Fountainhead, September 30, 1976






THIS ISSUE -
12 PA GES
tAST CAHOUNA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over 50 years
CIRCULA TION -
8,500
VOL. 52, NO. 6
30 SEPTEMBER 1976
VICE-CHANCELLOR EDWIN MONROE addresses Board of Trustees at Wednesday's meeting.
See STORY, page 5.)
SGA survey reveals
i
student tendencies
By JIM ELLIOTT
Senior Editor
Editor's Note: This is the first
of four articles concerning the
results of a Student Government
funded survey completed last
Spring.
Females at this University are
on the average smarter and
thriftier than their male counter-
parts.
These ana other statistics
were the conclusions of a survey
submitted to the Student Govern-
ment Association in May that
examined academics, attitudes
and involvement of the student
population at ECU. Titled "Stu-
dent Opinion Survey the report
was prepared under the direction
of Dr. Young-dahl Song with the
assistance of Randy Doub, Jim
Kyle and John Kellogg-all asso-
ciated with the Political Science
Department.
The survey was based upon
information collected almost ex-
clusively from questionnaires
sent in December 1975, to 1,499
randomly selected students. The
survey committee received 599
completed questionaires that
were usuable.
A slightly higher percentage
of females and upperclasspersons
responded to the questionaires
But, according to the researchers,
there were less than two percent-
age points difference between the
Title IX strikes
Homecoming
By BRENDA NORRIS
Staff Writer
According to the Homecoming
Steering Committee, this year's
Homecoming Queen may be a
male.
Barry Robinson, Student
Union President, said the phrase
"Homecoming Queen" is in
violation of Title IX.
Title IX is HEW's attempt to
put an end to discrimination of
the sexes.
The Steering Committee voted
to term the position "Homecom-
ing Pirate
According to Dr. Dave
Stevens, co-ordinator of campus
organizations, trying to comply
with Title IX, "pirate" does not
oonnote either male or female.
Any campus organization sub-
mitting a contestant should con-
tact Bobby Harrill at the Kappa
Sigma house.
Voting for "Homecoming
Pirate" will be October 25-29th in
the lobby of the old Student
Union.
There will be a Homecoming
Court oonsisting of the eight
finalists and the winning
"Pirate" will be announced dur-
ing halftime of the Western
Carolina football game.
sample and the actual student
body in terms of tuition status and
housing status.
The report is divided into five
chapters. The first deals with the
research method employed and a
justification for its use in the
survey. The second chapter gives
a profile of the ECU student body
based on the survey. Chapter III
is conoerned with educational
issues and attitudes-such as the
desire to obtain a oollege edu-
cation; reasons for ooming to
ECU; opinions on professors,
course requirements, major fields
of study, and finally how satisfied
students are with regard to the
education they receive from ECU
in general and from various
schools and departments in parti-
cular. The fourth chapter explores
student opinion of their campus
government and voting habits of
students. Chapter V deals with
some of the current issues on
campus.
In Chapter II the survey
describes the student body which
ranges in age from 17 to 48. Of
these, the majority, 84.5 per cent
are between the ages of 18 and
22.
In terms of domicile while
attending ECU 49.4 per cent of
the students live in dorms, 38.4
per cent are day students living
off campus and 12.2 per cent are
commuters.
The greatest portion, 84.5 per
cent of the students have never
been married.
Overall, 12.3 per cent of the
students are from outside the
See SURVEY, page 3.)
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ELECTION
RESULTS
Results of the SGA elections will not be official until
Thursday afternoon, aocording to Tim Sullivan.
As of Wednesday night, only the results of the
referendums were available.
Aocording to Ray Hudson, only one of the referendums 1
failed.
TWO DA Y voting period sets precedent.
Editor's Note- Some candidates were elected to more than
one Student Government office according to last night's ballot
count. These persons must be notified and allowed to choose
which office they will serve in before the results can be
officialized.
The students listed as winners beiow ran unopposed and
are not official winners.
Class Officers
Sophomore President
Junior President
I Senior Vice-President
Valerie Chaffin
Craig Hales
Kathy Myslinski
Dorm Legislators
Greene Dam
Fleming Dorm
Gotten Dorm
JarvisDorm
Fletcher Dorm
Belk Dorm
1 Garrett Dorm
White Dam
Scott Dam
Kathy Pee
Jane Biddix
Libby Lef ler
Tina Padilla
Caroline Black well
John Bauer
Tammy DeJaager
DeniseViolette
Anne O' Brien
Greg Boykin
Jerry Cox
Referendums
m
tm
Students vtfed in fava of having the Student Union
President elected yearly in a campus-wide election. The
president will remain separate from the SGA.
Aocading to Hudson, students also voted in fava of the
SGA President vaing fa the use of reserve funds fa
Fioklen's enlargement.
The majaity of the students voted in fava of petitioning
the N.C. Department of Transportation fa a pedestrian
overpass at the oaner of 10th Street and College Hill Drive.
Vaers failed to suppat the proposed SGA Constitution.
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL.52, NO. 630 SEPTEMBER 1976
newsFLASHFLASHFLASHFLASHFLASHFLASI
Trips
TIME IS RUNNING OUT!
Last Day to sign up for the
Washington, D.C. and New York
trips is Oct. 15. See Washington
for $59 a New York fa $69 over
the Thanksgiving break. Only 90
places available, so sign up today.
Recital
Dr. Clyde Hiss, baritone, and
member of the ECU School of
Music voice faculty, will perform
a recital of varried songs and
arias Sunday, Oct. 3, at 815 p.m.
in the A.J. Fletcher Music Center
Recital Hall.
He will be accompanied by
Ellen Reithmaier Nagode of the
ECU piano faculty, and assisted
by a 12-voice ensemble of ECU
Opera Theatre students
Coffeehouse
Coffeehouse will present Dana
Rich this Thursday (Sept. 30) and
Friday (Oct. 4). Shows will be at 8
and 9 and admission is only 25
cents The Coffeehouse is in the
bottom level of Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. The Student Union
Coffeehouse Committee wants to
put icing on your cake!
Cinergy
Friday and Saturday Free
Flick -Day of the Dolphin. Admis-
sion - I.D. and Activity Cards.
Starring George C. Soott - "one
of the new year's biggest suc-
cesses" - L.A. Times. Ran to
attend. Sponsored by the Student
Union Films Committee -
"Cinergy
" Cinergy 7 flO p.m. - 9.00 P. M.
Art Show
Paintings by Doug Haas of
Wilmington, senior student in the
ECU School of Art, will be on
display in the gallery of Menden-
hall Student Center Oct. 17-24.
Included in the show will be
acrylic, water color, gauche and
encaustic paintings, with a
variety of aggregates and other
materials used with the medium.
Phi Alpha
On Tues Oct. 5, at 730 p.m
Phi Alpha Theta will hold a
business meeting in the Richard
C. Todd Room. This meeting is
very important because we need
ot make plans for the upcoming
banquet. Also, plans have to be
made concerning the dinner
meetings and the speaker's pro-
gram. All members are urged to
attend.
Crime
"Why America Is Losing the
War on Crime" is the topic of an
address by Dr. Jack Wright
scheduled at ECU Friday, Oct. 8.
Wright is director of the
criminal justice program at Loyola
University, New Orleans, and
co-author of several texts for
studies in criminology.
The presentation will begin at
11 a.m. in Brewster Building,
C-103, and is free and open to the
public.
Freshmen
Freshmen may pick up fresh-
men registers through Oct. 9 in
229 Mendenhall Student Center
between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. daily.
SociAnth
The SociologyAnthropology
club will met Wed Oct. 6 at 7
p.m. in Brewster 303-D. The
meeting will feature a unique film
about a fierce Brazilian forest
tribe, the Yanomamo. Also, in-
terested students may sign up fa
upcoming field trips at this
meeting. Majas, minas and all
interested persons are invited to
attend. Refreshments will be
served.
Catholic Mass
Catholic Mass is held in the
Biology Auditaium every Sunday
at 1230. Mass is also celebrated
evay Wed. at 5 p.m. at 608 E.
Ninth St. The house is the one
closest to campus on the street
behind the library. Afta Mass,
the Newman Club holds its
weekly meetings at the same
location. Everyone of all faiths is
invited fa an evening of friend-
ship and fun.
Writers
From now on, thae will be a
meeting of the TRENDS staff and
any interested prospective writas
each Tuesday at 4XX) at the
FOUNTAINHEAD offices, in the
publication building.
It is impatant that all writers
attend this meeting.
Forever
The Faever Generation will
na meet this Friday due to a
weekend retreat in the mount-
ains.
If you would be intaested in
joining us, please contact Jay at
758-3149 a Martha at 752-8962,
or drop by 304-A Soott a 315
Greene.
Reception
The League of Scholars will
hold its Annual Fall Reception on
Tues Ot. 5, at 7:00 p.m. In the
VanlandinghamRoomof the Home
Ec Building. The reception, fol-
lowing a short business meeting,
will be an excellent opportunity
fa all League members to get to
know one another, so you are
urged to attend.
ft
m
Hillel
Attention Jewish students.
You are cordially invited to the
Hillel -sponsaed bre kfast din-
ner, which will beheld Men Oct.
4, Yon Kippur night, at 6:45 at
the DEN (caner of 9th and
James behind Mendenhall).
Call Caey Duber at 752-6190
fa more infamatiat, ride, a if
you want to be on the mailing list.
Night Courses
ECU will offer evening
courses in basketball officiating
and scuba diving this fall. The
courses are open on a non-credit
basis to intaested and qualified
adults.
"Basketball Officiating" will
meet Mondays, Oct. 11-Dec. 6;
"Basic Scuba Certification" will
meet Tuesdays and Thursdays,
Oct. 7-Nov. 2; and "Advanced
Scuba Certification" will meet
Wednesdays, Oct. 27-Nov. 10.
Law Society
The ECU Law Society will hold
a meeting Tues Oct. 5 at 7:00
p.m. in room 221 Mendenhall.
This will be a planning session fa
the Law Society social. All
members are urged to oome and
bring $5.00 dues.
