Fountainhead, September 21, 1976






THIS ISSUE
24 PA GES
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
ENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over fifty years
CIRC U LA TION
8,500
VOL. 52, NO. 3
21 SEPTEMBER 79
�-��
mmmm
m

Student Union plans to oppose
adoption of SGA constitution
By KIM JOHNSON
Assistant News Editor
ECU Student Union staff will
oppose adoption of the proposed
Student Government Association
(SGA) constitution, according to
Barry Robinson, Student Union
president.
Robinson said Thursday he
intends to campaign extensively
to see that this Constitution is
rejected.
Robinson bases his objections
on a clause from Article III,
Section 1, which states the SGA
shall be supreme student
law having precedence over any
othei student originated charters
regulati m
Robinson feels this clause
threatens the independence of the
Student Union and its job of
plying student activities and
Transit
services
expand
ByROGtRWHITSON
Staff Writer
Tne ECU Transit System
opened Friday, Sept. 10, with
expanded service for the 1976
school year.
The purchase of two new
pusher buses, at combined cost of
$54,000, has enabled the system
to open a new route serving the
Elizabeth and Willow St. area,
according to Tim Sullivan, SGA
a dent.
This new Brown route has
joined the Purple and Gold routes
in providing students with readily
aajssible transportation to large
.isof Greenville, said Sullivan.
The purchase of the new buses
ibled the transit system to
designate one of the older buses
is a back-up in case of emergency
Of break-down
According to Gary Miller,
transit manager, the number of
angers has increased from
l .1 year.
Sullivan said that since there
have already been students turn-
ed away from overcrowded buses
on the Purple route, the SGA has
I ated a Shuttle bUS to nrry
overflow.
The transit authorities wish to
dents that these bu
, be chartered, information
(nay tx: obtained by calling the
e in Mendenhail Stu

major attractions.
The Student Union separated
from the SGA five years ago. At
present, Student Union commit-
tees and president make deci-
sions on entertainment indepen-
dent of the SGA.
According to Robinson, this
constitution implies that the SGA
intends to take over the Student
Union again.
"Since the break, there has
been a passing on of bad
feelingsamong SGA legislators
said Robinson.
"I'm afraid if we went back
under SGA authority politics
would hurt top-notch entertain-
ment
Robinson said he fears "50
people trying to decide what free
flick to show on one Friday
night.
Charlotte Cheatum, Theatre
Arts Committee chairwoman,
agreed with Robinson. 'The
Student Union cannot afford to be
controlled by a political organiza-
tion she said.
"If we have to go through
SGA approval, our work will be
hindered. We'd never get any-
thing done. We've been doing
quite well by ourselves; we don't
get bogged down in so much red
tape Cheatum said.
Georgina Langston, chairwo-
man of the "Entertainer" com-
mittee voiced belief that this
clause in the constitution implies
SGA control over the Student
Union
fie initial reason for the
split between SGA and the Union
was because the SGA couldn't
handle booking entertainment
plus evert hi ng else it does she
said.
"We've done a good job.
Damnit, leave us alone
According to Tim Sullivan,
SGA pres this constitution is not
a move to bring entertainment
back under SGA control, nor is it
any different from past constitu-
tions in stating SGA law as
"supreme
In reply to the accusation of
entertainment becoming entang-
led in political red tape under
SGA authority, Sullivan admitted
that the legislators did bicker "for
hours' over what bands to
secure, etc when SGA controlled
entertainment.
The students did have input
into the decisions then, Sullivan
said.
Robinson intends to talk with
Chancellor Leo Jenkins if the new
constitution is adopted. Jenkins
must give final approval before
Another ACC rival falls to the Pirates
the Constitution becomes official
Various Union committee
chairmen plan to resign if the
constitution passes, according to
Chairwoman Cheatum.
"They are saying they won't
go along with what the students
say then Sullivan said when
told of the resignation threats.
"I would hope Robinson's
people would be more loyal to the
students than that he added.
Sullivan called the Union's
opposition to the constitution
false controversy and said that
it is being created because the
Union and the administration
running the Union are embar-
rassed over the Homecoming
Steering Committee vote
Sullivan was referring to the
Sept 14 secret-ballot vote defeat-
ing his proposal for more on-cam-
pus entertainment Oct. 30 of
Homecoming weekend
SGA
races
start
By ROGER WHITSON
Staff Writer
Campaigning began last night
for SGA posts open in the Sept. 28
and 29 elections.
Following their meeting, the
candidates for student represent-
ative positions and class offices
met current SGA members and
officers.
The campaign period will run
until midnight election eve, Sept.
27.
In an interview last week, Tim
Sullivan, SGA president, named
Lynn Yow and Clay Burnette
election co-chairmen.
Sullivan also stated that, in an
effort to avoid the chaos of
previous elections, the 220-
member ECU Marching Pirates
have been contracted to man the
twenty polling places for the
two-day election, in addition to
counting ballots, distributing
4,000 campaign leaflets and
hanging posters.
The ballot will include a
five-part referendum on such
topics as SGA expenditures on
the transit system, Fountainhead,
Buccaneer and fine arts pro-
grams.
The referendum also includes
quest ions on construction of a
pedestrian overpass on Tenth St.
at the base of College Hill Drive
and the proposed expansion of
Fioklen Stadium.
m





