Fountainhead, September 23, 1976






THIS ISSUE -
16 PA GES
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
Fountainhead
CIRCULA TION -
8,500
VOL. 52, NO. 4
23 SEPTEMBER 1976
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Professor to head
campus fund drive
Dr. Clinton R. Prewett, ECU
Psychology Professor, has been
named campus chairman for the
$2.5 million Ficklen Stadium
Expansion Campaign.
The announcement was made
today by Dr. Ray Minges, sta-
dium expansion chairman for
Greenville and Pitt County.
"We are very fortunate to
have Dr. Prewett assisting us in
this drive said Minges.
"He is highly admired by the
faculty, staff and students at ECU
and he understands the impact a
larger stadium will have on the
University and the Eastern North
Carolina area he said.
A member of the ECU faculty
since 1951, Prewett has served as
dean of students from 1952-57
and was chairman of the depart-
ment of psychology from 1957-73.
He holds degrees from the
University of Georgia, Oklahoma
University and the University of
North Carolina.
Prewett said he was accepting
the chairmanship for the ECU
campus because the need for a
larger stadium is a legitimate
concern.
"A larger stadium is neces-
sary if we are to schedule our
major opponents in Greenville
he said.
"A larger stadium is neces-
sary if we are to schedule our
major opponents in Greenville
he said.
"A very heavy case could be
made to the point that our athletic
facilities now lay behind our other
facilities. Anyone who has seen
football games at our major
opponents' home fields probably
would agree
The campaign to expand the
stadium from 18,000 to 35,000
seats began' earlier this month
and is expected to be concluded
by the end of the year.
Construction is slated to begin
early next year and be completed
in time for the 1977 season.
Heading the fundraising cam-
paign is Robert L. "Roddy"
Jones of Raleigh with Chancellor
Leo Jenkins serving as vice-chair-
man. Tom Willis of Greenville is
directing the drive.
DR. CLINTON R. PREWETT WAS named head campus fund
raiser for Ficklen expansion.
Kilpatrick keeps
hectic schedule
By DENNIS LEONARD
Advertising Manager
James J. Kilpatrick, noted
WASHINGTON STAR syndicated
columnist, spoke here Tuesday at
two informal classroom lectures
and formally to a capacity audi-
ence at Mendenhall Student
Center.
Kilpatrick, most noted fa his
"Point-Counterpoint" segment
of the CBS program "60
Minutes" began his day long
lecture series by addressing a
Journalism class and an overflow-
ing political science class.
Kilpatrick began his lecture
Tuesday evening by stating, "I
am pleased to be in this vail of
humility between two mountains
of conceit
Kilpatrick then went directly to
his prepared speech by giving a
brief sketch of Jimmy Carter
two years ago when he first
addressed the National Press
Club in Washington announcing
his candidacy.
"Carter's first offense was to
be unknown in Washington, and
his second offense was not having
our permission to run fa the
KILPATRICK SPOKE to
by Dennis Leonard
ouse in Mendenhall Theater. Photo
presidency said Kilpatrick.
Kilpatrick then gave a three-
plank reason why he feels Jimmy
Carter has been so successful
during the two-year span he has
been campaigning fa the presi-
dency.
"The first reason for his
success is the nature of the man,
the second is the nature of the
opposition, and the third is the
nature of the oppatunity.
"Jimmy Carter has an ambi-
tion, a hunger, and a desire fa
the presidency that I have never
witnessed during my 35-year
journalistic career "
Kilpatrick next provided two
interesting observations about
the Republican campaign. "Fad
almost lost and Reagan almost
won added Kilpatrick.
A year ago I thought a sitting
President couldn't have lost, but
Mr. Fad almost brought it off
Kilpatrick then gave a brief
summation of the past Republican
campaign and the conflicts en-
countered during the heat of the
Kansas City convention.
According to Kilpatrick,
Ronald Reagan campaigned
superlatively and had all of the
campaign attributes a politician
should possess in a hard fought
campaign.
Kilpatrick then gave a brief
account of how Reagan lost the
election and various primaries
in certain geographic locations.
"If it had na been fa his
bizarre appointment of
Schweiker, Reagan could have
pulled it off
See KILPATRICK, page 3.
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1 REFERENDUM ON SELECTION OF STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT $
Referendums
included in ballot
campus
a joint '
In 1972, the SGA turned the function of campus entertainment over
to a newly aeated Student Union. The President of the Union, who is the �
chief student official planning concerts, movies and otha
activities, is currently selected by appointment by
student-faculty-administrata board. The Student Union receives $3.50
per student per quarter in student fees.
I am in fava of having the Student Union President elected yearly
in a campus-wide election. He would still remain separate from SGA.
� I am in fava of having the Student Union President selected by a
joint board each year, as it is currently done.
2 SGA REFERENDUM ON FICKLEN STADIUM
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Currently there is a fund-raising drive endeavaing to raise money to
enlarge Ficklen Stadium. A proposal may be made to the ECU Board of
Trustees to use a large patioi of University Reserve Funds to aid their it-
drive. This proposal would not raise student activity fees. The Reserve
Funds are student fees from past years which have never been spent.
The SGA President is a voting member of the Board.
' would be in fava of the SGA President voting fa the use of these
reserve funds fa Ficklen's enlargement.
I would not be in fava of the SGA President voting fa the use of
these reserve funds fa Ficklen's enlargement.
3 REFERENDUM ON 10TH. STREET COLLEGE HILL OVERPASS
The SGA is petitioning the N.C. Department of Transportation fa a
pedestrian overpass at the carter of 10th. Street and College Hill Drive.
I believe there is a need fa such an overpass.
I do not believe there is need fa such an overpass.
4 SGA CONSTITUTION RATIFICATION
The proposed SGA Constitution, which was passed oi three
successive readings by the SGA Legislature last Spring, has been
printed in its entirety in last week's Fountainhead. It would take effect
January of 1977, if ratified by the student body.
- I am in fava of ratification of the SGA Student Body Constitution
�. I am ratification of the SGA Student Body
Constitution.




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2
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 423 SEPTEMBER 1976
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news FLASH FLASHFL ASH FLASHFLASH FLAS
Co-op
Bahai
Avon
Recital
Tickets
What is Cooperative Educa-
tion? Find out! A meeting will be
held Tues Sept. 28 in Ftoom 341
of Rawl Building at 3 XX) p.m. All
interested students are invited to
attend to hear a general discus-
sion of the co-op program.
WECU
WECU Radio will furnish each
SGA candidate 30 seconds of free
air time to use in any manner
desired by candidate for upcom-
ing SGA elections. Come by
Room 227 Joyner Library between
12 and 1 fa recording spot.
Phi Eta Sig
The September meeting of Phi
Eta Sigma Freshman Honor So-
ciety will be held on Tuesday,
September 28, in Mendenhall
221, beginning at 7:00 p.m. This
is an important organizational
meeting and all members are
urged to attend.
Judicial
Do you believe in helping
people who are in trouble? if so.
you should apply for a Judicial
Board position. This is a reward-
ing opportunity, requiring only a
few hours per week. Application
will be accepted at the SGA
Offices beginning Sept. 28
through Oct. 5. Only sincere
students apply.
SPAN
The Student Planning Asso-
ciation (SPAN) held its first
meeting at 3 pm, on September
21 in room 209-D of Brewster.
The main topics of discussion
were the up coming trip to
Williamsburg, the Planning
Social, and repeating the sales of
planning tee-shirts. Dates and
details will tx decided during the
next meeting, Wednesday, Sep-
tember 29 at 4 pm in the Planning
Studio. All Planning majors and
minors are urged to attend.
Floats
Any campus organization
planning to enter a float in this
year's Homecoming will have to
submit a written proposal to the
Dean of Men's office. Each float
entry will be allotted $125 by the
Homecoming Steering Committee
toward cost. Likewise, House
Decoration entries will be allotted
$25. Orders for float materials
will be taken Thurs Sept. 23,
7:30 p.m at Delta Sigma Phi
Fraternity house, 2721 S.
Memorial Dr.
What is a Bahai? Investigate
and find out. Everyone is invited
to join us on Thursday evening at
7.O0pm in room 238 Mendenhall.
Forever
There is a group here on
campus we feel may interest you.
The Forever Generation of ECU is
a Christian fellowship that meets
weekly for warm, Christ-centered
fellowship. Our meetings include
a study of challenge from the
Bible, singing, prayer and re-
freshments. We also have get-
togethers, oookouts, weekend re-
treats, and other activities.
We will be meeting this
Friday at 7:30 p.m. in Menden-
hall 244. Why don't you join us?
Club Football
Anyone interested in playing
club football please go the Allied
Health Building intramural field
1 at 4:00 Thurs. Sept. 23or Mon.
Sept. 27. Please wear cleats if
possible.
I f anyone is interested in Avon
products for men a women, call
752-5880. A brochure carries an
assortment of low-priced items
fa all.
Parents
Two evening oourses to be
offered this fall by the ECU
Division of Continuing Education
will be of interest to parents and
prospective parents. Further in-
famatioi is available fron the
Office of Non-Credit Programs,
Division of Continuing Education.
757-61436148.
Art Exhibit
The Summerset 11 Art Exhi-
bit, presently living and breath-
ing in Mendenhall Gallery, will
remain alive until Sept. 25. If you
have not seen this splendid
conglomeration of paintings,
weavings, and hayyou must do
so immediately.
Those with waks in the show
can pick them up Sat. Sept. 25 at
8 p.m. a Sun. at 1 p.m.
Model UN Travel Film
Model U.N. invites all persons
interested in the United Nations
and international affairs to attend
a meeting Tues. Sept. 28 in
Brewster C105at 4 p.m. Plans fa
the March conference will be
discussed.
Convention
Baptist Student State Convention
Theme: "I am that I amAm
I?" Speakers: Grady Nutt and Ed
Seabough. Oct. 1-3 Ridgeaest
Conference Centa near Ashville
Call 752-4646.
Gardeners
Indoa and outdoa gardeners
in the ECU area may inaease
their knowledge and skill by
enrolling in special non-aedit
evening oourses this fall.
"Houseplant How-To schedul-
ed fa Wednesdays, Oct. 13-Nov.
17, is designed fa indoa garden-
ers. "Haticulture fa the Home-
owner scheduled to meet Wed-
nesdays, Oct. 6-Dec. 8, will
provide infamatiai at how to
plan home gardens.
Furtha infamatiai is availa-
ble fron the Office of Non-Credit
Programs, 757-61436148.