Cook-out
The Physical Education MA-
JORS CLUB WILL SPONSOR A
COOKOUT FOR ALL Physical
Ed. Majas and Faculty on sat
Oct. 2, at 330 p.m. at Green
Springs Park. You bring steak
and knife. Potatoe, Salad, and
Drink are provided.
Admission: Majas: Free
Guests: $1. All guests must be
accompanied by a maja. Call
758-9968 fa more infamatiai.
Omicron Delta
Omicrai Delta Epsilon will
hold its first meeting Thursday,
Oct. 7, in Rawl 202 at 4 p.m.
Officer elections and program
planning will be discussed. All
members are urged to attend.
Ebony Herald Covered Dish
Ebony Herald will hold an
important staff meeting Tuesday
night, Oct. 5, at 630 in 248
Mendenhall. It is imperative that
all staff members attend.
SNA
Thae will be a SNA meeting
Wednesday night October 6, at
730 p.m. in the Nursing Building
room 101. Tim Sullivan will be a
guest speaka. This meeting is fa
evayaie intaested.
ISHA
ISHA, a new campus organi-
zation, will hold its first meeting
Monday, Oct. 4 at 7 p.m. in the
White Dam lobby. The meeting
will feature a lecture on the book,
"Vaginal Politics
The basic purpose of ISHA
(the greek wad fa she) is to
increase students' awareness of
"women's issues ISHA hopes
to save as a source of infamatiai
to students on such topics as
abotiai, birth control, child care,
rape, ERA, women's sports and
career planning.
All students are encouraged to
join and share knowledge, exper-
iences, questions and complaints.
Gardeners
Indoa and outdoa gardenas
in the ECU area may inaease
their knowledge and skill by
enrolling in special non-aedit
evening courses this fall.
"Houseplant How-To schedul-
ed fa Wednesdays, Oct. 13-Nov.
17, is designed fa indoa garden-
as. "Haticulture fa the Hane-
owna scheduled to meet Wed-
nesdays, Oct. 6-Dec. 8, will
provide infamatiai on how to
plan home gardens.
Furtha infamatiai is availa-
ble fron the Office of Non-Credit
Programs, 757-61436148.
Car Wash
Alpha Phi Omega is holding a
car wash Saturday, Oct. 2 from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Pitt Plaza
Shell. Inflation Fighta only $1.
WECU
Applications are now being
taken fa daytime and nighttime
announcers at WECU. Intaested
persons see John Deaver during
these hours: Sun. 7-12 noon,
Mon. 6-7 p.m Tues, 5-6 p.m
Wed. 5-6 p.m Thurs. 10-11
a.m Fri. 1-2 p.m.
iniw niflMm mip�ru�imam
Attention all Food, Nutrition
and Institution Management
Majas! Thae will be a depart-
mental meeting Monday, October
4, at 7 DO p.m. in the Institution
Management Dining Room. This
meeting will be held in conjunc-
tion with the Student Dietetic
Association. Cone early, bring
your favaite dish, and join in on
the covered dish supper at 630.
All intaested please oome!
Rush Party
Alpha Phi Omega Fratanity
will hold a rush party Oct. 2 afta
the ECU game at the Fratanity
Caidaninium (Apt. 25-Univa-
sity Caidaniniums). All those
who are intaested in serving the
school, community, as well as
yourself are invited to attend.
Bring your date, enjoy the
refreshments and get to know the
brothas. Fa mae infamatiai
call 75&O260.
NTE
Students completing teacher
preparation programs and candi-
dates fa teaching positions may
take the National Teacha Exami-
nations at ECU.
The NTE will be administaed
Nov. 13, '76; Feb. 19, '77; and
July 16, '77.
Bulletins of Infamatiai fa
NTE candidates are available
fron ECU Testing Centa, 105-
106 Speight Building.
Black arts
The Student Unioi Art Ex-
hibition Committee will collect
artwak fron 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 3, fa the Black Arts
Exhibition. Bring ready-to-exhibit
wak to Mendaihall Infamatiai
Centa.
Basketball
Any freshmen intaested in
becoming basketball managers
should contact assistant coach
Dan Kinney in Minges Coliseum.
Also, any women intaested in
being hostesses fa the team
should see Coach Kinney.
Avon
If anyone is intaested in Avon
products fa men a wanen, call
752-5880. A brochure carries an
assatment of low-priced items
fa all.
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I
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 630 SEPTEMBER 1976
3
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Survey results
Grade average
Sex
Housing
Residency
Male2.74
Female2.86
Dorm2.75
Day2.82
Commuters3.04
In-state2.79
Out-of-state2.95
Monthly expenses excluding
tuition and housing costs
SexMales Females$148.10 $117.41
Marital StatusSingle Married Other$117.52 $195.92 $217.00
ResidencyIn-state Out-of-state$131.10 $118.73
HousingDorm Day student Commuters$104.87 $143.14 $194.57
ClassiTicationFreshmen Sophomores Juniors Seniors Graduates$104.86 $1t8.61 $128.15 $139.62 $187.36
Importance of religion in one's life
Religion is very important.
Religion is moderately important.
Religion is unimportant
May not add up to 100 because of rounding.
29.5
42.5
27.9
100.0
mm
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Students receive
financial aid
By DENNIS W.FOSTER
Staff Writer
ECU students received
$2,184,857 in financial aid fa the
1975-76 school year, according to
Robert Bcud eaux.finandal aid
officer.
$1,150,000 was received in
federal grants, BEOG and the
Supplemental Educational Op-
portunity Grant; $60 thousand
was received from the student
stores' profits and $125 thousand
from tuitions, according to
Bordeaux.
The remainder of the funds is
distributed through loan and
work-study programs, according
to the report.
The Sara E. Clements Emer-
gency Loan program is available
to all full-time students. Students
may receive up to $250 on a
temporary basis. This loan must
be paid in full during the quarter
in which it is obtained.
A portion of student stores'
profits go to the Athletic Dept.
"Years ago the Board of
Trustees earmarked $5 thousand
from the Student Stores fa the
financial aid of mina spats. This
is all the Athletic Department has
eva received of these funds
Bordeaux said.
Survey
Continued from page 1.
Noth Carolina, 28.2 pa cent are
from rural areas, 39.7 pa cent ae
from cities with populations be-
tween 5,000 and 50,000. Seven
pa cent of the students come
from cities with mae than 50,000
persons.
"In spite of the talk about
gradeflation' at many universi-
ties in the country, thae is no
evidence of that phenomenon at
ECU acoading to the survey.
To be continued Tuesday.
Student Appreciation Week
Sept. 27 - Oct. 2
10 OFF
all merchandise
with student I.D.
On The Mall Downtown Greenville
The Federal grants, Nursing
Student Scholarships and ECU
Resouroes Scholarships account-
ing fa $882,109, ae given to the
students.
These academic scholarships
and loans ae administaed at the
basis of individual financial need,
acoading to a financial aid sub-
committee report.
East Carolina
Kennels
Will be aponaaing classes
in Basic Obedience Training.
Class starts Oct 7th.
Cost 30.00
Call Ed Pary 752-9854
fa mae infamation
Rt. 7 Box 128 Greenville, IMC.
,
This week at the
Elbo Room
Thurs.
Fri. Spectrum
Sat.
Also Friday afternoon 3:00
Remember
every Sunday night is
Ladies Night
JASON'S IS NOW
SERVING
BREAKFAST
Good Morning
THE ITEMS SERVED ON JASON'S BREAKFAST WILL BE SERVED
FROM 6�3tV 10:30AM MONDAY THROUGH FRTOAY
Beverages
COFFEE
MILK
HOTTEA
HOT CONSTANT
COMMENT TEA
.25
.25
.25
.25
ORANGE JUICE
APPLE JUICE
CRANBERRY JUICE
BUTTERMILK
3S
.35
.49
.25
Beignets
HOT FRENCH MARKET DOUGHNUTS ORDER OF 3
Eggs
ANY STYLE SERVED WITH TOAST AND GRITS OR HASH BROWNS
.45
ONE
TWO
THREE
1.10
1.2�
1.5t
EGGS BENEDICT, POACHED EGG ON ENGLISH MUFFIN
WITH HAM AND HOLLANDAISE SAUCE
Omelets
THREE EGGS
PLAIN
MUSHROOM
TOAST WESTERN GREEN PEPPERS,
1.25 ONION AND HAM 1-?S
1.75 CHEESE ���
Biscuits
HOT AND HOMEMADE
WITH BUTTER AND JELLY
HAM BISCUIT, WITH COUNTRY HAM
SAUSAGE BISCUIT
French Toast
WITH ONE EGG
WITH TWO EGGS
SEP A RATELY
CHOICE OF FRENCH, WHITE, OR WHOLE WHEAT BREAD
Side Orders
HASH BROWNS
GRITS
TOAST
TOAST WITH CREAM CHEESE
TOASTKO F.NGI.ISH MUFFIN
.75
COUNTRY HAM
TENDERIZED HAM
SAUSAGE
EGG
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4
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 630 SEPTEMBER 1976
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Trustees' actions
promote degrees
The academic program at this University received
a hardy boost Wednesday at the Fall meeting of the
ECU Board of Trustees, the first of three scheduled for
this school year.
The Trustees approved the addition of a Master of
Science program in Environmental Health. As part of
the curriculum this will give East Carolina the only
post graduate environmental health program in the
region.
Eastern North Carolina has been and will oontinue
to experience increasing agricultural and industrial
development. With this new program ECU will be able
to train needed technicians to help protect the delicate
balance of nature found in a ooastal region.
The Trustees also passed without dissension a
resolution to seek inclusion of a Masters program in
Social Work in the university's curriculum. This
program is not specifically authorized by the UNC
Board of Governors' Five Year Plan for ECU but could
be authorized by amendment. It should be vigorously
pursued.
In addition, the Trustees voted to adopt six year
programs in Music and Biology.
Do it now!
Students will have to eat their words when they
claim a lack of representation at this university. When
it comes to course and professor evaluations, course
scheduling, and even what plants will be planted
where on campus as welt as many other regularly
made decisions we have no one to blame but ourselves
for lack of a voice in them.
Several committees on the Faculty Senate which
provide for a student representative are acting without
our input. All that is needed is a little concern by a few
students for the welfare of all students.