HHHHHMMHaHHHIH
2
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 321 SEPTEMBER 197b
GAAA Test Adopt a Pet Alpha Phi Inter-Varsity Entertainer
The Graduate Management
Admission Test will be offered at
ECU Saturday, Oct. 30.
Students interested in taking
the test may secure application
forms from the ECU Testing
Center, 105-106 Speight Building,
and mail them to Educational
Testing Service, Box 966-R,
Princeton, N.J. by Oct. 8.
Rush
Kappa Sigma Chapter of Delta
Sigma Theta will have rush
Tuesday, Sept. 21, at 7 p.m. at
the Afro-American Cultural
System.
Ebony Herald
Ebony � .ofald will hold its
staff organizational meeting
Thursday night at 9:30, im-
mediately following the SOULS
meeting in Mendenhall. All posi-
tions are open and all interested
persons are welcome. Please
attend.
SOULS
Society of United Liberal
Students will hold a meeting at 7
p.m. in Mendenhall, Room 244,
Thurs Sept. 23. Attendance is
encouraged. Important issues will
be oonsidered.
Spanish
The Spanish Club is holding
its's first meeting on Sept. 21, at
730 in 248 Mendenhall. All
interested students are welcome.
We will discuss upcoming events
for the year.
SociAnth
The Sociology Anthropology
club will .neet Wed Sept. 22, at
7 p.m. in Brewster D 301. All
majors, minors, and interested
persons are invited to attend.
Refreshments will be served.
Fac. Senate
The learning experience at a
university involves more than
just attending classes, studying
for tests and doing term papers.
Becoming involved with the
Faculty Senate gives the indivi-
dual student a chance to see the
workings behind the departments
and to become a part of Univer-
sity planning and functioning.
Interested students are en-
couraged to get involved because
if you don't, who will?
For further information con-
tact Tim McLeod, Secretary of
Academic Affairs, at the Student
Government office in Mendenhall
Student Center. His office hours
are: Monday 10-1 p.m Tuesday
12-1 p.m Wednesday 10-1 and
4-5 p.m Thursday 10-1 and 4-5
p.m and Friday 1-5 p.m.
m� 'i� turn iikimhj
The dogs available this week
include four mixed springer-
spaniel puppies, one black and
tan mixed breed, two tan mixed
breeds, one black, tan and white
mixed breed, two black mixed
breeds, and two white kittens.
The people at the animal
shelter would like to extend a
warmECU weloome to all stu-
dents. We would like anyone
interested in visiting the shelter
to please stop by. Our address is
2nd St off Cemetery Road. We
would appreciate your support
this year.
Co-op Educ.
What is cooperative edu-
cation? Find out. All students are
invited to hear a discussion of this
exciting new ECU program next
Tues Sept. 21, at 3 p.m. in 304
Rawl Building.
Fellowship
The Forever Generation of
ECU is a Christ-centered fellow-
ship group. We meet every
Friday night for a study or
challenge from the Bible, singing,
refreshments, and warm fellow-
ship. Our meetings are supple-
mented by oookouts, get-togeth-
ers, weekend retreats, and other
good times.
Why not join us this Friday
night at 7:30 p.m in Mendenhall
244?
Men's Tennis
Anyone interested in playing
tennis for the men's varsity
should meet in room 142 Minges
tonight, newcomers at 7 p.m. and
returnees at 8 p.m.
VWiters
Anyone interested in writing
sports for the Fountainhead
should call 757-6366 and ask fa
Steve Wheeler. If no answer, call
752-5180. Freshmen and sopho-
mores are especially urged tocall.
Award
The Gamma Eta Chapter of
the Phi Kappa Tau social fratern-
ity at ECU has been named one of
three recipients of the Harold E.
"Hap" Angelo Award for
Chapter Improvement. The award
is given annually by the National
Council of Phi Kappa Tau to those
chapters, not to exceed five in one
year, who have demonstrated the
greatest improvement in all
phases of fraternity.
The Gamma Eta Chapter has
been on campus 15 years. The
Chapter will accept the award in a
formal presentation by the Execu-
tive Director of Phi Kappa Tau,
Wlliam D. Jenkins.
Omega Alpha Chapter of
Alpha Phi Sigma (National Crim-
inal Justice Honor Society) will
hold a dinner meeting on 30
September at 6:30 p.m. at the
Bonanza Steak House. All mem-
bers and any interested students
who meet the following require-
ments are encouraged to attend:
(1) students must have declared
their major, minor, or equivalent
in the Criminal Justioe field, (2)
they must have completed one-
third of their aedit hours re-
quired fa graduation (3) they
must have oonpleted four oourses
in their declared Criminal Justice
maja, mina a equivalent, (4)
they must possess a 3.0 accum-
ulative grade point average with a
3.0 in the Criminal Justice field,
and (5) they must be in the upper
35 percent of their class and of
good maal characta. Students
who plan to attend must make
reservations by 27 September to
members of Alpha Phi Sigma:
David Rathbone, Mary Lou
Moae, Rita Whaley, Jon Wescott
a Jim Campbell of the Ca-
red iais Department.
Gamma Beta
Gamma Beta Phi will hold a
special meeting fa all members
oi Thurs. Sept. 23 in Brewster
B102 at 7 p.m.
Phi Sicma
The regular monthly dinner
meeting of Phi Sigma Pi National
Hona Fraternity will be held
Wed. Sept. 29, 1976, at Boianza
Steak Pit at 6 XX) p.m. All brahers
are urged to attend as the
National Convention will be the
main item of business.
Testing
The Law School Admissions
Test ana the Dental Aptitude Test
will be administered at ECU
Saturday, Oct. 9.
Both nationally-standardized
tests will be given in a campus
location arranged by the ECU
Testing Center. Applications fa
the tests are available from the
ECU Testing Center. Appli-
cations fa the tests are available
from the Center in 105-6 Speight
Building.
Application blanks fa the law
school test are to be completed
and mailed to Educational Test-
ing Service, Box 966-R, Prince-
ton, N.J. 08540.
Applications fa the dental
aptitude test should be mailed to
the Division of Educational Mea-
surements, American Dental
Association, 211 East Chicago
Ave Chicago, III. 60611.
Further information about
either test is available from John
Childers, Directa of Testing at
ECU.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fel-
lowship will meet Wed. Sept. 22
at 7:30 p.m. in the Methodist
Student Center across from Gar-
ret t dam.
Lost
Lost- Brown leather wallet in the
vicinity of Jason'sand McDonalds
after football game. It contains no
money, just important papers. If
found, please return to 402-A
Belk a call 752-5347. $10.00
reward offered.
Found
One pair of wirerim glasses with
smoked lenses. Found on side-
walk in front of old Joyner. Pick
up at Mendenhall's Infamatioi
Desk Lost and Found.
Freshmen
FRESHMAN-Pick up your Regis-
ters (Annuals at 229 Mendenhall
from Vice President Greg
Pingston from now until Friday
the 24th from 11 30-2.00.)
Bucaneer
Any persons interested in
writing free-lance fa the BUC-
ANEER should attend a writ-
ers' meeting on Wednesday at
400 in the BUCANEER office. A
staff meeting will also be held on
Wednesday at 430 fa interested
persais.
Poli Sci
The Political Science Depart-
mental Assembly will be held
Mon. Sept. 27, 1976 in BC-103 at
7 p.m. All Political Science majas
and minas are encouraged to
attend as there will be pertinent
infamatioi given concerning all
departmental programs.
Golf Tourney
United Cerebral Palsy of
Nath Carolina and Putt-Putt Golf
Courses have famed an unbeat-
able twosome to announce the
first annual PUTT FOR PALSY
Hole-in-One Tournament.
The tournament, set for
September 25 & 26, will be
statewide and involve almost 25
Putt-Putt courses in 23 cities.
Golfers will have the oppa-
tunity to play fa a four hour
period, win giant trophies and
compete fa the state champion-
ship.
All net proceeds from the
PUTT FOR PALSY will benefit
UCP-NC's extensive program
services for cerebral palsied
children and adults.
Fa more details, stop by your
focal Putt-Putt course a any
participating Fast Fare.
m
r0
mmtmmmm
mtmm
m
MM
mm mn
To experience the ultimate in
the publication field and learn the
know hows of the Student Union
(without entering insanity syn-
drome), apply fa the Entertainer
Committee of the Student Union.
We are new and need you to
become one of us. Apply at
Mendenhall Infamation Desk.
Witnesses
Anyone who actually saw the
bicyclist who was struck by a car
at the bottom of College Hill
Drive and 264 April 26, 1976
please call Jeanie Cox at 758-8300
a go by 616 White dam. The
information is pertinent to a
pending law suit.
Chess club
The ECU Chess Club will
meet Tues. evening, Sept. 21, at
730 p.m. in the Coffeehouse in
Mendenhall Student Center. All
interested persons are invited to
attend.
Three faces
The Oscar-winning movie,
The Three Faces of Eve, will be
shown in Mendenhall Student
Center Theatre on Sept. 22, at 8
p.m. The film stars Joanne
Woodward and Lee J. Cobb in
this psychological explaatioiof a
schizophrenic. The show is spon-
saed by the Student Unia Films
Committee. (See the Beatles'
show afterwards!)
Republicans
The first meeting of the
College Republicans is set fa
Wednesday, Sept. 22, 1976 at
i 30 in Brewster, Wing B 104.
Mr. Herb Lee will be the guest
speaker at this meeting. Mr. Lee
is the 1st District Chairman of the
Republ ican Party and a Trustee of
ECU. All students who are
interested in the political process
and the Republican Party are
invited to attend.
Senior show
Art wak by M ichael Shepherd
McNeely of Decatur, Ga senia
in the ECU School of Art. is on
display on the first floa show-
cases of Rawl Building.
McNeely's show includes
pencil drawings, india ink and
wash drawings, an intaglio print
and some limestone sculpture.
Weigh tliftinq
There will be a meeting of the
ECU Weightlifting Club, Wed.
Sept. 33, at 730 p.m. in room 143
M inges.
'See FLASHES, page 3.
. mi '� � Si'�- M





FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 321 SEPTEMBER 1976
3

mntm
mm
m � pi
newSFLASHFLAS
Rush
Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority
rush is Sept. 23 in the multi-pur-
pose room of Mendenhall.
Bowling
All persons interested in
participating in a Mixed Doubles
Bowling League, Fall quarter, are
invited to attend a meeting un
Wed. Sept. 22 at 6 p.m. at the
Mendenhall Student Center
Bowling Center. League play will
begin on Tues. Sept. 28.
Kilpatrick
Who is our next president?
James J. Kilpatrick Speaks To-
night! Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter is the site of this great
occasion. The program, "Wash-
ington Wonderland will begin
at 8 p.m. and is sponsored by the
Student Union Lectures Com-
mittee. ECU students are admit-
ted free with I.D. and Activity
cards, faculty and staff with MSC
membership card, and the public
with a $3-bill or equivalent cash.
THE WORLD'S MOST HIGHLY
RECOMMENDED SPEAKER
Free flick Comedy
This week's Friday and Satur-
day Free Flick is The Longest
Yardo be shown at 7 p.m. and 9
p.m. on Sept. 24th and 25th in
Mendenhall Student Center
theatre. This rip-roaring, get-in-
volved movie is big, fast and will
make you laugh and cheer along
with Burt Reynolds and his mean
machine. Presented by the Stu-
dent Union Films Committee.
I.Ds and activity cards are
'equired.
Art exhibit
The Summerset II Art Exhibit,
presently living and breath1,lg in
Mendenhall Gallery, will remain
alive until Sept. 25. If you have
ot seen this splendid conglo-
meration of paintings, weavings,
and hay you must do so immedia-
tely
Those with works in the show
can pick them up Sat. Sept. 25 at
8 p.m. or Sun. at 1 p.m.
Buddy Rich
The "World's Greatest drum-
mer Buddy Rich will Insert his
earth moving motions into Wright
Auditorium on Thurs. Sept. 23,
1976. Tickets are available at the
Central Ticket Office in Menden-
hall Student Center, pricec at
$1.50 for E.C.U. students and
$3.00 for public, faculty and staff.
Groups of 20 or more will be
admitted fa only $2.00 each.
Public tickets are available at the
door.
Crime
"Why America Is Losing ther
War on Crime" is the topic of an
address by Dr. Jack Wright
scheduled at ECU Friday, Oct. 8.
Wright is director of the
criminal justice program at Loyola
University, New Orleans, and
oo-author of several texts for
studies in criminology.
The presentation will begin at
11 a.m. in Brewster Building,
C-103, and is tree and open to the
public
East Carolina Playhouse audi-
tions for THE STUDENT
PRINCE, a comedy operetta, will
be held Tuesday and Wednesday,
September 21-22 from 730-10:00
o.m. in MoGinnis Auditorium.
Special project class credit
from the Department of Drama
and Speech for appearing in or
working on a show is available.
Singers should come prepar-
ed, with music, and an accom-
panist will be provided. Non-sing-
ing roles are also available.
The show will be directed by
Edgar R. Lcessin, Chairman of
the Department of Drama and
Speech.
HEAR & COMPARE BOSE
AT
-armony House 5outn
ONE OF THE LARGEST
BOSE DEALERS IN THE U.S.
m
mm
mm
m





BPSJpil ;Si� :�'
� .Jwfc'
��������������IMWIM
4
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 3'121 SEPTEMBER 1976
m
m
m
OTMtftaM

Robinson emcees
political circus
Opposition to the proposed Student Government
Constitution has arisen from the head of the campus
organization that usually applauds itself for being
nonpolitical. Student Union President Barry
Robinson said he intends to campaign extensively
against the new constitution on which students will
vote in the election of SGA legislators and officer s next
week.
Robinson is balking at the provision giving the
SGA "supreme authority" over all other student
organizations on campus. He said this clause implies
that the SGA is bent on taking over the Student Union
again. To the contrary, the Union President is
implying that the authority of that organization to
decide what is proper yet profitable entertainment for
the university community is without question. Its
authority is certainly without direct accountability to a
student constituency because no "representative" of
the Student Union comes to power through the
balloting process as do most SGA officials.
It is doubtful, however, that the purpose of this
clause is to retake the programming authority which
the SGA voluntarily relinquished in 1972. Neverthe-
less, what student organization would be in a position
to take remedial measures if, for example, the Union
began sponsoring unpopular events or if the acts
they did schedule cancelled because the Union
refused to work through a professional agent?
The governing and president-selecting authority of
the Student Union is invested in the Board of
Directors, the members of which are administrators,
faculty or students originally elected fa other
positions. Actual programming decisions are made in
committees headed by appointees of the Union
President that can conduct official business only with
the presence of an advisor from the administration
or faculty.
The disputed article of the proposed constitution,
which must be ratified by two-thirds of the student
body with the approval of the university chancellor, is
not significantly different from the Supreme Student
Law article of the present constitution. To have the
proposed constitution rejected because of this niggling
opposition would be unfortunate for the university
which will require a new political makeup with the
introduction of the semester system Fall Quarter,
1977.
Fcxintainhead
Serving the East Carolina community lor over fifty years
Senior EditorJim Elliott
Production ManagerJimmy Williams
Advertising ManagerDennis Leonard
Business ManagerTeresa Whisenant
News EditorsDebbie Jackson
Neil Sessoms
Trends EditorPat Coyle
Spats EditorSteve Wheeler
Fountainhead is the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Student Government Association
of ECU and appears each Tuesday and Thursday during the
school year, weekly during the summer.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C.
27834.
Editorial Offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions:$10.00 annually for non-students, $6.00 for
alumni.
JZXjj'rz
TVTUJRE HftUFTMfe ACTiviTr
(LEO AT bS)
Th1:orum
S.H.I.T. President raises stink
It began like most any morn-
ing on the East Carolina Univer-
sity campus bordering Fifth St.
between Holly and Rotary Sts.
The oold damp twilight of morning
reluctantly yielded to the growing
avalanche of golden rays. Sud-
denly, the metallic echos of
sledge hammers burst forth,
spreading thier stench ever the
still placid morning air. Steel
stakes were being pounded into
the resisting earth.
Painted green, to further
conceal their presence, this mim-
iatureSiegfried Line interspersed
the hedge serving as a deterrent
to those who may pose a threat to
the sacred and virgin campus
grass (nonsmokable variety of
course). That was some time
during Spring Quarter. Weeks
passed, a few brave souls fought
and won the skirmishes that
blazed new trails through the
bourgeois' bureaucratic green-
ery.
One evening during the break
between Second Session and Fall
Quarter I observed a scene that
almost went unnoticed. Two
Frisbee freaks trucked up Jarvis
Street and crossed Fifth to toss a
few on the grass in front of
Fleming Hall. They traversed the
hedge with great difficulty and
then proceeded to enjoy them-
selves until a stray throw ventur-
ed near the lurking hedge. With
an outstretched arm the projectile
was caught; but then dropped as
the unidentified individual quick-
ly grasped his left arm now
bloodied. He was the first.
Approximately two weeks lat-
er several neighborhood youths
were running toward the same
break in the hedge that the dudes
with the Frisbee had enoountered
previously, when all of a sudden
the first neophyte executed a
perfect one-and-a half over the
hedge. It was beautiful. Witnes-
sing this from my apartment I was
at first unconcerned, until I heard
the boy'scries. Rushing to his aid
I likewise did a not so perfect
belly flop over the hedge. This
Forum Policy
Forum letters should be typed
or printed and they must be
signed and include the writer's
address. Names will be withheld
upon request. Letters may be sent
to Fountainhead or left at the
Information Desk in Mendenhall
Student Center.
m
m
mm
was not planned but with the
assistance of BARBED WIRE
tightly streched across the break
in the hedge at about waist
height. Neither the young man
nor myself were seriously injured,
but if the boy had been several
inches shorter he oould have been
stabbed in the eye.
Since then I have seen many
wrestle with Joseph F. Glidden's
invention, and applauded when
one Amazon pulled a stake and its
attached menace out of the
ground and neatly deposited it
two meters a. ay! I know not the
mental midget that authorized
this project, but if you read this
may your gonads swell to the size
of Saturn.
this letter and Sisyphus have a
lot in oommon - neither will reach
the top. It will probably require a
law suit to remove this concealed
weapon, but until then I want to
most heartily caution my com-
rades to be careful as you
maneuver over or through the
"Greenville Wall but by no
means walk around in defeat!
Raymond Neal Linvi Me
President, S.H.I.T. of Greenville
Step High n Traversing, Inc.





