Fountainhead, September 28, 1976






THIS ISSUE -
16 PAGES
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over 50 years
CIRCULA TION -
8,500
VOL. 52, NO. 5
98 SEPTEMBER 1976
Town Meeting '76
opens in Greenville
BILLY AND SANDRA STINSON during lunch with a little help from their friends. Photo: David Hunt)
Disabled students hold
organizational meeting
By LARRY UEBERMAN
Staff Writer
The Disabled Students Associ-
ation (DSA) held its first meeting
Wednesday night, Sept. 22.
The purpose of the organi-
zational meeting was to inform
students of the DSA.
It is not just for disabled
students; all interested students
are weloome, said Roy Pate,
temporary chairman.
The meeting was attended by
approximately 15 students of
which about half were disabled
students. Tim Sullivan, SGA
president, also attended the
meeting.
The DSA constitution was
read and problems faced by
disabled students were discuss-
ed.
The DSA's goals are to make
others aware that disabled stu-
dents have the same needs as
others, to aeate a research and
resource facility to upgrade all
members physically, socially and
psychologically, and to make DSA
services available to the univer-
sity.
A list is being completed of
architectural barriers which still
exist. One problem is that bikes
are often locked on aooess ramps
so that the wheelchair students
cannot get by.
Sullivan said the SGA will
allow the DSA to get an appro-
priation until the end of October
when the DSA's budget can be
presented.
Only two more organizational
meetings can be held before it is
recognized by the SGA.
The DSA urges all interested
students to attend the next
organization meeting Oct. 6, at
7:30, in Room 221 Mendenhall.
ByROBBENTON
Staff Writer
A group of approximately 100
people, consisting mostly of
Greenville citizens, met at J.H.
Rose High School Saturday,
September 25, as part of Town
Meeting '76.
Town Meeting '76 oonsists of
5,000 one-day community forums
attempting to encounter local
problems through a representa-
tive group of the population.
Town Meeting '76 is conduct-
ed by the Institute of Cultural
Affairs.
Saturday's meeting opened at
9 a.m. with registration, during
which refreshments were served.
This was followed by a weloome
at 9:30 by Rev. Jim Bailey,
ohairman of the Greenville town
meeting Steering Committee.
Don Francis, of Pittsburgh, Pa.
then gave a short speech noting
ways in which Town Meeting '76
had helped other communities.
The assembly then divided
into four groups to begin the
morning workshop, "The Present
Challenges The groups named
many issues oonoerning the citi-
zens of Greenville, one of which
was the lack of political response
to citizens' concerns.
The groups reassembled in
the cafeteria at 1230 p.m. for
lunch, which was provided by
local restaurants. Billy and
Sandra Stinson, a local singing
duo, entertained the assembly
during lunch.
At 1 :30 the group again
divided for the afternoon session,
"The Practical Proposals" work-
shop. Each of the groups was
presented with a specific area of
problems.
Group A received the econ-
omic challenges, group B the
political challenges, and group C
the cultural challenges. The task
of group D wastooompose a town
song, symbol, and story.
The groups onoe again as-
sembled at 3:30 to present their
proposals. Many of the proposals
conoerned the lack of citizen
participation in matters which are
pertinent to the welfare of the
town.
The meeting was concluded at
4:30 by Rev. Jim Bailey, who
summarized the day's activities.
Each participant in the event
received a bound report of the
workshops' results which was
prepared by representatives of
Addressography Multigraph
Corporation.
Fraternity rents church
Prewett: expansion
drive needs support
By JACK LAIL
Staff Writer
Sigma Nu social fraternity has
rented a vacant church at the
corner of Thirteenth and Cc-
tanche St.
The house was a Pentecostal
Holiness Church that was vacant
for three years said David
Dulin, the fraternity's Lieutenant
Commander. "We started rent-
ing September 3, 1976.
"We found the church in early
August and made a deal with the
landlord to construct bedrooms
and bathrooms. We are painting
and cleaning up the house now
and it is not furnished said
Dulin.
"We have the option to buy
but we are not sure what we are
going to do. It's got potential to
be one of the best fraternity
houses but it needs a lot of work,
mostly painting and furnishing.
"We will have 18 members living
in the house by this weekend
said Dulin.
Sigma Nu established in the
spring of 1975 with 13 members
has now grown to 30.
Most of the members pre-
viously lived in Scott and Belk
dorms and meetings were held in
Mendenhall.
By JACK LAIL
Staff Writer
Dr. Clinton R. Prewett, cam-
pus chairman for the Ficklen
Stadium Expansion Campaign
says he wants to infuse Pirate
blood into everyone connected
with ECU.
"We are sending every facul-
ty and staff member a letter
asking for both financial and
psychological support said Pre-
wett. "We want to get everyone
involved.
ECU is building this
stadium for ourselves and fa
future students Prewett said.
The campaign hopes to raise
approximately $2.5 million by the
end of the year, according to
Prewett.
"We sit in the lap of immense
riches, if we just knew how to
open the doa of alumni. The
alumni is equivalent to a $100
million yearly endowment.
"We don't have a lot of
wealthy people, but we have a lot
of people. All of us together can
gat this done he said.
"We want to convince our-
selves that we are a good school;
that we deserve a good stadium
as well as good academic pro-
grams. We have to believe In
ourselves
Prewett feels more "visi-
bility" in football could inaease
suppat fa football and other
area.
"Everytime the prestige and
I See EXPANSION, page 3.)

NEW SIGMA NU Fraternity house.
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 528 SEPTEMBER 1976
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news
SIHIFL
Parks
The Parks and Recreation
Society will hold a meeting,
Thursday, Sept. 30 at 730 p.m. in
Room 221 Mendenhall Student
Center. The convention trip to
Asheville will be discussed. All
students are invited to come.
Phi Alpha
There will be a meeting of Phi
Alpha on Tuesday, Sept. 28 at
7:30 p.m. This is a business
meeting and all members are
urged to attend as we will be
discussing projects for the up-
coming year.
Car Wash
Alpha Phi Omega is holding a
car wash Saturday, Oct. 2 from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Pitt Plaza
Shell. Inflation Fighter only $1.
PRO
There win be a PRC Society
meeting Thursday, Sept. 30 at
730 p.m. in Room 221 Menden-
hall Student Center.
All interested students should
attend. The society is not dosed
to PRC curriculum.
Rush Party
Alpha Phi Omega Fraternity
will hold a rush party Oct. 2 after
the ECU game at the Fraternity
Condominium (Apt. 25-Univer-
sity Condominiums). All those
who are interested in serving the
school, oommunity, as well as
yourself are invited to attend.
Bring your date, enjoy the
refreshments and get to know the
brothers. For more information
call 758-0260.
Forever
The Forever Generation will
not meet this Friday due to a
weekend retreat in the mount-
ains.
If you would be interested in
joining us, please contact Jay at
758-3149 or Martha at 752-8962,
or drop by 304-A Scott of 315
Greene.
Law
The ECU Law Society is
holding its first meeting Tuesday
September 28 at 630 in Brewster
B-102. This will be a planning
session for the entire calender
year. Membership dues of $5.00
should be paid at this meeting
Anyone interested in a career in
law or a law related field is
welcome to attend.
Chess Club Psi Chi
WECU
The ECU Chess Club will
meet tonight at 730 p.m. in the
Coffeehouse in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. All interested per-
sons are invited to attend.
Rockathon
Any sororities who haven't
scheduled a meeting to partici-
pate in the Alpha Phi Omega
Rockathon contact Stacy Evans
at 758-0260 or 756-5507 after 5
p.m.
Auditions
Auditions for "Hello From
Bertha" and "The Lady of
Larkspive Lotion" by Tennessee
Williams will be held Wednes-
day, Sept. 29 from 1 p.m. to 3
p.m. and Thursday, Sept. 30 from
4 p.m. to6 p.m. in the Drama and
Speech Department, Room 206.
Performance dates are Nov.
4,5,6 . Scripts are on reserve in
Joyner Library.
Covered Dish
Attention all Food, Nutrition
and Institution Management
Majors! There will be a depart-
mental meeting Monday, October
4, at 700 p.m. in the Institution
Management Dining Room. This
meeting will be held in oonjuno-
tion with the Student Dietetic
Association. Come early, bring
your favorite dish, and join in on
the covered dish supper at 630.
Ail interested please come!
Gamma Sig
Gamma Sigma Sigma invites
you to rush with us! We have
three rush activities planned.
Sept. 28 is popcorn and movie
night, Sept. 29 is skits and sweets
night, and Sept. 30 is Salad Bar
night. All rush activities will be
held in the lobby of White Dorm
at 630 p.m. For further informa-
tion or questions oontact-Debbie
Chason- 907 Clement (752-8453).
Come and join us!
Honor Council
Appplications are being ac-
cepted for the Review and Honor
Councils. The only requirements
are a 2.0 Q.P.A and full-time
students status. The Review
Board hears constitutional and
final appeal cases. Duties of the
Honor Council include presiding
over honor code offenses. Are you
interested in maintaining equal
treatment for all? If so, apply for
one of these positions. Appli-
cations will be accepted 8-5
MonFri. by the SGA in Men-
denhall until Oct. 5.
Rush for Psi Chi will end on 29
Sept. for the Fall quarter. Psi Chi
is the national honorary society of
psychology. If you have a
minimum of 12 quarter hours in
psychology with a 3.0 or higher
average and if you are in the
upper 35 percent of your entire
class and if. psychology is your
major or minor (or the equivalent)
you may qualify. Psi Chi is open
to graduate and undergraduate
students and has a membership
of over 100 members at East
Carolina. Applications are avail-
able in the psychology office and
the Psi Chi library which are
located in the Speight building.
Applications are now being
taken for daytime and nighttime
announcers at WECU. Interested
persons see John Deaver during
these hours: Sun. 7-12 noon,
Mon. 6-7 p.m Tues, 5-6 p.m
Wed. 5-6 p.m Thurs. 10-11
a.m Fri. 1-2 p.m.
Writers
Anyone interested in writing
sports for FOUNTAINHEAD
should contact Steve Wheeler in
Pub Building or call 757-6366 or
752-5180.
Pets Available Basketball
The animals available for
adoption this week include a
brown and white mixed breed
named "Trigger" and a "brown
flea bag" mut. These animals will
be available for consultation in
times of loneliness or anger.
The people at Animal Control
would like to extend a warm
invitation to any interested per-
sons to stop by the shelterandtalk
to the animals. The shelter is
located on 2nd St off Cemetery
Road.
The writer of these News
Flashes will probably not be
available to write flashes winter
quarter. After graduation there
will not be anyone to let students
know what animals will be
available.
If you are a humanitarian and
want to help people and animals
oome together, I urge you to
contact the shelter at 752-4137,
ext. 247 or call Pat at 758-1504. If
you feel you can spend a half hour
a week, then this creative outlet
may be fulfilling to you fa Ke
rest of your oollege days. Pi
call today.