Art Wilson, acclaimed wald
traveler and speaker, will present
"The Grandeur of Spain" in
Mendenhall Student Theatre,
Wednesday, Sept. 29at 800 p.m.
in the first of seven programs in
the Travel-Adventure Film
Series. Tickets are free with
student I.D. and Act. Card,
Faculty and Staff with member-
ship card and $1.00 general
admission fa public.
Free Flick
This weeks Friday and Satur-
day Free Flick is 'The Latgest
Yard' to be shown at 7 p.m. and 9
p.m. on Sept. 24 and 25 in
Mendenhall Student Center thea-
tre. This rip-roaring, get-involved
movie is big, fast and will make
you laugh and cheer along with
Burt Reynolds and his mean
machine. Presented by the Stu-
dent Union Films Committee.
I.Ds and activity cards are
required.
Conference
Membasof the ECU Disabled
Students aganizatioi are invited
to attend the Governa's Confa-
ence of the Hiring of the
handicapped Oct. 1 at the Wil-
mington Hiltoi Inn, Wilsoi, N.C.
The White House Regional Com-
mittee Conference will be held in
Greenville Oct. 9.
Soprano Patricia Hawkins
Hiss will pafam in recital at
ECU Sun Sept. 26, at 8:15 p.m.
in the A.J. Fletcha Music Centa
Recital Hall. The program is free
and open to the public. Mrs. Hiss
will begin with a Caocini song and
arias from Pai's "Euridice" and
Purcell's "The Libertine Fol-
lowed by the Balioz "Le Nuits
d'Ete opus 7.
Crime
"Why America Is Losing
Their War on Crime" is the topic
of an address by Dr. Jack Wright
scheduled at ECU Fri Oct. 8.
Wright is director of the
aiminal justice program at Loyola
Univasity, New Orleans, and
oo-autha of sevaal texts fa
studies in aiminology.
The presentation will begin at
11 a.m. in Brewsta Building,
C-103, and is free and open to the
public.
Buddy Rich
The "Walds Greatest drum-
mer Buddy Rich, will insert his
earth moving motions into Wright
Auditaium ai Thurs. Sept. 23.
Tickets are available at the
Central Ticket Office in Menden-
hall Student Centa, priced at
$1.50 fa ECU students and $3.00
for public, faculty and staff.
Groups of 20 a mae will be
admitted fa only $2.00 each.
Public tickets are available at the
doa.
Directa of Spats Infamatiai
Ken Smith announoed Tuesday
that student tickets for the
ECU-North Carolina game Oct. 23
will go on sale Monday in the
athletic ticket office. Cost to
students will be four (4) dollars
and the tickets are na expected to
last too long.
Also, North Carolina Assistant
Athletic Directa John Swoffad
announoed Monday that thae are
only about 2500 general admis-
sion tickets left fa the game in
Chapel Hill.
The game should be sold out
by the middle of next week.
Buses
SGA buses will go to the
William and Mary game. Cost
will be $2. Fa infamatiai call
757-6611 Ext. 218 befae 5 p.m.
Afta 5 p.m. contact Gary Milla
at 752-9121.
Crusade
Campus Crusade fa Christ
will meet this Thursday night at
7:30 fa a time of singing, sharing
and fellowship. Come join us at
1509 E. 5th St. (aaoss from the
nursing building.) Evaybody's
welcome.
Josh
Only six mae waiting days
until Josh is hae!
Who's Who Writers
All schools, departments and
campus ag nizations wishing to
nominate students for the
"Who's Who Among Students in
Amaican Colleges and Univasi-
ties" which did na receive the
fams should contact a oane by
the Office of the Dean of Student
Affairs, Whichard Building,
Room 204.
Nominations should be receiv-
ed in the Office of the Dean of
Student Affairs no latei than Oct.
1, 1976.
Anyone interested in writing
news fa FOUNTAINHEAD come
to staff meeting Thurs. Sept. 23 at
4:15 p.m.
NTE
Students completing teacher
preparation programs and candi-
dates fa teaching positions may
take the National Teacha Exami-
nations at ECU.
The NTE will be administaed
Nov. 13, '76; Feb. 19, '77; and
July 16, '77.
Bulletins of Infamatiai fa
NTE candidates are available
from ECU Testing Centa, 105-
106 Speight Building.
MMPWM
Meeting
Greenville will participate in
an histaic Town Meeting '76 in
celebration of the Amaican Bi-
centennial. The meeting will be
Sat. Sept. 25 at J.H. Rose High
School. Cost will be $2.00, $1.00
fa senia citizens and students.
Children unda 12 will be admit-
ted free. Registration should be
mailed to: Greenville Town
Meeting, P.O. Box 1155, Green-
ville, N.C. 27834.
Name
Address
CityState
Zip Code
Phone
Numba of Participants
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 423 SEPTEMBER 1976
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Dr. East served as
convention delegate
By JULIE EVERETTE
Staff Writer
Dr. John P. East of the ECU
Political Science Department ser-
ved as delegate to the 1976
Republican Convention in Kansas
City, Mo.
East worked on the Defense
and Foreign Policy Committee of
the Platform Committee.
"The very competitive spirit
added to the excitement and
interest of this convention. It was
a very unique experience stated
East.
Having also attended the 1968
Republican Convention, East
KILPATRICK
Continued from page 1.)
Kilpatrick crossed party lines
once again and went back to the
Democratic convention in New
York, mentioning the strong line
of speakers that appeared during
the course of that convention.
According to Kilpatrick, Bar-
bara Jordan, a Texas member of
the U.S. House of Represent-
atives, was very impressive and
could go a long way in American
politics.
"I wouldn't be surprised that
if Supreme Court Justice Thur-
good Marshall were to resign or
die, she might make American
political history
After Kilpatrick gave equal
party and candidate characteris-
tics, he went directly to the issues
of the on-going presidential cam-
paign, listing the issues inde-
pendently.
"Some people consider
Carter's stand on the issues
fuzzy. It's not so. The criticism is
that he takes a stand on every
issue, for instance the grain
embargo
"In Iowa he made it clear that
he would not use an embargo,
then he stated that he would use
embargos if the U.S. grain crop
was bad
Kilpatrick discussed the Taft-
Hartley Act next and indicating
one of his strongest personal
criticism of Jimmy Carter.
Section 14-B of the Taft-
Hart ley Act guarantees an Amer-
ican citizen the right to work in
either a unionized or non-
unionized employment situation.
In essence the Act states that an
employer cannot deny employ-
ment to a person because that
person refuses to join a union.
"Carter has no feelings about
Section 14-B and that bothers me.
How can anyone not have feelings
about the working force of
America?
Kilpatrick ended the text of
his speech by glancing into the
future of American politics. "I
feel there will not be an end to the
Republican Party, and the
Republic itself will survive be-
cause it i3 one of the most durable
countries ever
feels that this year's suspense
was even greater because of the
close race between President
Fad and Governor Ronald Rea-
gan.
East is serving as Ford's
North Carolina campaign co-
chairman.
East commented that Kansas
City is currently attempting to
become a national convention
center, based on it's central
location. "Kansas City is a very
fine place for a convention,
although it lacked the facilities
needed to accomodate all the
MORNING STAR GALLERY
1966-1970
Rock Poster Exhibit
PARADOX POTTERY AND DRAWINGS
DURING OCTOBER
MORNING STAR
applied and fine arts
�Handmade Pottery -Planters
� Wall Hangings -Mirrors
�Prints, Photographs, Drawings
403A Evans On The Mall Upstairs
MASTERCHARGE
BANK-AMERICARD
-FEATURES-
25�
o
OFF
ON SELECTED GROUPS OF FALL MERCHANDISE
WHICH INCLUDE: TQps PANTSUITS
SWEATERS DRESSES
TUNICS SKIRTSETS
LEVI SHIRTS JUMPSUITS
ALSO LARGE SELECTION OF JR. CO-ORDINATES
BY TOM BOY & REDEYE
DRESS PANTS-9" & 12� PRINT BLOUSES
WERE '15.98 to ?19.98 LONG-SLEEVE NYLON FALL-
AVAILABLE IN POLYESTER, COLORED PRINTS WERE '13.98
GABARDINE � CORDUROY NOW $8�
BLUE JEANS ASSORTED STYLES
ONLY T WERE�1� SALE AT ALL STORES
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4
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 423 SEPTEMBER 1976
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Question needs
clarification
Question two, SGA Referendum on Fickk
Stadium, to appear on the ballot next week should I
defeated if for no other reason than at the present tirr
students are not familiar enough with the Universe
Reserve Fund and its uses. The referendum as
students if they would favor enlarging Fickle
Stadium through the use of University Reserve Fund:
Superficially explained, it is the money cdlecte
from student fees in excess of what is legally require
to have on deposit for a project for which bonds wee
issued. For example, Minges Coliseum was funde
through the issuance of bonds that stipulate monie
will be collected from students at a pre-determine
rate until two "pockets" have been filled. The fin
pocket is collateral against the principle and was fille
initially as student fees were collected. The seconc
the Repair and Replacement Reserve fund, i
insurance should a frenzied crowd of basketba
enthusiasts literally bring the roof down and was fille
after the first pocket. When both pockets were full, a
required by the bond, money was then deposited i
the Redemption Account-the University Reserv
Fund.
According to Cliffe Moore, vice-chancellor fc
business affairs, there is approximately $1.6 million ii
this fund for all such campus projects which, excep
for operating expenses, may be used for any legs
purpose. But even Moore is not completely sure wha
constitutes a legal purpose.
Perhaps these monies could be applied to othe
projects equally, if not more, important than addinj
nearly 20,(300 seats to a stadium which has only once
been filled to capacity. Students, who are being asked
to contribute to the stadium fund-raising drive, should
also be sure that these excess funds could not be used
to offset unforeseeable hikes in student fees.
Until these questions are answered it would be
unwise for students to dump their fees into a project
which in all fairness should be financed by the
community. After all, who is going to benefit from the
stadium's enlargement? The fund raisers, who are
looking to the citizens of Greenville for the lion's share
of donations, seem certain of who stands to benefit the
most in the long run.
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community tor war titty years
Senior EditorJim Elliott
Production ManagerJimmy Williams
Advertising ManagerDennis Leonard
business ManagerTeresa Whisenant
News EditorsDebbie Jackson
Neil Sessoms
Trends EditorPat Coyle
Sports EditorSteve Wheeler
Fountainhead is the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Student Government Association
of ECU and appears each Tuesday and Thursday during the
school year, weekly during the summer.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C.
27834.
Editorial Offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions:$10.00 annually for non-students, $6.00 for
alumni.
