This cut also features
veteran session man, Bobby
Keyes, on saxophone.
"Message" features a di vase
keyboard accompaniment by
Pinder (piano, RMI, Arp) and
some vay, vay tender vocals.
Jim Dillon presents some inta-
esting sitar playing on this
numba which obviously emages
as one of the stronga cuts of the
album.
"The Seed anotha moving
piece by Pirida, is a poem put to
music, vay reminiscent of some
earlier Moody Blues' work. Dean
Olch plays shakkukach and Susan
McDonald accompanies with
some good background on harp.
The strongest cut on the
album is the title song of the
album, "The Promise The
penetrating emotion of Pinder's
lyrics really comes through in this
song. Jim Dillon exoeils on both
acoustic and electric guitar. Pind-
er sparkles with some good
meilotron.
THE PROMISE by Michael
Pinda is definitely an album fa
anyone with sophisticated musi-
cal preferences.





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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 75 OCTOBER 1976
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Ex-Peace Corps workers laud Foster Parents Plan
By BARBARA LEWIS
"The Peace Corps is a dying
organisation according to one
young couple who formerly
served with it.
For the past couple of years,
Lloyd and Rita Feinberg have
been working with Foster Parents
Plan, which they believe has both
the organization and the f inandal
resources that the Peace Corps
lacks.
"When the Peace Corps be-
gan it attracted a certain type of
individual who had a great deal of
idealism and really wanted to do
something Rita said. "But
today's volunteer is more in-
terested in getting away from
home and having a good time .
Rita, who came back to the
United States to give birth to her
son, Joshua, now two months old,
admitted that her statement was
"prejudidal But she daimed
she has seen both types of Peace
Caps wakers in her travels and
has seen "much more of today's
type of volunteer
Since 1974, the Feinbergs
have travelled to the poverty-
stricken Third World nations
where Foster Parents Ran aid not
only children, but entire com-
munities.
They've been assigned to an
area so remote that the women
have to walk two hours down the
side of a mountain to fetch their
EAT FOR JUST
VVCplus tax MonThurs.
Crabeakes, slaw, french fries plus
hushpuppies.
1 4 pound hamburger steak, slaw,
french fries and rolls.
Fish, slaw french fries, hushpuppies.
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Open 4:30-9:00 MonSat. 752-3172
2 miles east on highway 264
(out 10th St.)
water supply and so backward
that the men don't think they
have a water problem.
They've seen medical fadli-
ties that consist of a ramshackle
building with a small bottle of
merourachrome and a maternity
room with an oil-doth delivery
table covered with flies.
"In ader to help a child, Ran
helps its family and oommunity
said Rita.
"Sometimes the most import-
ant thing we can do for a
youngster is assure it of dean
water she oontinued. "So we
help dig a well
Thay also help communities
develop youth centers, con-
sumers' cooperative stores, vo-
cational training schools, housing
and improved farming methods.
Whatever the prqjed, the com-
munity always supplies its own
labor so that there is a personal
involvement.
"It becomes an investment fa
them she added. "And we just
doi't go in and impose what we
think a particular area needs. The
community determines the pria-
ities and we assist with the
finances and technical skills
Rita and Lloyd have been
living and waking in faeign
countries ever since they gradu-
ated from oollege. She's from
Yak, Pa he's fron Providence,
R.I. Befae they met, Rita taught
at a small school in the Himalayas
fa two years and Lloyd taught
primitive tribes in the Philippines
as a Peace Caps volunteer fa 2
and a half year a
And in lieu of a honeymoon
after their wedding in 1973, the
couple dedded to continue their
education at the Experiment in
International Living in Vermont
where they attended graduate
school.
When Lloyd was appointed
directa of Fosta Parents Plan in
Ethiopia the following year, Rita
joined him as a social waker. She
would have given birth to Joshua
there had it not been fa the dvil
wars that raged after the over-
throw of Haile Selassi.
The couple was headquarter-
ed at a tiny mountain top village
when a band of insurgents began
attacking the area. Lloyd was
away at the time and Rita took
refuge in a small tourist hotel
with other staff members. When
the soldiers finally entered the
hotel, the leader politely apolo-
gized and invited Rita to take tea
with him.
"We didn't know from one
day to the next which town would
be invaded by which insurgent
group, so Plan dedded to relocate
us in Ecuada and I came back to
have Joshua she explained.