Art Show
Wish to submit pieces dealing
with the black experience? Should
bring ready-to-show artwork to
the Information Desk in Menden-
hall Student Center on Sunday
Oct. 3 from 1 to 3 p.m. All work
must be submitted at this time.
Do it to it!
Travel Film
Art Wilson, acclaimed world
traveler and speaker, will present
"The Grandeur of Spain" in
Mendenhall Student Theatre,
Wed Sept. 29at 800 p.m. in the
first of seven programs in the
Travel-Adventure Film Series.
Tickets are free with student I.D.
and Act. card, Faculty and Staff
with membership card and $1.00
general admission for public. The
presentation is sponsored by the
Student Union Travel Committee.
Any freshmen interested in
becoming basketball managers
should contact assistant coach
Dan Kinney in Minges Coliseum.
Also, any women interested in
being hostesses for the team
should see Coach Kinney.
Fac. Senate
Don't let the faculty tell you
what to do! Not until after you tell
them what they should do. Get
involved with YOUR University.
Positions are open on Faculty
Senate committees that must be
filled by oonoerned students. Get
your assignments in gear and get
oonoerned, or don't squawk later.
Positions are open on several
oommittees including the very
important Calendar Committee,
University Curriculum Commit-
tee, Teacher Education Commit-
tee, Instructional Survey Commit-
tee and the Computer Committee.
For further information con-
tact Tim McLeod, Secretary of
Academic Affairs, at the Student
Government office in Mendenhall
Student Center. His office hours
are: Monday 10-1 p.m Tuesday
12-1 p.m Wednesday 10-1 p.m.
and4-5 p.m Thursday 10-1 p.m.
and 4-5 p.m and Friday 1-5 p.m.
Judicial Board
Do you believe in helping
people who are in trouble? if so.
you should apply for a Judicial
board position. This is a reward-
ing opportunity, requiring only a
few hours per week. Application
will be accepted at the SGA
Offices beginning Sept. 28
through Oct. 5. Only sincere
students apply.
Avon
If anyone is interested in Avon
products for men or women, call
752-5880. A brochure carries an
assortment of low-priced items
for all.
immm mi
Floats
Any campus organization
planning to enter a float in this
year's Homecoming will have to
submit a written proposal to the
Dean of Men's oflioe. Each float
entry will be allotted $125 by the
Homecoming Steering Committee
toward cost. Likewise, House
Decoration entries will be allotted
$25. Orders for float materials
will be taken Thurs Sept. 23,
7:30 p.m at Delta Sigma Phi
Fraternity house, 2721 S.
Memorial Dr.
NTE
Students completing teacher
preparation programs and candi-
dates for teaching positions may
take the National Teacher Exami-
nations at ECU.
The NTE will be administered
Nov. 13, '76; Feb. 19, '77; and
July 16, '77.
Bulletins of Information for
NTE candidates are available
from ECU Testing Center, 105-
106 Speight Building.
Who's Who
All schools, departments and
campus organizations wishing to
nominate students for the
"Who's Who Among Students in
American Colleges and Universi-
ties" which did not receive the
forms should contact or oome by
the Office of the Dean of Student
Affairs, Whichard Building,
Room 204.
Nominations should be receiv-
ed in the Office of the Dean of
Student Affairs no later than Oct.
1, 1976.
Conference
Members of the ECU Disabled
Students organization are invited
to attend the Governor's Confer-
ence of the Hiring of the
handicapped Oct. 1 at the Wil-
mington Hilton Inn, Wilson, N.C.
The White House Regional Com-
mittee Conference will be held in
Greenville Oct. 9.
Gardeners
Indoor and outdoor gardeners
in the ECU area may increase
their knowledge and skill by
enrolling in special non-credit
evening courses this fall.
"Houseplant How-To schedul-
ed for Wednesdays, Oct. 13-Ncv.
17, is designed for indoor garden-
ers. "Horticulture for the Home-
owner' scheduled to meet Wed-
nesdays, Oct. 6-Dec. 8, will
provide information on how to
plan home gardens.
Further information is availa-
ble from the Office of Non-Credit
Programs, 757-61436148.
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 528 SEPTEMBER 1976
3

Professors discuss debate
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ByBRENDANORRIS
Staff Writer
The outcome of the long
awaited Presidential debates was
discussed Friday by two ECU
professors.
According to Mrs. Janice
Faulkner, an ECU English 'pro-
fessor, "the debates were a
staged performance and the
candidates behaved like robots.
They acted like a couple of
presidential Barbie Dolls
Dr. John East, of the Political
Science Dept. agreed with
Faulkner's comments, saying he
believed the future debates will
be changed to a less rigid format.
Faulkner suggested a round
table discussion type format,
while East thought the candidates
should be sitting down with a
moderator between them.
Both professors did not think
the debates hurt either candidate
and that each had well prepared
information.
East, co-chairman fa the Fad
campaign in N.C said that the
was no real winner and the
stronger leader will not be
evident until after the next two
debates.
Faulkner, an active leader in
the Democratic party, said, "The
debates were to draw, everybody
lost
Faulkner said, "Both candi-
dates repeated themselves in
ader to get a point aaoss. Fa
example, Gerry Ford mentioned
three times that he had reduced
taxes for the lower income
families.
"Both had remarkable com-
mand of a lot of infamatioi, but
each candidate kept accusing the
other of distating the infamatioi
as the other used it said
Faulkner.
Both Faulkner and East
thought the questioning panel
was fair considering the format
they had to follow.
"The panel seemed mae in
oommand of the material than the
candidates said Faulkner.
"Ninety minutes is too long
fa a debate. They should be
shatened to 30 minutes a an
hour at the most said East.
East said that the audience
should not be shown on the
camera because concentration
should be only on the two
candidates.
On the other hand, Faulkner
said the live audience should be
shown because it would help hold
the attention of the home viewers.
Aocading to Faulkner, "If
you only saw the last 30 minutes,
(during the blackout), you saw the
best part. I would have rather
spent my evening with
Buddy Rich at Wright Aud-
itaium
DoiW Fbrget
that Wed.
is
Ladies Night
at
Chapter �
Honor frat to attend meeting
ByNEILSESSOMS
Co-News Edita
Tau chapter of Phi Sigma Pi
hona fraternity, ECU'S oldest
fraternal organization, will attend
its 60th annual national con-
vention Oct. 1 and 2 in the
nation's capital.
Aocading to Randy Doub,
fraternity president and chief
delegate, thecawention will seek
to settle the Title Nine question
regarding admittance of women
fa the first time.
"This is a maja decisiai for
the future of the fraternity, but I
feel we will oome to a proper and
acceptable conclusion said
Doub.
Tau chapter will be seeking its
11th consecutive "Most Out-
standing Chapter in the Nation"
award, based on the chapter's
achievements in the past year.
This year's convention theme
will be "Solidarity Through
Unity
Other delegi.es will include
EXPANSION
Continued from page 1.
visibility of ECU goes up, there is
a oorresponding escalation in the
value of degrees offered at
ECU he said.
Prewett hopes to involve
student aganizatiois, such as the
SGA and FOUNTAINHEAD into
the campaign.
"I want to get some real 'hell
fire' spirit around here he said.
"I'd like to see pep rallies
before every game, but that
depends on what the students
want to do
Prewett believes ECU has the
best student support in North
Carolina.
I'd like to see the students
hold a' pirate carnival' starting on
Wednesday befae a game with
the cheerleaders, band, and
refreshments.
"I'd also like to see the
famation of a 'junia millionaires
club To become a member a
student would oontribute, say,
$10 and get a bumper sticker fa
his suppat. We could easily get
300 a 400 students to join. It's
not the money; we could get that
in one pop. But we want
everybody to get pirate blood in
them he said.
Prewett feels ECU does not
presently emphasize athletics
enough.
"ECU is a good place but it
can get better he said.
dp this coupon!
And get three games for only $1.25.
Bring three friends along. We'll let
them in on the deal, too.
r
WASHINGTON HWY.
GREENVILLE. N.C
Expires Oct. 31, 1978
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Dr. Richard C. Todd, national
advisor, John Gilchrist, Randy
Ziglar, Jeff Wilder, Tom Barwick,
Hal Sharpe, Don Turner, Reed
Waren, Ronnie Rose, Jim Ried,
Scott Brandt, and several alumni.
The convention will be held at
the Burlington Hotel.
Delegates will go on famal
and infamal tours of the city and
surrounding areas.
JIUDJXAPPRECJATION JWEEK
PAINTERS PANTS
Natural off-white ducking with
triple stitch seams- rule pocket
& hammer loop
REG $995
ALL THIS WEEK
SIZES 25 10 42 WAIST 90
TURQUOISE &
CORAL JEWELRY
AT REASONABLE PRICES
MAR KA Y RINGS & THINGS IS
NOW OPEN AT 112 E. 5th ST.
WITH A FINE SELECTION OF
HANDMADE INDIAN JEWELRY
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 528 SEPTEMBER 1976
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Eating it to death
A study released Sundav by the International
Association of Chiefs of Police concludes that
overweight police officers who follow poor nutritional
practices and fail to get enough exercise cost
taxpayers extra money in disability benefits. These
practices, smoking cigarettes and drinking coffee
excessively often produce heart and circulatory
ailments which force many officers to retire early, the
report indicated. The results of this study are far-
reaching; they are applicable to the debate on
spiraling health care costs in this country.
America's culinary tradition, effectively promoted
by the advertising world, has become one of the fries,
a hamburger and a shake - and our changing medical
statistics are reflecting the trend. The "Forward Plan
for Health the second in a series of long-range
blueprints from the Department of Health, Education
and Welfare argues that the major killers are no
longer diseases like pneumonia, influenza and
tuberculosis that can be categorized as problems with
strictly medical solutions. Today, the prime health
concerns are heart disease, cancer and stroke which
could be prevented with proper nutritional habits.
Pumping dollars into physician-training programs will
only make the nation's health problems chronic by
keeping the poorly nourished, not necessarily
undernourished, alive. The only effective solution is
one of prevention, to create a national habit of proper
nutrition.
But in America food is not always considered for its
healthfulness, it must be FUN! At least that is what
the processed-food advertisers would have us believe.
Dr. C. Arden Miller, president of the American Public
Health Association, in a recent speech at the North
Carolina Health Convocation suggested government
control of the multimillion dollar promotion of "junk
food including ready-to-eat breakfast cereals,
sugary snack foods and fast food items sold at
roadside chain outlets. Miller said one tactic would be
to coeroe manufacturers to deposit one dollar in a trust
fund for nutritional advertising every time they spent
a dollar to advertise junk food. Although a forward-
thinking, rational approach to the health dilemma,
such a scheme would be instantly labeled "big
brotherish" or "Orwellian" by the pro junk-food
reactionaries.
But unless some positive action is taken to
reeducate those misled by the hucksters of hot dog
and soda pop diets, the costs for medical care will
continue to skyrocket as doctors spend their time
keeping alive those chronically afflicted with the
effects of nutritional self-abuse.