1
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 321 SEPTEMBER 1976
5
nnm���iwin�-�iM ff ii inmiLiiy jiiiiimMi n iriiiiji pgwiiji, iin i mm it �mmmmmmmm i n ��iwii�
Students eligible for unemployment benefits
Rj n&VAJrtMn A im T-io anH aro tnJH tn ow h ik�a take inct " anu" i�K Ail ��i MinrK � i .
By RA YMOND A VRUTIS
NEW YORK (LNS)Many
unemployed college and high
school students, dropouts and
graduates who are seeking full-
time work may collect unemploy-
ment insurance (Ul) based on the
work they performed while stu-
dents.
All 5s are covered except
self-employment. And it doesn't
matter whether you have worked
full-time, part-time, at temporary
employment, or at two or more
jobs.
Tax-free Ul benefits (which
are often 50 percent or more of
your before-taxes wages) can be
paid for up to 65 weeks, depend-
ing on the state in which you have
worked, the length of time you
were employed, and the amount
of money you earned while
working. (Students are not eligi-
ble to receive Ul during vacations
period for work performed in
Illinois, Montana, North Carolina
and Utah, and in some cases
Indiana and Louisiana
Ul benefits are based on the
total wages you earned in the past
12 to 18 months. You may have
worked at two or more jobs in two
or more states and have the
wages you earned at each job
count toward your benefits.
Merely ask to file a "combined-
wage" claim.
Most states require only $300-
$800 in prior earnings to qualify
for some benefits. And no more
than 4112 months work is usually
required in your base period to
meet the employment require-
ment. You may be able to collect
even if you have worked less
time, and you don't have to have
worked in consecutive months.
You may collect Ul at any age,
whether or not you live with your
parents, and regardless of your
parents' (or your) income or
assets. U.S. citizenship is not
required to collect.
Although in many states stu-
dents cannot collect while enroll-
ed full-time in school, apply for
benefits to find out what the law
is in your state.
Apply for Ul benefits as soon
as you become unemployed-
payments do not start until your
claim is filed.
You can apply for Ul benefits
at any one of the over 2,700
unemployment offices in the
United States and Puerto Rico,
and you may even apply for U.S. -
based Ul in Canada. Your bene-
fits and the eligibility require-
ments you must meet are those of
the state in which you worked.
When you apply, you miu
wing your social security card or
something which lists your social
security number, such as a pay
stub or your W4 federal income
tax form.
Take a book to read when you
file your daim. If you wait all day
and are told to oome back the next
day, do so! The longest wait is
usually when you first apply and
when you return to receive your
benefit determination. But if you
are entitled to benefits-you will
get them.
To maximize your potential
benefits, list every job you had in
the last 18 months, in any state.
Once you are collecting un-
employment, you do not have to
take just "any" job. All states
require a person to accept only
suitable work. In most states,
work that is hazardous to your
health, safety or morals; work
that is far from where you live;
and work unrelated to your prior
experience, earnings or training
is unsuitable.
Students may, however, be
required to be less discriminating
than full-time members of the
labor foroe on the issue of suitable
wotk.
Leaving a job while in college
to look for a job elsewhere will get
you suspended from benefits in
some states, but not in others. In
all states, you may collect Ul if
you quite with good cause. But
the definition of good cause
differs from state to state, and
varie from claims deputy to
claims deputy.
Your benefits will be sus-
pended if you were fired for
misconduct. But being fired for
inefficiency will not earn
suspension in most cases.
If you feel you were suspend-
ed unjustly, appeal on the spot. It
usually takes four weeks for your
appeal to be heard. The appeal is
free and you may subpoena
witnesses (e.g oo-workers). The
subpoena is free as well.
Save this article for future
reference and mail a copy to a
friend. And remember: When in
doubt, file a claim. You worked
for it-now collect it.
���.

What does the
population
explosion
have to do with
�t -�") When more and more people compete
inflation r
to buy limited goods or resources, prices
go up. That's a basic reason for infla-
tion, though the whole story is more
complicated.
When more and more people compete
CnClcfV C llSlS � � � . to buy more and more energy, the price
climbs and shortages are further aggra-
vated.
irrr chrkrl-arrPeP With 75 million additional people every
lUUU ollwl Llcito� � year pressing against limited world food
resources, shortages, higher prices, and
famine are as certain as the setting of
the sun.
cknir ri h.ncinrrP when more comPetc for hous-
ldLlV Ul llVJUollli mg, then mortgage rates, land costs, and
construction prices all move upward.
And decent housing moves fi rther out
of reach for an increasing number of
people.
Some people will quarrel with these explanations as over-
simplified Ol course the) arc; little in life is uncomplicated.
But no one should quarrel vuth this truth: If our globe had
fewer people on it, most of its problems would find easier
solutions and the quality of life for all would be improved.
So won't you help the Population Institute's campaign to
motivate all potential parent! to reduce their childbearing?
We're domg that around the world by enlisting the aid of
those national and world organisations that, through the
creative impact ol entertainers, writers, journalists, editors,
broadcasters, publishers, teachers, clergy, statesmen, and
activists, can reach out again and again to the people of the
world with the message that . .
whatever your cause, it's a lost cause
unless we halt the population explosion
You ian heIp solve the population nisi by lending a check today to:
The Population Institute, 100Maryland Ave N E , Washington. DC 20002
THE POPULATION INSTITUTE CAMPUS ACTION PROGRAM
116 Mary!�n� Ave. N.E WnMngten, DC. 28082
I want to participate in the effort to heighten population
awareness on college campuses Please send me a bro-
chure describing the Campus Action Program
Please print
2p
wmmm
mmmm
mmm
m

m





6
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 321 SEPTEMBER 1976
m
�M
Greek diplomats
analyze U.S. policy
3y ROGER WHITSON
Staff Writer
Dr. Zacharias Kratsas and his
brother, Apostolis Kratsas, mem-
bers of the Greek Parliament,
held a two-day speaking engage-
ment here Thursday and Friday,
Sept. 16 and 17.
The brothers were elected to
Parliament as members of the
new Democratic Party in 1974
after living for seven years under
a military junta which banned all
political activity.
This was their sole university
appearance on a tour which
included the major cities of the
North and Midwest.
Apostolis opened the lecture
with an explanation of Greek-
Turkish problems and a critical
analysis of American foreign
policy, pertinent to the Aegean
and northeastern Mediterranean.
Concerning the Cyprus con-
flict of 1974 and the current
Greek-Turkish quarrel over oil
rights in the Aegean, Apostolis
said, "Turkey, motivated by
economic gain and in an effort to
draw attention away from her own
internal problems, has always
played every type of political
game, regardless of its effects on
her friends and neighbors
Apostolis downplayed the
strategic importance of U.S.
missile bases in Turkey, which he
described as "outdated and
denounced U.S. reluctance to act
in the Cyprus conflict.
Apostolis cited the failure of
the U.S. intervention in prevent-
ing the Turkish invasion of the
independent island.
Kratsas blamed the U.S.
government and Henry Kissin-
ger, in particular, as being
responsible for the subsequent
eight day war which left some
4,(XX) Greek Cypriots dead and
another 200,000 homeless.
In a recount of recent Greek
political and economic advances,
Apostolis expressed pride in the
steps the new government has
taken in restoring democracy to
Greece.
Since the fall of the junta,
unemployment has fallen to 1
percent and the inflation rate is
now 6 percent as compared to
25-30 percent of two years ago,
Apostolis noted.
Apostolis presented Turkish
i attempts at preventing Grecian,
entrance into the Common Mar-
ket as an example of the current
state of hostilities existing be-
tween the two nations.
Apostolis stated, "Greece will
not permit anyone to infringe on
one inch of her territory
According to Apostolis this
territory includes the sea bed
rights granted to Greece by the
1968 Conference on Sea Rights.
"Greece relies on the sea and
on the continental shelf for its
economic livelihood Apostolis
said.
Apostolis denied claims that
Greece's Aegean islands pose a
threat to Turkish interests and
that they interfer with Aegean
trade.
Dr. Zacharias Kratsas re-
counted the Cyrpus conflict,
citing Turkish colonization pro-
grams, aimed at changing the
Greek-Turkish population ratio on
the island, as an example of
Turkish hostility toward Greece.
EPISCOPAL STUDENTS
OPPORTUNITIES FOR WORSHIP & STUDY
EACH Wednesday beginning Sept. 22nd at St. Paul's Episcopal
Church 5:30 EUCHARIST 6:00 SUPPER
EACH Tuesday beginning Sept. 28 12:00 noon EUCHARIST
in Chapel 501 E. 1st St.
EACH Thursday beginning Sept. 23rd 4:00pm History beliefs
and Worship of of the Espicopal Church (A weekly open-
ended discussion-come anytime)
Office of the Episcopal Chaplain 501 East 5th St. 758-2030
(The Methodist Center) Chapel & Office
Office Hours 9am-12am-2pm-5pm Bill Hadden, Chaplain
MASTERCHARGE
FOR
LOVELY
THINGS
BANK AMERICARD
BACK-TO-CAMPUS
SALE
DAKS WELCOMES ALL ECU STUDENTS
WITH GREAT BUYS ON
FAMOUS BRANDS:
LEVI JEANS
25 OFF REGULAR PRICE
(EXCLUDES MENS STYLE)
COUNTRY-SlT
SWEATERS
?1396 to ?1798 VALUES
NOW 790 AND 1090
RUGBY SHIRTS
590
WERE 12�0 VALUE
ENTIRE STOCK OF
TOMBOY AND RED-I
COORDINATES ON SALE
LEE PAINTER PANTS
AND DENIM JEANS
VALUES TO M498
NOW 1198
DAKS-
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE - ONTHE MALL
ft