So for the sake of us all, get involved. Contact Tim
McLeod, SGA seaetary for academic affairs. His
office in on second floor of Mendenhall Student
Center. Do it now!
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over fifty years
Senior EditorJim Elliott
Production ManagerJimmy Williams
Advertising ManagerDennis Leonard
Business ManagerTeresa Whisenant
News EditorsDebbie Jackson
Neil Sessoms
Trends EditorPat Coyle
Sports EditorSteve Wheeler
Fountainhead is the student newspaper of East Carc'ina
University sponsored by the Student Government Association
of ECU and appears each Tuesday and Thursday during the
school year, weekly during the summer.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C.
27834.
Editorial Offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 751-6309.
Subscriptions: $10.00 annually tor non-students, $6.00 for
alumni.
Unbelievable Sapped
-�Th1:aum�
Give grass a chance
To Fountainhead:
I would like to reply to
Raymond Neal Linville's(Pres. of
S.H.I.T.) letter oonoerning pro-
tection of shrubbery around the
campus and his opposition to it
(Sept. 21 issue).
There's quite a big of dif-
ference between playing on grass
and enjoying it vs. killing it in
order to get from one point to the
next faster. This applies to trees,
flowers, and shrubs as well. Even
though sidewalks are not put in
the most convenient places, peo-
ple ought to use them in
consideration for what greenery
and natural beauty there is still
left around here. Look at all the
Playing the numbers game
To Fountainhead:
I'd like to know what's this jazz
about a computer that will have a
number for each person on earth?
From what I hear the number is
an aocount number; one works for
the government, they keep all the
wages, they pay for all that you
need. You pay for goods and
services buy showing the money
man a number that has been
stamped on your (or yurr) hand.
Those not wanting to be stamped
nor work for the government do
not get a USNB 24 card and must
get along on their own.
I ask the heads of the Fountain
what they think about this topic.
Allreet andchazee
Econ 111, 112 need commercials
m
m�
m
To Fountainhead:
Why are Economics classes
111 and 112 taught on television?
Why doesn't the Economics Dept.
let the proctors teach the class?
Having to sit in front of a
television set for 50 minutes is
extremely boring. Especially
since there are no commercials. I
have studied my class ever a
period of a week. During the
period only two people had the
will power to stay awake all class
long. I feel the students would
enjoy the classes more, if that's
possible, by letting the graduate
student teach and let the profes-
sors help them if they have any
questions. I wish the Economics
Dept. will answer this letter so
the students will know why they
are forced to learn from a TV.
Frank Barrow
Forum Policy
Forum letters should be typed
or printed and they must be
signed and include the writer's
addresc. Names will be withheld
upon request. Letters may be sent
to Fountainhead or left at the
Information Desk in Mendenhall
Student Center.
dirt and mud paths people have
made on campus, ruining po-
tential beauty of many areas. The
consequence of this is either
more sidewalks or roped areas.
Take your pick. Eventually, con-
crete will cover the whole campus
as it does already in many big city
colleges. Trees will be in pots!
Enjoy your freedom Mr. Lin-
ville, at the expense of Mama
Nature!
PegieQuinn
Chairperson, National Give
Grass a Chance Campaign
Yours truly,
To Fountainhead:
I'm a convict at the state
prison in Oklahoma, and would
like to correspond with some
college students.
As we may be able to learn from
one another, I feel this would be a
worthwhile experience. Inclosed
are the names and numbers of a
friend and myself. Thank you for
your time and consideration.
Yours,
David Farley
David Farley
89291
P.O. Box 97
McAlester, Okla.
Mike Burks
89767
P.O. Box 97
McAlester, Okla.
74501
74501
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1
FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 630 SEPTEMBER 1976
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Jenkins savs $300,000


�11
Pledges big in Ficklen expansion fund drive
By DEBBIE JACKSON
Co-News Editor
The Ficklen Stadium Fund
Drive has been pledged $300
thousand, ECU Chancellor Leo
Jenkins announced at the Board
of Trustees meeting Wednesday.
The fund drive officially be-
ams Friday, Oct. 1.
According to Jenkins, the
pledges came from local busi-
nessmen, alumni and five board
members.
Jenkins said he was pleased
with the enthusiasm surrounding
the stadium expansion.
In other business, Vice-
chancellor C.G. Moore reported
E VIDENCE OF campus parking crisis.
News Writers
Meeting
Thursdays 4:15
Miller announces
Pick-Em-Up winner
By JACK LAiL
Staff Writer
Winners of the ECU spring
1975 Miller-Pic-Em-Up' contest
were announced this week.
Phi Kappa Tau social frater-
nity won a Panasonic Quad stereo
for their first place victory with
9,215 points in the fraternity
division said Greg Grauel, ECU
Miller representative. Phi Kappa
Tau was the only entry in the
category.
"Alpha Xi Delta sorority
racked up 11,904 pts. to capture
first place and a $500 prize in the
open division
There were two second place
winners in the open division.
Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority
9,314 pts. won a microwave oven
and Kappa Delta sorority 4,570
pts. won a Magnavox FMAM
tape player. The two third place
winners were Clement Dorm
3,809 pts winning a tent and
White Dorm winning an electric
grill.
A pound of Miller bottles
counted one point, a pound of
Miller cans earned 30 points, and
a keg sticker counted 50 points.
This fall the 'Pic-Up' is not
being held at ECU but it may
resume in the spring, ' said
Grauel.
Two Pic-Ups' a year have
been held since 1973, with six
prizes awarded. Phi Kappa Tau
social fraternity has the most wins
aocording to Grauel.
"In 1973 ECU came in first in
the nation in point totals said
Grauel. "The Pic-Up' is now
held on 85 campuses
Miller offers other things for
any campus related activity, such
as films trophies, banners and
beer, aocording to Grauel.
Any group interested in furth-
er information can contact Greg
Grauel, 758-5963.
"Miller plans to sponsor a
bike race this spring at ECU
said Grauel. "There will be a
student race and then a profes-
sional race.
The "Pic-Up" and other acti-
vities are sponsored through C.
O. Tankard Co Washington,
N.C.
that the Greenville City Council
had passed resolution asking fa a
50-feet right-of-way, extending
into the north parking lot of
Ficklen Stadium.
Moore said the school spent
$40,000 this summer in leveling
and re-seeding the fields.
Greg Pingston, SGA vice-
president asked fa the board's
suppat of the proposed Green-
ville bikeway.
Aocading to the resolution,
Sanfad Drive would cut across a
third of the intramural field.
Pingston said the city and
SGA are trying to get a Bureau of
Outdoa Recreation grant which
required that "property must be
allocated to the controlling a-
gency
Aocading to Pingston, there
is still land to be acquired from
the railroad and homeowners.
"This would be a 50-50 type
grant, with the city and the SGA
splitting their 50 per cent said
Pingston.
The proposed bikeway would
provide easy access to Minges
and the Allied Health building fa
students, said Pingston.
A oommittee was appointed to
work in conjunction with the
Board of Trustees' property oom-
mittee and the SGA.
baton!
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COME TO baroni's
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����������������'���
6
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 630 SEPTEMBER 1976
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DIVISION OF CONTINUING ElKUCATlON
BASIC GUITAR (10)
Mon Ofct. 4 - Dec. 13 7:30 - 900 p.m. lOsessions
This course is designed as a classical approach to the develop-
ment of basic guitar technique, instruction will be concerned
with: the instrument-its parts and care, tuning and various
playing positions, graduated exercises and practice studies be-
ginning with the open strings, and different hand techniques
leading to intermediate-level pieces. Included with the classical
guitar style will be an introduction to the folkfinger style.
Students will learn basic chord progressions and diagrams in
familiar tunes and the reading of guitar tablature.
Applicants should be at least 16 years old. Please contact the
Continuing Education office for information about guitar rental
arrangements.
Instructor: Mr. Mike Thompson, a graduate student in the
ECU School of Music. He received the B.M. degree in Classical
Guitar Performance from UNC-Chapel Hill, and has studied with
Jesus Silva of the N.C. School of the Arts. Mr. Thompson was
also a first prize winner in the 1974 Union Grove guitar
competition.
Class Location: Room 269, A. J. Fletcher Music Center.
Tuition: $35.00
SCRUGGS STYLE BANJO PICKIN' (10)
Wed Oct. 13 - Dec. 8 730 - 9:00 p.m. 8 sessions
Seventy-five or a hundred years ago, the five-sti !ng banjo was
played by thousands of people; but, by 1940 our national instru-
ment had lost its popularity. The uniquely-American folk art of
the five-string banjo was preserved and returned to popularity in
the late 40's by musicians in the Appalachian Mountains and
the Carolmas, people like Earl Scruggs.
This course will give music lovers of today a chance to learn
to play finger-style bluegrass banjo. Emphasis will focus on a
brief history of the five-string banjo, its parts and care, use of
finger picks, various tunings, chord positions, the reading of
tablature and exercises in picking. Students will learn to play
several popular Scruggs tunes (Cripple Creek, Cumberland Gap,
Foggy Mountain Breakdown), and will gain a basis ability
necessary for further personal development in banjo playing.
Applicants should beat least 16 years old. Information about
instrument rental is available from the Office of Non-Credit
Programs.
Instructor: Mr. Mike Thompson, a graduate student in the
ECU School of Music. Mike has been playing and teaching banjo
for a number of years and is the featured banjo player with a
bluegrass band that he recently formed called, "Ground Speed
Class Location: Room 269, A.J. Fletcher Music Center.
Tuition: $32.00
PIANO FOR BEGINNERS (9)
Tues Oct. 5 - Dec. 7 7 30-9)0 p.m. lOsessions
Applicants for the beginning piano class should be 16 years of
age and over. The course will emphasize note reading, develop-
ment of sufficient dexterity to perform easier piano repertoire,
and the understanding and use of chords. Individual student
interests will also help determine course content.
Each student will be assigned a separate instrumentduring the
group instruction. The group setting will allow the ideal combi-
nation of individual attention plus the advantages of class
participation. Students will have access to pianos for practice
between sessions.
This course is for the person seriously interested in learning
to play piano and willing to practice regularly between sessions.