Waking in the capital dty of
Ecuada revealed to hem the
typical problem of the under-
developed country. "The poa
rural people flock to the dty
because they have nothing. They
go without money a relatives to
the city because they have
nothing. They go without money
a relatives to stay with and the
little hope they bring with them is
soon dispelled by the lack of
employment a housing.
"They ultimately develop the
most inaedible slums you've ever
seen she added.
The Feinbergs are convinoed
that it's in the rural areas where
change must take place and
Plan's operations are now heavily
concentrated in the rural com-
munities of Latin America and the
Far East.
Trends meeting
Every Tuesday - 4:00
Publications building
New writers welcome
mm �. � ���
�Hi





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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 75 OCTOBER 1976
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Pirate defenders smother 'Dogs
By STEVE WHEELER
Sports Editor
East Carolina faced probably
the best defensive team they will
see this year Saturday night in
The Citadel and came away with
ar, impressive 22-3 win over the
Bulldogs in front of 18,250 fans in
Ficklen Stadium.
"The Citadel has a fine
football team an elated Pirate
mentor Pat Dye said following the
game. "Defensively, they are the
best we've played by far this
year. They get a lot of aedit for
the way they play defense and
they deserve it. But, I also want to
give out kids a lot of aedit on
defense because they deserve it. I
think the best defensivve team
tonight was on our side of the
field
After spotting the Bulldogs to
a 3-0 lead the very first series of
downs, the Pirate defense stiffen-
ed to allow the visitors past the 50
just twice during the rest of the
game, once on a turnover by the
offense.
The Pirates used the talented
toe of Pete Conaty to take a 9-3
lead into the locker room at
halftime. The senior from Annan-
dale, Va. kicked field goals of 22,
28, and 18 yards in the first half to
take ECU to the six-point lead.
Conaty has now set a new
single-season record for field
goals in just four games with ten.
Sports
He has not missed.
Quarterback Mike Weaver led
the Pirate offense with 103 yards
rushing in 26 carries while
passing for 48 yards on five of
nine passes. Fullback Raymond
Jones picked up another 52 yards
in 16 carries.
The Citadel's defense virtual-
ly cut off the wide pitch to Pirate
running backs Eddie Hicks and
Willie Hawkins with good lateral
movement. Hicks had just 24
yards rushing while Hawkins
picked up 17.
The game started off with a
bang as the Pirates kicked off to
the Bulldogs. Tyrone Roper field-
ed the Pete Conaty kick at the five
yard line and bolted through an
alley on the right side to the
SeeFOOTBALL, page 10.

First Downs
Rushes-Yards
Passing Yards
Return Yards
Passes (A-C-l)
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Final Team Stats
Citadel
10
40-96
54
17
21-7-6
8-44
4-0
6-30
ECU
19
70-239
48
196
10-5-1
7-35
2-2
5-55

Pete Conaty selected
Athlete-of-the-Month
By STEVE WHEELER
Sports Editor
Editor s note: The A thlete-of-the-Month will be a
monthly feature in FOUNTAINHEAD in which one
athlete will be selected for hisfher excellence in East
Carolina athletics during the month by a panel
consisting of sports staff of FOUNTAINHEAD and
the staff of the Sports Information Office.
Pete Conaty is sure getting a big kick out of life.
The senior place-kicker and reserve quarterback for
the ECU football team has kicked ten field goals and
has been selected FOUNTAINHEAD's Athlete-of-
the-Month.
Going into Saturday night's game with The
Citadel, the senior has seven three-pointers in three
games to lead the NCAA with an average of 2.33 per
game. He helped his cause against the Bulldogs
with throe field goals.
The amazing thing about Conaty is that he has
been perfect through four games. The Annandale,
Va. native is ten for ten in field goals and 11 of 11 in
extra point attempts.
He has 41 points in four games for a 10.25 per
game average and leads ail kickers in scoring. He
stands about seventh among all scorers.
The ten three-pointers Conaty has through four
games is a new school record, the old being nine by
Ricky McLester in 1972. He is closing in on the
career mark of 14 by Jim Woody. He has 12 field
goals in his career.