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over fifty years
Senior EditorJim Elliott
Production Manager .Jimmy Williams
Advertising ManagerDennis Leonard
Sports Editor Steve Wheeler
News EditorsDebbie Jackson
Neil Sessoms
Trends EditorPat Coyle
Business ManagerTeresa Whisenant
Fountainhead la the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Student Government Association
ol ECU and appears each Tuesday and Thursday during the
school year, weekly during the summer.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C.
27834.
Editorial Offices: 757-6386, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions: $10.00 annually tor non-students, $6.00 for
alumni.
YBTJ VtSCo &ANDROOCNltTS9TS AMD 8fe
Dennis C. Leonard
Constitution issue reviewed
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During the past week the controversial SGA
Constitution has re-surfaced into quite an extensive
battle pitting the forces of the SGA versus the Student
Union. As the SGA advertises its strength in dollars
by being the second largest student government body
in the nation, it certainly is not advertising any
rational decision making abilities by trying to ratify
the proposed constitution nor by propelling the
additional controversy between the Student Union.
First, examine the Student Union controversy and
realize that the most efficient system of providing
entertainment for the ECU student body is to
incorporate a separate entertainment entity. The
cancellation of concerts is one area that the Student
Union cannot oontrol and as we see Student Union
President Barry Robinson use the legal system to the
fullest extent in settling contract disputes from the
past, we realize that the Union is simply not going to
take the cancellation problem sitting idly in
Mendenhall. The problem of cancellations does not lie
within the framework of the Student Union, but exists
in the failure of the various agents to properly handle
the oontract arrangements. This problem with the
agents is one that cannot be overcome by any one
single governing body, i.e. the SGA could probably
not do the job half as effectively as the Major
Attractions Committee is presently.
Secondly, note that the SGA is obviously trying to
take its oontrol into other areas besides the SGA, and
it is abusing its power and operational boundaries.
SGA President Tim Sullivan was probably correct
when he said in a " Letter to the Editor last week that
"Dean Rudolph Alexander has had far too great an
influence on the Union but look at the SGA and one
will notice that advisors, Dr. Jack Thornton and Dr.
Hans Indorf, have also had quite a bit of influence in
dedsion-making policies of the SGA. Sullivan should
look at the grass in his own backyard before trying to
mow down the neighbor's next door. Also note that
former Speaker of the House Ricky Price is basing his
legislature campaign on "Concerts instead of
Cancellations The power dwelling on second floor
Mendenhall is simply becoming so obvious that the
students had best beware of the entire revised
Constitution before they choose to vote on such an
important issue.
In last Thursday's "The Forum Monika
Sutherland, BUCCANEER Editor, made some crucial
observations about the proposed Constitution. Look at
Article III of the Constitution where it states that the
SGA shall have supreme student law. This article
alone documents the amount of power the SGA would
have if the Constitution were to be adopted. This one
article should call for student concern because of the
encroaching power on which the SGA could capitalize
in the future.
Secondly, note that the lack of representation
would be quite unfortunate for the Freshman Class
because they would be unrepresented for almost six
months before having a chance to run for the
Legislature. What a contradiction from two years ago
when Sullivan was a freshman legislator working
diligently to get "Operation Free Bird" and other
important legislation passed.
Thirdly, Ms. Sutherland makes a very valid point
when she mentions the correlation between the
February to February budgeting system and a
possible decline in student en.odment. If by some
chance the student enrollment was to drastically
decline, the SGA would obviously lose already
appropriated student fees. How can our system of
government propose annual budpets when they are
uncertain how much will be received the following
Fall quarter? The February to February budgeting
system simply will not work in the manner which the
authors of the Constitution have drawn up because
they will not be sure how much money is going to
oome in during the Fall and how much will be there
when the fiscal year ends.
Note, finally, one more obvious flaw in the
Constitution. During the summer legislature the only
members of the Executive Council with voting power
are the President of the SGA and the Speaker of the
House. There needs to be a third member of this
Council to offset a majority vote and to provide a third
check over the SGA during the summer months. If an
SGA President and the Speaker of the House allied
together on voting for summer appropriations, the
students oould be the financial loser from wasteful
appropriations.
Students, when you vote either Tuesday or
Wednesday take these factors into consideration and
choose fa yourselves whether you want a totally
'inchecked student government or do you want one
that is accountable to the needs of the students.
r
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 528 SEPTEMBER 1976
5
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orum
President blitzes Editor
To Fountainhead:
The enlargement of Ficklen
Stadium is far too important to be
treated as it was in the last issue
of Fountainhead.
As the only student member
of the ECU Board of Trustees, it
is vitally important to me to see
how the students feel about using
Reserve Funds to help enlarge
the stadium.
Election folly
To Fountainhead:
While scanning through the
FOUNTAINHEAD, I observed a
proposal to make the Student
Union President a position the
students oould elect. That way,
the president would be the
people's choice. Correct?
Wrong There is a lot more to it
than meets the eye. The Presi-
dent's job is so tough, that
students with experience in the
Union find it very challenging.
We, at the Student Union, don't
envy his position due to the
responsibility involved.
The appointment by the Board
of Directors is done with respect
to ability and experience. This
position can't be turned into one
which depends on popularity. If
one wishes to be the Pres. of the
Union, become involved. We
need you and your ideas. When
you gain experience, run for the
Presidency! It's open to every-
one.
As a matter of interest, the
S.G.A their constitution, wants
to appoint a Treasurer to head
finances so they get an experi-
enced man in control. Doesn't
that sound a lot like the reasoning
behind the appointment of the
Union President?
Further, isn't it rather para-
doxical that the S.G.A. would
sponsor a resolution to change the
President's selection policy while
in the midst of a controversy
between Barry Robinson, S.U.
President, and Sullivan over the
Constitution.
Respectfully,
Curtis Pitssnbarger
Artist Series Chairperson
Student Union
Flicks okay
To Fountainhead:
Upon reading Tim Sullivan's
comments concerning the choice
and quality of free flicks I became
very distraught and upset. I
happen to enjoy the films shown
especially those on Wednesday
night at Mendenhall Student
Center and it does not matter to
me who selected the film and why
because they are all good. If Tim
Sullivan wants proof of this fact
he should try finding a seat after
8:00, when the shows regularly
begin.
In conclusion, I feel that
Sullivan should not gripe about
such matters in which he knows
virtually nothing and I'm sure
that my statements speak for a
much larger majority!
Polly Fussell
With that in mind, plus
knowing that the chances of the
Board voting on this issue this
year are great, Jim Elliott, editor
of Fountainhead, and I met with
Vice-Chancellor C. G. Moore. We
went to (1) find out if a vote in the
future on this was a possibility,
and (2) to find out what the
Reserve Fund was so he oould
inform the students of the facts
and I oould prepare a referendum
question on it.
Mr. Moore is extremely
bl tint, not always polite, but he
has never misled me or other
student leaders he deals with. He
can be counted upon to give a
direct answer. Mr. Elliott and I
grilled him for over an hour on the
Fund, how it would affect stu-
Green-handed
To Fountainhead:
At the end of each day, we felt
it necessary to bring our plants in
from outside for fear they would
be stolen. During the break was
the only time we felt safe leaving
them out at night.
Damned if someone hasn't
stolen two diffenbachias and a
window box from the wall in front
of the Traffic Office. They were
personal property - not depart-
mental. Just another incident to
destroy our faith in people.
Peggy and Pat
Traffic Office
WRC votes 'no'
To Fountainhead:
We, the members of the
Women's Residence Council, feel
compelled to support the Student
Union's opposition to Article III,
Section 1 of the proposed Student
Government Association Con-
stitution. We believe this Article,
stating that the SGA shall be
supreme student lawhaving
precedence over any other stu-
dent originated chartersand re-
gulations to be contradictory
to the independence of other
campus organizations such as
ours.
We feel the SGA should not
have license over independent
organizations nor should our final
decisions be subject to SGA
approval.
If it is not the SGA's intention
to regulate all decisions of
separate organizations, it should
be so stated dearly in Article III,
Section 1 of their constitution.
Respectfully,
Sheila Craddock
WRC Secretary
Forum Policy
Forum letters should be tytd
or printed and they must be
signed and include the writer's
address. Names will be withheld
upon request. Letters may be sent
to Fountainhead or left at the
Information Desk in Mendenhall
Student Center.
dents if it was used fa the
enlargement of Ficklen, and what
other purposes it oould serve.
Several times he was asked to
clarify points-which he did.
Moore did not at any time refuse
to answer a question.
The next I knew - or saw - was
an editorial by Mr. Elliott stating
that the referendum question
should be defeated "if for no
other reason than at the present
time students are not familiar
enough with the University Re-
serve Funds and its uses
I am not yet in favor, nor am I
opposed, to the use of those funds
to make Ficklen larger, but it is
vital that the student who vote
know what they are doing - a job
that Mr. Elliott should have done.
How can you criticize something
on one hand because the students
don't know enough, when you
are the one who can and should
inform them? You can't have your
cake and eat it too.
It seems to me that as of last
Tuesday Mr. Elliott had the
necessary information from
Moore on the use of Reserve
Funds, and by failing to print up
an explanatory article he led me
to believe he would print, has
given a totally negative impres-
sion on the referendum question.
If there were unanswered ques-
tions in Mr. Elliott's mind, they
were there because he didn't ask.
The students are not served
by this deliberate censorship of
information, and I may not get the
objective response I need to vote
for this student body should this
issue come up. Even if the
promised article appears in the
28th paper, it may be too late.
I hope the students take Mr.
Elliott's editorial with a grain - or
a cow-lick of salt, and carefully
consider the referendum question
on Ficklen objectively.
Tim Sullivan
Student Body President
Back your SGA
ToFountainheao:
Time and time again we tend
to show a great deal of anger over
the decisions and programs
initiated by the Student Govern-
ment Association. Now that we
the people have a chance to help
strengthen the system by running
fa student offices, the filing
rosters are empty. We are so
quick to condemn and criticize,
but never do we come out of the
shadows and put our own neck on
the line. Too often we fear the
embarrassment of being wrong,
but to be wrong, only inaeoies
our hunger to be right. Thoun it
is too late to file fa the fall SGA
elections, it is not too late to back
a candidate of one's similar
philosophy. To vote is essential to
change. In essence, we that are
blind to the need fa voting, are
also deaf to the cries fa change.
Respectfully,
Kevin P. McCourt
203 East 5th Street � Greenville, N. C. 27834
WELCOME BACK!
STUDENT APPRECIATION
WEEK
SEPT27-OCT2
10 OFF ALL REGULAR PRICE
ON MERCHANDISE IN THE
STORE WITH STUDENT I.D.
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STUDENT CHARGE ACCOUNTS
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BIGGS DRUG
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300 EVANS
ON THE MALL
PHONE: 752-2136
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DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR
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6.