4J
TheForum
Constitution draws comments
V
For ratification
To Fountainhead:
As chairman of the oommittee
which drafted the new constitu-
tion, I would I ike to st ate one fact.
No time in any of the many
discussions and debates on this
constitution was it ever intended
to take Student Union back under
SGA. The clause that Mr. Ru-
dolph Alexander has advised
certain students to oppose the
constitution on is a fabrication. To
be a little more plain it's a LIE!
The supreme law dause is a mere
re-wording of what is in the old
Constitution. What Mr. Alexan-
der (The Student Union) needs to
spend their time and effort on is
in getting us a CONCERT THAT
DOESN'T CANCEL OUT.
We would all be better off.
Ricky Price
Against
To Fountainhead:
I would like to clear up a few
points about the Student Union's
opposition to the proposed SGA
Constitution.
First, I am cursing myself for
not explaining further to Miss
Johnson (Fountainhead Assistant
News Editor) the reasons behind
my "threatened" resignation. I
had said that I might resign if the
constitution is approved and that
others were contemplating re-
signation. My reasons for resign-
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ing, if I did, were tnat between
school work and Student Union
work. I have enough hassles to
handle. If the SGA started taking
over the Union the hassles would
be augmented to the point where
I might not be able to handle both
jobs without having a nervous
breakdown. I did not explain this
and I am sorry.
Other points that should be
brought up and clarified included
the ridiculous idea mentioned in
Tuesday's editorial that we have
shows cancelled because we do
not work through a professional
agent. Of course we work through
professional agents there is no
other way to book an event.
Therefore all our shows are
booked through professional
agents. Got it?
As for the idea pushed by Mr.
Sullivan that students do not have
input in the decisions made by the
Student Union, what are the over
100 people working voluntarily for
the Unioncockroaches? The
Union is made up of students,
interested students, students
Forum Policy
Forum letters should be typed
or printed and they must be
signed and include the writer's
address. Names will be withheld
upon request. Letters may be sent
to Fountainhead or left at the
Information Desk in Mendenhall
Student Center.
with something to say. There is
no money or glory involved with
this job, therefore the kids who
work here do it because they want
results. We accept and cherish
input from other students. We are
not exactly closed off from the
university.
I hope and trust that for once
the students of ECU read, listen
and think about the new constitu-
tion This one clause is not the only
problem. Please vote this time.
Sinoerely,
Charlotte Cheatham
Theatre Arts, Chairperson
Pres. votes yes
To Fountainhead:
It has oome to my attention in
the last few days that the false
controversy over the SGA Consti-
tution is being partly generated -
and perhaps oo-ordinated - not by
students but by a seoond-level
administrator.
The Constitution will pass, of
course, because the students
aren't the sheep some people
wish they were, but the role of
administrators in the running of
campus entertainment is some-
thing which should worry us all.
Rudolph Alexander is one of
the hardest working administra-
tors I know, but he has no
See FORUM, page 5.
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 423 SEPTEMBER 1976
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rTheForum
business advising Student Union
officials how to campaign against
the new Constitution, which I
believe he has done.
It isoneof thetroublesof ECU
that our entertainment - such as
in concerts - is not in total oontrol
of the students, even though each
student pays $3.50 per quarter.
An example of the administra-
tive strangle-hold over entertain-
ment is the fact that the Major
Attractions Committee, which
books concerts, cannot even meet
without either Dean Alexander's
representative or a faculty mem-
ber. If the Union got funds
elsewhere, this would be fine, but
the Union gets student fees.
In my opinion, the students at
ECU, while appreciating such
things as the free flicks, are not
happy with the kind of entertain-
ment here, or the volume. I
believe this stems from two facts:
(1) that no one at the Union is
elected by the student body, and
(2) that administrative influence
is far too great.
In my opinion, Rudolph Alex-
ander has had far too great an
influence on the Union, and on its
"campaign" against the stu-
dent's Constitution, and he
should remove himself as Union
Advisor, and allow someone who
wants to advise, and not rule, fill
that job.
Also, because of the mood of
many students at ECU over the
entertainment question, I plan to
include a referendum question on
next week's ballot to see if they
want the Union President elected
in a campus-wide election instead
of selected.
Tim Sullivan
SGA President
Const.? 'No'
To Fountainhead:
Opposition was expressed in
Tuesday's paper towards the
proposed SGA constitution by
members of the Student Union.
The opposition was based on
Article III which stated that the
SGA shall have supreme student
law which includes the Student
Union.
In the editorial the comment
was made "to have the proposed
constitution rejected because of
this niggling opposition would be
unfortunate for the university
Continued from page 4.)
There are several other reasons
why the proposed constitution
should not be passed at this time.
One is the time table on which
the new constitution is based
from January to January. With
elections in January there will be
no freshmen in the legislature
from Sept. to Jan. or their first
semester. It seems strange that
Mr. Sullivan would support such
a constitution after he waked so
hard as a freshman to give
freshmen more representation
and raise their status on campus.
Likewise, there would be no
seniors in the SGA from June to
January except for the juniors
that become seniors in the fall.
Another problem arises with
the proposed budget which will
be approved in Feb. to operate
from Feb. to the following Feb.
. Our present budgets are based on
the fall enrollment figures which
could go up or down at any time
(it is down 500 this year which cut
the budget by about $50,000).
How can the SGA appropriate
money for the entire fiscal year
when they will have no idea what
the fall enrollment will be? Should
there be a sharp decline the SGA
could go broke before the year
was up.
One last question. What is the
purpose of the Senate? I realize
they act as advisers for pending
legislation but the Senate has no
vote. If we are going to all the
trouble to set up our SGA
according to the U.S. system of
two houses why not give both
houses the power to vote? As it
stands now there is no checks and
balance within the proposed
constitution.
I believe that the students that
wrote the new constituiton had
some good ideas but before the
new constitution is approved
some flaws need to be ironed out.
Until that time our present
constitution can serve as it has
done for years. After all the U.S.
Constitution is 190 years old and
it is still working fine.
Monika Sutherland
For ratification
To Fountainhead:
The adverse comments by
Barry Robinson ooncerning the
proposed SGA Constitution is
unfounded. The present constitu-
tion and previous constitutions
encluded the same provision of
"supreme student law These
constitutions were in effect even
before the Student Union was
separated from the SGA in the
early 1970's. The Student Union
of which Robinson is president ws
was made more responsible to
entertainment, lectures, concerts,
and related areas.
In the four years that I have
been associated with student
government, there has been no
case that the SGA has changed
the inside operations of the
campus organizations. This new
constitution does not allow this.
The supremacy of the SGA is only
through campus wide elections in
which all students can be active.
The SGA is the only organization
that can represent all the stu-
dents. The Men's Residence
Council and the Women's Resi-
dence Council can only speak for
selective consequences, and well
as many others.
The oritism of the new consti-
tution should fall in other areas if
there is valid oritism. The indi-
vidual rights of any campus
organization will not become
limited by the proposed constitu-
tion or the old constitution.
Donald Rains
Former Chairman
of Rules & Judiciary
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6
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 423 SEPTEMBER 1976
mm
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SGA Candidates Forum
a
Senior
class
officers
PRESIDENT
Wanda Gunter
Last year, as a junior, I
transferred to ECU and within
two months I received a position
as a dam legislator. By May, I
had served on three committees
and held a chairman's position.
With these accomplishments I
feel that I am better qualified to
serve and represent myxdass than
my opponents. For better repre-
sentation and unity in our senior
dass vote Wanda Gunter fa your
president.
Junior
cass
officers
VICE-PRESIDENT
Randy Bailey
As Junia Class Vice-presi-
dent I will strive to see that the
dass of 1978 does not get screwed
when ECU switches over to the
semester system fa the 1977-78
school year. Our dass also has na
seen much top nach entertain-
ment during the last two years. I
will wak to make up fa this gap
during our last two years.
Clint Cooke
I am a business maja ooncen-
trating in marketing and am a
member of Sigma Phi Epsilon
fraternity. Although the respons-
ibilities of vice-president are
limited, I believe that as vice-
president I could assist our
president in many ways and there
by allow him mae time fa
performing the executive re-
sponsibilities of our dass. Your
support and vae will be greatly
appredated.
Sophomore
cass
officers
PRESIDENT
Valerie Chaffin
I am running fa Sophomae
Class President because I believe
that I can represent my dass
better than any other candidate.
Sophomaes are the second
largest voting dass at ECU. And
with that vae comes power. This
power must be represented by a
strong, assertive person with
legislative experience.
I feel I'm well qualified having
served in the legislature and on
several oommittees.
I have the time and experience
to wak fa you. All I need is your
vae.
Kevin McCourt
In running fa any elected
office, I always gauge my activi-
ties and effats by the issues and
their effects oi the students. Last
year as Freshman Class Presi-
dent, I also became experienced
in the SGA legislature and
appropriations. As Sophomore
Class President, I can continue to
ad as a voice fa the average
student. But mae than a token
voioe, the students with their
vaes, can help me initiate needed
changes and programs.
Freshman
cass
officers
PRESIDENT
Bill Szostak
I would like the chance to do
my best in helping you. If you
have any question or want
something, just ask and we will
see what we can do. 436 Jones -
752-3900.
David Whitson
As mae than 37 percent of the
undergraduate students at ECU
are freshmen, the freshman dass
certainly is entitled to ample
representation in the administra-
tion of the school community. I
would like the oppatunity to
provide this representation in the
SGA. So if you're upset with
arbitrarily imposed restridions
which are inconsistently enfaced
I hope that you will do something
about it by vaing fa David
Whitsoi, president of the fresh-
man dass.
VICE-PRESIDENT
David Goodwin
A Vice President must be a
person who is capable of taking
the responsibilities of the Presi-
dent at any time.
I know that I have the leader-
ship qualities that can help the
student body. Please vae fa me.
Donna Hurst
I am a graduate fran 71 st
High School, Fayetteville, N.C.
My maja is pre-med.
In high school I was involved
in student coundl and oommunity
affairs and thus have gained
interest in the rights of students.
If eleded I will do my best to
help the freshman student body
and praect student rights.
I will be very grateful fa your
suppat.
Day
student
rep.
Randy Bailey
There is a severe parking
problem fa ECU day student.
Something needs to be done to
keep students from walking a half
mile after they park their cars.
Also, the 1977-78 school year
ECU switches over to the
semesta system and students
should na lose hours (which is
very likely to happen under
current plans). I will wak to make
it a smooth transition.
Debby Boyce
The most impatant reasai
you should vae fa me is that I
am independent. Thaefae I can
wak fa the students in general
and na have any biases. I will be
open to the wants and needs of al I
groups and individuals and be-
lieve I can be instrumental in
aiding them. So if you want
someone to represent all
students, vae fa me.