Conaty won in the balloting over seven other
nominees. They were Cathy Zwigard of field hockey;
Cathy Port wood of women's tennis; Harold
Randolph. Zack Valentine, Raymond Jones, Mike
jUlUW.HillllWliffl '�It
Weaver, and Gerald Hall, all of football.
"Pete Conaty is a real good kicker stated head
football coach Pat Dye. "He's won two ball games
this year with his booting. Pete'sal so a good quarter
back. Heck, he's a good all-round athlete. He
pitches on the baseball team
By winning, Conaty is automatically a nominee
fa Athlete-of-the-Year to be voted on in the last
month of the school year.
PETE CONATY
TWO UNIDENTIFIED PIRA TE defenders bring down Bulldog runner
as Tommy Summer 64 looks on.
Bill Keyes
Adulation of a coach
In the preiaoe to BEAR: The Hard Life and Good Times of Alabama's
Coach Bryant, oo-autha John Underwood quotes one-time Bryant
assistant O.A. (Bun) Phillips:
"We used to have those conferences befae practice at (Texas)
A&M. Coach Bryant would stick his head in, and in the middle of a
sentence everybody would stop and look at him. Total quiet. He'd walk
in, real slow. Sit down. Take out a cigarette. Tap it on his fingernail, and
light it. And as often as not, he'd smoke the whole damn cigarette
without anybody saying a word. We'd just sit there and wait.
"Some of these guys had played fa him fa four years, and ooached
with him I don't know how long. I don't mean they were scared of him,
but they respected him, like I did. If he was going to say something they
damn sure wanted to hear it. He never had to say, 'Let me have your
attention He already had it.
"I remember one time walking out of his office, shutting the doa
behind me, and John David Crow was standing there. I said, 'What do
you need, John?'
"He said, 'Just want to see The Man Everybody called Bryant 'The
Man
"I said, 'Whyn't you just goon in. There'snobody with him. He'll be
glad to see you
"Crow said, Oh, I'll just wait
" Crow was a senia then and had played out his eligibility. I couldn't
talk him into going in. He just leaned against the wall. It must have been
twenty minutes befae the doa opened and Coach Bryant came out. He
said, What the hell you doing out here, Crow?'
"Crow said, Well, I just wanted to talk to you
"Why didn't you come in then?'
"I thought you were busy a you wouldn't have had the doa dosed
"And all John Crow had done was make All-America two years in a
row and win the Heisman Trophy. That's the kind of respect Bryant gets
from people
It seems strange to oompare Pat Dye to the legendary Bear Bryant.
But he does indeed receive the same respect from his staff and players
at ECU that Bryant receives at Alabama. Players speak of the way Coach
Dye walks into a meeting and the room becomes completely silent, fa
example. And with admiration they mimic Coach Dye:
"You've gotta remember that when the going gets tough the tough
get going. You've gotta reach down inside and get something your
mama and daddy gave ya.
"I wanna see ya with a bounce in your walk and a gleem in your
eye
Along with all the adulation, some team members take time to recall
humaousoocuranoes. Offensice tackle Ricky Bennett says Pat Dye does
aazy things to loosen the team up. A few days befae the season opener
against Southern Miss, Dye walked into a meeting wearing a blond wig
and said, "I've gotta be able to communicate with my blond, long-haired
QB's Later in the meeting, he garnished an Afro wig and said, "Gotta
be able to tap with my' brothers' "On those two notes the team roared.
Aooading to tamer Bryant player and Oakland Raider piacekicker
and quarterback Geage Blanda, when The Man walks into a room, you
wanted to stand up and applaud. Ladies and gentlemen, Pat Dye.
i imiinni mi

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io
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 75 OCTOBER 1976
m
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Intramurals
by John Evans
Scott's Time-Out's continue to lead the way in the men's touch
football standings while three teams from Tyler Dorm lead the women's
football competition.
The Time-Outs rolled to a pair of wins last week, including a 90-8 rout
over the Jones Klampits. The Time-Outs were to play Charlie division
rival Umstead TD' s Monday in a key game. The TD' s were 4-0 and have
been averaging 45 points a game. Scott's Time-Out was averaging 68
points a game.
Belk's Assasins have won three straight games after losing the
opening game by forfeit.