FOUNTAINHEAD VOL. 52, NO. 528 SEPTEMBER 1976
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New face at Memorial Gym
Assistant intramural director joins staff
By JOHN EVANS
Staff Writer
There is a new face around
Memorial Gym these days. She is
Rose Mary Adkins, the new
Assistant Intramural Director at
East Carolina University.
Ms. Adkins is a graduate of
Southeastern Louisiana Univer-
sity where she received a
bachelor's degree in Health,
Physical Education, Recreation
and Safety. She also earned a
Masters Degree from the Univer-
sity of Southern Mississippi.
Born and raised in Louisiana,
Rose Mary came to East Carolina
for several reasons.
"The job here was a good
opportunity for me to expand my
experience in the field of recre-
ation and since I love outdoor
sports it was a good, central
location tot me said Adkins.
"I had heard nothing but good
things about the school and the
town and I knew the intramural
program here was one of the best
in the southeast and one of the
fastest growing. For that reason it
has a lot of opportunities and
advantages for me
Rose Mary assisted the South-
ern Mississippi women's basket-
ball coach and worked in the
intramural department as a Grad-
uate Assistant.
While at Southeastern she
was a student director of intra-
muralsand played on the volley-
ball team. Se is also an avid lover
of softball, basketball and gym-
nastics. While at SE Louisiana
she helped with public relations
work for the U.S. Olympic
gymnastics team and travelled
with the team to exhibitions.
"I really enjoyed working with
them says Rose Mary, "but I'm
afraid I am not that good myself. I
am a little too tall (5-11) to really
be good. Most of the time my legs
get in the way
But Rose Mary's varied in-
terests and hobbies show she is
well-rounded, both recreational I y
and academically.
For recreation she likes to do
the things an outdoors woman
would. She likes to fish, swim, go
camping, play tennis and go
bicycle riding.
Her other hobbies she de-
scribes are "interests in history
Utilities commission
issues new policy
By BECKY SWART
Staff Writer
The Greenville Utilities Com-
mission has issued a new cus-
tomer policy which can increase
customer deposit as high as $80
for electricity, water and gas
service.
The new policy affects resi-
dential, commercial and in-
dustrial customers.
In a policy forum dated Aug.
1, 1976, the policy is described
as a method designed to prevent
loss to the Commission from non-
payment of utility bills
The new policy requirements
are "based on historical revenue
oss factors affecting the Com-
mission's operations according
o the forum publication.
The Commission's only other
alternative to this required initial
deposit would be an increase in
utility rates, according to Curtis
Howell, business manager.
Prior to Aug. 1, the deposit
policy implied that after twelve
months of residential customer
utility use with "good" pay
history, the commission would
refund the initial deposit at two
percent interest.
The new policy, however,
dictates that for the same period
of "good" customer pay history,
the deposit will be refunded at
five per cent interest.
The deposit will also be
applied to negligent payments
with the balance refunded to the
customer with the five percent
interest still in tact, according to
Howell.
Jfifl�W
201 E. 5th St.
Greenville
The Gazebo is
having a Student i
Appreciation Sale
on slightly
damaged merchan-
dise for one week
only
Also: 10 off any merchandise not
on sale with presentation of this
coupon or ECU I.D. card
�Twi7hi"i ijij"u7i) rWiii
and people. I enjoy life in
general
"I am big-hearted and gulli-
ble says Rose Mary. "I think
everyone is honest and it gets me
in trouble a lot. I enjoy meeting
people and I like to travel.
Greenville is in a good location to
do all the things I enjoy doing
Her duties in the intramural
department deal with the co-
recreational and women's intra-
mural programs, the recreational
swimming program and life-
guards. In addition she teaches
service courses in tennis and
swimming this quarter.
"I am especially interested in
improving the co-rec program
here says Rose Mary. "I like
the relaxed atmosphere of the
program in that a person has a
chance to play without an em-
phasis on winning and the intense
competitiveness of the other
programs. Enjoyment is the main
idea behind the oo-recreational
program.
"The things we can do here
are almost limitless and I look
forward to teaching as well as
learning some more about the
program
As a long-range goal Ms.
Adkins plans to get her Doctorate
and go further in the administra-
tive aspect of recreational ath-
letics.
r
ROSE MARY ADKINS
ftstoui
If you haven't been down
ftt to The Tree House lately,
vfe now is a good time.
The Tree people are onc0
again offering their famous
pizza and salad specials.
Ask your friends about it
instead of asking us
about it.
The Tree House-
An Alternative Restaurant
Here's the casual, well-dressed
look in a three piece suit made
of soft, supple "washed" effect
midwale corduroy. This suit is
highlighted by novel patched
pockets. This is the suit you'll
find easy to live in.
MM
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52. NO. 528 SEPTEMBER 1976
7
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'77 fall semester registration
date changed to August
ByLOUISTAYLOR
Staff Writer
Next Fall semester, ECU
students will register on Aug. 23
and dasses will begin on Aug. 25.
Last year, the ECU Calendar
Committee, established to submit
a semester calendar for 1977-78,
was changed for an early semester
by the ECU Faculty Senate so
final exams could be oompleted
before Christmas.
According to the Committee,
the August starting date was
necessary for the nearly 75 dass
week days before Christmas since
the ECU calendar induded about
150 dass days.
The 1975-76 Calendar Com-
mittee submitted calendars
through academic year 1980-81
for approval. The final proposal
had 1980 ECU students register-
ing on August 19 to begin dasses
on Aug. 21. According to then
Calendar Committee Chairman
Dr. Edgar W. Hooks the Commit-
tee had used Monday as a
starting base causing the date to
move around.
� In an unprecedented move,
SGA President Tim Sullivan
asked to address the April 27,
1976 Faculty Senate meeting
which considered the calendar
proposals. He informed the
Senate that the SGA had passed a
resolution the previous night
which oppose an early date.
Sullivan stressed that many stu-
dents held jobs in agriculture or
resorts which continued into late
August. He said that the local
dimate, coupled with the absence
of dormitory air conditioning,
might not be condudve to good
student performance.
Sullivan then asked that the
Senate consider the students
before voting and that they
postpone the vote to allow for
student input on the matter.
As a result of Sullivan's plea
and support from various Sen-
ators, a motion to accept the
calendars from 1978-79 to 1980-81
as information only waspassed.
North Carolina's Number 3 Rock Nightclub
ATTIC
WED
THUR
FRI
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THIS WEEK AT
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TO SHOW OUR APPRECIATION FOR OUR
MANY STUDENT CUSTOMERS:
ALL $6.98 list LP'S �i
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ALL '7.98 LIST TAPES
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Sport Coats and Suits:
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Now in Stock
Fall Shipment of
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THE TALKING LEAVES
BOOK STORE
WE CARRY A WIDE VARIETY OF BOOKS
AND WILL SPECIAL ORDER ALL TITLES.
108 EAST FIFTH ST.
752-0354
Available in Navy,
Scarlet, & Gray
50 Cotton 50 Acrylic
Good through Oct. 2
Our Student
Appreciation Sale
10 off on all merchandise
in the Athletic Department
only.
(with this coupon and
student I.D. card.)
(except sale merchandise)
H. L. Hodges
210 East 5th St.
Downtown Greenville
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8
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 528 SEPTEMBER 1976
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'Make a Wish' theme chosen
Homecoming activities scheduled
"Make a Wish" is the theme
for ECU's annual Homecoming
Week, scheduled Oct. 27-31.
Returning alumni and their
guests will be offered a variety of
enjoyable diversions, on and
around the campus, including a
parade; field hockey, soccer and
football games; parties; and a
"50's" musical extravaganza fea-
turing Maurice William and the
Zodiacs, the Tarns and the
Clovers.
Early arrivers may attend
either of two games scheduled for
330 Wed Oct. 27, a soccer
match between ECU and UNC-
Wilmington and a field hockey
game between ECU and Old
Dominion University. A concert
by Tom Chapin in the Mendenhall
Student Center Theatre has been
set for Wed. evening at 8 p.m.
Saturday's events include the
annual Homecoming Parade at 10
a.m a soccer match, ECU vs.
William and Mary at 11 a.m and
the featured football game in
which the ECU Pirates meet the
Western Carolina University
Catamounts at 1:30 p.m.
Also on Saturday, alumni and
their guests are invited to attend
an Alumni "Keg" Social from 5-7
p.m. at the Greenville Moose
Lodge. The Monitors will provide
musical entertainment.
Auditions
to begin
By DAVID NASH
Staff Writer
East Carolina Playhouse Fri-
day announced open auditions for
the Shakespeare tragedy,
RICHARD II. The auditions are
scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 30
at 7:00 p.m. in the ECU Studio
Theatre.
RICHARD II is based on the
actual story of King Richard and
how he lost the English crown to
Henry IV.
In choosing the play, Edgar R.
Loessin, director of the play, cited
the many likenesses between
Richard II and ex-President
Richard M. Nixon.
. " I bel ieve Richard faces many
of the same problems that all
leaders must face added Loes-
sin.
"So many times, Richard II is
noted as being a weak king, and I
don't necessarily see him that
way. I want to do the play and
find out what his problems really
are. His complexity interests
me ooncluded Loessin.
According to Loessin, the
show includes a large cast of men
and women in major, minor and
non-speaking roles.
Scripts for RICHARD II are on
reserveat the ECU Joyner Library.
Interested persons are encour-
aged to read the play and, if
possible, prepare a speech a a
scene of approximately three
minutes. Residents from the
oommunity and university are
urged to audition.
The production is slated fa
Dec. 8-11 and 13-16
On Saturday evening, alumni
may choose between two featured
events scneduled to begin at 8
p.m a "50's" musical extrava-
ganza at the Moose Lodge, which
includes buffet dinner, and a jazz
concert featuring Count Basie in

Wright Auditorium.
Alumni touring the campus
are invited to view the current
exhibition in the Kate Lewis
gallery in Whichard Building.
The gallery is open each weekday
from 8-5 p.m. and from 9-12 p.m.
on Saturday.
Additional concerts are plan-
ned for Friday and Sunday
evenings. Ticket information for
persons who wish to attend any or
all Homecoming Events is avail-
able from the ECU Alumni Oi�
SAAD'S
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113 Grande Ave.
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Student Appreciation
WEEK!
SEPT. 27 THROUGH OCT. 2
All ECU & Pitt Tech Students Are in-
vited! Come Celebrate With Us, And Get
Special Discounts And Specially Priced
Merchandise All This Week! We've Got
'em On Everything You Need. Shop The
Participating Business Firms Listed
Below:

1
W,
W
Art & Camera Shop
Belk Tyler
Bigg's Drug Store
Blount Harvey
Book Barn
Brody's
Carolina Office Equipment
Central News & Card Shop
C. Heber Forbes
Coffman's
College Shop
Cox Florist
Cox TV Center
Crego's
DAK's
Electronic Supermarket
Gazebo
Giant Discount
Globe Hardware
Harmony House South
Headstrong
H.L. Hodges & Co.