m�
���UftiPH
m





FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 321 SEPTEMBER 1976
7
m
m
mumm
m
High school students
attend ECU workshop
By JACK LAIL
Staff Writer
The second annual journalism
workshop, held in Joyner Library
Saturday, attracted 185 hiph
school students and student pub-
lication advisors from all areas of
eastern North Carolina.
The event is sponsored by
Alpha Phi Gamma (honorary
journalism society), ECU jour-
nalism department, and ECU
Division of Continuing Education.
Students from as far away as
Gastonia and Wilmington, N.C.
participated in workshops con-
cerning news and feature writing,
photography, advising student
publications, and production.
Participants competed in a
news writing contest. First place
went to Mary Jane Hunt, Garner
High School, Raleigh, N.C. and
second place to Carolyn Worsley
Washington High School, Wash-
ington, N.C.
Speakers included Susan
Quinn, reporter for the Greenville
DAILY REFLECTOR, Jerry Alle-
good, reporter for the Raleigh
News and Observer, Gary McCul-
lough of Delmar Publications,
Henrietta Barbour, publications
advisor at Rocky Mount High
School, Rocky Mount, N.C, Ken
Barnes, publications advisor at
Gddsboro High School, Gdds-
boro, N.C, Jim Steeds, photo-
grapher from Robbins, N.C,
Terry Maulsby of American Year-
book Company, Dr. Thomas
Williams, editor of The New East,
John Evans, former sports editor
for the Fountainhead, Jeff Rollins
1976 editor of The Rebel, Monika
Sutherland, Editor of the Buc-
caneer, Jim Elliott, editor of the
Fountainhead, Jimmy Williams,
production manager of the Foun-
tainhead, Ira Baker, Dr. Sally
Brett, and Lawrence O'Keefe,
ECU journalism professors.
Dr. John M. Howell, ECU
Provost, opened the workshop in
ECU recieves
day care grant
A total of $91,678 has been
awarded the ECU Human Re-
sources Training Institute to
support an eastern North Carolina
day care training and consultation
project. The funds originate from
the N.C. Dept. of Human Re-
sources.
According to Diana Pegram,
project coordinator, the ECU
Human Resouroes Training Insti-
tute will be involved in ooopera-
ative efforts with Pitt Technical
Institute and the ECU Schools of
Home Economics and Allied
Health and Social Professions.
The project is concerned with
providing a wide variety of
in-service training opportunities
for day care personnel in 33
eastern North Carolina oounties.
The ECU project, directed by
Lawrence Nason, director of the
ECU Institute, is one of several
throughout the state, all members
of the N.C. Child Care Training
Consortium.
N.C. study group
to meet on campus
BENTON-The North Carolina
Association for the Education of
Young Children (NCAEYC) will
have its annual study conference
here Sept. 30-Oct. 2 at the Benton
Convention Center, the Hyatt
House Hotel and the Centenary
United Methodist Church.
The ECU Division of Con-
tinuing Education is coordinating
the conference. Current NC
AEYC president is Lucy Peterson
of the N.C. School for the Deaf at
Morganton.
Approximately 2,500 rTV-f?
bers are expected to attena nil6
conference. NC-AEYC member-
ship includes persons profession-
ally involved with the education of
children to eight years old.
Conference activities will in-
clude workshop sessions, lectures
by experts in early childhood
education, special interest group
meetings, films and commercial
exhibits arranged by Gloria Nor-
ris of Winston-Salem.
Workshop and lecture topics
include language development,
oeative learning environments,
contemporary research in child
development, the importance of
play in learning experiences, art,
drama, music and folk-dancing
for young children, mathematics
and science in the early school
years, cooking with young chil-
dren, storytelling, library pro-
grams, sex role stereotyping
among young children, parent
involvement and producing chil-
dren's publications.
Pre-registration materials and
further information are available
from the Office of Non-Credit
Programs, Division of Continuing
Education, East Carolina Univer-
sity, Greenville, N.C. 27834.
place of the scheduled Leo
Jenkins. The workshop ran from
930 a.m. until 4 p.m.
Monika Sutherland presented
a graphics show illustrating var-
ious aspects of university life and
different uses of photography.
Attendence was so brisk 30
applicants were turned away.
Fulltime student desiring
parttime work selling life
insurance for 7th largest in
nation.
Career upon graduation.
Call B. L. Hunt, CLU, for
appointment. 752-4080
BILL L HUNT, CLU, District Agent
P. O. Box 206, Contanche Street
Greenville, NC 27834
Phones: Office 752-4080, Residence 752-3015
NORTHWESTERN
MUTUAL LIFE
MILWAUKEE
NML
BIGGS DRUG STORE
300 EVANS-ON-THE-MALL
DOWNTOWN
PHONE: 752-2136
FREE PRESCRIPTION PICKUP
AND DELIVERY
Old fashion soda fountain drinks
made the way you Jike them:
Freshly squeezed lemonades and
orangeades-milkshakes made with
ice cream!
Prescription Dept. with medication profiles: your
prescription ulways at our fingertips, even though
you may lose your R bottle.
COSMETICS-
SUNDRIES-
TOILETRIES-
DELIVERED TO
YOUR DOOR
TIME X WATCHED
COSTUME JEWELRY
PHOTO PROCESSING
FIRST-AID SUPPLIES
GREETING CARDS-
CONVALESCENT SUPPLIES,
ATHELETIC SUPPORTS, SCHOOL SUPPLIES
m
m
m

MSfclfluSfejfc
��������JM





8
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 321 SEPTEMBER 1976
mm
iPtwiiWii
m
Greenville transit
system discussed
By BRENDA NORRIS
Staff Writer
Plans for expanding the
Greenville "Great" transit sys-
tem were discussed at a joint
session of the Transit Committee
and the Greenville City Council
Wednesday, Sept. 17 at 8 p.m. in
the City Hall.
A study by Alan M. Voorhees
and Associates, Inc analyzing
alternative transit programs and
elements that could be imple-
mented in Greenville within five
years was presented by Jim
Watt and Ken Patten.
According to the study, there
are five feasible route service
alternatives.
Direct economic benefits cited
in the study are more and better
employment opportunities, more
shopping choice, better use of
existing economic assistance pro-
grams, reduction of household
auto, and non-driver transport-
ation.
Non-economic benefits in-
clude more recreational and edu-
cational opportunities and ex-
panded social opportunities.
Programs suggested in the
study include three basic service
concepts, fixed-route transit,
demand-responsive transit, and
specialized services.
Fixed route transit is the type
of service now being offered by
"Great" Buses make regular
stops at fixed time schedules.
Demand-responsive transit
(DRT), provides door-to-door
pick-up.
Specialized services provide
transportation to the handicap-
ped, the elderly or agency
clientele.
The first alternative stated in
the study is a moderate level of
services using the fixed route.
Only one bus would be added to
the "Great" system.
According to the study, "ser-
vice is provided primarily to the
high-need areas of the city;
however, the large loop routes are
replaced with more direct radial
routes. Pick-ups are every 60
minutes
The next proposed system is a
fixed-route with a high level of
service.
The next level of service
would incorporate the ECU stu-
dent bus system. Service fre-
quencies would be 30 and 60
minutes.
The fourth level would be a
composite system with a moder-
ate level of service with comple-
mentary demand-responsive ser-
vice. This system utilized the
moderate service level alternative
complemented by a point-
deviation type demand-
responsive transit service in two
"lower need" residential areas.
The last alternative would
divide the entire city into service
areas with an activity center
terminal for each.
The City Council and the
transit committee will hold an
open session to discuss these
alternatives Monday, Oct. 4 in
City Hall at 8 p.m.
SMI UNO QREEK faces dot the campus, luring freshmen into the
throes of "Rush Week"
nil I ' 9mHi iMWlii Hi i tfiinu liiiyinmitfiiin a
bot O Ai
TIRED OF BREAD & LETTUCE SANDWICHES?
come to baroni's
AND GET MEAT ON YOUR BUNS
Open Everyday 11 - till 752-83S1
free delivery: campus, fraternity, Cr downtown area
BIG SOUND
FOR
SMALL BUDGETS
Complete System Specials
1 CRAIG AM-FM RECEIVER
BSR TURNTABLE
CRAIG SPEAKERS
249
95
2 SONY AM-FM RECEIVER
SONY SPEAKERS
SONY TURNTABLE
299s
5
3 FISHER AM-FM RECEIVER
SCIENTIFIC ACOUSTIC
SPEAKERS
BSR TURNTABLE
397
00
4 JVC 5505 AM-FM RECEIVER
BSR TURNTABLE ORCHESTRAL
SPEAKERS
425?
0
5 SONY 7015 AM-FM RECEIVER
TOSHIBA TURNTABLE ORCHES-Q
TRAL SPEAKERS
� it
HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH
ON THE MALL