Instructor: Dr. Richard Lucht, a member of the ECU Piano
faculty. He is known on state and national levels for workshops
and seminars in his specialized field of group piano instruction
and piano pedagogy.
Class Location: Room 374, A. J. Fletcher Music Center.
Tuition: $45.00
PHOTOGRAPHY (18)
Tues Oct. 5 - Nov. 23 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. 8 sessions
Designed for beginners who want to learn to take good pic-
tures, this course will cover such topics as: the four basic types
to cameras and how they're used; basic principles of lenses; the
elements of design and composition; and simple lighting tech-
niques. No darkroom work will be required, and any still
camera will be sufficient. While studying photography as a
process and as an art form, students will have the opportunity
to take pictures to be critiqued by the instructor.
Instructor: Mr. Bob Rasch, Associate Professor and Chair-
man, Communication Arts Department of the East Carolina
University School of Art.
Class Location: Room 1019, Leo W. Jenkins Fine Arts
Center.
Tuition: $35.00
THE ART OF REFINISHING FURNITURE (20)
Mon Oct. 18 - Nov. 22 730 - 930 p.m. 6 sessions
Refinishing of woods and metals can be an enjoyable and
personally rewarding pastime. Class sessions will proceed from a
brief discussion of the history of furniture to students actually
working step-by step on the refinishing ot a piece of furniture
(supplied by the student). Instruction and demonstrations will
cover; identification of woods, use of different tools, stripping
the old finish, preparing and finishing the surface, and working
with gold leaf. The sixth and final session will be devoted to
metals - identification, refinishing and preserving.
Instructor: Mr. Jeffrey Verheyen, Instructor of Interior
Design with the East Carolina University School of Art.
Class Location: Room 229, Leo W. Jenkins Fine Arts
Canter.
Tuition: $25.00
BASIC SCULPTURE - MOOELING, MOLDMAKING AND
CASTING (15)
Tues Oct. 12 - Dec. 7 7:00 - 1000 p.m. 9 sessions
During this studio course, emphasis will be on modeling
portraits and heads. The student will learn to model in clay, to
make plaster molds, and to cast in selected material. Flexibility
of instruction and classroom activities will enable students to do
work exnressive of their individual personalities, preferences,
and abih es.
Instructor: Mr. Barry Bailey, Master of Fine Arts Candidate
with the East Carolina University School of Art. Mr. Bailey has
participated in national and state competitions and has received
numerous awards for his works.
Class Location: 103D, East Cafeteria Building.
Tuition: $35.00
BASIC DRAWING (20)
Tues Oct. 5 - Dec. 7 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. lOsessions
This course is designed to provide ,ersons with little or no
drawing experience basic techniques and compositions of draw-
ing. Fundamentals of visual expression will be demonstrated
using various conventional drawing media: pencil, charcoal,
conte, ink and wash. Participants will receive class and individual
instruction in drawing and in still-life, environmental arrange-
ments, landscape and architecture. Individual expression and
development of skills at a level commensurate with experience
and ability will be highly encouraged. Necessary art supplies
(costing around $6.00 will be available for sale at the first
class session.
Instructor: Mr. Ray Elmore, an Assistant Professor with the
East Carolina University School of Art. Mr. Elmore's works are
in several collections and have appeared in numerous exhibitions
across the United States, including the Smithsonian Institute
Traveling Exhibition.
Class Location: Room 217, Leo W. Jenking Fine Arts
Center.
Tuition: $35.00
HOME INTERIORS (20)
Tues Oct. 19 - Dec. 7 730 - 930 p.m. 8 sessions
Persons who wish to develop their own talents and abilities
for skillfully and decoratively managing home interiors will begin
by learning about applying the basic principles of design for the
home.
Specific discussions, or lectures, and demonstrations will deal
with: color and accessories; furniture styles, selection and
arrangement; fabrics and window treatments; lighting; choosing
and hanging pictures; wall coverings; soft floor coverings and
more.
Instructor: Dr. Patricia G. Hurley, Chairperson, Department
of Housing and Management, of the East Carolina University
School of Home Economics, will be the instructor.
Class Location: Room 230, School of Home Economics
Tuition: $25.00
PRACTICAL ORAL COMMUNICATIONS 20
Thurs Oct. 14 - Dec. 9 730 - 930 p.m. 8 sessions
This course has simple objectives: to develop the skills, con-
fidence and ability to present your ideas to others. If you are
involved in civic, business, church or social organizations, you
are involved in speech. You need the power of the spoken word
to make your ideas clear and convincing to others. You need
the a surance that will help you make the most of your speaking
opportunities, not cause you to shrink from them.
Just a few of the questions this useful short cc rse will
answer are: How do I overcome my fear of getting up before an
audience? What makes a speech or demonstration interesting to
people? How can I be sure people understand me? How can I
get an audience to accept my ideas?
These and many other questions will be answered, and
personal guidance plus supervised speaking experiences will be
provided. "Practical Oral Communications" is more than a
speech course. . . it is a growth experience in the most important
area of our relationship with others � communication.
Instructor: James L. Rees, has taught speech communications
at East Carolina University for ten years. Prior to his tenure at
ECU, he taught speech at Syracuse University, and has served as
a communications consultant for business, educational, and
civic organizations.
Class Location: Room 101, Rawl Building
Tuition: $22.00
BEHAVIOR IN ORGANIZATIONS:
EMPLOYEREMPLOYEE RELATIONSHIPS (30)
Mon, Oct. 18 - Dec. 13 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. 8 sessions
In dealing with interpersonal relationships in an organizational
setting, this course will begin with such basic psychological con-
cepts as perception, attitudes and motivation. Knowledge of
these concepts will help students from various organizational
backgrounds gain a better understanding of the self-concept of
an individual. Study will then focus on groups � the formal and
informal organization � and the individual's position in both.
Following will be an examination of supervision and leader-
ship styles and how the supervisor affects his peers, his superiors,
and his subordinates. Finally, students will learn about leader-
ship and basic elements of effective supervision.
Instructor: Mrs. Betty Grossnickle, who has served for
several years in personnel administration with Hanes Corporation
and now is an educator and consultant.
Class Location: Room 103, Speight Building
Tuition. $30.00
FUNDAMENTALS OF REAL ESTATE (30)
Tues Oct. 5 Jan. 18 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. 15 sessions
This course is designed to provide both the beginner and real
estate practitioner with a basic knowledge of real estate law,
finance, math, brokerage (including transactions and ownership),
appraising, and the mechanics of closing. In addition to helping
students understand real estate fundamentals, the course win
assist them in preparing for the N.C. Real Estate Licensing
Examination.
Since the course is approved by the Real Estate Licensing
Board, students satisfactorily completing it are allowed to take
the brokerage or salesman's licensing examination.
Instructor: Mr. James Stainback, President of Hill Realty
Company, Kinston. He is a graduate of the Realtors Institute
and a member of several professional real estate associations.
REQUIRED TEXT: North Carolina Real Estate for Brokers
and Salesmen by Webster (copies will be sold at the first class
session for approximately $10.00 each.)
Class Location: Room 101, Rawl Building.
Tuition: $45.00
�� l,JL, fo'1 "
WRITTEN COMMUNICATIONS (25)
Thurs Oct. 14 - Nov. 18 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. 6 sessions
A practical writing course, involving study and practice, for
persons whose work requires them to be clear, correct, tactful
and persuasive in written communications. The student will
have an exposure to the uses and formats of letters, including
applications and vita sheets, memoranda, reports and other
sources of written communications.
Instructor: Dr. Keats Sparrow, East Carolina University
English Professor. Dr. Sparrow has written numerous articles on
language and literature and was the director of the Technical
Writing Program at the University of Kentucky.
Class Location: Room 202, Austin Building.
Tuition: $25.00
SPEED READING (30)
Thurs Oct. 7 - Dec. 16 7:30 - 9:30 p.m. lOsessions
Serious students will have an opportunity to at least double
their reading rates while improving comprehension. Poor reading
habits such as vocalization, sub-vocalization, word by word
reading, and regression will be gradually replaced by the practice
of good reading habits.
Use of the tachistoscope, an eye training machine, will im-
prove eye movements, broaden the span of visual recognition,
increase speed and accuracy of perception, and develop skills of
concentration. Use of another machine, the controlled reader,
will replace word for word reading with increasingly longer
phrase reading, develop "thought unit" reading, "idea" reading,
and gently force the reader to increase speed daily. Three work-
books will assist in developing speed and concentration, expand-
ing vocabulary and developing the skills necessary to further
develop speed and comprehension after the course is over. These
books are included in the course registration fee.
Instructor: Mr. Homer Yearick, Associate Professor in the
Department of Social Work and Correctional Services, School of
Allied Health and Social Professions. Mr. Yearick has had several
years experience in teaching speed reading to college students
and members of the business community.
Class Location: Room 108, Carol G. Balk Building
Tuition: $42.00 (includes $14.00 for textbooks)
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PREPARATION FOR PARENTHOOD
Wed Oct. 6 - Nov. 17 7 30 - 9:30 p.m. 7 sessions
Young couples thinking about starting a family or perhaps in
the early stages of parenthood should find this course of great
value. The course is designed for both husband and wife who
desire an understanding of the maternity cycle, the newborn
and his care, and increased confidence in the role of being a
parent. Instruction will be provided to promote skills and
achieve optimum conditions for labor and delivery. Hospital
routines and procedures will be discussed, along with informa
tion on characteristics of the newborn, home preparation, and
infant care and development through the first year. Course
material will be presented through lectures, discussions, demon-
strations and practice sessions. Pre-registration is recommended
but not required for this course.
The course will be taught by junior level students of
obstetrical nursing under the direction of Lona Ratcliffe and
Hazel Browning, R.N of the School of Nursing, ECU.
Class Location: Room 101, Nursing Building.
Tuition: $13.00 per person or $17.00 per couple
THE PARENT AND HIS PRE SCHOOL CHILD (25)
Tues, Oct. 12-Nov. 30 7:30 930 p.m. 8 sessions
A parent is his childs first teacherl This is a course designed
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Complete the form nrovtded lor �
facsimile), and return it, with
� check or icionoy order peyeble to Bast
Carolina University, to:
Non-Cfedft frdfrinu
Or�Woi� o( Continuiao 6ihi�Sftion
East CtraMne Univemty
GrenvMe,N.C. 27834
In Person:
IXUCanpu�: �oom318. ErwinHetl
�8:00 �0:00 pjnMonttoy through
Thursday; 8:00 ajn. - 8.00 p4� Fri-
days.