Jewel Box
Joli's Boutique
Julienne's Card Shop
Larkins & Charlie O's
Larry's Shoe Store
Lautares
Lord's Jewelers
Marie's
Merle Norman Studio
Mushroom
Music Shop
Olde Towne Inn
Riggan Shoe Shop
Robinson's Discount Jewelers
Rock 'n Soul
Saslow's
Shoemasters
Smith Electric
Snooty Fox
Stork's Nest
Talking Leaves Book Store
Taff Office Equipment
Taft Furnit jre Company
University Book Exchange
V.A. Merritt 4 Sons
Whites
'non,
A'
STUDENTIDCARDS REQUIRED
V
Wflbf.
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INC.
Downtown Greenville Association
Post Office Box 333
Greenville, North Carolina 27834
, Inc.
Ride the bus, it's GREAT!
Parking tokens available at participating
downtown merchants.
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 528 SEPTEMBER 1976
I.
9

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'Away With Words'good, but overrated
By JOHN EVANS
Staff Writer
"And God Bless The Beatles
For Being
One doesn't have to be a
Beatles fanatic to appreciate and
agree with this statement from
the presentation "The Beatles: A-
way With Wads" which played
fa two shows at Wright Aud-
itoriurn Wednesday.
But to appreciate fully the
work of Howard Ragland and
Chris Marshall we think you
would have to be a true die-hard
Beatles fan.
To begin with, let's get the
record straight. I am no Beatle
fanatic. I appreciate the four
Liverpoolians fa their contribu-
tions and innovations to the wald
of rock and roll music and I
recognize the affect that they may
have had on society in the sixties
and early seventies, but I must
apologize fa na having been
what in those days was called a
beatlemaniac"
Fa that reasoi, perhaps, I
didn't hang oi every piece of
Beatle film footage oontained in
the multimedia presentation a
swoon at every Beatle song, but
nonetneless I felt the show had its
finer points - as well as its lower
points.
True Beatle fans may rant and
rave at me when I say the show as
at times very dull and unenter-
taining, but at the same time I
must oommend Mr. Marshall and
Mr. Ragland fa their production
and direction job. Likewise, tech-
nician Dennis Debruhl and sound
directa Steve Firestone are to be
uxnmended.
These individuals did a good
job in their choice of film footage
and musical accompaniment to
the selected footage, but the
action and movement of the
Away
was well-done showing the hustle
and bustle of the pre-Beatle era,
the Beatles era and typing them
in the musicians of the time (Elvis
et al) and finally into the Beatles,
the maturing Beatles. And just as
we think the film portion of the
production is showing society's
change along with the Beatles'
change we get the credits and the
title portion.of the film. How
with words
presentation just did not remain
consistent enough.
As so often happens when we
search fa keys to reviewing such
a production, we found ourselves
being caught off guard several
times.
The introduction of the film
annoying that was.
But those responsible fa the
presentation did divide the
themes well, even if they didn't
seem to live up to the billing
given "Away with Wads
Using "Sargeant Pepper's" to
open the maja part of the film,
the sound experience was appro-
priate. The use of "When I'm65"
to show the different changes in
the group's appearance also was
done well.
Other sound-imagery success
was achieved with the segments
put to "Fool On A Hill dealing
with Beatle rumas and if we
figured it right, partly with the
rumored death of McCartney; and
the carryover from "Nowhere
Man" to "Revolution showing
the revolutionary phase of the
wald during the Beatles fama-
tive years. The Beatles them-
selves were revolutionaries of
sat.
Fran there the peace theme
was stressed, with segments set
to "Give Me Love, Give Me
Peace "My Sweet Lad" and
Give Peace A Chance
Other segments showed the
metamaphasis of the Beatles
individually and as a group,
spiritually and physically, and
ultimately with the segment
"HeyJude
I noted the audience reaction
to the shat-haired (by today's
standards) gentleman with
glasses who was dapping along
with the Beatles on the segment.
The aowd laughed, but the man
looked very much like the Beatles
did when they first appeared from
Great Britain. By chance this was
meant to show the change of the
times aeated and experienced by
the Beatles and young society in
the early seventies.
Finally the presentation ends
with "Let It Be" and aocompan-
ing film dips. What else could
have been used?
My reaction to the whole
experience was varied. I wasn't
overly entertained by the show
and I did feel a certain bit of
disappointment towards the final
product and the buildup it
received. But it did stop and mate
you think � and make you
remember. And in the long run I
believe that was the real idea
behind the whole thing
Had the sound reprodudion in
' acoustically-perfect" Wright
Auditorium been better and had I
not had to strain to see ova the
constantly moving parade in front
of me .and strain to hear ova the
constant play-by-play of whispa-
ing voices behind me I might have
enjoyed it mae. Please if you go
towatchashowdosodon't go
to parade a hear yourself talk.
Evaybody will enjoy themselves
betta.
Back to " Awav With Wads
almost no staling success to me.l
guess I'm just nd enough of a
Beatles fanatic to enjoy it as much
as some would, but one can't be
blamed fa that.
Success in such a presentation
deals with the reaction d the
individuals to it: If the Beatle
fanatics loved it and those less
fanatical gd some entertainment,
then the night was a success. At
any rate, it was something
diffaent.
Rich wins comically, musically
By BRENDA NORRIS
Staff Writa
Buddy Rich and his Killa
Face Band entatained an almost
capadty aowd with blues, jazz
and disco in Wright Auditaium
last Thursday night.
Rich quietly appeared on
stage in a long sleeve white
T-shirt and caggies. His band,
consisting d a brass sedion,
pianist, bass and rhythm guitar-
ist, wae blue jeans, and T-shirts
labeled 'Buddy Rich and his
Killa Face Band
The first half d the concert
consisted d dassical jazz with
sdos by the band and long
introdudion by Rich on drums.
Rich's comical genius appear-
ed during the fifteen-minute
break when he acknowledged that
he was in competition with
"something on television He
compared the president debate to
the"Ozzieand Harriet Show
The band opened the second
set with an upbeat vasioi d
"Sophisticated Lady But the
highlight d the show was Rich's
twenty-minute drum sdo at the
end d the theme from "West
Side Story
Rich aeated and mastaed a
rhymical flow on the cymbals
that amazed the audience. He
produced a fullness d sound from
one set d drums that no achestra
could match. Rich played the
drums with such ease, tnai me
sweat from his brow was the only
sign d physical effort.
The concert was put on by the
Special Entertainment committee
d the Student Union.
Teleview
'All's Fair" scores for Lear, CBS
ByPATCOYLE
Trends Edita
With the start d each new TV
season, certain programs are
anticipated as winnas on the
basis of: the track recads d the
produoa, the reputation d the
netwak, the time aid, etc.
"All's Fair a new CBS
comedy had all d those fadas
behind it. First, Naman Lear,
considered by many to be the
pioneer d libaated television
comedy, is the produoer.
Second, CBS has established
itself as the sitcom champion with
such winners as "All in the
Family "Rhoda "Mary Tyla
Moae "Good Times the list
goes on and one.
The third predestining facta
fa "All's Fair" is its time aid. It
airs at 9:30 on Mondays, sand-
wiched between the established
winna, "Maude" and a highly-
touted new soap operadrama.
"Executive Suite
Despite ail d these advant-
ages, it was, we tdd ourselves,
still possible that this comedy,
starring Richard Crenna and
Banadette Petas, would be a
loser. We were wrong.
Inaeating "All's Fair Lear
has taken the talents d Crenna
and Petas, and used the Wash-
ington political scene as a back-
ground.
The plot is simple; 23-year-
dd super-liberal photographa
"Charley" Drake (Petas) meets
49-year dd Richard Barrington
(Crenna), the conservative
columnist to end all conservative
columnists.
Within one half-hour, the two
scream and insult their ways into
each dha's hearts.
Dees it sound a bit much?
Well, thae was a certain incred-
ibility to the speed with which the
story progressed.
We especially questioned the
way the pair literally "fell" in
love in front of Barrington's
society mistress1itaary agent
(who gracefully dropped from the
romantic competition).
But with good writing, excel-
lent ading, and the dha pleas-
ing fadas d "All's Fair we
may be willing to faget this
"chrondogical mystery
All tdd, Crenna and Petas
mate the script sparkle, and
vioB-vasa. Once again, Naman
Lear has opened the dcor to
andha comedic famat, and (to
quote "Charley") "a darned
good one"





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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 528 SEPTEMBER 1976
li W�IffUllg
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MARQUEE
The Sailor Who
Fell From Grace
With the Sea
By DAVID R. BOSNICK
Staff Writer
When the marquee of a movie reads Like the act of love, this movie
must be experienced from beginning to end I have my doubts as to the
depth of emotion to be depicted. (It is faintly reminiscent of "don't tell
your friends how this pictureetc"). This movie is like the act of love,
only in the sense that, when rushed and pretentious, they are both
disappointing. This is the flaw in Lewis Carlino's "The Sailor who Fell
from Grace With the Sea
The novel, by Ykio Misnima, obviously does not translate well into
English. Misnima is a Japanese poet who committee hari-kari in the late
sixties. This novel was his last complete wk, and is associated with the
note he left pinned to his door for all is as air
The director, Lewis John Carlino, never realizes that the focus of the
novel is that there is nothing honest or heroic enough to justify mere
existence. This misinterpretation of the crux of the novel causes the
movie to degenerate into a static "Lord of the Flies with occasional
soft-core porno scenes.
The movie revolves around the actions of a group of five precocious
British boys in a seaside village. Anne Osbome's (Sara Miles) son John,
(John Kahn) is a member. The focus of the group is that all of the adult
world is twisted and evil, yet such is their leader's preoccupation with it
that their meetings are adult imitations. The leader is an unrealistically
precocious cigar smoker (Earl Rhodes) who lectures the group on the
essence of life as he disects his cat to find its "core
John is the fatherless romantic of this little group and is fascinated by
the beauty and "perfect order of the sea It is the fear that Mr.
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmfmmmmmmmm
Cameron (Kris Kristoferson) has ruined that order that leads him to
believe that the chief is right, that Mr. Cameron must be saved from
himself.
John's mother is a thirty year old widow who, among the selling of
her antiques, lives in her memories of her husband. We observe, (with
John, who is agonizing through puberty), her masturbatory fantasy and
are left with the image of a lonely, thoughtful woman.
It is a major incongruity that this private woman suddenly decides to
sleep with Mr. Cameron. Their introductory dinner together is
punctuated with tired lines like;
"I've never spoken like this to anyone and "We're all searching
Mr. Cameron's dream of a grey shark, fin shining as it moves
towards the ship one night is absurd and never explained, yet it leads
Mrs. Osborne to the final (and ridiculous) "Mr. Cameron, would you
please sleep with me tonight?"
The best dramatic moments are during the erotic scene where M iles
expresses with her eyes and lips the needs of a lonely widow. Generally,
however, she is guilty of overacting, perhaps attempting to compensate
for Kristoferson who looks like a macho schnauzer, but doesn't act
nearly as well.