Dalton Denson
The off ice of SGA day student
legislature representative is of
great impatance to each student
on and off of ECU campus. This
office has been neglected in the
past and I would like to see mae
of the student's opinion brought
into the legislature. This is my
main reason fa being a candidate
fa day student representative.
Your suppat and help will be
greatly appredated. Thank you.
see Candidate Faum pg. 7
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�PHHS ��HiHMHB
����������������������1
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, No. 423 SEPTEMBER 1976
7
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��
SGA Candidates Forum
����� ��������
John Epperson
�������������������������������������
It is my belief that our SGA
cannot truly be successful without
diversity of opinion. I say this
because there are as many
different opinions on this campus
as there are students.
If the legislators can bring the
students and legislators closer
together, they can bridge a
menacing communications gap.
Elect me to the legislature and
I will endeavor to bridge this
communications gap by fairly
representing all of the students.
Thank you.
Jenni Harrison
Last year I served as SGA
Legislator, becoming aware of the
responsibility that the SGA has in
relation to the expenditure of
student fees. Our SGA oontrols a
large sum of money, spending it
for the student's benefit. Last
year I helped with the parking
situation, the Halloween Riot, the
Rules and Judiciary Committee
and other aspects of oollege life
which must be dealt with by the
SGA. I'd again like to fairly
represent the day students in this
powerful organization.
C.R. Knight
My name is C.R. Knight and I
am running for the position of day
student legislator. With the sup-
port of the day students I can be
elected.
If I am elected you can be
assured of a vote and a voice in
the legislature that says what you
will want it to say.
Please go to the polls on
Tuesday and Wednesday and
vote for the candidates of your
choice.
Ron Morrison
Day student legislation should
be taken seriously in order to
have an effective student govern-
ment.
I served as SGA President at
Mitchell College for the school
year 1974-75. I traveled over the
state representing Mitchell in the
North Carolina Student Legis-
lation and the NCCCCSGA.
I am aware of the work
involved and would appreciate
your help on election day.
Ricky Price
As a day student legislator
candidate here is what I would
like to do: (1) see more campus
entertainment. Concerts and not
cancellations. (2) a model oontract
to keep students from being
screwed over by bad oontracts
(losing deposits).
I weloome the work and would
appreciate your support. I have
worked for you. I will work for you.
Thank you.
Anne E. Stohrer
My platform is straightfor-
ward. I want more students to
become aware of the programs
and involvement offered by REAL
Crisis Center. I would also like
the Student Volunteers for REAL,
and all students who are interest-
ed in REAL, to have representa-
tion on the legislature. This does
not mean that I will vote
exclusively for REAL, but it does
mean that my election will ensure
those in favor of REAL a voice in
student government.
Teresa
Whisenant
As a member of the East
Carolina student body I would like
to help my fellow students in the
position of day student represen-
tative. Every facet of student life
is affected by SGA decisions. I,
like all of you would like to see
pre-existing problems solved
through helping SGA progress. I
hope to be a voice for you through
serving as an SGA day legislator.
Dorm
student
rep.
Gary Blumenthal
I am running for SGA legisla-
tor for Slay Dorm. I feel that as a
Political Science major I under-
stand the legislative processes,
and by understanding these pro-
cesses I will be better able to work
fa you. My door will be open to
any ideas, complaints, and
opinions that you care to voice. I
will work for Say and anything
that is detrimental to the resi-
dents of Slay will be opposed.
Greg Boykin
I am seeking a legislative seat
from Scott Dorm. Look at my
honest and sincere look of deter-
The Guitar Workshop
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mination. You know that you can
trust me to spend our money
wisely. You want a legislator with
an open ear to the student mouth;
someone to oversee our interests
as students throughout the year.
Turn me loose on student govern-
ment because I'm running purely
for persona! gainyours!
Jerry Cox
We should be proud of our
SGA here at ECU. It is a fine
institution organized, staffed, and
executed by and for the students.
The budget this year will be
between $250,000 and 300,000. I
feel that my business background
will be an asset in helping to
make the .right decisions toward
achieving the best possible
management of our funds.
It is my sincerest desire to
honestly present the views of the
men living in Scott Dorm to the
SGA Legislature.
David Eason
I would support allocation of
funds for the Fine Arts depart-
ments and for the campus media
(i.e. WECU, The Pub Board). I
would try to see that our money is
spent on things that we, the
students, can enjoy and benefit
frcr
David Goodwin
A Legislator must be a person
who "you" the students can
trust. Students must have this
trust because legislators handle
all of the students' funds.
I know that I have the leader-
ship qualities that can help the
student body. Please vote for me.
Libby Lefler
I assure you that if you cast
your vote fa me you'll have a
hard-working person in the legis-
lature who really cares about your
needs. I want this offioe because
it will be a way through which I
can effectively serve the student
body of the greatest school on
earth, East Carolina. Again I ask
for your support.
Jeff Yates
Jeff Yates previously held
office, and was very active in high
school activities.
Jeff's intended major is politi-
cal science. Upon graduation, he
intendsto continue in a politically
oriented field. Jeff urges you, if
elected, to contact him, so that he
can properly serve YOU. He may
be reached at 758-8227, or at
room 183. Remember, vote
Yates legislator of Jones Dormi-
tory
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THE FALL 1976 CAMPUS LOOK IN FASHION BY
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SAINT LAURENT SUIT AT EITHER OUR CAMPUS
SHOP�HEADSTRONG OR OUR DOWNTOWN STORE
ON THE MALL
L
Offtnans
MEMS WEAR
On the Mall in Downtown Greenville
mm
mm
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8
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 423 SEPTEMBER 1976
m
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Bike way grant defeated
By DEBBIE JACKSON
Co-News Editor
The defeat of a federal grant
in late August has slowed pro-
gress of the proposed Greenville
bikeway, according to Greg Ping-
ston, Student Government Asso-
ciation vice-president.
The Federal Highway Admin-
istration grant was to match
combined university and city
funds on a four to one basis, said
Pingston.
"ECU and Greenville put up
$12,000 each. The FHWA grant
should have been $90,000
A grant application was ini-
tially screened in Raleigh and
then sent to Atlanta, Ga accord-
ing to Pingston.
"We got word in Atlanta that
our application had been killed
there
According to Pingston, the
reason for the defeat was a
communication breakdown.
"At first FHWA printed that
urban areas under 50,000 would
be eligible for the grant, but ten
days after the application dead-
line amendment changed the
figure to over 50,000
"We were told the amend-
ment was necessary to correct an
error in original guidelines
Pingston said the guidelines
were amended several times
before the application was filed.
Pingston called the bikeway
program unique in that it is a joint
city and university effort.
The Citizens' Bikeway Com-
mittee, chaired by Dr. Jim Hix,
includes three city representa-
tives and three students.
Student members are Barbara
Luciani, Larry Zicherman and
Pingston who heads the student
representation.
"What we're working for is to
alleviate parking problems, to
provide cheap transportation and
to get the bikes off major traffic
routes said Pingston.
"We are presently trying to
apply for a Bureau of Outdoor
Reaeation grant. If this grant
falls through the bike path
program is at a standstill
Introducing Th
Greenville Dating Service
For more information and descriptive question-
naire send $1.00, name and address to:
Greenville Dating Service
P.O. Box 2541
Greenville, N.C. 27834
All correspondence is strictly confidential
"Give us a chance to help you"
1 boio Ai
TIRED OF BREAD & LETTUCE SANDWICHES?
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AND GET MEAT ON YOUR BUNS
Open Everyday 11 - till 752-8351
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Election termed
well organized
ByROGERWHITSON
Staff Writer
The 1976 SGA elections will
be one of the best organized
elections in recent years, accord-
ing to SGA President Tim Sulli-
van
Thepollswill be open Sept. 28
and 29 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Polls
located in the "Croatan" and the
Student Supply Store will remain
open until 7 p.m. both days.
The ECU "Marching Pirates"
will begin ballot counting at 5
p.m. Wednesday in the Afro-
American Cultural Center adja-
cent to the Infirmary. A represen-
tative for each candidate may
oversee the count if they so
desire.
Only band members unasso-
ciated with candidate campaigns
may man the polls.
Complaints concerning cam-
paign violations or ballot count
must be submitted to an election
co-chairman or Sullivan within 24
hours after the polls close.
Election co-chairmen are Lynn
Yow, 758-1346, and Clay Bur-
nette, 758-9491. Sullivan can be
reached at the SGA office in
Mendenhall Student Center.
Run-off elections will occur
only if a candidate receives less
than 35 per cent of the vote.
Run-offs will then be held within
two weeks after the original
elections.
Included on the ballot will be
referendum questions pertaining
to the proposed SGA constitution
Ficklen Stadium expansion, elec-
tion of the Student Union presi-
dent and the proposed overpass
on Tenth Street.
Sullivan wishes to remind
candidates that their campaign
expenditures must not exceed $50
and that they must submit
expenditure reports no later than
Friday, Sept. 24.
Students are required to pre-
sent valid I.D. and activity cards
to vote.
Fulltime student desiring
parttime work selling life
insurance for 7th largest in
nation.
Career upon graduation.
Call B. L. Hunt, CLU, for
intment. 752-4080
� � �
BILL L HUNT, CLU, District Agent
P. O. Box 206, Contanche Street
Greenville, NC 27834
Phones: Office 752-4080, Residence 752-3015
NORTHWtSTfKN
MUTUAL I Iff �
MILWAUKEE
NML
The FUTURE TELLERS
HnjMMHnjnjBO
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 423 SEPTEMBER 1976
9
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!
REAL offers advice for many student problems
By LINDA CHERRY
Staff Writer
How many times have you
students felt confused or frus-
trated over a situation and simply
didn't know what to do about it?
You might have money problems,
school problems-or even some
sort of sexual problem. Don't give
up! There is somewhere you can
go to seek help. It is called the
Real Crisis Center.
REAL is a crisis intervention
center, which provides free and
confidential information and re-
ferral services for all kinds of
problems. It has a walk-in center,
located at 1117 Evans St and it
hasatelephoneHELP-line, which
operated 24 hours a day every
day. Its number is 578-HELP
(4357).
The REAL staff attempts to
help anyone with any type of
problem�either directly or one of
its trained counselors, or through
one of its specialized, profession-
al agencies located throughout
the state.
The staff consists of vol-
unteers, three residents, and a
paid director, program co-
ordinator and administrative as-
sistant, said Duane Overton, a
REAL resident.