�Month of September
I October - other times,
ypjn weekdays.

r end first week of
i, 8:00 a.m. - 8:00 J
court title
te the rnaxirmMh ournber of students to
leak, aiaen eaue�Al 1 �- - usehiiii �� � . . A assail Islas: so e�i
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Fiiik?imemas �f Reel Kttete.
PS
Refund �nW be' treated only if re
quested prior to the course registration
deadline.
Please write or celt (767143 or
787-81481 for additional brochures or
information.
Tateptione .�f
fndosedii.
(Home)
, m payment for v � r
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, (coarse tide.
A fact miia of this form ft �coeptatole tor course registration.
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to provide parents of pre-school children with information about
normal child growth and development. A major objective of the
course is to encourage parents to develop their potential as
parent-teachers by learning more about child development.
Course content will include current theories and research in
child development with descriptive information about physical,
social and cognitive development. The parent's role in facili-
tating this development will be examined thoroughly with
positive and practical suggestions of how this might be accom-
plished. Class sessions will be varied and will include some
lectures, film presentations, discussions and opportunities for
parent participation. Both parents are encouraged to attend.
Instructor: Mrs. Sandra Houston, Child Screening Specialist
with the Statewide. Pre-kindergarten Screening Program. Mrs.
Houston is an experienced preschool teacher, and parent.
Class Location: Room 202, Nursing Building
Tuition: $17.00 per person or $25.00 per couple
HOUSEPLANT HOW-TO (20)
Wed, Oct. 13 - Nov. 17 7:30 - 930 p.m. 6 sessions
Learn to select, care for, and propagate plants that add beauty
to your home. In terms of caring for indoor plants, attention
will focus on primary growth requirements (light, heat, water
and humidity), potting mediums and plant feedings, and identi-
fication and control of troublesome insects and diseases. Stu-
dents will also have the chance to learn "How-To" propagate
from cuttings, runners, separation, and air layering.
Instructor: Mrs. Rita Minton, owner and manager of the
Flora and Fauna in Greenville.
Class Location: 106, Brewster Building, Wing D
Tuition: 20.00
HORTICULTURE FOR THE HOMEOWNER 125)
Wed Oct. 6 - Dec. 8 7:3C - 930 p.m. 8 sessions
This course will present the homeowner information on how
to plan to get the most from the area commonly referred to as
the yard. Instruction will cover the planting and maintenance of
lawns, trees, shrubs, plants and bulbs Also included will be dis-
cussion of soils (types, grading, drainage and modification) and
a session on the vegetable garden. A tour of the East Carolina
University campus will also be arranged in a session on plant
nomenclature and identification.
Instructor: Mr. Doug Caldwell, Grounds Superintendent at
East Carolina University, manages the largest vard in Greenville.
Class Location: Room 107, Brewster Building, Wing D
Tuition: $25.00
A
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BASKETBALL OFFICIATING (30)
Mon.Oct. 11 - Dec. 6 7:30 - 930 p.m. 8 sessions
This course is designed to provide a working understanding
of basketball rules, mechanics, positions, and interpretations for
officiating in Junior and Senior High School games. While the
primary purpose of the course is to prepare a student for job
opportunities in basketball officiating, it will also prove to be of
value to basketball spectators, players, and coaches.
Techniques used to present the course will include a variety
of audiovisual aids and handouts, as well as lectures, discussions
and actual on-court demonstrations.
The instructor for the course will be Mr. John (Dokey)
Grimslay. owner of the Trophy House in Greenville. Mr.
Grlmsley brings to us twenty-two years of basketball officiating
experience including with the A.C.C. and Southern Conferences.
Mr. Grimsley is also a booking agent with the Northeastern
Officials Association. (NOTE: This course has been approved
a m in in i minimum im
by the North Carolina High School Officials Association.)
Class Location: Room 142, Minges Coliseum.
Tuition: $22.00
BASIC SCUBA CERTIFICATION (20)
Tues. & Thurs Oct. 7 - Nov. 2 7:30 - 10:30 D.m. 8 sessions
This course is designed to prepare persons who enjoy water
sports to become safe, competent, well-informed divers. Students
will be trained to react favorably to both normal and adverse
conditions on the surface and under water.
The first session will be an introductory session during which
a swimming test will be administered, medical forms will be
distributed, and course objectives will be outlined. All class dives
will take place in the Minges diving tank except for three
(additional) open-water checks which will be scheduled with the
instructor after the eighth class session. These deep dive checks
are generally held off Radio Island, Morehead City, N. C.
Each student must have his own flippers, masK and snorkel.
The remainder of the equipment, including air, may be obtained
from the instructor for $32.50 for the course duration.
Instructor: Mr. Robert Eestep. He has taught the Los
Angeles County Certification Program for several years and is
recognized as one of the outstanding SCUBA instructors in the
Southeast.
Class Location: Room 145, Minges Coliseum.
Tuition: $42.00
ADVANCED SCUBA CERTIFICATION (20)
Wed Oct. 27 - Nov. 10 7 30 - 10:30 p.m three
week-night sessions; and Saturdays (or Sundays, depending on
class preference five week-end sessions.
ADVANCED SCUBA CERTIFICATION is designed to offer
well supervised extensive training beyond the level of the BASIC
SCUBA CERTIFICATION course or any other such basic pro-
gram. This course should be of interest to divers interested in
adapting their skills to the waters of Eastern North Carolina.
The first three sessions of the course will consist of lectures
and a pool SCUBA test, with the remaining five sessions con-
sisting of open water dives (river, sound, and ocean dives). The
open water sessions will be held on either Saturdays or Sundays,
depending on class preference as to days and times.
Students must provide their own SCUBA equipment and
must come fully equipped (including wet suit and gloves, B.C
tanks and regulator, extra weight, mask, snorkel and fins) for the
first class session, and show proof of a basic certification. Boat
transportation for three ocean sessions will be available at an
additional cost of $10.00 per student, per session; or, a student
may wish to provide his own boat or team up with a classmate
with a boat suitable for ocean work.
Instructor: This course wilt also be taught by Bob Eestep (see
Basic SCUBA). It is approved for certification by The Pro-
fessional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) and The Los
Angeles County Underwater Instructors Association.
Class Location: Room 144, Minges Coliseum.
Tuition: $37.00
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8
FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 630 SEPTEMBER 1976

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Would you believe
A Little
social variety
8yPA7COVL�
Trends Editor
It hasn't been my habit in the past to divide this highly respected
journalistic forum into a two-paft discussion, but in view of the fact that
there are two highly important social subjects on my mind, I decided to
break with tradition.
WHAT SIN A ROLE?
Wnile I was downtown last Saturday night, I became involved in a
discussion, the point of which was both valid and thought-provoking.
The topic was the long-accepted belief that, in normal situations (at
the Jolly Roger, on campus, inthebacf if a Greyhound bus) it is the man
who takes the prerogative in picking up.
Since the beginning of time, all decent girls knew that it is their role
to be demure, introverted, like a flower waiting to be picked, when it
comes to meeting men.
Likewise, boys came into manhood filled with fear and awe at the
responsibility society has put on their shoulders; the responsibility to
make time with ladies.
So it was, during my downtown discussion, that several of us, both
male and female, asked why this should be so. Why should men have all
of the hassle when it comes to the meeting of the sexes? Why also,
should men have the right to pick and choose, while women are faced to
take pot luck?
In answer to this question, one friend hypothesized that men would
feel threatened if the women started making moves on them. To this I
say, BAA!
In my encounters over the years, I have met both men and women
who were shy, but the men far outnumbered the women. There's
nothing sadder than a 32-year old man who turns red if he's in the same
room with a member of the opposite sex.
Now all of this pain and embarrassment could have been avoided if
only some normal, decent girl had taken the first step with him way back
in '62. His whole life could've been different.
Many of you women might wonder what kind of nerve it would take to
even consider walking up to some perfect male stranger and start a
conversation.
Well the key to the whole thing is the idea of a "perfect male
stranger' . Look at it this way girls, how many times have you seen a
male person who was, without a doubt, exactly your type, standing alone
while some first class turkey was making time with you?
So you see, a little well-timed role-changing could serve not only to
liberate the shy male, it could also make life a lot more interesting for
girls who are tired of being surrounded by male nerds.
THE OTHER SIDE OF THE TRACKS
While we're discussing the possibility of change in one's social life, I
think it is pertinent to share another experience I had last weekend.
It happened late Friday night when, after a short, dull trip
downtown, several friends of mine invited me to go with them to another
of Greenville s nightspots- Louie's Lounge.
Incase you don t know, Louie sis an establishment on Tenth Street.
Nestled in the midst of service stations, used-car lots, and tobacco
warehouses. Louie's is one of the local bastions of the country music
culture.
Anyway, my friends were quick to explain that it wouldn' t really be a
pleasure trip - that they simply had to deliver a message to someone.
It all sounded harmless enough, we would walk down to Louie's,
leave the message, then depart as inconspicuously as possible.
The walk over made us extremely thirsty, so we decided that one
quick brew wouldn t hurt.
As we opened the door, we were jarred by a blaring juke box playing
last year's disco sound. We walked in and were amazed to see couples
doing the bump.
We went through our first beers and then a couple more, fascinated
by the activity around us.
Some people looked at us with curiosity, as our jeans and plain hair
set us apart from the painted ladies. But, for the most part, we were
allowed to blend into the scene.
I was disappointed that there was no country music playing, but the
disco-lover s songs soon ended and Nashville came to stay.
The arrival of country music turned Louie's into the Cand W haven
it s reputed to be. I could almost imagine Charlie Rich and Loretta Lynn
were sitting at the table next to ours.
We finally left, without incident (except for the old man who followed
us to Knspy-Kreme).
My impression of Louies is that there s nothing wrong with an
occasional change of pace, and that no one will laugh at you if they see
you gang there.
Oh, by the way, you can borrow my fake nose, dark glasses, and wig
if you want. I won t be needing them anytime soon.