The movie is a flaccid interpretation of Misnima's belief that there is
nothing to believe in. It'sastarvehide with occasional erotica. I give it
a star and a 12 on the basis of Miles' occasional adequacy and an
excellent soundtrack. It is now playing through Thursday at the Plaza
Cinema One.
(Many thanks to the Plaza Cinema.)
m
Also showing
BILLY JACK - Best noted for its
theme song One Tin Soldier a
cult videnoe film in which Tom
Laughlin parlayed a hat and
mediocre karate skills into a
career. It's a melodramatic pre-
sentation of "a man's gotta do
what a man's gotta do a;
"Bruee Lee Meets the Red-
necks
Playing through Thursday at
the Pitt Theater.
CANNONBALL - David Carradine
as a Richard Speck on wheels.
They should have saved the gas.
Playing through Thursday at
the Plaza Two Theater.
BREAKING POINT - Unavailable
for review at this printing.
Now playing at the Park
Theater.
TRENDS
needs
feature writers
Meetings
Tuesdays,
4:00

Wednesday Night
8:00 P
Wright Auditorium
Thursday Night
8:00 P.M.
Wright Auditorium
Free Admission Sponsored by: Christian Activists ECU
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 5128 SEPTEMBER 1976
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Pirates squeak by Indians, 20-19
By STEVE WHEELER
Sports Editor
Many times when a football
game has just been won or lost,
the coaches say it was the kicking
game that made the difference.
That was the case Saturday as
East Carolina pulled out a
squeaker over William and Mary,
20-19, on the Indians' home turf,
Cary Field.
A missed extra point by Steve
Libassi spelled the difference as
Pete Conaty kicked a field goal
with just 322 left in the contest to
give the Pirates their initial
oonferenoe victory of the season.
ECU is 3-0 overall, while the
Indians fell to 1-1 in the Southern
and 2-1 in all games.
"Our kicking game definitely
won the game for us stated
head coach Pat Dye following the
contest. "I'm tremendously
proud of our kids for their kicking
game. We had a blocked punt and
Conaty had those two field goals.
You know, he's 7-7 (on field
goals) fa the season
Even after the field goal by
Conaty, it took a big defensive
play to salter the game into the
win column. After the kickoff,
William and Mary picked up a
couple of first downs and moved
to their 45 yard line. On first
down, quarterback Tom Rozantz
went back to pass. His throw to
the left side was intercepted by
cornerback Ernest Madison to
give the Pirates the ball back with
just ever a minute left in the
game. ECU then ran the clock out
fa the win.
To get the deciding points, the
Pirates drove the ball down the
field much like they did against
State the previous week. Quarter-
back Mike Weava moved the
team up the field with authaity,
much as he did against the
Wolfpack, to pick up the winning
field goal. Starting at their 32
yard line, the Pirates took 11
plays to get in position for
Conaty's three-pointer.
The big play in the drive was
Weaver's keeper on third-and-
eight at the ECU 49. The play
netted ten yards and kept the
drive going. Finally, on fourth-
and-four at the Indian 19 Conaty
came on to hit seventh field goal
of the season and provide the
Pirates with the margin of victay.
"I've ga to be proud of our
kids fa oaning back and showing
class to win it said Dye. "But,
I've got to believe our kids were
unemotional and na very en-
thusiastic. We are not good
enough to play without emaion
and enthusiasm.
"Just maybe the best team
and best prepared team didn't
win today Dye added. "Coach
(Jim) Root did a super job, had a
good game play and his team was
ready to play today. He and his
players did not get what they
deserved today. They played hard
Bill Keyes
AH really a champ?
How can athletes who participate in team spats be scaned fa
demanding high salaries when Mohammed Ali makes millions fa what
he does? Tonight Ali fights Ken Natoi at Yankee Stadium with $6
millioi guaranteed him.
Professional spats teams rake in loads of money from their high gate
receipts, radio and TV contracts, and food and souvenir sales. Loads of
money! So, I figure, why should the owners be the ones who pocket so
much when it is the players who the fans come to the stadiums a turn ai
their TV sets to watch. Put the money in the pockets of the people who
are earning it.
Also, we must admit that when we go to a professional football game
- even if it's the Kansas City Chiefs versus the New Orleans Saints- we
are usually gonna see a good ball game. We're entatained, anyway.
Is that always true of a Mohammed Ali fight? There is so much
hoopla which psyches people into expecting a great spectacle. (Pay
Howard Cosell a million.) But if we're aitical, we realize that if Ali is in
the ring fa fifteen rounds, he might actually fight fa three a four. I can
understand why boxing people would consider the rope-a-dope good
strategy, just as I can understand why basketball coaches use the stall,
but it baes me to death. And I just don't think five minutes of real
boxing is wath the millions Ali collects. Enough said about the financial
end.
Then there is the matter of the man's offensive personality. Many of
the athletes whom I admire and respect are really outrageous characters. I
can even identify with their arroganoe, their audacity, their braggadocio.
But Ali's verbosity is too much. I find it distasteful fa him to exclaim
on national television, "I'm bigger than boxing And I feel it is
intolerable fa him to declare himself out of the reach of boxing's
governing bodies' jurisdiction.
Quite possibly, Ali will beat Ken Natoi to a pulp at Yankee Stadium
and oonvinoe you that he really is bigger than boxing. But this
prejudiced writer would be mae than happy to see it the other way
around.
and deserved to win. And I think
that quarterback they have
(Rozantz) is the best we've seen
in three years and the best
prepared
Fullback Raymond Jones had
an outstanding game fa the
Pirates. The senia rushed 22
times fa 109 yards, most coming
right up the middle with second
effat to break tackles.
Raymond Jones is one hell of
a playa praised Dye. "He
probably won the game fa us
today, along with the kicking
game
The Pirates started the game
as if they were going to run the
Indians out of their own stadium.
William and Mary took the kickoff
and started from the 20. Afta
three plays gained nahing on the
Pirate defense, punter Joe Agee
had trouble handling the pass
from osnter and got off only a 21
yard kick, giving ECU excellent
field position at the Indian 41 yard
line.
East Carolina took nine run-
ning plays to go the distance as
Jones bulled over from the one.
Conaty's point after put the
Pirates up 7-0 just six minutes
into the game.
But, William and Mary came
right back. Starting from their 17
after the kickoff, the Indians
drove down to the ECU five
befae a fourth down pass fell
incomplete.
The Pirates could do nahing
and punted to the Indians at their
48. William and Mary,took just
seven plays to scae, mixing their
running and passing game per-
fectly, with Rozantz passing to
tight end Ken Cloud fa the
touchdown from 13 yards out.
Steve Libassi added the extra
point to tie the game.
After stopping the Pirates
following the kickoff, the Indians
drove to the 50 befae the Pirates
faced them to punt. ECU put on
a tremendous rush and Zack
Valentine blocked the punt back
up the field. Defensive end Fred
Chavis, substituting fa injured
Cary Godette, fell on the fumble
at the William and Mary 11 yard
line.
In three plays, the Pirates
scaed en Jaies' one yard plunge
and East Carolina went up 14-7
after Conaty's conversion.
The Indians stayed tough as
they took the kickoff and drove 62
yards to paydirt behind the arm of
Rozantz. The touchdown came on
a 14 yard pass from Rozantz to
Ken Cloud. The ball was tipped
by ECU'S Jim Bdding befae
Cloud caught it. Libassi's extra
point attempt was wide and the
Pirates took a 14-13 lead into the
locker room at halftime.
The Pirates took the second
half kickoff, but Mike Weava
fumbled on the second play and
the Indians took ova on Rolfe
Carawan's reoovay at the ECU
34 yard line. William and Mary
picked up one first down but
faced a fourth-and-five at the
ECU 18. They then called on
HAROLD RANDOLPH led the Pirates' defense against William and
Mary with 16 tackles and 11 assists.
Libassi fa a 35 yard field goal
attempt. The little sidewinda put
the ball through the goal posts to
give the Indians their first lead at
16-14.
But, East Carolina was na to
be without the lead fa long. They
took ova afta the kickoff at their
28 and on the first play Weava
hit setback Eddie Hicks with an
aerial along the sidelines and
Hicks turned it into a 29 yard
gain. Afta picking up three mae
first downs on the running of
Jim Kruis led the Indians with
57 yards in 16 carries, while
Rozantz completed 16 of 28 fa
179 yards. His leading receiva
was split end Tom Butla, who
had eight receptions fa 95 yards.
Defensively, the Pirates were
led by Harold Randdph with 16
primary tackles, 11 assists, and
one quarterback sack. Zack
Valentine had six tackles and five
assists, while Fred Chavis had
eight tackles and three assists.
The Pirates will be at home

ECUW&M
First Downs1422
Rushes-Yards56-21645-154
Passing Yards62179
Return Yards1351
Passes A-C-l6-4-028-16-2
Fumbles-Lost1-12-0
Punts-A vg.5-335-30
Penalties-Yards11-1144-36

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Jones up the middle, the drive
stalled and Conaty hit a 36 yard
field goal to give the Pirates the
lead onos again, 17-16.
Early in the fourth quarta the
Indians ga the ball on their 17
yard line and Rozantz drove them
down to the ECU 29 befae the
drive stalled. Libassi came on to
boot a 47 yard field goal to give
the Indians the lead with just ova
eight minutes left in the game.
That is when Weava drove
the Pirates down the field fa the
winning field goal.
Behind Jones' 109 yards rush-
ing, Willie Hawkins came in with
65 in ten carries. Eddie Hicks
caught two passes fa 48 yards
while Hawkins pulled in two fa
14. Weava completed four of six
fa 62 yards.
m
this week against the Bulldogs of
The Citadel. The Citadel defeated
Furman, 17-16, to give them a 2-1
ovaall mark while inflicting the
first loss of the year on the
Paladins.
SCORING SUMMARY:
East Carolina 7 7 3 3-20
William and Mary 0 13 3 3-19
ECU-Jones 1 run Conaty kick)
W&M-Cloud 13 pass from
Rozantz Libassi kick
ECU-Jones 1 run Conaty kick
W&MCloud 14 pass from
Rozantz Libassi kick
W&MLibassi35FG
ECU-Conaty 36 FQ
W&M-Ubassi 47 FG
ECU-Conaty 36 FQ
Attendance)13,500
fciifun

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FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 528 SEPTEMBER 1976
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Intramurals
by John Evans
Touch Football began last week in both men's and women's
competition. In the women's play forfeits dedded all but five games as
Tyler III and Tyler I are tied for the lead with 2-0 records in the Pass
division. In the Punt division the Fleming Flames and Tyler II are both
unbeaten after two games. Other unbeaten women's teams are the Big
Subs and the Garrett GoGetters. Both teams stand 1-0.