In the fraternity league. Kappa Alpha "A" oontinues to win over its
top rivals. TheKA'stopped previously unbeaten Phi KappaTau 15-14 in
sudden death last week. Pi Kappa Phi, Tau Kappa Epsilon and Sigma
Nu remained unbeaten with 4-0 records. The TKE's and Pi Kapps play
each other this week, meaning one team will not continue its unbeaten
ways.
In club play Phi Epsilon Kappa holds a slim one-game edge over both
the Rugby Ruggers and the P.E. Majors. Phi Epsilon Kappa has beaten
both teams, which have yet to face each other.
In the Independent league the Pack are pulling away from the league
and stand 4-0.
With the playoffs approaching in two weeks, it has been announced
that the top four teams and ties will qualify from each division for the
playoffs.
In women's play only three teams remain unbeaten and they all hail
from Tyler Dorm. The three teams together have won 12 games without
a loss. In the Punt division Tyler II holds a slim one game edge over the
Fleming Floozies, who have a 3-1 record. In the Pass division Tyler I and
Tyler III are tied with 4-0 records.
FOOTBALL RANKINGS
Independent
1. The Pack 2. Last Chance
Club
1. Phi Epsilon Kappa 2. Rugby Ruggers 3. P.E. Majors
Dormitory
1. Scott Time-Outs 2. Umstead TD's 3. Schlitz Blitz 4. Yellow Jackets
5. Belk Assasins
Fraternity
1. Kappa Alpha (A( 2. Tau Kappa Epsilon 3. Phi Kappa Tau 4. Pi
Kappa Phi 5. Sigma Nu
Worijen
I.Tyler II 2. Tyler I 3. Tyler III �?. Fleming Floozies
TENNIS RESULTS
Thirteen contestants remain in women's singles play. In this week's
matches Janet Bunch meets Christy Williams, Cathy Cox meets Janet
McVeigh, Debbie Williams meets Janet Hoeppel, Claire Lingenfelser
playsCathryn Deal, Elizabeth Wallace squares off against Mary Sawyer
and Debra Skut meets Nancy Moore. Mary Leisy draws a bye as three
first-round matches ended in doublr ' -felts.
Our picks to advance are William kx, Hoeppel, Deal, Sawyer and
Moore.
In team tennis the Aycock Dueces and Belk Bombers hold narrow
leads in their divisions, while Pi Kappa Phi, Tau Kappa Epsilon and Phi
Kappa Tau vie fa the lead in one Frat-Club-lnd. league and the Kappa
Alphas head the other league.
Nineteen teams have signed up for co-rec mixed doubles which begin
this week. We pick the team of Keith Gray and Cynthia Averett as the
pre-tournament favorite.
TRACK MEET WON BY AYCOCK
An awesome assembly from Aycock Dorm swept past the Plundering
Peaheads and took the Intramural Track Meet held Wednesday.
Winning the women's meet was Fleming Dormitory.
Aycock scored in every event and finished with 93 points to the
Peaheads' 83 points. Kappa Alpha was third with 62 points and Kappa
Sigma was fourth with 53 points.
Five intramural records were set. Jeff Siler of Delta Sigma Phi set
records in both the 880-yard and mile runs, Aycock's Jeff Mitchell set
the two-mile record, Bucky Moser of the Peaheads set a record in the
high jump an the Aycock Mile Relay team set a record fa that event.
Ivey Peacock repeated as champion fa the third time in the shot put and
discus events.
INNERTUBEWATERBASEKTBALL
Registration fa Innertube Wata Basketball runs through
Thursday. Volleyball registration fa wanen runs through Wednesday
with a captain's meeting scheduled fa Thursday at 6 p.m.
�mmlimning iimnmiin i' ��m �� � w ii mm i urn
"Almost Anything Goes'
coming next week
By JOHN EVANS
Staff Writer
This year's Intramural Almost
Anything Spats Carnival will be
held oi Wednesday, October 13
on the ECU Mall.
Registration fa the event runs
through Monday, October 11. A
team must have three men and
three women.
Fa those who have watched
television's "Almost Anything
Goes show this intramural
spectacular will be familiar be-
cause the famat and scheduled
events will follow along the lines
of the television show.
This year the competitiai has
been expanded to include five
events, plus two surprise final
events to decide the winning
team.
Entered teams will be divided
into groups fa competitiai and
will proceed from event to event
except fa the final two events
when the division champions will
meet in the final two champion-
ship events.