OUR OWN SERVICE TECHNICIANS
"STUDENT TERMS
(QUALIFIED)
1
m
mm





FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 321 SEPTEMBER 1976
9
Experience cited as criteria
SGA retains local firm to
serve student legal needs
TICE
DRIVE-IN -AYDEN HIGHWAY
Wed. Thru Sat. Adm. �1.50
NOT SINCE LOVE STORY.
By DAVID NASH
Staff Writer
The legal firm of Blount, Crisp
& Grantmyre has again been
retained by the SGA to serve the
legal needs of the students of
ECU.
The firm, having served ECU
since 1972, was selected from
nine other law firms in the
Greenville area, according to
Student Government Association
President Tim Sullivan.
"In my estimation, it is the
firm that will look out for the
students' interests said Sulli-
van.
Sullivan cited the firm's ex-
perience and enthusiasm as the
criteria for the selection.
Sullivan also announced that
the counseling service has been
extended to twelve hours a week.
"We were previously faced
with legal service that provided
students with only six hours of
individual counseling per week
said Sullivan.
The new contract allows for
counseling available Monday
through Thursday. Office hours of
ECU students are 8:00 a.m. to
9:30 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. to 430
p.m.
The response of the students
has been very good, with consul-
tations numbering up to as many
as 15 per week, according to Ms.
Nelson B. Crisp, partner in the
firm.
The firm counsels on subjects
ranging from in-state tuition
requirements, leases and vehicle
violations to drug violations and
marital problems, stated Ms.
Crisp.
Besides counseling, other du-
ties of the firm are to advise the
SGA on legal responsibilities, to
counsel organizations under the
Moeller receives
achievement award
Herman G. Moeller of the
ECU Department of Social Work
and Correctional Services was
presented the E.R. Cass Cor-
rectional Achievement Award by
the American Correctional
Association (ACA) at its 1976
annual meeting in Denver, Col.
The award is one of three
granted annually to outstanding
professionals in the field of
corrections.
Prof. Moeller was cited as "a
living example that a correctional
practitioner can become an out-
standing academician" and as
"one who deserves this high
honor award by his peers within
the organization he has long and
well served
Currently vice chairman of the
ACA Research Council, Moeller
has also been elected to member-
ship of the organization's Profes-
sional Education Council.
In addition, Moeller chairs the
National Commission on Accredit-
ation for Corrections which deve-
lops and applies standards for the
voluntary accreditation of cor-
rectional institutions and
agencies.
Before accepting his faculty
appointment to ECU in 1969,
Moeller was Deputy Director of
the U.S. Bureau of Prisons. He
has served as consultant to the
United Nations Crime Prevention
and Criminal Justice Section and
was secretary of the U.S. dele-
gation to the Fourth United
Nations Congress on Crime Pre-
vention and Control, held in
Japan in 1970.
History department
gets study grant
The ECU Department of
History has received a $1,200
award from the Marine Science
Council - The University of North
Carolina to continue a study of
boat and shipbuilding in the
state's past.
The study is being conducted
by Dr. William N. Still, and ECU
historian who has spent the past
year compiling facts and data on
the shipbuilding industry. He is
centering his study on the
Colonial period through the
World War II.
Still says the importance of
mmm
shipbuilding in North Carolina
has never been fully recognized
and is often overlooked as having
been a major industry. But he
says his research of historical
records and interviews with ship-
builders and descendents of
shipbuilders indicates that ship-
building once employed
thousands of people and ranked
as one of the state's top in-
dustries.
Dr. Still plans to write a book
on the subject when his research
is completed.
Mi
SGA, to provide a notary public
service, to publish a monthly
legal advice column in the
FOUNTAINHEAD, and to take
ECU cases to court.
The retainer for Blount, Crisp
& Grantmyre is $800 per month
during the regular school year
and $400 for the summer session,
said Sullivan.
The contract expires in Jan-
uary of 1977 when the firm will
again by evaluated by the incom-
ing SGA officers.
Appointments for consulta-
tions should be made through the
SGA office. The firm does not
represent students in court be-
cause of the tremendous cost,
said Ms. Crisp.
"We are not saying other
attorneys are not as good, but this
firm shows enthusiasm and has
experience. Now it is up to the
students to use it said Sullivan.
The true story of Jill Kjnmonr.
The American Olympic
ski contender whose tragic fall
took everything but her life.
And who found the courage
to live through the love of one
very special man.
fcTHE OTHER SIDE Of
THE MOUNTAIN'
THE OTHER SIDE OF THE MOUNTAIN Stirnnn MARILYN HASSETT n I,II Kinmoni
nd BEAU BRIDGES � Dick Bo�k � BELINDA I MONTGOMERY � NAN MARTIN
ALSO ON THE SAME PROGRAAA
'���
Comedy that steals its way
At 10:00
into your heart
News
PG
JEFF BRIDGES ANDY GRIFFITH DONALD PLEASENCE
Bring This Ad And You Will get
1 Free Admission With One Paid
ECU'S Complete
Headquarters
T.Vs
Portable Cassettes
AM - FM Clock Radios
Portable Radios
Electronic Supermarket
On the Mall - Downtown - Greenville
m
MM
MMWMIMI
wmmmi
m





io
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 3121 SEPTEMBER 1976
mt0m
rnmmt
N
mm
�MM
Tired of hitting the hot pavement,
dodging mad cars, falling off your bike?
Student government runs, with your fees,
the SGA Transit: 4 big buses that make 44 stops
per hour all over campus and Greenville.
SGA Transit is run for students by students
Use it!
PURPLE GOLD
BROWN
PLACEDEPARTPLACEDEPARTS
SpeightOn half hour10th & Hill25 after hour
East brook25 till hourCollege Hill26 after hour
River Bluff22 till hourMingeson half hour
Kings Row18t ourAllied Health27 till hour
Village Green15th xjtPitt Plaza24 till hour
Memorial Gym12tilll jrOakmont21 till hour
Mendenhall10 till hourMendenhall16 till hour
SpeightOn .hour10th & Hill5 till hour
East brook5 after hourCollege Hill4 till hour
River Bluff8 after hourMingeson the hour
Kings Row12 after hourAllied Health3 after hour
Village Green15 after hourPitt Plaza6 after hour
Memorial Gym17 after hourOakmont9 after hour
Mendenhall20 after hourMendenhall14 after hour
PLACE
Speight
Memorial
Mendenhall
5th & Elizabeth
Avery & Holly
WillowWoodl.
Elm & Willow
Speight
Memorial
Mendenhall
5th & Elizabeth
Avery & Holly
WillowWoodl.
Willow & Elm
Willow and Oak
DEPARTS
on half hour
28 till hour
26 till hour
22till hour
18tillhout
16till hour
15 till hour
on the hour
2 after hour
4 after hour
8 after hour
12 after hour
14 after hour
15 after hour
17 after hour

(For pocket schedules, come by SGA.)
And something else:
If you want to charter a bus-
to a rock concert, gamelike State or Chapel Hill)
we Ye here to help.
Call Gary Miller at 752-9121 for more information.
SGA Puts Students First!
mmmm
m
m
m
mm





��������������������H ��������������������l
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, No. 321 SEPTEMBER 1976
11
��� 11 mm
immmutmmm i pi mini i munm � �m�ii n i pi m
mmmm
.