Men's play began with a bang and the Scott Time-Outs created the
biggest explosion of all. The Time-Outs set an intramural record with a
68-0 rout over the High Flyers. Kevin Thomas scored three touchdowns
in the win. The Time-Outs finished the week at 2-0 and have been ranked
as the Number One team in the intramural Department's rankings. The
Pack opened defense of its title with a 12-0 win over Last Chance and
hold the number three rating. Phi Epsilon Kappa, by virtue of a 17-16
overtime vidory over the Rugby Ruggers stands number two. Both the
Pack and PEK's finished the week 2-0.
In fraternity action the Kappa Alpha (A) team took a big win over
Kappa Sigma, 12-6, and Pi Kappa Phi swamped Delta Sigma Phi, 35-0 to
start off with 2-0 records after the first week of play. Tau Kappa Epsilon
also went 2-0, inlcuding a 30-0 win over the Kappa Sigma Cheap Thrills.
TENNIS SINGLES BEGIN THIS WEEK
Women's tennis singles begin today with first-round matches to be
completed by September 30 at 5 p.m.
Team tennis began last week in the men's division and co-rec mixed
doubles registration will begin Oct. 4. Registration fa mixed doubles
will end Sept. 30. Racquetball mixed doubles and men's singles and
doubles all begin scon. The men's racquetball competition begins today
and the mixed doubles will begin Oct. 4. Registration doses Sept. 30.
TRACK AND FIELD MEET WEDNESDA Y
The intramural Track and Field meet will take place on Thursday. Fa
a schedule of events and their times drop by the Intramural office in 204
MemaiaJ a pick up a copy of the Intramural Update around campus.
Men and women will compete in separate events, but will compete at
the same time.
Last year'smeet was held in the spring, but the change was made to
the fail this year fa betta partidpatiai. No football games will be held
on Wednesday.
Awards will be given to the winning team and winning partidpants in
each event.
ONE-ON-ONE BASKETBALL BEGINS
One-orvOne basketball begins Tuesday in two dassifications. There
will be competition in the 6-1 and ova and the unda 6-1 categaies.
Scheduled matches are posted outside the intramural office in MemaiaJ
Gym.
REGISTRA TION FOR WA TER BASKETBALL
Registration fa Innertube Water Basketball will begin at Oct. 1 and
runs through Oct. 7, Ray will begin on Oct. 11. Each team must have
three men and three women on the roster to play.
Intramural department
to fund club sports
OFFICIA LS CLINIC OCT. 4
Any student interested in being a volleyball official must attert (he
volleyball offidaJs' dinic in MemaiaJ Gym oi Oct. 4 at 730 p.m. All
off idal s are paid fa their wak. To officiate one must attend the of f idai s
dinic
OTHERANNOUNCEMENTS
The ECU Volleyball dub will hold an aganizatiotai meeting on
Thursday, Sept. 30 at 730 p.m. The meeting will be held in Room 106
MemaiaJ Gym.
The ECU Ski Club will hold weekly meetings on Tuesday and
Thursdays this year, dub president Wade Hobgood has announced. The
first meeting will ba held this aftanoon, Sept. 28 in Room 106 MemaiaJ
Gym. All meetings will last from 430 p.m. to 530 p.m.
The ECU Rugby and Football dubs opened their seasons this past
weekend. Results will be given when we receive them.
By JOHN EVANS
Staff Writer
The administrative responsi-
bility fa all dub spats has been
taken over this year by the ECU
Intramural department, accord-
ing to Intramural Directa Wayne
Edwards.
Along with the administrative
responsibility fa all dub sports,
Dr. Edwards said the intramural
department will provide limited
funding fa six dub spats in
1976-77.
The six dubs to be funded will
be football, karate, rugby, weight
training, volleyball and skiing.
"These are the only dubs wve
can help to fund this year said
Edwards. "In the future we hope
to help other dubs, but fa
budgetary reasons it is impossible
fa us to fund any other sports
this year.
"We will accept new dubs
during the year, though, if they
meet the criteria. No dub we
approve this year after Sept. 1
will be funded until next year
(1977-78). The six dubs we are
funding now were chosen because
they were the only ones that had
constitutions approved by the
SGA and who submitted requests
to us to be funded
The funding of the six dub
sports is based on the need of
each dub according to the nature
of travel, activity and basic needs.
"The funding won't be ex-
tensive said Edwards. "Each
club will be responsible fa
supporting their program by
raising money through dues a
admission. We are just giving
them a little extra to help them
out. Fa instance if we were to
completely fund the dub football
program it would take $30,000
and we don't have the money
available to do that.
"We should be able to help
fund the clubs through the
student intramural fees. This
should benefit the dubs greatly
and thaefae the student body,
by allowing more dubs to be
established. It won't raise intra-
mural feea
"In addition we will be able to
schedule facilities, trainer's
coverage and assistance through
our department. We can also help
them purchase equipment be-
cause we can get it at reduced
rates
Dr. Edwards said that along
with the funding of the dubs, the
intramural department will also
administrate the dubs and ap-
prove their schedules and mem-
bership.
"Every member of the dub
must sign a waiver of risk fam in
case of injury said Edwards.
"In addition, every member has
to show evidence of a physical
examination in the last 12 months
and have a hospitalization in-
surance policy
In addition, Edwards said only
ECU students can be membas of
the dubs. A Club Sports Coundl
will preside over the administra-
tion of the dub spats.
The coundl will be made up of
each dub's President, a repre-
sentative of the SGA as appointed
by the SGA President, Rose Mary
Adkins, assistant intramural di-
reda, and Dr. Edwards.
"Thiscoundl will be in charge
of policy-making fa the dubs.
We will have mandatay meetings
every month and if the presidents
do not attend then the funds fa
the dub will be frozen said
Edwards.
The dub sponsaing by the
intramural department is a new
experiment this year and one Dr.
Edwards thinks will be fa the
best. It will help to insure more
aganization fa the dubs, as well
as better the oppatunity fa
scheduling and partidpatiai.
Lwtft
For
Student Appreciation Week
15 Off All Shoes And
Accessories
Downtown Greenville on the Mail-
across from WOOW Mon-Sat 9:30-6:00
Friday Nite- Open till 9:00pm
WE APPRECIATE YOU!

flP
GOOD
I MINGS
(OH
GfNIII PFOHI
�m mm
10 OFF
EVERYTHING IN THE
STORE WITH STUDENT
"� 318 EVANS ST.
MON-FRI 11AM - 9PM SAT 11AM - 6PM
ARTISTS AND WRITERS
The East Carolina University Literary and Art Magazine
is now accepting submissions. The magazine is
interested in poetry, prose fiction, plays, and all genres
of the visual arts. Submissions can be turned in at the
Rebel office in the publications center (old east cafeteria)
across from Joyner library. All works accepted for
publication will be financially supplimented.
All submissions will automatically be entered in the
Annual Attic Art and Literary Awards contest.
This contest is made possible by a donation from
the Attic.
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COUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 528 SEPTEMBER 1976
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Women's golf outlook good
By STEVE WHEELER
Sports Editor
With one returning player off
last year's team, women's golf
ooach Mac McLendon is most
encouraged of the squad's chan-
ces for the upcoming season. The
lady golfers open their season
today in the Blue Ridge Ladies
Golf Tournament in Boone.
McLendon has the right to be
happy with the team, for the
player coming back is the defend-
ing state collegiate individual
champion, Marsha Person. She
also has a supporting cast that
will be fighting hard for the state
team title.
"I am very encouraged at this
point McLendon said. "Last
year, ECU had the individual
state champ (Person), but had
just two playet 5 on the team, and
therefore, was not elgible for the
team title. We should have a good
shot at the team championship
this year, but we lack exper-
ience
Other than Person, McLendon
has Heather Jones, Jill Carney,
Lynn Copeland, Morri Chambliss,
and Dawn Williamson on the
team. None have college exper-
ience, but McLendon is high on
quite a few of them.
Jones was the runner-up in
the state high school champion-
ships last year, and was a
"pleasant surprise" to McLen-
don. A native of Raleigh, Jones
has a "solid all-around game"
and has been right with Person in
practice on the Brook Valley
layout.
"Heather will get better with
experience McLendon added.
She has a great attitude and has
the potential to be a class golfer
Another top golfer will be Jill
Carney. A freshman from Green-
ville, Carney is a "long hitter,
hits it a ton Carney is the
defending Brook Valley ladies
champion.
"Jill hits it real good off the
tee, around 225 yards or more
stated McLendon. "And she is
real good around the green, but
she tends to be a little inconsis-
tent. She is a middle 80 player
now, but with a little work she can
shoot consistently in the high
70's
Lynn Copeland is a junior
from Ahoskie, N.C. and has
shown a good hitting stroke in
practice.
"Lynn is a mid 80 shooter and
is a real competitor McLendon
stated. "She has played for five
years but has not played in
competition
Morri Chambliss is a mid 90
shooter from Aberdeen, Ohio.
She has had a little trouble
putting and with her swing play,
but she is "ooming around real
fast
Morri has real good poten-
tial McLendon said. "She has
real good determination and I'm
sure she'll oome around and help
us
Dawn Williamson, a senior
from forfolk, Va. rounds out the
team. She has been shooting in
the 80's at the Brook Valley
oourse. Although McLendon has
not seen Williamson play, he said
her score cards look real good
Williamson is also the chief
cheerleader this season.
McLendon thinks with a little
experience the team can be real
good.
"We have just two players
that have played competitively in
their lives. But the others look
real good. We have excellent
potential, but pressure is the key.
Once you have the skill, the
pressure can still beat you. After
we get some experience, I think
we'll be alright
With just six players, depth
can be a problem. Coach McLen-
don said tryouts would be held if
anyone else wanted to go out for
the team. Anyone interested in
playing should call 757-6408.
Coach McLendon would also
like to thank Mr. and Mrs. Harold
Thomas at Brook Valley Country
Club fa the use of the oourse for
practice.
Sept. 26 Oct. 1 Oct. 8 Oct. 14 Oct. 27 Nov. 4SCHEDULE t Blue Ridge Ladies Golf Tournament at Boone Mary Baldwin Golf Tournament at Staunton, Va. Duke, ASU at Durham at UNC-CH 1:30 NCAIA W Golf Championship at Chapel Hill Duke Better Ball Invitational
Our way of showing our appreciation
for your business:
10 OFF ON ALL
FALL MERCHANDISE
Booters lose pair
ECU's soocer team journeyed
up to Norfolk, Va. last weekend to
oompete in the Old Dominion
Tournament, but came back with
two losses and finished fourth in
the tourney.
In the opener, the Pirates fell
to Old Diminion, 4-0. The Monar-
chs scored three quick goals in
the first half, but ooach Curtis
Frye changed goalies in the
second half, favoring freshman
Hal Bullock over Waye Burrow.
Bullock allowed just one goal
in the second half.
The Monarchs had 18 shots
on goal to 16 for the Pirates.
In the consolation match,
Women's tennis wins
over Atlantic-Christian
ByKURTHICKMAN
Staff Writer
East Carolina's women's ten-
nis team rebounded from a 6-3
loss to St. Mary's in Raleigh last
Tuesday by defeating Atlantic
Christian here Friday, 7-2.