The REAL center needs more
volunteers, said Overton. More
crisis counselors are needed to
answer phones. But all must first
be screened; then must pass a
10-week training course before
anyone is allowed to do phone
counselling, reminded Overton.
Volunteer fund raisers are
also needed to help plan pro-
grams and projects, said Overton.
Office assistants are needed to
do typing and filing, he added.
Rape Victim Companion and
Prevention Specialists are need-
ed. A rape companion is trained
especially to accompany a rape
victim through the medical, legal,
and emotional proceedings. Over-
ton emphasized that the victim
who asks for a companion has this
assistance as long as is necessary.
Volunteers are also needed for
the Speaker's Bureau. These
members will be trained to speak
to the Pitt County Community and
to ECU classes about the services
of REAL.
A new 24 hour service is the
dial-a-teen program for youth (or
students) aged 14-21. An employ-
ment telephone service, it
matches youth with city residents
who need employers on a one-
time, temporary, or full-time
basis, claimed Overton.
Though REAL began only five
years ago, its services have
constantly expanded to meet new
needs.
In 1970 REAL answered its
first callsfrom a small apartment.
When someone noticed that the
REAL telephone number, 758-
4357 spelled the words HELP on
the telephone alphabet, the REAL
Center truly became a HELP
Center, Overton declared.
As the calls for help in-
creased, so did the REAL staff. So
the center moved out of the
apartment and into an old house,
Overton stated.
At first the staff was advised
by community people and by a
couple of ministers. Though
REAL has neven been religiously
oriented, religious referral coun-
selling is available, said Overton.
Two years after REAL began,
it filed for and received its first
state grant. A budget was sub-
mitted toa N.C. Commission. The
Commission offered to grant 112
the submitted budget-but only if
theoommunity matched the other
half, said Overton.
For the past two years, REAL
has been operating on a minimum
budget of $30,000 a year; $15,000
from the state and $15,000 from
the oommunity.
This year REAL asked the
state for $16,000. The stated
offered only $9,000, Overton
claimed. After the N.C. Commis-
sion was flooded with numerous
protest letters, it finally offered
$12,500. Even if this fund was
matched, REAL would still be
operating on a less than minimum
budget of only $25,000, reminded
Overton.
So far the REAL team has
matched only $1,000 fa this year.
However, the United Fund, which
donated $5,000 last year, has
proposed $8500 for this year,
claimed Overton.
But the SGA, which donated
$4,000 last year, is operating on a
tighter budget this year, said
Overton.
REAL has devised various
ways to raise money, Overton
commented. One way is through
an assertiveness-training course
being offered September 25. For
more information on this, call the
crisis center.
Fund-raising events are also
programmed for this year, said
Overton. There will be a yard
sale, an art sale, and a spring
walk-a-thon.
Overton emphasizes that sup-
port is needed�either through
actual service, a tax-exempt
donation, or by participating in
any of the fund-raising events
REAL Crisis Intervention Center, at 1117 Evans St houses trained
volunteers who are there to help, 24 hours a day.
Cocker recaptures success on STINGRA Y album
By MICHAELFUTCH
Assistant Trends Editor
Pardon me sir, for this late
review of Joe Cocker's STING-
RAY album, but I felt it was of
considerable importance due to
his ECU concert last spring and
because of its significance in the
sporadic recording career of the
32 year old white Englishman.
Joe Cocker has transgressed a
great deal since working as a
Sheffield gas-fitter and pub sing-
er. He first recorded a Beatles'
tune, "I'll Cry Instead" as Vance
Arnold and the Avengers in 1963.
It's been eight years since he
first scored a number one Great
Britain hit with his now manda-
tory encore, "With a Little Help
From My Friends This was
followed by a brilliant first LP on
A and M Records with such
notable session-people as Stevie
Windwood, Jimmy Page and
Albert Lee.
Cocker's voice moved the late
Lillian Roxon to describe him as,
"a white English singer with a
strong soul voice like something
out of Motown
Cocker shone at Woodstock in
1969 and many consider his
musical contribution at the festi-
val his definite peak. It was there
that Cocker met Leon Russell who
later put together the Mad Dogs
and Englishmen tour. The 1970
tour was a runaway success, but it
was Russell, not Cocker, who
emerged as a superstar. It is
reported that Cocker made only
$800.00 from the extravagance;
he retired to England after
recording one more tune, "High
Time We Went
Joe Cocker made a disastrous
comeback in 1972. The tour
opened in the States and dosed in
Australia, where repeated arrests
led to an inevitable deportation.
This was soon followed by the
release of SOMETHING TO SA Y.
In 1974, Cocker released
CAN STAND A LITTLE RAIN,
which gave him a top single on
Billy Preston's "You Are So
Beautiful The album, like his
live performances, was incon-
sistent.
JAMAICA SAY YOU WILL
was of little improvement than his
previous album; A and M were
trying their damnest to score
again with a deteriorating human
being. Although unable to cash
in with studio work, Cocker
continued with live performance.
Kit Rachlis, in ROLLING
STONE, explicitly wrote, "See-
ing Joe Cocker in concert is like
rubbernecking at an automobile
accident. It's scary and it's
perverse
This proved to be true last
spring in Minges Coliseum as Joe
Cocker upset alot of people.
Vastly overweight, drunken in a
stupor and pacing in a constant
frenzied motion, he seemed on
the verge of self-destruction.
Many left before he caught fire,
although the band was in top
notch form from the beginning.
Well, enough of the biograph-
ical sketchnow to STRINGRA Y.
This LP, Cocker's seventh, is as
close to consistency as the
Manchester man can and probably
will achieve.
STINGRA Y is his best since
the Mad Dogs and Englishman
tour album. Why?Cocker had
the personnel then and he has it
now. He is surrounded by some of
the best R and B sessionmen
around: Cornell Dupree, Richard
Tee, Eric Gale. Definitely pros,
the know what is to be done and
they fulfill it.
Side one opens fairly slow
with a Bobby Charles tune, "The
Jealous Kind Cocker opens
with his now patterned restrained
vocal delivery with which he later
cuts loose by vocal bending vid
distortion. The Ray Charles in-
fluence is definitely found here.
Cornell Dupree adds some laid
back guitar-work on this opener.
"I Broke Down" recalls seme
of the Mad Dog and Englishmen
work with the prominent organ,
and female background vocals.
Cocker rocks on this song and
brings to mind that inexhaustable
energy he exhibited last spring in
M ir.as. The band's back-up work
proves to be steady here.
Another Bobby Charles tune,
"You Came Along features
Albert Lee on a short guitar solo.
Cocker delivers a fine perfor-
mance on this specific cut.
The overs!ick "Catfish" that
grabs at first, loses its appeal
after a couple of hearings. This
was a Dylan and Jacques Levy
tune that had been canned.
Cocker wanted to do a Dylan
number, so he was offered this. I
w$m � i m
m
mm
m
find it difficult to enjoy a blues
tune based on "million dollar
man" Catfish Hunter. It fails to
click.
Matthew Moore's "Moon
Dew" is definitely Cocker at his
peak in vocal manipulation. Un-
equivocally the highlight of this
album, the song grips, hurts,
stings and moves all at once.
Cocker gives a rare performance
that haunts and frightens to a
large degree.
At one time, I felt that this
next prominent music person to
die would be this man, and this
song seems to exhibit this. It
causes me to have chills like few
songs can. This love song is done
with all seriousness by a man that
can hypnotize listeners when he
wants to. Eric Gale follows the
superb vocal performance with
some flashy guitar work that
should go on forever. The key-
board work is masterfully done by
Richard Tee.
Side two begins with a reggae
version of Dylan's "The Man in
Me At the most perfectly
harmless, Cocker has no reason to
be doing reggae, although every-
one else is trying it (Clapton,
Ronstadt, to name a few).
"She is My Lady" starts out,
but evolves into a biting vocal
delivery by Cocker. Gale assaults
this tune on a short solo that
definitely grabs.
Eric Clapton sneaks up on
See Cocker, pg. 10
MMMffMMMM
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io
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 423 SEPTEMBER 1976
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Politics & showbiz: a marriage made in Hollywood
By RICHARD TRUBO
Were it not for the Allman
Brothers, Jimmy Carter's smile
might not be well-known as it is
today. Jerry Brown might never
have won the Maryland primary
without the Eagles. And Tom
Hayden'sbid for a U.S. senatorial
nomination in California hinged
significantly on Linda Ronstadt
and Jackson Browne.
The era when rock performers
were seen only at anti-war or
anti-establishment rallies is over.
Ask any politician these days who
he'd like to have raising money
for him, and he's as likely to
mention John Denver as John
Wayne.
"I get asked all the time to do
this or that for some politician
remarks Denver. "I turn most of
them down, but occasionally I'll
get involved
Actually, entertainers have
been raising money for politicians
for years. You only have to go
back to the 1964 presidential
election, when Barry Goldwater's
most successful fund raiser was
an actor named Ronald Reagan.
In 1972, George McGovern's
campaign was aided by a concert
headlined by Carole King,
Barbara Streisand and Simon &
Garfunkel.
But today, more than ever
hefore, rock singers are being
sought by nearly every major
candidate and cause on the ballot.
Jimmy Carter, for instance, is
planning to make considerable
use of rock stars during his fall
campaign. Already, the Allman
Brothers, the Marshall Tucker
Band, the Outlaws and several
lesser-known rock entertainers
have performed at Carter benefit
concerts, adding more than
$100,000 to the Democratic
nominee's campaign chest. And
now that Wet Willie and Dobie
Gray not to mention pop artist
Peter Max and comedian Pat
Paulson-are also on the Carter
bandwagon, Carter campaign
officials estimate that rock stars
may raise as much as $2 million
for the former Seorgia governor
election day in November.
Interestingly enough,
throughout the Drimaries and in
the weeks immediately preceding
the conventions, most rock per-
formers who publicly supported
politicians aligned themselves
behind Democratic candidates.
Ronald Reagan had a few sup-
porters in the music industry-
namely Pat Boone and Buck
Owens - but they can hardly be
called rock artists. President
Ford's staff says that he has
wooed several prominent per-
formers for the fall campaign, but
thus far no names have been
revealed.
The power of rock stars to
attract their fans to fund-raising
benefits is well-documented. The
Eagles raised more than $100,000
for California Governor Jerry
Brown in a single concert at the
Capitol Center in Largo, Md just
prior to that state's primary
election. Linda Ronstadt and
Jackson Browne also appeared at
that Brown concert.