The semifinal events will be
the egg toss, the human inner-
tube, the innertube shuffle, blind
football and skin-the-snake. The
two surprise events will not be
announced until the finals.
Points will be awarded in each
event with 25 points fa first-
place, 20 points fa second-place,
15 points for third-place, 10
points fa fourth-place and five
points awarded fa fifth-place.
The teams receiving the most
points in their division will meet
in the finals fa the overall title.
Some of the events will
require that all the groups
participate at the same time.
More detailed information
concerning each event can be
obtained at the Intramural office
in Memaial Gym. Those in-
terested in playing but who don't
have a team to play with may
sign-up on Monday, October 11 at
8 A.M. on the bulletin board
outside the Intramural office.
Television coverage fa the
carnival will beprovided by
WNCT-TV, Channel 9, in Green-
ville. Prizes for the overall
winners and the winners in each
event have been provided by
Greenville restaurants and mer-
chants.
FOOTBALL
Continued fom page 9.
Pirate 26 yard line. It was Conaty,
the last ECUdefenda fa Roper to
go by, who faced the speedster
out of bounds.
After failing to pick up a first
down, the Bulldogs called on Paul
Tanguay to attempt a 37 yard
field goal. The sidewinder split
the uprights and put The Citadel
out in front with just a minute and
a half gone in the contest.
Afta a couple of exchanges of
punts, the Pirates took ova on
their 42 yard line. It took Weaver
just ten plays to take the Bucs
down to the five yard line of the
Bulldogs where Conaty came on
to boot a 22 yard field goal to knot
the game at 3-3.
Conaty then kicked off to the
Bulldogs who could generate no
offense and had to punt. Kenny
Caldwell got off a boomer that
was fielded by Gerald Hall at the
Pirate 21. The lithe strong safety
then weaved his way through
Citadel defenders and returned
the punt 59 yards to the Bulldog
20 yard line.
Three plays netted nine yards
fa the Pirates but left them with
a fourth-and-one situation Dye
again called on his consistent
place-kicker Conaty and he split
the goal posts from 28 yards out,
giving the Bucs a 6-3 edge.
Hall set up another Conaty
field goal in the second quarter
with an intaception of a Joe
Sumrall pass. Catching the ball
on the Pirate 41, Hall returned
the ball to The Citadel's 41. ECU
took 11 plays to get down to the
Bulldog two yard line, where
Conaty again came on to do his
specia. . Again being pafect,
Conaty booted his tenth three-
potnter of the season to set a new
East Carolina reoord.
The half ended with the
Pirates up 9-3 and the game was
far fron being cva.
The Pirates took the second
half kickoff and Weava coughed
up the ball on the third play from
scrimmage and all-Amaica line-
backa Brian Ruff recovaed fa
the Bulldogs.
Fate then switched to the
Pirates as Hall picked off yet
anaha Sumrall aerial at the ECU
39 and returned it to the Bulldog
ten.
From thae it took Weava just
two five yard bursts to get into the
end zone. Conaty added the point
afta to put the Pirates up 16-3.
Defense dominated the rest
of the quarta, Sumrall again
threw an arant pass which was
intacepted by Harold Randolph
at the Bulldog 23 yard line,
setting up the final scae of the
game.
Weava did all the wak ai this
touchdown by carrying 14 yards
on the first play and nine fa the
scae. The Pirates failed in their
attempt fa a two-point oonva-
GOOD BLOCKING and tough defense were the name of the game
86 ECU beat The Citadel 22-3 Saturday night.
si on.
Gerald Hall was a tara fa
the Bulldogs on defense as strong
safety and on the specialty teams
as a punt returna.
The sophomae fran Edenton
intercepted two passes, one of
which he returned fa 59 yards,
and ran back two punts fa a total
of 68 yards. Going into this game,
Hall led the nation in total yards
returning punts at 166. The 68
yards against The Citadel gave
Hall 234 yards on the season,
surely tops in the NCAA.
"Gerald Hall is a helluva
football playa Dye said. "He
plays safety almost pafectly and
is a tremendous punt returna
Hall was not the only Pirate
intacepting passes off the hands
of Bulldog quartabacks. Ernest
Madison picked off two whiie
Harold Randolph and Harold Fort
got one apiece.