Union Black Arts Festival
offers variety of programs
The various committees at the
Student Union have collaborated
on the 1976-77 Black Arts Cult-
ural Festival, to be kicked off
Sunday night at Mendenhall
Theater.
GOSPEL MUSIC FESTIVAL
PLANNED
A gospel music festival has
been planned as part of the
festival. Slated for Sunday,
October 3 at 6:00 P.M the
program will be held in Menden-
hall Student Center Theatre
under the sponsorship of the
Student Union Minority Arts
Committee. No admission will be
charged and the public is encour-
aged to attend.
Music has always been a vital
part of the Black experience,
especially religious music. Even
from the days of slavery, the
Negro Spirituals were used to
communicate messages and to
inspire hope.
Performing in the festival will
be four outstanding area musical
groups who will offer selections
covering basically the entire
range from the Spiritual to "rock
gospel" such as that popularized
by such artists as Clara Ward,
The Staple Singers, and The
Edwin Hawkins Singers.
Appearing on the program
will be the Andrew A. Best
Chorale of Greenville, The Inter-
denominational Choir of Farm-
ville, The Carrie Harrison Singers
of Roanoke Rapids, and The
Relevation Singers of Goldsboro.
The Andrew A. Best Chorale
is under the direction of Johnny
Wooten. Organized in 1975, the
group has released two albums.
The Interdenominational
Choir is under the direction of
Mary Streeter and Dollie Brown.
The group has toured widely
throughout North Carolina
spreading the gospel in joyous
song.
The Carrie Harrison Singers
originated in the Halifax County
area and consist of twenty-five
members. Members of the choir
came from various churches at
which Carrie Harrison was
musician.
The Revelation Singers were
originated in 1971. The group,
which consist of twenty-five
members has toured throughout
the east coast. Recently their first
album "Revelation Plea" was
released.
A FRICA N FOODS A ND DA NCE
SYMPOSIUM
Mendenhall Student Center
Multi-Purpose Room will be the
site of an African Foods and
Dance Symposium on Monday,
October 4 at 7:30 P.M. The
program is being held in con-
junction with the Black Arts
Cultural Festival.
The symposium will be con-
ducted by Dr. Robert Bunger of
the ECU Dept. of Sociology and
Anthropology, Mrs. Jo Saunders
of the ECU Health and Physical
Education Dept and several
African students.
Dr. Bunger will prepare sev-
eral African dishes and they will
be made available for sampling.
Other dishes will be prepared by
African students who will also
give tips on African cooking.
The dance portion of the
program will be conducted by
Mrs. Saunders. She will demon-
strate several dances and then
have an audience participation
session where members of the
audience will be taught various
dances.
Tickets will be available at the
door on the night of the program
and are priced at twenty-five
cents.
DISCO JA M VICTORY DA NCE
The SOULFULL STRUTTERS
one of the state's hottest disco
bands will be featured for a
victory dance following the ECU-
Southern Illinois game on Satur-
day, October 9. Slated for Wright
Auditorium, the dance will begin
at 10:00 P.M.
The name SOULFUL STRUT-
TER suggests the type of energy
this group releases during a
performance. A young, happy,
and zestful love of life is
translated into music action by
this enthusiastic and highly moti-
vated group. They compose and
play their own music, but they
also perform chart music by
EARTH, WIND, & FIRE,
TOWER OF POWER, AVERAGE
WHITE BAND, GLADYS
KNIGHT, and many other artists
on today's scene.
The group hails from Fayette-
villeand has traveled extensively
throughout the United States.
If rhythm is what you want
and today's soul turns you on, the
the SOULFULL STRUTTERS will
deliver. For an unmatched even-
ing of disco entertainment don't
forget the SOULFUL STRUT-
TERS following the ECU-South-
ern Illinois game.
Tickets for the dance are
available from the Central Ticket
Office and are priced at $1.00 for
ECU students and $2.00 fa the
public. The program is being
sponsaed by the Minaity Arts
Canmittee of the Student Union.
A NINTERPRE Tl VE HISTORY
OF BLACKS IN AMERICAN
FILMS
Donald Bogle, autha of the
award-winning book Tom, Coons,
Mulattoes, Mammies and Bucks
will present a lectureslide pro-
gram of an interpretive histay of
Blacks in American films. Bogle
will appear on Tuesday, October
5, at 8:00 P.M. in Mendenhall
Student Center Theatre.
Donald Bogle started learning
about the movies when he waked
as story editor for the film
directaproducer Otto Preming-
er. He learned even mae re-
searching his book, Toms, Coons,
Mulattoes, Mamies and Bucks,
the first specifically documented
nistay of the black acta in the
American cinema. He's still
earning mae, "running out to
the movies whenever possible
In his book, Toms, Coons,
Mulattoes, Mammies and Bucks
Viking, 1973, he takes a close
look at the stereotypes black
actas have always been faced to
portray, examining film from
Edwin S. Porter's 1903 one-
reeler, "Uncle Tom's Cabin
through "Birth of a Nation "Our
Gang "Gone With the Wind
St. Louis Blues "Imitation of
Life" and "Carmen Jones to
"Dutchman "The Pawn-
broker "Putney Swope" and
"Shaft He has interviewed a
number of old-time black per-
famers and has cone up with his
own theay about the ways in
which blacks have been exploited
in American movies�"and also
the grand manner in which
individual black actas, through
their talents and their ingenuity,
triumphed over the system to
come up with really remarkable
and stimulating perfamances.
Blacks have always been stereo-
typed in movies, but the great
actas were able to individualize
these roles and make a personal
statement
Amoig the actas whose rdes
he examines are Steppin Fetchit,
Paul Roberson, Rochester, Buck-
wheat, Mantan Moreland,
Farina, Bill "Bojangles" Robin-
son, Butterfly McQueen, Hattie
McDaniels and Darthy Dand-
ridge. His discussion also focuses
on oontempaary actas such as
Sidney Poitier, Roscoe Lee Brown
and Jim Brown, as well as the
current rush of new black films on
the scene.
Currently at work oi a novel
fa Bantam Books, Donald Bogle
recently presented two popular
lecture series on black film
histay at the Studio Museum in
Harlem.
Tickets fa the program which
is being sponsaed by the Mina-
ity ArtsCanmittee of the Student
Union are priced at $2.00 fa the
public and are available frcm the
ECU Central Ticket Office. ECU
students will be admitted with
their ID and activity card, and
ECU faculty and staff with their
Mendenhall Student Center
membership card.
I





FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 630 SEPTEMBER 1976
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SPECTRUM
(Note: SPECTRUM will be a weekly feature of TRENDS, providing
Capsulized information on newly released LPs.)
By CHRIS FARREN
Staff Writer
HALL AND OA TES "BIGGER THAN BOTH OF US
After four previous albums of changing styles, producers and labels,
Daryl Hall and John Oates in their fifth album, Bigger Than Both of Us
on RCA, have apparently settled down to the same formula which
brought them national prominence. Utilizing the same musicians,
producer and oonoept as their critically acclaimed fourth album, Hall and
Oates have created an album which is as good as their fourth in nearly
every category.
Once again Christopher Bond's production and arrangement work is
impeccable, and immaculately done. Leland Sklar's bass lines and Jim
Gordon's drumming is, as usual, distinctive and unique. The Hall and
Oates trademark of intertwining falsetto harmonies has never sounded
better, especially in cuts like "Back Together Again" or Do What You
Want, Be What You Are" where Daryl Hall really shows off his vocal
talents. Add to that a cameo appearance by the genius of the woodwinds
himself, Tom Scott, and one would think thisalbum would have all of the
qualities for being great.
However the shortcoming of Bigger Than Both of Us lies not in the
formentioned qualities but in a much more basic component part of any
album, namely the songwriting. There are no "Sara Smiles" or "She's
Gones" on thisalbum. Instead it is filled with nine lack-luster cuts that
vary stylistically from slow ballads to off-the-cuff rock n' roll, none of
which really generate any great excitement within the listener. The best
cuts are probably the soulful Crazy Eyes and the bouncy AM tagged
single called "Rich Girl However as we look at the album as a whole it
would have to be considered a disappointment, but maybe we were just
expectina too much.
AMERICAN FLYER
Looking more like a club fa the diverse and unwanted than a musical
group, American Flyer, a name meaning nothing to most people, has put
out an album that deserves attention. Led by the originator of Pure
Praire League and the writer of that group's hit single "Amie Craig
Fuller's presence is felt throughout the album's twelve cuts. Other
members include the original guitar player from Blood Sweat and Tears,
Steve Katz, and Eric Kaz who some might recognize as being the author
of Linda Ronstadt's knock out "Love Has No Pride
The album is split up with each member lending a hand in the
songwriting, but most of it being handled by Craig Fuller and Eric Kaz.
All twelve of the songs are pretty solidly constructed and the production,
vocals and instrumentation are terrific. They are aided in their efforts by
such musical luminaries as: Larry Carlton on guitar, Rusty Young on
pedal steel, Leland Skla' on bass and Byron Berline on fiddle. If there is
a pitfall to the songs it would have to be in the lyrics, where eight of the
twelve deal with a pitiful love lost theme.
The music on the album is aooustic and very pleasant to listen to.
While all the songs are solid the best cuts are probably "Light of Your
Love" and "Let Me Down Easy" both of which were written by the team
of Fuller and Kaz. These four men who call themselves American Flyer
while being from very diverse backgrounds, have put together a quality
album. One which I think will greet the public with a most unexpected
pleasure.
THE SANFORD TOWNSEND BAND
It has become a common occurrence in today's pop music that we the
listener are very often dissapointed by people who we expect a lot from,
probably because we expect so much. On the other hand, when a group
puts out their first album we normally have no reason to anticipate either
good or bad. In essence we can listen ma 3 objectively. Subsequently
after objectivelylistening to the album by the Sanfad Townsend Band, it
is easy to see that this is going to be a group that we will tend to expect
quite a lot from.
While the names might sound unfamiliar to most, these guys are no
strangers to the music business. John Townsend has waked very closely
with Kenny Loggins in the past year and even collaborated with Loggins
on two songs from the Native Sons LP by Loggins and Messina. Ed
Sanfad is known fa his keyboard playing and has done studio work
with many big timers.