Ronstadt and Browne actively
campaigned, too, for Tom Hay-
den, grossing $33,000 in a concert
in San Jose. Ronstadt says that
she decided to get involved this
year because of her disappoint-
ment with many of the politicians
COCKER
Continued from pg. 9
"Worrier another Matthew
Moore number. Not about to
upstage Cocker, he remains at
most hardly recognizable. Cocker
again delivers some solid vocals
as Bonnie Bramlett backs him up
with some enticing background
vocals.
"Born Thru Indifference
co-written by Cocker along with
keyboard player Tee, is socr,
forgotten after the needle moves
on to the last cut on the album.
The bluesy voice is there, but the
song appears to have no unity,
and consequently, never gets off
the ground.
It's ironic that Cocker should
choose Leon Russell's "A Song
for You" to end STINGRAY.
Supposedly not on very good
speaking terms, it would seem
that Cocker wouldn't have touch-
ed the song fa any reason.
However, Russell's tunes have
,vays fitted Cocker's vocal pitch;
unfortunately, this time the
temptation should have been
suppressed. The cut could have
been a definite highlight even
though it's been overworked
beyond necessity. Due to a poor
arrangement, it drags and drags
until one has that uncontrollable
urge to pick the tone arm up
halfway through.
Cocker has tried to find a
successful formula on STING-
RA Y, a concentration on slower
material. In doing this, he
borders on that thin line between
success and failureluckily he
makes good' this time. Thealbum
fails to lose its impact after
repeated listenings, and it's been
a long time since Cocker has
managed that.
Coffeehouse offers cheap thrill
By MARK LOCK WOOD
Staff Writer
In case you haven't heard7et,
Mendenhall Student Center and
the Student Union sponsor what
is known as a Coffeehouse. Ruth
Morris, Chairman of the Coffee-
house Committee for the Student
Union, says she is looking for
talent for the Coffeehouse, which
serves as a kind of showcase for
musicians, local and otherwise.
According to Miss Morris,
most of the music featured in the
Coffeehouse is folksy, blue-grass
and quiet music. "I would like to
see somethinQ other than music -
for a broader spectrum Morris
said. She cited a mime troupe as
example of a previous non-musi-
cal act .or the Coffeehouse.
Miss Morris explained the
procedure for auditions to the
Coffeehouse: "Local people are
granted auditions where they
perform. Out of town people often
send in resumes and tapes
When asked about schedul-
ing, Morris explained that the
ooffeehouses are scheduled keep-
ing in mind other events such as
movies and football games.
Some new innovations are
projected for the Coffeehouse.
"Hopefully we can have some
more patio coffeehouses with
local and professionals. There will
oe three local shows. Hopefully I
can get back Tim Bays She is
planning coffeehouses on a week-
ly basis - "If things are success-
ful
Morris said members are still
needed for the Coffeehouse
Committee. Those who wish to
audition for the Coffeehouse
should contact Ruth Morris at
Mendenhall.
The Coffeehouse itself is 25
cents which includes the music
plus refreshments. "It gives
people something to do on slow
weekends according to Miss
Morris.
who have won the most recent
elections.
"Attitudes have changed
she explains. "In the sixties, it
used to be fashionable to pretend
that you weren't interested in
things like money, your career or
politics - so we all got ripped
off
When the Fred Harris presi-
dential campaign was in full gear,
Harry Chapin raised $3,200 for
him in a concert in the university
town of Davis, California. Arlo
Guthrie, Pete Seeger and Tom
Paxton were also on the Harris
bandwagon. Neil Diamond allied
himself with the Sargent Shriver
camp.
Rock performers fjave also
raised money for ballot
initiatives, like the California
proposal designed to strengthen
safety measures for nuclear ener-
gy plants. John Denver, for
instance, sang at a concert at the
University of California at Santa
Barbara for the nuclear power
plants initiative. He raised
$30,000 for the cause, although
the young crowd seemed more
interested in music than politics.
When Denver tried to discuss the
initiative with them in mid-con-
cert, his remarks received only
mild applause; his music earned
him a standing ovation.
"Here you have something
that directly affects people's
lives he said after the perform-
ance. "It'scritical and I wanted to
help
But even the most dedicated
support sometimes backfires.
Two years ago, John Denver and
Robert Redford both raised mon-
ey for Richard Lamm, who
successfully ran for governor of
Colorado. But not long after the
election, Redford was on the
front pages of every Colorado
newspaper, blasting Lamm for
being a "phoney" environmenta-
list.
TICE
DRIVE-IN �AYDEN HIGHWAY
Wed. Thru SatAdm. M.50
NOT SINCE LOVE STORY
The true story of lill Kinmonr.
I he American Olvmpu
ski contender whose tragic tall
took everything but her life.
And vvlxi (bund the u hi rage
to live through the love ot one
very special man
CTHE OTHER SIDE OF
THE MOUNTAIN'
THE OTHER SIDE OF THE MOUNTAIN Surnng M ARM V N H ASSE T T jt Ml Kmrnoni
jndBEAU BRIDGES iiDick Buelt -BELINDA I MONTGOMERY � NAN MARTIN
ALSO ON THE SAME PROGRAM
Comedy that steals its way
AT 10:00 Woyourhttrtr
JEFF BRIDGES ANDYGRIFFITH DONALD PLEASENCE
Bring This Ad And You Will get
1 Free Admission With One Paid
PG!
tetul
If you haven't been down
to The Tree House lately,
now is a good time.
The Tree people are once
again offering their famous
pizza and salad specials.
Ask your friends about it
instead of asking us
about it.
The Tree House-
An Alternative Restaurant
� .� awe





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FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 423 SEPTEMBER 1976
11

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�M
� Keyes raps
with Dr. Jenkins
EDITORS NOTE: Dr. Loo Jen-
kins, ECU Chancellor, is very
interested in the school's ath-
letics. Here is a light-hearted
conversation between Jenkins
and FOUNTAINHEAD's Bill
Keyes.
FOUNTAINHEAD: When you're
sitting in your box at Ficklen
Stadium, do you ever wish you
were out there wearing the purple
and gold?
JENKINS: No, not really. I've
never played football because
football is a game for big men. Of
course you' II find a little guy once
in a while who'll make it, like
little Albie Booth of Yale, but
that's the exception rather than
the rule. The sport requires a
certain coordination, a certain
dexterity. Either you have it or
you don't.
FOUNTAINHEAD: Why are you
so interested in athletic excel-
lence at ECU?
JENKINS: It's a part of the
American ideal, that spirit of
competition, trying to win. We
tried to win the West. We try to
win in business. We try to win
over science. It's in keeping with
what we're trying to do here. Not
only do we want our young men
and women to do well athletically,
but we want our students to do
well on the nursing exams, as
they have, the CPA exams, the
teachers' exams.
FOUNTAINHEAD: What is the
effect of athletics on college life in
general?
JENKINS: In our society,
people's impressions of an insti-
tution are affected by a multipli-
city of things. For the university,
athletics plays an important role.
Here is a perfect illustration:
Before Knute Rookne came along,
Notre Dame was just a little
school out in the Midwest. Now
everyone has heard of and
respects Notre Dame for being a
fine institution. Football brought
them the attention, not aca-
demics.
FOUNTAINHEAD: I'm sure that
student bodies of different time
periods have collective personali-
ties which can be catagorized and
compared. Have you noticed a
parallel between the personalities
of various student bodies and the
personalities of their athletic
teams?
JENKINS: The Fifties was a
decade of apathy; the Sixties a
decade of protest over the war,
race relations, and governance of
the academic institutions; and
now the Seventies a decade of
evaluation; all of which have been
good for education. I can't really
see how these have affected
athletics. All of our teams have
been real spirited ones that we
have been quite proud of.
FOUNTAINHEAD: Would it be
unfair to ask you whether you had
a favorite coach or a favorite
team?
JENKINS: Well, we're very high
on Pat Dye. He is, without
question, the strongest coach
East Carolina has ever had, anu
will coach outstanding football
teams here. He has a tremendous
future ahead, and will be one of
the most highly respected coach-
es in the country. In fact, he is
very highly respected right now.
FOUNTAINHEAD: Over the
years, what players have impres-
sed you most?
JENKINS: Well, we've been
fond of both the Strayhorn men.
They were not only fine athletes
but fine gentlemen as well. I was
impressed with Carlester Crump-
DR. LEO JENKINS
ler. Uick Cherry, who has been a
coach over in Washington, was a
great quarterback here (in 1953
and '54). Bill Cline (All-America
QB in 1965) was an outstanding
player. And, of course, Danny
Kepley (linebacker in '74) played
with alot of intensity and was an
inspiring player to watch.
FOUNTAINHEAD: As you have
indicated, the way people see
ECU'S athletic program has alot
to do with the way they perceive
the University itself. Let's con-
sider recruiting. How did you feel
when Greenville's Al Hunter
signed with Notre Dame rather
than stay here?
JENKINS: When we lose an
athlete of this calibre, we are very
disappointed, of course, but
never bitter. The athlete must do
what he thinks is best fa himself
and his family. If Hunter thought
playing at Notre Dame and
having that national exposure
would be of significant benefit to
him, then he made the proper
decision. If he didn't think we had
to offer what Notre Dame had to
offer, he would have been less
than wise to stay here.
FOUNTAINHEAD: How did you
feel when Grumpier signed here
rather than at Ohio State, Okla-
homa, or any of the others that
wanted him?
JENKINS: We, of course, were
very pleased to have him. We
regret he didn't have a better
professional career, but we would
still like to believe he gained
something by spending four years
here, as we did.
We were also proud that our
Jim Bolding was named All
America and led the nation in
interception last year. That brings
a great deal of credit to us, and
urn iiwm mutt i IH
nothing succeeds like success. It
helps recruiting when high school
players see that they can come
into our program, which is
obviously a good one, and receive
national recognition when they
are due it.
It also helps to have student-
athletes like Larry Lundy, to
name one, in our program. He
was nominated fa a Rhodes
Scholarship, as you are aware of.
High School players read that in
the newspapers and realize that
they can participate in athletics
here and receive a quality educa-
tion at the' same time. This is
important.
FOUNTAINHEAD: New oonfer-
ence plans?
JENKINS: We were in coher-
ence where sane of the schools
wanted to emphasize athletics
while others wanted to deempha-
size it, and that was no good fa
us na the conference. So our
Board of Trustees decided that it
would indeed be betta fa us to
leave the Southern Conference.
We want to join a strong
conference for a number of
reasons. It would provide new
trends, stronga rivalries. It
would provide competition fa
conference alampionships, which
would help the minor sports
programs because if we were
independent they would only
have national championships to
short fa. And we know that
national championships are rare.
FOUNTAINHEAD: What is the
k 3al conference situation?
JENKINS: We need to have
schools with similar aspirations.