"I thought our defense made
amends fa their play at Williams-
burg last week Dye added.
"They intaoepted six passes,
and we had a good pass rush all
night. Fred Chavis caught my eye
playing defensive end in place of
(Cary) Godette
The Pirates gave up just 150
yards to the Bulldogs while
gaining 287 fa themselves. The
1974 Southan Confaence Playa
of the Year Andaew JOinson
picked up only 36 yards on nine
carrias fa the Bulldogs.
The Pirates will face Southan
IIIiniois Saturday in Ficklen Stad-
ium. The Salukis come to Green-
ville with a 3-1 mark fa the
seasai. The Pirates defeated SIU
last year 41-7 when the Salukis
finished with a 1-9-1 recad.
SCORING SUM MARY:
TheCitadel 3 0 0.0 - 3
East Carolina 6 3 7 6 - 22
QT-Tanguay 37 FG
ECU-Conaty 22 FG
ECU-Coiaty 28 FG
ECU-Gonaty 18 FG
ECU-Weava 5 run (Cawrty kick)
ECU-Weava 9 run (try fa two
failed)
Attendance-18,250
r
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SMWEK- , . - �. teal





HHHHHMHH
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 75 OCTOBER 1976
11
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���!�


Tennis team third in Methodist tourney
ECU's women's tennis team
placed third in a field of eight in
the Methodist Invitational last
weekend in Fayetteville.
Methodist, the host school,
won with 41 points, while High
Point College placed second with
32, and ECU third with 27. The
Pirates were followed by Camp-
bell with 26, Guilford 21, Atlantic-
Christian 16, Pembroke State 15,
and UNC-Wilmington.
The Lady Pirates had no
champions in the six singles
flights or in the three doubles
divisions, but copped four second
place trophies and one third. Four
Pirate performers lost first round
matches.
Playing at number four sin-
gles, Susan Helmer won her first
two matches before bowing in the
finals. Helmer showed her best
strength in the first two matches,
winning 6-2, 6-2 and 6-1, 6-0.
Women's
Hockey
takes one,
ties one
ECU's Women's field hockey
team won one and tied one in the
Duke Invitational field hockey
tourney Saturday.
In the opener, the Lady
Pirates downed High Point Col-
lege 3-1. ECU had 13 shots on
goal to just seven for High Point.
Cathy Zwigard again led ECU
with two goals, bringing her
season total to give. Gail Betton
scored the other point for the
Pirates wile Patty Wooten picked
up High Point's.
In the afternoon contest,
Durham Club tied the Bucs 1-1.
Betton scored the Pirates' goal
while Holly Swartz scored for
Durham.
ECU led ten shots on goal
while Durham had just six, but
the dub's goalie had nine saves.
The field hockey squad will be
traveling to Chapel Hill today to
face UNC.
Helmer ran out of steam in the
finals, losing 6-4, 6-2. That was
Helmer's first loss of the season.
Vicky Loose, in number six
singles, won her opener 6-2, 6-2
and semi-final match 6-2, 6-1,
losing the final 6-4, 7-5.
Helmer and Loose were team-
ed at number two doubles and
won their first two matches to
reach the finals, but bowed in the
finale 6-4, 7-5.
In the third flight of doubles,
Karen Clark and Leigh Jefferson
worked hard to reach the finals
but lost 6-0, 6-2.
All the Lady Pirates that
reached the finals lost to Metho-
dist performers.
Leigh Jefferson, playing at
number three singles, won her
first round match but lost in the
semis.
Dorcas Sunkel, Cathy Port-
wood, and Maria Stewart lost first
Women's volleyball
loses three matches
ECU's volleyball team opened
its season last Thursday at
Appalachian State, but bowed to
the Mountaineers both games,
15-12, 15-11.
Saturday, the Lady Pirates
lost two matches at Durham,
bowing to High Point College
15-11, 15-4 in the opener. Duke
then beat the Bucs 15-7, 15-9.
No details were available at
press time on any of the matches.
The Lady Pirates played host
to N.C. State and Wake Forest
yesterday at Memorial Gym but
no scores are available.
ECU will travel to Murfrees-
boro Wednesday to face Chowan
College. The Lady Pirates are
now 0-3 on the season.