The album has all of the aspects fa being great. John Townsend's
vocals are clear and strong as anyone in the business, while the
production and arrangements are refreshing and appropriate.
All the songs on the album were written as a team by Sanfad and
Townsend, and they vary quite a bit in style but still contain a controlling
aspect which holds them together as being under the Sanfad Townsend
style. The best cuts are the up tempo Smoke From a Distant Fire and
Oriental Gate" a la Loggins and Messina. The band is new, the music is
terrific and the sound truely deserves to be heard.
Union sets October 15
as deadline for trips
By BECKY BRA DSH AW
Staff Writer
The nation's bicentennial is
quickly coming to a dose! Want a
way to close out the bicentennial
with a bang?
The Travel Committee is
giving you an oppatunity to visit
two of the nation's most histaic
cities.
Fa oily $59 you can visit the
nation's capital�tour historic
buildings and see where histay
has been and continues to be
made.
If Washington is not exactly
what you had in mind, how about
New Yak City.
Fa oily $69 you can go to the
nation's first capital city.
New Yak has many things to
offer-fine dining, Broadway
shows, interesting museums and
exhibits, plus the Statue of
Liberty and Empire State Build-
ing.
The dates of both trips are
Nov. 24-29. The prices include
transnnrtatinn and accommod-
ations and are based on quad
occupancy.
Sign up at the Central Ticket
Office in Mendenhall Student
Center.
Last day to sign up is Friday,
Oct. 15, so hurry-time is running
out. Have one last bicentennial
fling!
SAAD'S
SHOE SHOP
Material and
Workmanship
Guaranteed
Prompt Service
113 Grande Ave.
758-1228
Chapter
� your place to go in DoiuntoiDn
(Sreenuille 315e fyaoe pinball, football,
tfje colbeSt braft in town, a bance floor
anb lots of feappo 9ftu3ic
2beb 8-10 is �abie$' ftite
8:00PM WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
LOVE IS STILL POSSIBLE IN A JUNKY WORLD
SPONSORED BY CHRISTIAN ACTIVISTS ECU

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10
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 630 SEPTEMBER 1976
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Bill Keyes raps with Pat Dye
Editor's Note: Pat Dye is in
his third year as head of the ECU
football program. Many expect
this to be his best season to date,
and possibly the best season in
the University's rich football
history. Following is a conver-
sation between Coach Dye and
FOUNTAINHEAD s Bill Keyes.
FOUNTAINHEAD: Some game
at William and Mary, huh?
DYE: We were happy to win it,
but that certainly wasn't our best
performance. As a matter of fact,
that was about the flattest I've
seen a team since I've been here.
We played with no emotion, no
enthusiasm. And that was a
reflection on me, our coaching
staff, and our senior leadership.
You can expect sophomores and
freshmen to not be ready to play,
but seniors should know what that
type of game means.
But a conference win keeps
things alive, and some good
things came out of that game.
Pete Conaty oontinued his perfect
string of PAT's and field goals,
and Raymond Jones played a
heckuva game and was named
offensive Player of the Week in
the Southern Conference.
Also, we hope that game has
waked us up. We'll be better off
knowing we can't take anyone fa
granted.
FOUNTAINHEAD: You said on
TV we haven't been a disciplined
team. What are you doing in
practice this week to remedy the
situation?
DYE: Today (Tuesday) we are
having officials on the fields. If
the players are penalized by the
officials, then we penalize them
against the number of yards they
receive in penalties. Also,
through the media we have
appealed to their pride for more
discipline and less mistakes.
FOUNTAINHEAD: In August,
you praised the team for report-
ing in the best shape you've ever
seen a team report in. Then every
time we picked up the papers you
were unhappy with the team's
progress. Then finally on the
week of the first game, you were
optimistic. What was going on?
DYE: We ve run as much or
more this fall than any team
we've ever had here, and after a
while they were just mentally and
physically exhausted. We had
scrimmages on the Tuesday and
Friday of the week before the first
game and we oould tell they
needed a rest. So we practiced on
Saturday morning and gave them
that afternoon and Sunday off.
But they still looked poor on
Monday and Tuesday. I had
hoped they'd have a little spring
in their walks and a different look
in their eyes, but they were still
listless and lacked enthusiasm. I
chewed the defense out about not
going to the ball full speed and I
stayed on them pretty good. We
started getting a few more folks
around the ball.
I thought about it alot and
prayed about it on Tuesday night,
and we had a team meeting on
Wednesday. I was afraid they'd
lost their ambition, their desire.
We put them under the lights
Thursday and had a super
practice. We didn't workout on
Friday, just had a meeting. I had
fifteen-yarderson Madison, Pink-
ney, Randolphwell, there's no
excuse for them. We had 86 yards
in penalties and they possibly
couid have called more than that.
At William and Mary, we were
guilty of alot of penalties. You
can't play like that against a good
football team. You'll have no
chance.
FOUNTAINHEAD: Do you be-
lieve you can build a program at
ECU which could win against the
best in the oountry?
DYE: Well, I think it'll take time.
But it can be done.
FOUNTAINHEAD: But how can
you achieve this by recruiting
players the bigger schools don't
think can help them?
DYE: How do you account for us
beating North Carolina last year
with not one player who was
offered a scholarship to play
there, and beating N.C. State,
who offered only three or four of
our players scholarships?
FOUNTAINHEAD: How do you
aooount fa it?
DYE: Intangibles, (pause) We
have a coaching staff that's done
an outstanding job waking with
our playas, and the players have
been hungry enough to wak and
saaifice to reach heights ahers
don't believe they can reach. We
have hungry people who believe
winning is impatant enough and
are willing to pay the prioe fa
success.
M iami of Ohio has been taking
players Ohio State didn't want
and have had winnina football
teams for years. But that's
because they've been able to get
the most out of the players
they've signed.
FOUNTAINHEAD: How's your
reauiting program set up?
DYE: Comparing our budget
with Carolina, State, Duke, Wake
Faest, and Virginia Tech, we
reauit ai less than one-fourth of
what they do. But that's alright.
We reauit good fortball playas
from Nath Carolina. That's what
we've done fa the past two years
and that's what we'll oontinue to
do.
FOUNTAINHEAD: What kind of
game do you expect from the
Citadel Saturday night?
DYE: They have ala of class.
They're a sound football team
offensively, defensively, and in
their kicking game. They try to
beat you physically. When you
stay on the field with them fa 60
minutes you know you've been in
a heckuva contest. Ask our
players what they think about
'em.
Pirates face Bulldogs
in key Southern clash
The
(the
PAT DYE
to take it fa granted we were
ready to play.
You neva know how they'll
react, how they'll respond, but
they played as pafed a football
game as you'll eva see.
The next week against N.C.
State we played awful hard but
made mistakes. I didn't get all
that upset about the fumbles, but
the thing we were oonoerned
about was the penalties. Those
By BILL KEYES
Assistant Spats Edita
Coach Bobby Ross of
Citadel: "Geez, are they
ECU Pirates) good! Defensively,
they are vay, vay quick. Their
speed parallels that of Furman,
and we thought Furman had
excellent speed. They have more
size than Furman and I think their
linemen are a little better.
Offensively, Mike Weaver is
betta than eva. They have sane
excellent running backs. You've
got to stop the running game first
when you play East Carolina, but
you can't ovalook the pass. They
have proven they can play with
just about anyone
Ross praises the Pirates, but
brings in a Bulldog team which is
also vay highly respected. Of-
fensively, they run a vea option
from Pro-I and Slot-I famatiois
with quartaback Marty Crosby
giving the football to fullback
Felix Hooks a tailback Andrew
Johnson when he doesn't run
himself. Johnson, out last season
with a knee injury, is in fine fam
and has been running as hard as
Netters beat Wolf pack
ByKURTHICKMAN
Staff Writa
The East Carolina women's
tennis team woi their second
oonsecutive match of the season
by defeating N.C. State, 6-3,
Tuesday in Raleigh.
It was a tough win as four of
the six singles matches took three
sets.
In the singles competition the
Lady Pirates outlasted State as
Dacas Sunkel, Cathy Patwood,
Leigh Jeffason, Susan Helma,
and Vicky Loose collected victa-
ies.
Sunkel fought back to beat
Ali.cia Jones, 2-6, 6-2, 6-4,
Patwood defeated Helen Stockin-
ga, 6-3, 6-4, Jeffason outdueled
Cathy White, 6-7, 6-3, 6-2,
Helma took Margie Acka, 6-2,
6-1, and Loose beat Carol Wood-
ard, 4-6, 6-0, 6-2.
State's only singles victay
came as Glaia Allen defeated
Marie Stewart, 7-6, 3, 4-6.
The doubles matches were
also close as State won two of
three.
State's Jones and Stockinga
defeated Sunkel and Port wood,
8-6, while Allen and Woodard
beat Helma and Loose, 11-10.
The Pirates' doubles win
resulted with Jeffason and Ka-
m
m
ren Clark's 8-5 victay ova Acka
and White.
"This match was so dose yet
our girls played tough and pulled
it out stated ECU coach Ellen
Warren. "State has a fine team
but we displayed a lot of characta
against than
This leaves ECU with a 2-1
ovaall recad. They play Friday
and Saturday in the Methodist
College Invitational at Fayette-
ville, N.C.
Otha teams involved in the
tournament will be Methodist,
Guilfad, UNC-Wilmingtai, At-
lantic Christian, High Point,
Pembroke St and Campbell.
he did two years ago when he was
Playa of the Year in the SO
The passing game is the same
as it has been fa the past two
seasons with flanka Doug John-
son and big tight end Dickie
Regan, a three-year starta, re-
turning.
Defensively, the Bulldogs will
cause ECU problems from the
moment they break the huddle.
They use a 6-2 defense, but they
neva line up the same way twice
in a row. That eight man front
constantly shifts and stunts. The
intelligence of Pirate linemen
Clay Burnett, Ricky Bennett,
Randy Parrish, Tim Hightowa,
Wayne Bolt, and Matt Mulhd-
land will be valued and appreci-
ated on Saturday night.