Right na we have the makings of
a very strong conference with
ECU, South Carolina, Florida
State, Virginia Tech, and West
Virginia, to name a few. In fact, it
could be a tremendously strong
oonference. South Carolina beat
Geagia Tech in their opener and
then beat Duke Saturday. Flaida
State and West Virginia always
have fine teams. And we've woi
two games against two highly
regarded teams from outside our
oonference.
FOUNTAINHEAD: What is your
impression of the Pirates football
team after those first two games?
JENKINS: We're really proud of
them la winning. But we could
have beaten State by a much
bigger scae; maybe by three a
four touchdowns. But we had a
number of bad breaks that hurt us
during the game. I had predicted
victay, with my prediction based
en the results of the Southern
M iss. game. We beat them rather
handily, and they don't put out
weak fortball teams down there.
If you'll nrtice, they only lost to
Virginia Tech by eight a nine
points Saturday. But beating
State certainly was a sweet
victay.
FOUNTAINHEAD: Ok, Dr.
Jenkins, enjoy the William and
Mary game Saturday and while in
Williamsburg remember that ctf-
ton candy and rollercoasters don't
mix.
i inm��m
Sports
Minor sports need student support
Depth in any spat is most impatant. But, in the cases of soccer,
field hockey and aher sports whae injuries are bound to occur, it is
most definitely needed.
It was most disheartening, to say the least, to listen to women's field
hockey coach Laurie Arrants Tuesday night discussing the woes of her
team.
Coach Arrants had just 23 prospects to repat ai the first day of
practice a couple of weeks ago. After many of them found that the
running in the game meant fa them to he in top-nach shape, they left
the team.
This left Coach Arrants just 13 players on the team to fill the 11 spas
that have to be on the field at all times. If coach Arrants were to have
three injuries that required the individuals to leave the match, she would
have to fafeit the contest.
This isdisgusting to think that out of 11,000 studentson this campus,
only 13 toughed it out to stay on the team. The mina spats program at
East Carolina, as well as women's sports, have always had a winning
tradition, but they need student suppat and participation to continue. It
is na feasible to have a spat if there is na enough people to field a
team.
Coach Arrants repats that anyone coming out fa the team now,
even at this late date, could help the situation. Coach Arrants said that
previous experience in the sport is na even necessary.
It has always been said that One of the makings of a good team is
that they can play bad and still win East Carolina's football team may
have proved that statement right Saturday night against State.
From this writer's point of view, the Pirates clearly outclassed State
on the Carter Stadium turf, but offensive mistakes nearly provided the
Pack with a chance to win.
Defensively, ECU stopped State odd, except a couple of times in the
second half after turnovers or mistakes. It was the best defensive effort
the Pack has seen in five years. The Pirates held the usually
high-powered veer offense to just 128 yards total offense, one yard more
than they limited State to in the 1971 victory 31-15.
"I was really pleased witn our effort anu naiu fj.ay against N.C.
State stated head coach Pat Dye. However, I was most disappointed
with the mistakes and most of all the penalties. We're going to stop
those penalties if we have to bench some people. I didn't think the State
game was one of our better games
But, against William and Mary, the Bucs will have to cut down on
the mistakes offensively, as the Indians have come out with a winning
attitude this season. William and Mary has won one conference game
and one game against A tlantic Coast Conference competition.
Dye said that William and Mary "looks like a much more aggressive
team than in the past. Their back field will be the best we've faced this
year, with two great running backs and a very fine looking quarterback
Despite sputtering a bit on offense against the Pack, ECU still ranks
high in the NCAA team and individual catagaies.
Willie Hawkins stands 43rd in rushing with a 95 yard average, while
PeteCoiaty is second oily toVMI'sCraig Jones in field goals per game
with 2.5. Jones leads with three a game.
Gonaty is also ranked in scaing along with Eddie Hicks. Gonaty is
15th with an averageof 11.5 points per game while Hicks istied fa 24th
with nine points per contest.
In team categories, ECU is still highly ranked in six separate areas.
The Pirates are ranked third behind only Texas A & M and Princeton in
taal defense, giving up just 150.5 yards per contest.
The Pirates rank sixth in rushing defense (81.5 YPG), tied fa 12th in
scaing defense (7.0 points per game), ninth in rushing offense (336.0
YPG), 17th in taal offend (420.0 YPG), and 11 th in scaing offense(35.5
PPG).
In two games this year, East Carolina has played in front of two
record-breaking crowds The 17,400 against Southern Miss, was a record
fa a home-opener, while the 49,700 at State was the largest ECU-NCSU
crowd ever and the third largest ever at Carter Stadium. It was also the
largest night attendance ever at a sporting event in the state of North
Carolina.





12
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 423 SEPTEMBER 1976
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Jake Dove feels natural on defense
Last year, my goal was to try
and make all-conference. This
year I'm aiming for something
higher Those are the words of
ECU defensive tackle Jake Dove.
Actually, it might be considered
as more of a warning to Pirate
opponents.
Jake Dove is a 6-2, 240 pound
senior from nearby Havelock
N.C. In the past he has proven
his talents on both sides of the
line. Dove came to ECU as a tight
end, but was switched to doien-
sive tackle shortly afterward. The
next spring, as the Pirates were
trying to make up for graduation
losses, Coach Pat Dye moved
Dove to offensive tackle. He
played the year at the spot and
did a good job, especially in the
wishbone offense.
The following spring (1974),
graduation claimed some mem-
bers of the defensive line, so the
ever versatile Dove was transfer-
red back to defensive tackle. Dove
had a fine season last fall and was
named honorable mention all-
oonferenoe. This time around,
although the spring is when Jake
Dove packs his gear to make the
trip across the line, Coach Dye
decided to leave him at defensive
tackle.
"I really feel more natural
Soccer team
drops third
East Carolina's soccer team
dropped their straight match
Tuesday afternoon as they lost a
2-0 decision to N.C. State at
Raleigh.
The Wdfpack scored .both
their goals in the first half of play
and held the Pirates scoreless
throughout for their first victory
of the season against a single
defeat.
The Pirates played like they
did in last week's Campbell
tourney by giving up two early
goals and settling down to play
sound defense fa the rest of the
contest.
State did much better than
ECU offensively as they had 26
shots on goal to just 14 for the
Bucs. Pirate goalie Wayne Bur-
row was busy as he had 18 saves.
Head Coach Curtis Frye was
"not happy at all with the loss,
but not completely disappointed
with the defense the Pirates
played
"We're going to have to go
back to playing more defensive-
minded in the early portions of
the game added Frye. "We go
out at the start of the match and
flood the offensive end of the field
and leave ourselves open for
fast-break opportunities by our
opposition.
The one bright spot -for the
Bucs was Dave Wasoilek. The
defenseman shut out all-ACC
forward Gino Olasis in the match
and Frye cited him for his
defense.
East Carolina will be traveling
to Norfolk, Va. Friday to compete
in the Old Dominion Tournament.
Alsooompeting will be Prinoeton,
America University, and host Old
Dominion. Prinoeton is an Ivy
League power while America beat
William and Mary 3-0. The
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already this year. Old Dominion
oomes off a 13-2 mark of last year
and promises to be extra tough.
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plaving defense Dove com-
mented. You get to attack rather
than defend Dove has sighted
some advantages to playing both
offense and defense. "It really
made me respect the man across
from me he said. "On offense
there is a tendency to want to hold
on almost every play. Now, I
don't think about it as much being
on defense. But I can understand
why a guy might try to do it
against me
Contrary to what one might
think, the oonstant movement
from offense to defense was not
hard for Dove. "It was relatively
easy he said. "It really made
me a better all around player and
improved my agility
In the past, some of Dove's
accomplishments have been over-
looked by many, but Coach Dye
has called him, "one of the most
underrated players on the
squad That will change this
year. Dye is looking to Dove to be
a team leader on the field and off.
Dove seems willing to accept the
responsibility.
"Last year everybody was
looking to Jim Bolding and Cary
Godette to do things. Being
overlooked made me work a little
harder. You can't get complacent
on a team like this or someone
will take your place.
"This year, since Cary and I
are the only two starters coming
back on the defensive line, I think
the younger players might look to
us in tough situations to keep
things going
Dove sighted experience as
the main advantage over the
younger players. "I've been on
the other side he explained.
"It's good to have someone who's
been through it all before in a
time when you're tired or behind
late in the game. That's when
good examples are set. Some
things a coach can't teach unless
he's played the position. There
are things that happen which
coaches might never see, and an
experienced player will know how
to react
This being Dove's final year at
East Carolina, his thoughts turn-
ed to the future. "I would like to
try pro ball if I got a chance he
said. "If that happens I'll play
ball in season, then go to
graduate school Dove is a
psychology major and would like
to someday have a counseling
clinic of his own. He feels that a
masters degree would give him
some of the training he needs, but
is eager to strike out on his own.
"I would like to help people
with problems he said. "Most
seem to start in kids at an early
age as a result of their environ-
ment. I would like to think that I
could help them see their way
through the difficult times
In the fall of 1976 at East
Carolina, if Jake Dove lives up to
his personal goals, the people
with the biggest problems are
going to be the ones directly
across the line from him.
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Assist
After
against a
and shuttin
Saturday, I
Indians oc
contest wit
attitude.
The hig
who have
who start
another las
three garm
and hope t
that streak
The In
offense whi
on every d
often but '
more Tom
throwing tl
end is Kei
receivers
flanker Joe
190-pound
Bil
ba
Forme
basketball
joined the
Carolina I
tant ooach
Lee, ;
ooach ed ti-
the last tr
record of
year reoor
He also gi
oonferena
being the
the school
reoor deds
for a New
Prior tc
Lee was
Montgorm
son, and
JV coach i
year. Whi
team wool
ship.
t
Al
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OHHHHHHIHHHHBalHi
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 423 SEPTEMBER 1976
13
� WWW
iM
Pirates face Indians Saturday
By BILL KEYES
Assistant Sports Editor
After winning their opener
against a good VMI team 34-20
and shutting out Virginia 14-0 last
Saturday, the William and Mary
Indians come into this week's
contest with ECU with a winning
attitude.
The highly emotional Indians,
who have 21 players returning
who started at one time or
another last season, now have a
three game winning streak going
and hope to upset ECU to extend
that streak even farther.
OFFENSE
The Indians boast a potent
offense which has to be respected
on every down. They don't pass
often but when they do, sopho-
more Tom Rozantz is excellent at
throwing the long ball. His tight
end is Ken Cloud. His primary
receivers are 5-10, 160-pound
flanker Joe Manderfield and 6-2,
190-pound split end Gray Oliver.