FOUNTAINHEAD
needs
sports writers
call 757-6366
Lm$
DINGO BOOTS
Men's and Women's
5.00 OFF
with this coupon
Downtown on the Mall
PHONE 752- 2188
301 SOUTH EVANS STREET. CHERRY BLDG.
On the premises Custom
Silversmithing by LES. Contem-
porary and traditioal jewlery by
artisans from throughout the U.S.
and Mexico.
Top of the Mall-Downtown Greenville
round matches in singles compe-
tition while the number one
doubles team of Portwood and
Sunkel also lost first round
matches.
The team, now 2-1 on the
season, play host to State today at
2 p.m. at the Minges Courts.
ECU Bootes whip
Appalachian State
ECU's soccer team posted its
first victory of the season Satur-
day, beating highly-ranked Appa-
lachian State, 2-1, in the Pirate
home-opener.
The Mountaineers have been
ranked as high as fourth in the
nation this year and are the
defending Southern Conference
champs.
The Pirates, now 1-6 overall
and 1-0 in the league, beat ASU
even though the Apps had 37
shots or goal to just 14 for ECU.
Goalie John Keener had 19 saves
for the Pirates.
Jeff Karpovich scored the first
goal for the Pirates on an assist by
Tim Harrison, while Phil Martin
scored the other goal unassisted.
Willie Hanson scored for the
Apps, now 3-3.
Thursday, the Pirates journey-
ed to Durham to meet Duke and
was shot out 2-0.
Edwin Agypong scored both
goals for the Blue Devils as Duke
had 23 shots a goals to 14 for the
Bucs.
The Pirates will play host to
the University of North Carolina
today. The Tar Heels are one of
top teams in the South.
CLASSIFIEDS
MENWOMEN!
JOBS ON SHIPS! American.
Foreign. No experience required.
Excellent pay. Worldwide travel.
Summer job or career. Send $3.00
for information SEAFAX, Dept.
Boc 2049, Port Angeles, Was-
hington 98362.
If you have something to buy
or sell come to the Red Oak Show
and Sell; We sell on consignment
anything of value, excluding
clothing. Open Mon. - Sat.
11.00-6 O0 Sun. 2-6, closed Thurs.
Located 3 miles west of
Greenville at the intersection of
264 and Farmville Highway in the
old Red Oak church building.
HELP WANTED. Income de-
pendent upon initiative. Set your
own hours. For informatior call
752-2095, Thurs Sept. 30, V6
from 800-9:30 p.m. only!
WANTED: Ladies size 7 ice
skates. Will pay well. 752-1058.
FOR SALE: Mustang-loaded with
value. Power steering and power
disc brakes, factory air, radio,
automatic floor shift, mint con-
dition. Owner will accept best
offer. Phone days 757-6961 or
after 6 p.m. 756-6552.
WANTED: Keyboard player for
weekend band, top 40 and
pop-country. Bookings through
Jan. Days call 758-3378, nights
call 752-6566.
FOR SALE: 1970 Honda CL-175,
very good oondition; asking $300,
includes two helmets. Call
758-9322.
HELP WANTED: Washington
Yacht & Country Club, we need
waiters or waitresses, come for
interview Wed Fri Sat after
4. 752-9680
FOR SALE: Realistic stereo com-
ponent. Best offer. Call Jack
752-7596.
PIANO AND GUITAR lessons.
Daily and evenings. Richard J.
Knapp, B.A. 756-3908.
NEEDED: Female roommate to
share 3-bedroom trailer. Rent $60
plus utilites. Call 758-9577 after
3.
FOR SALE: 1972 1245 Fiat
Convertible. Whiteblack top, 5
speed. Low mileage. Must sell.
Call 7528179.
For Sale: 65 MGB Good
Condition. Call 758-0984.
Yard sale, October 1 & 2 All types
of junk. 1310 Cotten Drive,
Greenville, 758-1530.
Do you have problems? Do
you need a caring listener? Call
758-2047.
For Sale- 72 Vega, 4 speed,
20,000 miles. Call Allan after 4
o'clock. 746-4990.
FOR SALE: 1972 Cutlass
Supreme. Green beige vinyl top.
Air, tape deck, bucket seats.
Great condition. Must sell. Call
752-8179.
m
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mm
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12
FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 75 OCTOBER 1976
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Title
Fountainhead, October 5, 1976
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 05, 1976
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.413
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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