Though they line up with only
three deep backs, the Bulldog
defense has been mae than
adequate. They intacepted three
passes against Furman, two of
which led to soaes. Free safety
Ralph Faguson is particularly
good, aooord'ng to ECu assistant
Lanny Norris, and 225-pound
linebacker Brian Ruff was second
team All-Amaica last year.
The Pirates are going with the
same lineups and will use the
same offensive and defensive
strategies.
Coach Pat Dye: "Saturday
night's game with The Citadel will
be a jaw-to-jaw, toe-to-toe, skull-
bustin' time. Those folks down
there know how to Dlay football
and how to hit people. I'm
waned to death because they are
a great team. But at the same
time I lookfawardtoit. We don't
want any patsy games. We want
to play the tough ones and win
those. That's when you're good.
And I know, based on the last two
years against The Citadel, Coach
Ross will bring a team in hae that
will give us evaything we could
possibly want. It's time to buckle
up the chin straps, get in the
trenches and go to war. If folks
want to see football at its best,
then they had betta be in Ficklen
Stadium this week
�AHHup"

Aa1?m
RAYMOND JONES led the
Pirated with 109 yards in 22
carries against William and Mary
and attained Southern Con-
ference offensive player of the
week accolades for his per-
formance.
Sports
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 630 SEPTEMBER 1976
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Volleyball team optimistic as season
ByBRUCEPROCfOR
Staff Writer
Coming off a 6-11 reoord from
last year, volleyball ooach Cath-
erine Bolton is optimistic on the
team's chances for the upcoming
season going into today s opener
at Chapel Hill against Appala-
chian State and North Carolina.
Last year we lost alot of close
matches, so we won't be coming
into this year with a big reputa-
tion Bolton said. "We'll be the
underdogs, but we will have a
good season
Bolton will be aided by Sheila
Cotton and Terry Ward this
season.
The team will have the benefit
of several experienced sopho-
mores this season to replace
graduating seniors from last year.
Fireworks
display
Saturday
Saturday night will be Bi-
centennial Night for East Carolina
as the Pirates play host to The
Jitadel in a Southern Conference
football game.
Joining the Pirate fans will be
2,000 boy scouts from the Eastern
North Carolina Council in co-
operation with the "Partners in
Scouting Roundup Program
with ECU.
At halftime, there will be a
special salute by the Marching
Pirate band and a firewoks
display. Athletic Director Bill
Cain oommented on the oele-
oration.
"We decided that we should
honor America on its 200th
birthday and thought this would
be appropriate.
The game itself should be
enough to bring in a fullhouse as
the Bulldogs bring a 2-1 mark o
the oontest. Their only loss wa. o
Clemson on a last minute field
goal and they defeated previously
unbeaten Furman, 17-16, last
Saturday.
Gale Kerbaugh is one of the
best all-round players on the
team, while standing just 5-6.
But Gale has perfect timing and
is a tremendous jumper, there-
fore proving to be an excellent
blocker
Kerbaugh will be joined by
two more second-year women,
Lori Calverley and Kim Dayton,
who will be setting the plays for
the spikers.
Charlotte Layton will be see-
ing alot of action this year. Bolton
maea mat the senior's spike was
looking real good as well as her
blocking ability.
Last year's co-recipient of the
FOUNTAINHEAD's Athlete-of-
the-Year Award, Debbie Free-
man, will miss the first few
matches with a sprained ankle.
Freeman, a junior, shared the
honor with all-America football
player Jim Bolding.
Other players to see a lot of
action will be transfer junior Gay
Hines, freshman Linda Model-
SCHEDULE
DATEOPPONENTS
9-30-76Appalachian
10-2-76Duke, High Point
10-4-76N.C. State, Wake
Forest
10-6-76'Chowan College
10-11-76UNC-G, Catawba
College
10-14-76Shaw, Meredith
10-19-76UNC-CH,
Louisburg
10-21-76Eton, UNC-W
10-25-76N.C. State
10-29-76Appalachian St.
Tournament
11-2-76"Chowan College
11-4,5,6-76NCAI AW State
Tournament
PLACE
at UNC-CH
at Duke
HOME
at Chowan
at UNC-G
at Meredith
at Louisburg
HOME
at N.C. State
atBoone
HOME
at Duke Univ.
TIME
3:30 p.m.
1.00 p.m.
5.O0p.m.
6:30 p.m.
4 XX) p.m.
7.O0p.m.
6:30 p.m.
4.00 p.m.
6.00 p.m.
TBA
6:30 p.m.
TBA
' denotes a Varsity
and a JV game
ROSTER
NAME
Vicky Lee
Donna Wooiard
Charlotte Layton
Gay Hines
Debbie Freeman
Connie Wagoner
Rosie Thompson
Gale Kerbaugh
Lori Calverley
Kim Clayton
Linda McClellan
Renita MoGee
Linda Mason
Joy Forbes
CLASS
Senior
Senior
Senior
Junior
Junior
Junior
Sophomore
Sophomore
Sophomore
Sophomore
Freshman
Freshman
Freshman
Freshman
HT.
5'3"
5'7"
5'7"
5'6"
5,8"
5'5"
5'6"
5'5"
5'4"
511"
5'5"
5'4"
5'6"
Head Coach: Catherine Bolton
Assistant Coach: Sheilah Cotten
Manager: Rhonda Griffin
j If you haven't been down to
&cl the Tree House lately, now
jsSfc is a good time. We have
the finest pizza and salads
in town.
The Tree people also want
you to try their fine Italian
dinners.
two01
Coffee house music every
night - no cover.
The Tree House -
An Alternative Restaurant and Nightclub
Corner of Fifth and Cotanche
Ian, and Rosie Thompson, a
sophomore.
The team will be aiming at a
strong showing in the state
tournament to be held at Duke
University in Durham in Novem-
ber.
Bolton sees height as being
one of the few problems her team
will have to deal with this season,
with most teams towering over
the Lady Pirates. Carolina has
several girls standing 6-1 or
taller.
Golfers place fifth
By DAVID ROBEY
Staff Writer
Freshman Heather Jones cop-
ped the individual medalist hon-
ors but the ECU Women's golf
team placed last in a field of
seven at the Blue Ridge Ladies
Tournament Tuesday in Boone.
Carolina won the team champ-
ionship with a score of 335, while
Duke placed second at 350.
Appalachian State finished third
with 351, while Wake Forest took
fourth at 365. The Lady Pirates
scored 385 to place fifth. UNC-
Charlotte and Winthrop College
failed to have enough team
members to compete fa team
title.
"This was our first collegiate
t rnament of the year, and
although our placement was not
high, the experience and learning
was most beneficial for the girls
Heather Jones won the indivi-
dual medalist in the tournament
with a score of 80 and also bogied
the last three holes.
"For her first oollegiate tour-
nament, Heather shot extremely
well despite the pressure and lack
of colliegate experience
McLendon added.
"UNC-Chapel Hill and Duke
are favorites for the champion-
ship at this point. We're not
discouraged with the soore, in
fact I'm highly pleased with the
girls attitudes and their deter-
mination to win and improve
The Lady Pirates will be in
action again tomorrow in the
Mary Baldwin Golf Tournament
in Stanton, Va.
said ooach Mac McLendon. " Four
out of five of our girls had their
first colliegate tournament, with
three out of five having their first
tournament ever
CLASSIFIEDS
WANTED: Ladies size 7 ice FOR SALE: B.I.C. 960 turntable,
skates. Will pay well. 752-1058. 1 year warranty left. 752-0734
FOR SALE: 1972 Cutlass
Supreme. Greenbeige vinyl top.
Air, tape deck, bucket seats.
Great condition. Must sell. Call
752-8179.
WANTED: Keyboard player for
weekend band, top 40 and
pop-country. Bookings through
Jan. Days call 758-3378, nights
call 752-6566.
FOR RENT: Room in attractive
breenville suburb to young lady.
Full house privileges. $79 mo.
Call 756-0698 or write P.O. Box
6065.
FOR SALE: Mustang-loaded with
value. Power steering and power
disc brakes, factory air, radio,
automatic floor shift, mint con-
dition. Owner will accept best
offer. Phone days 757-6961 or
after 6 p.m. 756-6552.
FOR SALE: 2.5 cu. ft. refrigerator
$50. 4.5 cu. ft. refrigerator $120.
Call 758-7098.
Yard sale, October 1 & 2 All types
of junk. 1310 Cotten Drive,
Greenville, 758-1530.
LOST: Dog, Black Scottish Terrier
answers to name of Soottie. Black
all over. If found call 758-4922.
FOR SALE: 1970 Honda CL-175,
very good condition; asking $300,
includes two helmets. Call
758-9322.
HELP WANTED: Washington
Yacht & Country Club, we need
waiters or waitresses, come for
interview Wed Fri Sat after
4.
FOR SALE: Realistic stereo com-
ponent. Best offer. Call Jack
752-7596.
PIANO AND GUITAR lessons.
Daily and evenings. Richard J.
Knapp, B.A. 756-3908.
NEEDED: Female roommate to
share 3-bedroom trailer. Rent $30
plus utilites. Call 758-9577 after
3.
FOR SALE: 1972 1245 Fiat
Convertible. Whiteblack top, 5
speed. Low mileage. Must sell.
Call 752-8179.
HELP WANTED. Income de-
pendent upon initiative. Set your
own hours For information call
752-2095, Thurs Sept. 30, 1976
from 800-930 p.m. only!
I
j�





FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 630 SEPTEMBER 1976
"SPIRIT"
MUSIC FROM COLUMBIA RECORDS BY
WIND
6.98 LIST
ONLY
ON SALE NOW ONLESS DELATED IN SHIPPING
IN THE GEORGETOWNE SHOPPES, COTANCHE & REID STREETS
ACROSS FROM CLEMENT DORM
STEVIE WONDER ALBUM ALL6.98 LIST LPs ONLY '4.99 OUT OUTS $2.49 ft UP.
EASTERN CAROLINA'S BEST JAZZ SELECTION 2.99 ft UP.
SILVERSMITH JEWELRY BY APACHE
PLUS A FULL LINE OF HEAD EQUIPMENT-PAPERS-30





Title
Fountainhead, September 30, 1976
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 30, 1976
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.412
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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