ECU coach Ellen Warren was
encouraged over the play of her
squad this past week.
"Against St. Mary's we made
a strong comeback by sweeping
the doubles matches said War-
ren. "They have to play us here
later in the season and I know we
will be ready. I'm pleased with
the way the team came back and
beat Atlantic Christian
The Lady Pirates won five of
six in the singles matches against
Atlantic Christian as Cathy Port-
wood, Leigh Jefferson, Susan
Helmer, Marie Stewart, and
Vicky Loose were victorious.
mmmmmmmmmm
AmericanUniversity defeated the
Pirates 6-3 in overtime. Burrow
started the game and America led
at halftime by 3-1. Frye inserted
Bullock in as goalie in the second
half and the Pirates caught up as
Bullock held the AU team score-
less. But, the overtime period,
AU was in much better condition
and scored three goals.
"I was proud of the way the
guys played this weekend Frye
said. "They really rallied behind
Bullock, since he had never
played goalie in his life. We really
played well. We were in a
tournament with four of the better
teams in the east
The losses dropped the Pirat-
es to 0-5 for the season. Old
Diminion is 3-1, losing only to
strong Maryland, while Princeton
is 3-1 and American 3-2.
'efclyfer
STUDENT
APPRECIATION
WEEK
SEPTEMBER 27 THRU OCTOBER 2
10�
O OFF
REGULAR PRICED MERCHANDICE
JUST SHOW E.C.U. I.D. CARD
Port wood bested Phyllis
Parish, 6-1, 6-3, Jefferson defeat-
ed Cora Hawkins, 6-3, 6-2,
Helmer beat Camilla Kromer,
6-2, 6-2, Stewart took Patti
Denkins, 6-0, 6-1, and Loose
defeated Vickie Alexander, 6-0,
&0.
ECU'S Dorcas Sunkel was
beaten by Joan Adams, 6-1, 6-2.
In the doubles competition
ECU took two out of three
matches as Portwood and Sunkel
beat Adams and Parish, 6-2, 7-6,
and Sarah Casey and Qinny
Gainey defeated Mary Atkins and
Debbie Former, 6-2, 6-1.
The other doubles match saw
Atlantic Christian's Hawkins and
Kromer beat Patty Collins and
Karen Clark, 6-7, 6-1, 6-3.
This past week's competition
leaves ECU with a 1-1 record on
the season. Their next match Is
today as they again travel to
Raleigh and take on N.C. State.
The TREE people care what
you put into your tummy.
We make your food just like
we make it for ourselves.
But don't take our word for
it, ask your Mends
The TREE HOUSE Restaurant
Corner of 5th and Cotanche



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14
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 528 SEPTEMBER 1976
� I III i �mi
MM
ECU-UNC
game
sellout
About 100 a so die-hard ECU students braved the rain Sunday night
to get their tickets fa the Carolina game to be held on Oct. 23, making
the game a complete sellout.
The tickets went in about two hours on Monday maning.
There has been talk at campus that Carolina gave us less tickets this
year than last. Not so. According to the Business Manager fa Athletics,
Earlene Leggett, UNC sent ECU the same amount of tickets this year as
last. "But, last year, we had to send some back. We didn't sell them all.
This year we needed mae but so did they. They've got a winner this
year too
The allocation of tickets fa the Carolina game were on the same
percentage as fa the State game. This means that the same percentage
were allowed fa students and general public as fa the State game.
There ended up being a few mae tickets than Initially expected as
Athletic Directa Bill Cain visited Chapel Hill oi Thursday and came
back with about 500 mae.
The Pirates Club had the same problem, na enough tickets.
Acoading to Gus Andrews, executive directa, the Pirates Club
aiginally received 5,000 tickets, but had to go back fa sane mae.
On the second try, they received 600 mae.
"We have sane good contributas that cannot see this game
Andrews said.
This will be band day for Carolina and there will be tempaary
seating put in fa the bands to sit in.
"This is a good thing in the reasoning that there is so much interest
in our program by students, alumni, and the general public Leggett
said. "But it's a shame fa the people who want to see it not being able
to
A paper in Richmond calls the contest "the game of the year in Nath
Carolina
There is a distinct possibility that the game will be on regional
television. That Saturday is held open by ABC fa regiaial broadcasting
and this game should be one of the top games in the South fa that day.
There is oie thing fa sure, there has never been this kind of
reaction to any spating event at ECU.
SR-56
The super slide rule
programmable powerhouse
with 10 memories and 100 program steps.
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95
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The SR-56 is a tremen-
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calculator. Yet you can pro-
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ready.
T h e r e a re 74 prep r o -
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Standard deviation. De-
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it works with TI's new
printer-thePC-100.
Chances are, you'll be pro-
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gramming. That's what pro-
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doing-right now. And with
an SR-5() you're ready. It
has 100-merged prefix pro-
gram steps. (5 logical deci-
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subroutines. You can decre-
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iterate a loop as many times
as you specify. There are 4
levels of subroutine to let
you use your program steps
to maximum advantage.
And, you can even compare
a test register with the dis-
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branch. So you can check an
intermediate result
for convergence, or a
maximum.
The edge you need. Now. And in your career.
Texas Instruments will rebate $10.00 of your original
SR-56 purchase price when you return this coupon
and your SR-56 customer information card post-
marked no later than October 31,1976. To apply:
1. Fill out this coupon
2. Fill out special serialized customer information city
card inside SR-56 box
3. Return completed coupon and information card to:
Special Campus Offer
P.O. Box 1210
Richardson, Texas 75080
Name
Address
State
Zip
University
Name of SR-56 Retailer
SR-56
Serial No (from back of calculator)
Please allow 30 days for rebate
' Suggested retai price
f 11 with the T register
() 1976 Texas Instruments Incorporated
Texas Instruments
INCORPORATED
65538
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1
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 528 SEPTEMBER 1976
15
inm�n
�WKI�P
mmmmm
Women's field hockey splits
in UNC-G tournament
ECU's women's field hookey
team opened their season with
excellent performances in the
UNC-G Sportsday Invitational last
Saturday in Greensboro.
The Lady Pirates lost a tough
match in the morning to the
Washington (D.C.) Club, 2-1, but
came in the afternoon to dominate
Catawba, 3-0.
Against the Club, the Pirates
faced a team which has three
former and two current members
of the U.S. National squad.
Neither team scored in the first
half as the defenses dominated.
In the second half the Club
picked up one goal on a good
play, but the Lady Pirates came
back to tie the game at 1-1. But,
the Club came back to score the
winner late in the match. Cathy
Zwigard scored the Pirates' goal.
The two teams were evenly
matched all the way. Washington
had 11 shots on goal as opposed
to nine for the Bucs, but the Lady
Pirates had the ball in their
offensive end of the field for
about two-thirds of the match.
Coach Laurie Arrants was a bit
concerned about this.
"We played a super team
game, but we did not get the best
of our breaks. We had the ball an
awful long time to score no more
than one goal. But their (Wash-
ington's) defense was super
In the afternoon oontest, the
Lady Pirates manhandled the
Catawba girls. The Pirates had 13
shots on goal to just two fa
Catawba.
Cathy Zwigard picked up two
goals for the Pirates, while Linda
Christian added another. Arrants
was pleased with Zwigard's play.
"Cathy is the kind of fresh-
man you like to see. She's very
aggressive and really plays the
�rvne hard.
"The whole team played real
well Arrantsadded. "I justcan't
say enough about them
The Lady Pirates will be in
action again Saturday when they
travel to an Invitational at Duke.
They will face the Durham Club in
the opener and High Point
Colleqe in the afternoon.
CLASSIFIEDS
Fountainhead
needs
sports writers
call 757-6366
HELP WANTED: Male short-
order cook, must be 18 years old,
and available to work some
weekends, apply in person. Sam
& Dave's Snack Bar. (located in
Darwin Water's Service Station.)
FOR SALE: 1 blue rug, ,12x12
$10. Call 752-4013.
WANTED: Keyboard player for
weekend band, top 40 and
pop-oountry. Bookings through
Jan. Days call 758-3378, nights
call 752-6566.
FOR RENT: Room in attractive
Greenville suburb to young lady.
Full house privileges. $79 mo.
Call 756-0698 or write P.O. Box
6065.
FOR SALE: Mustang-loaded with
value. Power steering and power
disc brakes, factory air, radio,
automatic floor shift, mint con-
dition. Owner will accept best
offer. Phone days 757-6961 or
after 6 p.m. 756-6552.
FOR SALE: 2.5 cu. ft. refrigerator
$50. 4.5 cu. ft. refrigerator $120
Call 758-7098.
FOR SALE: B.I.C. 960 turntable.
1 year warranty left. 752-0734.
LOST: Dog, Black Scottish Terrior
answers to name of Scottie. Black
all over. If found call 758-4922.
FOR SALE: 1970 Honda CL-175,
very good condition; asking $300,
Includes two helmets. Call
758-9322.
HELP WANTED: Washington
Yacht & Country Club, we need
waiters or waitresses, come for
interview Wed Fri Sat after
4.
FOR SALE: Realistic stereo com-
ponent. Best offer Call Jack
752-7596.
PIANO AND GUITAR lessons.
Daily and evenings. Richard J.
Knapp, B.A. 756-3908.
NEEDED: Female roommate to
share 3-bedroom trailer. Rent $60
plus utilites. Call 758-9577 after
3.
COME SAVE WITH
GIANT
DISCOUNT
HEALTH &
BEAUTY AIDS
429 EVANS MALL
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
STUDENT APPRECIATION WEEK
10 DISCOUNT ON ALL
PURCHASES TO ECU STUDENTS
WHO PRESENT THEIR I.D. CARDS
DURING THIS WEEK
bcif oni
TIRED OF BREAD & LETTUCE SANDWICHES?
coMETObaroni's
AND GET MEAT ON YOUR BUNS
Open Everyday 11 - till 752-8351
free delivery: campus, fraternity, 8- downtown area
DOWNTOUM
PITT PLm&
4&PK0� THIS WEEK IS:
STUDENT APPRECIATION WEEK
AT
BRODY'S
CELEBRATE THIS WEEK WITH:
- JEANS 25 OFF: SELECTED STYLES OF MALE,
FADED GLORY AND OTHER JEANS 8-
JEAN SKIRTS 25 OFF.
- TOPS ft SWEATERS 25 OFF: SELECTED
STYLES OF FALL TOPS ft SWEATERS NOW
25 OFF.
- ASSORTED SPORTSWEAR 25 OFFI
� CHECK BOTH STORES FOR EXTRA SPECIAL
SALE ITEMS, NOT LISTEDI
m
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mm
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K





te
OUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 528 SEPTEMBER 1976
FALL
WAREHOUSE SALE!
WE NEED ROOM TUES w2 sat. 10276
NEW EQUIPMENT!
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Title
Fountainhead, September 28, 1976
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 28, 1976
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.411
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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