12
FOUNTAlNHEADVOL 52, NO. 321 SEPTEMBER 196
mm
PREAMBLE
We, the students of East
Carolina University, with a desire
to preserve the atmosphere of
free discussion, inquiry, and
self-expression, to insure per-
sonal freedom and general wel-
fare of the student body, and to
establish justice, hereby form a
collective student body of respon-
sible self-government, and esta-
blish this Constitution of the
Student Government Association
for the student body of East
Carolina University.
ARTICLE I:
NAME OF THE
ORGANIZATION
Section 1. The name of this
organization shall be the "Stu-
dent Government Association
ARTICLE II:
MEMBERSHIP
AND PRIVILEGES
m
mm
mmmm
m
Section 1. Every registered
student of East Carolina Univer-
sity shall be a member of this
organization.
Section 2. Any full-time stu-
dent shall be entitled to vote in
Student elections.
ARTICLE III:
SUPREME
STUDENT LAW
Section 1. This Constitu-
tion and all laws enacted thereto
shall be supreme student law.
Supreme student law shall be
defined as having precedence
over any other student originated
charters and regulations which
shall conform to this Constitution
and subsequent enactments.
Section 2. Enactments of the
Legislature and rules made by
agencies of the Student Govern-
ment Association shall at no time
conflict with the Constitution of
the Student Government Associa-
tion or any University regulations
or North Carolina statute deemed
to have precedence.
Section 3. The General Sta-
tutes of the Student Government
Association shall become the
official supplement to this Consti-
tution. The General Statute shall
state the procedures determined
by the Legislature and decisions
of the judiciary.
ARTICLE IV:
BILL OF RIGHTS
Section 1 The Student Govern-
ment Association recognizes and
awim �!��! i in �im ill � ffllWl
Undertakes to guarantee to all
students the rights and liberties
of the Constitution of the United
States and the Constitution of
North Carolina.
Section 2. Specific rights appli-
cable to the students at East
Carolina University, or objectives
to be achieved, are enumerated in
the appendix to this Constitution
and shall form an integral part of
this Constitution.
ARTICLE V:
ASSEMBLY
Section 1. Supreme Legislative
power shall be vested in the
Assembly, which shall consist of
two Houses. The two Houses
shall be called the Senate and the
Legislature.
Section 2. Members of the
Assembly shall be: A. Senate: (a)
President of Men's Residence
Council or an appointee; (b)
President of Women's Residence
Council or an appointee; (c)
President of Inter-Fraternity
Council or an appointee; (d)
president of Panhellenic or an
appointee; (e) President of Stu-
dent Union or an appointee (f) A
representative of campus media;
(g) Student Government Associa-
tion President or an appointee ;(h)
i nere snail De three (3) members
selected at large by the Senate to
cover unrepresented groups; (i)
There shall be four (4) members
of the Senate elected as their
respective class presidents. B.
Legislature: The membership of
the Legislature shall be elected as
specified in the Article Elections
and Recall
Section 3. There shall be a
Speaker elected-from and by the
Legislature at its first meeting for
the duration of the Legislative
session. The Senate shall elect a
Chairperson from among its
members on terms specified by
its bylaws.
Section 4. The Assembly shall
enjoy the following powers and
duties: A. The Legislature: (a) To
appropriate the funds of the
Student Government Association;
(b) To enact laws as are deemed
necessary to fill any Student
Government Association vacancy;
(c) to approve or reject by
majority vote all appointments
nade by the President of the
Student Government Association;
(d) To establish procedures for
the execution of Legislative busi-
ness; (e) To receive regular
activity reports and statements of
accounts from all organizations to
whom student funds have been
appropriated; (f) To Approve
every three (3) years the Constitu-
tion andor bylaws of all organ-
izations recognized b the Legis-
lature of the Student Govern-
ment Association; (g) To make all
laws which shall be necessary and
proper for carrying into execution
the foregoing powers, and all
other powers vested by this
Constitution; (h) to over-ride a
Presidential veto by a two-thirds
(23) majorityof those present and
voting; (i) There shall be a
question and answer period dur-
ing each Legislative session at
which time the Executive and
other members of the Student
Government Association are re-
quired to be present and reply as
necessary. B. The Senate: (a) To
advise on pending legislation; (b)
To recommend original legisla-
tion; (c) To consider presidential
appointments; (d) To be respon-
sible for execution of all Student
Government Association elect-
ions; (e) to establish procedures
for the execution of Senate
business; (f) To appoint members
of the Review Board and the
Judicial Board with the approval
of the Legislature; (g) To review
Student Body petitions for initia-
tive or review of Legislation.
Section 5. The Speaker or the
Presiden. shall have the power to
call an emergency meeting of
either House provided the Speak-
er, the President and each House
is notified twenty-four (24) hours
prior to the meeting.
Section 6 The Assembly re-
cognizes the power of the Student
Body to initiate new Legislation or
to review existing Legislation in
the following manner: fifteen (15)
percent of the Student Body shall
sign a petition for initiative or
review to be submitted to the
Chairperson of the Senate for
determination of correctness. The
Senate shall request the Election
Commission to conduct an elec-
tion on the proposed bill in not
less than five (5) class days nor
more than fifteen (15) class days
after receipt of the petition. A
majority of the votes cast in the
special election shall be sufficient
to pass the bill. This article shall
not apply to appropriation bills.
Section 7 The Assembly shall
neither suggest nor enact any
laws which do not afford equal
protection to each student and all
recognized organizations thereof.
Section 8 The Assembly shall
neither suggest nor enact any ex
post facto law, nor shall it enact
any law affecting any incumbent
except as directed by an esta-
blished judicial body.
ARTICLE VI:
EXECUTIVE
Section 1. The Executive
Powers of the Student Govern-
ment Association of East Carolina
shall be vested in a President of
the Student Government Associ-
ation. (A) The President shall be
elected at large by the qualified
student voters of East Carolina
University. (B) The President
shall serve for a term not to
exceed one calendar year. (C) The
President ahatl be eligible fa re-
election. "
Section 2. The President shall
enjoy the following powers and
duties: (A) Make reoonmend-
jationstothe Legislature. (B) Veto
P of the Legislature provided
that such action be exercised
within six (6) days of passage of
the bill. (C) Enforce and adminis-
ter all laws enacted by the
Legislature. (D) Be the Chief
Representative of all students in
any matters, internal or external,
and call and preside over meet-
ings of all students. (E) Establish
such other executive agencies as
shall be deemed necessary and
proper to aid in the performance
of duties and to require reports as
needed. (F) Delegate the exercise
of any of the above duties and
powers except: the veto power,
the calling of emergency meet-
ings of the Legislature and the
power to appoint. (G) Perform all
duties incident to such office.
Section 3. There shall be a
Vice-President of the Student
Government Association to aid
the President in the performance
of his duties. (A) The Vice-
President shall be elected in the
manner prescribed for the Presi-
dent. (B) No person shall be
qualified for the offioe of Vice-
President. (C) The Vice-President
shall enjoy the following powers
and duties: (1) To perform the
duties and exercise the powers of
the President in the event of the
President's absence or incapa-
city. (2) To succeed to the office of
President should that offioe be-
oome vacant. (3) To perform all
duties incident to such office.
Section 4. Financial authority,
under the direction of the Presi-
dent, shall be vested in a
Treasurer of the Student Govern-
ment Association. (A) The
Treasurer shall be appointed by
the President with approval of the
Legislature. (B) The Treasurer
shall enjoy the following powers
and duties: (a) Be directly re-
sponsible to the President and the
Legislature for all financial trans-
actions, (b) Regularly advise the
Legislature on all financial mat-
ters under their consideration, (c)
Countersign all valid checks
andor requisitions for organi-
zations funded by the Student
Government Association, (d)
Keep an open and up to date
record of all appropriations acts
passed by the Legislature, (e)
Perform all other duties incident
to such offioe. (f) Withhold any
appropriated funds only with the
consent of the President and the
Speaker until the Legislature can
act. (C) Establish financial pro-
cedure which are to include: (a)
Review of all financial requests to
the Student Government Associ-
ation which are to be received no
later than February 15, for dis-
bursement during the following
fiscal year, (b) Preparation of a
comprehensive budget which
matches requests with antici-
pated revenue, (c) Submission of
a balanced budget to the Legis-
lature by March 15, with tentative
appropriation commitments com-
municated to recipients prior to
the end of the school year, (d)
Provide the Legislature with
monthly financial r�nnrt�s
Section 5. Vacancy. (A) If the
Office of President becomes
vacant the office shall devolve
upon the Vice-President or in his
her absence, upon the Speaker
of Legislature. (B) The Speaker of
the Legislature shall be acting
President for a period not to
exoeed thirty (30) days during
which elections shall be held in
order to elect a new President to
serve for the remainder of the
calendar year. During this trans-
action, the Speaker shall assume
all powers encumbent upon the
President except the power to
appoint and to veto bills.
Section b. ihe Kresident, the
Speaker of the Legislature and
the Treasurer shall be required to
attend summer school and as-
sume all duties for the operation
of the Student Government
Association during summer
school. They shall oontinue to
receive their regular salaries and,
as a summer supplement, their
tuition and fees shall be paid by
the Student Government
Association. Any officer desiring
an exception to this requirement
must file a formal request with
the Legislature no later than
thirty (30) days before the end of
the regular school year.
ARTICLE VII:
JUDICIARY
Section 1. Principles. (A) The
judicial system has the responsi-
bility to insure the rights of
individual students and campus
organizations within the frame-
work of campus rules, university
regulations, student body stat-
utes and the honor oode. (B)
Students shall at all times enjoy
the benefits and duties of the
Federal and State Constitution as
well as applicable laws while on
the campus of East Carolina
University. Should there be a
conflict with the University rules
and regulations, the provisions of
the former shall prevail. (C) The
Student Government Legislature
shall establish a roster of mini-
mum sentences for specified
offenses to be widely publicized
for preventive purposes.
Section 2. The supreme stu-
dent judicial body shall be the
Review Board. (A) The Review
Board shall consist of five (5)
students who shall be appointed
by the Senate, and approved by
the Legislature in April of each
year. Vacancies shall be filled in
like manner fa the remainder of
the term. (B) The Review Board
shall have final ruling on all
disciplinary matters and appeals
arising from decisions made by
the Judicial Board. (C) The
Review Board shall render ad-
visay opinions oonoerning all
constitutional matters to the
Legislature. (D) A simple maja-
ity shall be necessary for all
rulings. The Review Board cannot
hear any case a deliva any
ruling unless four (4) members of
the Board are present. The Board
determines its own rules of
procedure.
Section 3. Thae shall exist a
Judicial Board to hear any and all
violations of campus rules, regu-
lations, statutes and oodes. (A)