The pride of the Indians
offense is their running game.
Rozantz is a good play caller who
uses - his backs equally. Both
fullback Keith Fimian and tail-
back Jim Kruis have rushed for
more than 100 yards in the first
two starts.
From a Slot-I formation with
both wide receivers on the same
side of the field, Rozantz likes to
run from a sprint series. William
& Mary fans are quite familiar
with their leads, sprint draws and
option plays. Fimian is an excel-
lent blocker, and they will use
him to carry the ball and pave the
way for tailback Kruis through
the middle. East Carolina assist-
ant Frank Or gel calls these two
runners "the best combination
we have seen They run behind
a veteran line which returns five
of the six starters from last
season.
DEFENSE
An experienced secondary re-
turns with key players being free
Billy Lee joins
basketball staff
Former New Bern High School
basketball coach, Billy Lee, has
joined the basketball staff at East
Carolina University as an assis-
tant coach.
Lee, 26, from Mt. Olive,
coached the New Bern Bears over
the last three years, compiling a
record of 42-18, the best three-
year record in New Bern history.
He also guided New Bern to two
conference championships, those
being the first 4-A titles ever for
the school. In 1973-74, the team
recorded a mark of 17-3, best ever
for a New Bern High team.
Prior to coaching at New Bern,
Lee was head coach at East
Montgomery High for one sea-
son, and an assistant coach and
JV coach at Wake Forest for one
year. While at Wake Forest, the
team won the state 2-A champion-
ship.
In five years on the high
school level Lee has produced a
71-29 mark, one of the finest in
North Carolina. Also, in the last
three years, ten players from
Lee'steams have joined a oollege
basketball team.
Lee attended Southern Wayne
High School ('67) and Atlantic
Christian College ('71), as well
as two years at Mt. Olive. While
at Southern Wayne, Lee was
all-East, all-conference for three
years, played in the East-West
All-star game and set school
scoring records for one season
and for an individual game. At
Mt. Olive, he set school scoring
records and was all-conference
for two years.
Lee is married to the former
Shirley Scarborough and they
haveonechild, Patrick. Lee is the
son of Mr. & Mrs. Bill Lee of Mt.
Olive.
Chapter X
i
INVITES YOU
TO COME PARTY
AT GREENVILLE'S NEWEST
DISCO
WITH DRAFT IN FROSTED MUGS
AND THE BEST IN DISCO SOUNDS
WED. 8-10 LADIES NITE
VICTORY PARTY
AFTER EACH ECU WIN.
safety Joe Agee and strong safety
Scott Hayes.
The Indians' front line in-
cludes 235 pound left end Bruno
Schmalhofer, who has started
every game of his oollege career,
240 pound Pete Griffin at left
tackle and 228 pound Gary
Meenan at middle guard. On the
right side are tackle Dave O' Neil I
(218) and end Ralph Carawan
(230).
The linebackers are Jeff Hos-
mer and Jim Ryan who weigh 215
and 210 respectively.
TheWlliam& Mary defense is
a 5-2, but they will vary it with
hopes of confusing the Pirates'
blocking. From the basic 5-2 the
Indians will offset their middle
' guard and stack their linebackers.
Also, Hayes blitzes often during
his strong safety position.
PIFtA TES
The Pirates, also undefeated
in two starts, are anxious for
Saturday's 1 30 kickoff. They are
healthy and hungry. Zack
Valentine, injured at State, is in
excellent shape and Gary Godette
is ready to play, though he could
be replaced by Fred Chavis.
Starting lineups are expected to
be the same.
FOUNTAINHEAD thanks
Frank Orgel fa his assistance in
preparing this scouting report.
Coach Orgel's responsibility with
the team is to coach linebackers,
and he was chief scout for the
William and Mary game.
PLAYERS OF WEEK
Raymond Jones (I) and Pete
Conaty were two of the six players
of the week for their play in last
week's 23-14 win over N.C. State.
Jones gained 54 yards rushing
while Conaty kicked three field
goals. Other players of week
were: Wayne Bolt-offensive line-
man; Jake Dove-defensive line;
Ernest Madison-defensive back;
and Mike Brewington-defensive
specialist.
East Carolina
Kennels
Will be sponsoring classes
in Basic Obedience Training.
Class starts Oct 7th.
Cost 30.00
Call Ed Perry 752-9854
for more information
Rt. 7 Box 128 Greenville, "N.C.
The
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14
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 423 SEPTEMBER 1976
m
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Sports Writers
Fountainhead office
Thursdays at 4:30
SR-56
The super slide rule
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The SR-56 is a tremen-
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There are 74 prepro-
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Chances are, you'll be pro-
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Texas Instruments will rebate $10.00 of your original
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3. Return completed coupon and information card to:
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 423 SEPTEMBER 1976
15
mmm
m
MMH
m
m � Pi ��
Field hockey opens
season shorthanded
By STEVE WHEELER
Sports Editor
Editor's Note: Women's field
hockey is a sport that has not
been publicized much in the past
and a sport most people in the
South know little about, including
this writer. But, after studying
the sport in some depth, I found it
to be a close cross between soccer
and ice hockey. Most of the
positions of the field resemble
that of a soccer team, but the
team members use a stick to
strike the ball, as in hockey. The
sport is offered on the high school
level in Northern states, but not
in the South.
Depth will be a major problem
as the Head Coach Laurie Arrant s
takes her field hockey team to
Greensboro this weekend for an
Invitational Field Hockey Meet
involving eight teams. This will
be the first action seen by the
Lady Pirates this season.
Coach Arrants finds herself in
the unenviable position of having
to play two matches Saturday
with just 13 team members.
Eleven players must be on the
field at all times, and if three
injuries were to occur, East
Carolina would have to forfeit the
match.
"We were hurt by graduation
last year said Arrants, "be-
cause we had five seniors start-
ing. We are very young this year
but will have some fine individual
players
The Lady Pirates must face
the powerful Washington (D.C.)
Club in the opener at 9:00 A.M.
The Club has three former U.S.
national team members and
another two that are currently on
the U.S. squad.
The Pirates then face a fine
Catawba College team at 1 P.M.
East Carolina will be attempt-
ing to better the 4-5-3 mark of last
year's squad. Top returnees for
the Pirates will be Gail Betton and
Moira Devlin.
Betton has been all-Deep
South fa the last two years and
was named to the all-Southeast
teamlast year. She is a three-time
letter man at East Carolina and
was the team's best player last
year. Betton plays center halfback
for the Pirates.
"Gail (Betton) is a very
aggressive player stated
Arrants. "She has excel lent stick-
work and is a natural leader. She
has been playing on two bad
ankles for the last two years and
had one operated on last year
Devlin, also a three year
letterman, was picked to the
all-South team last year. Arrants
ROSTER
PLAYERCLASSPOSITION
Beth BeamJuniorFullback
Gail BettonSeniorHalfback
Sally BurchSophomoreHalfback
Linda ChristianJuniorInner
Cathy ClauseFreshmanInner
Moira DevlinFreshmanWingback
Gretchen FahrenbruchSophomoreFullback
Lynette GinnSophomoreFullback
Holly JeffriesFreshmanFullback
Diana MillickFreshmanGoalie
Annie RuddleSophomoreWingback
Montine SwainSophomoreHalfback
KathyZwigardFreshmanForward
Letters earned
Captains-Gail Betton,Moira Devlin
Head Coach-Laurie Arrants
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said that Devlin has "picked up a
lot of self-confidence since last
year. She has also gained leader
ship potential and is very aggres-
sive with good stickwork
Montine Swain is ooming off a
good freshman year in which she
was named the outstanding fresh-
man of the team.
Montine (ifcvain) has very
deceiving speed fa a big girl
said Arrants. "She is very quick
and is always hustling. She is the
fastest girl on the team
Other returning lettermen in-
clude Linda Christian, Beth
Beam, Sally Burch, and Annie
Ruddle. Christian and Beam have
lettered twice.
Another minus for the team is
practice time. The squad has
practiced for just under two
weeks. In a sport where the
players must be on the field for 30
minutes each half without a
break, the players must be in
top-notch shape, and with this
little time in practice, the Lady
Pirates are just not in real good
shape.
"All the other schools were on
campus fa up to three weeks
befae we were Arrants oom-
plained. "And we just canna get
into real good shape in that small
length of time
The team will play six aher
teams this year as well as being in
two invitational tournaments this
season. The Lady Pirates will also
be host to the Deep South
Tournament, the oonferenoe with
which it is affiliated.
Coach Arrants would like to
announoe that anyone ooming out
fa the team, even at this late
date, could help the depth
problem. Anyone wishing to
tryout is urged to go to the
practice field behind Allied
Health any afternoon at 330.
SCHEDULE
DATE
Sept. 25
Oct. 5
Oct.9
Oct. 14
Oct. 16
Oct. 22
Oct. 27
Nov. 5,6, 7
OPPONENTPLACE
UNC-G SpatsdayGreensbao
Invitational
UNC-Chapel HillChapel Hill
UNC-G and AppsClub Greensboro
DukeDurham
Winthrop InvitationalRock Hill, S.C
Wake ForestHome
Old DominionHome
Deep SouthHome
Tournament
Championships
CLASSIFIEDS
HELP WANTED: Male short-
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weekends, apply in person. Sam
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Darwin Water's Service Station.)
FOR SALEM blue rug, ,12 x12
$10. Call 752-4013.
WANTED: Keyboard player fa
weekend band, top 40 and
pop-country. Bookings through
Jan. Days call 758-3378, nights
call 752-6566.
HOUSE FOR SALE:9 rojms, wall
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dining room; drapes, new inlaid
kitchen and den, spacious back
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information, call Hooker &
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FOR RENT: Roan in attractive
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Full house privileges. $79 mo.
Call 756-0698 a write P.O. Box
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FOR SALE: '75 Corvette, low
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758-8883 (Business) 756-5465
(home).
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Nice
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VNTIQUE SHOP & Flea Mkt.
Greenville Coilectas Club's 5th
LOST: Dog, Black Scottish Terria
answers to name of Seattle. Black
all ova. If found call 758-4922.
FOR SALE: 1970 Honda CL-175,
very good condition; asking $300,
includes two helmets. Call
758-9322.
HELP WANTED: Washington
Yacht & Country Club, we need
waiters a waitresses, come fa
interview Wed Fri Sat afta
4.
FOR SALE: Realistic staeo com-
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752-7596.
FOUND: 4 mo. old black & tan
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FOR SALE: 2.5 cu. ft. refrigaata
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Title
Fountainhead, September 23, 1976
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 23, 1976
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.410
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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