9
5

5

m
m
m

L





HMHIHi
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 321 SEPTEMBER 1976
13
0
0

0
o
:
0
I!
The Judicial Board shall consist of
seven (7) members appointed by
the Senate in September of each
year, subject to the approval of
the Legislature of the Student
Government Association. Vacan-
cies shall be filled in like manner
for the remainder of the term. (B)
All membersof the Judicial Board
shall be full-time students. (C) A
simple majority opinion shall be
necessary for all rulings delivered
by this Board. (D) A quorum shall
consist of four members. (E) All
rulings of this Board can be
appealed to the Review Board.
Section 4. There shall exist a
Board of Enquiry: (A) It shall
consist of three (3) student
members, one each appointed by
the President of the Student
Government Association, the
Speaker of the Legislature and
the Chairperson of the Senate, for
a period of one year beginning in
September. The Chairperson of
the Board, to be elected by Board
members, shall be known as
Ombudsman. (B) The primary
prupose of the Board shall be to
investigate non-judicial com-
plaints, grievances or matters of
administrative mismanagement
or procedural injustices at the
application of individual students
or at the discretion of the Student
Government Association. (C) Re-
dress shall be speedily sought by
all possible means, and recom-
mendations for broader rectifying
action shall be brought to the
attention of the Student Govern-
ment Association Executive and
the Student Government Associ-
ation Assembly. (D) Each mem-
ber of the Board shall individually
be available as a Public Defender
fa individual students where the
latter is the plaintiff against a
division of the Student Govern-
ment Association.
Section 5. There shall be such
residence hall boards as shall be
established for the maintenance
of good order in a residence hall,
provided that the original juris-
diction of these boards does not
extend beyond the residence halls
for which they were created and
that the decisions of these boards
may be appealed to a judicial
board.
Section 6. All boards enumer-
ated in this Article shall have
such additional powers, duties,
and original or appellate juris-
diction as the Legislature shall
from time to time grant them.
Section 7. The Student
Government Association Resi-
dent shall appoint an Attorney
General, subject to approval by
the Legislature, with the follow-
ing powers: (A) Provide advice to
students of their rights and
privileges under campus rules
and regulations. (B) Represent
any student who requests assist-
ance with one's defense before
any Board within the Student
Government Association if the
latter is not the defendant. (C)
Represent the Student Govern-
ment Association in all cases in
which it is involved before
Student Boards.
Section 8. The Legislature
may establish such other judicial
institutions as it deems necessary
and proper fa the aderly ad-
ministrattoi of student justice.
m
m
m
m
ARTICLE VIII:
OA TH OF OFFICE
Section 1. All Student Govon-
ment Association executive, judi-
cial, a legislative members shall
take the following oath I,
hereby pledge myself to uphold
the Const it ution of the Student
Government Association of East
Carolina University, to promae
the highest ideals of hona, and to
execute to the best of my ability
the duties of my office
Section 2. "Any member of a
oonstitutioially established Stu-
dent Government Association in-
stitution, who has previously
taken the Oath shall be empower-
ed to administer it
ARTICLE IX:
ELECTIONS
AND RECALL
Section 1. Principles. (A) Any
elections conducted under the
jurisdiction of the Student Gov-
ernment shall be free, seaet, well
publicized, and open to all
qualified student voters. (B) The
objective of election procedures
shall be to permit widest partici-
pation in a fiar and judicious
manner. Details shall be specified
in a set of election rules enacted
by the Legislature but limited by
the provisions contained in this
Constitution. They shall na be
subject to Presidential veto.
Section 2. Qualifications. (A)
Any full-time student at East
Carolina University is allowed to
vae and to run fa elective offioe.
Full-time status is determined by
payment of an activity fee and
evidenced by an activity card. (B)
Each qualified vaer shall have
one vae fa each elective offioe
during an election.
Section 3. Constituency. Re-
presentation in the Legislature
shall be based on place of
residence.
(A) Each residence hall of na
more than three hundred and fifty
(350) student residents shall elect
one representative to the Legis-
lature, and each residence hall of
more than three hundred and fifty
(350) students shall elect two
representatives. (B) The taal
number of day student represent-
atives shall be equal to the taal
number of full-time students
divided by the average number of
residence hall students repre-
sented by each legislata from a
residence hall.
Section 4. Tenure of Office.
(A) Elected members of the
Legislature and the Executive
shall serve fa a period of no
longer than twelve (12) calendar
months beginning on the day on
which the oath of office is taken.
(B) A vacancy occurs fa reasons
of recall, resignation, death a
loss of full-time student status.
The Legislature is empowered to
enact laws as are deemed neces-
sary to fill Legislative vacancies.
Whenever there is a vacancy in an
elective position of the Executive,
�luiimKimniiirn m n
such offioe shall be filled in
accadanoe with the provisions
specified in the applicable Arti-
cle. No vacancy can be filled fa a
period of longer than the aiginal
election intended it to be.
Section 5. Recall. (A) The
power to recall any elected official
fa any reason shall be vested in
the constituency of that official
which shall be defined ?o that
body of students who are quali-
fied to vae fa that offidal. (B) A
petition to recall an eleaed
Executive Officer must contain
the signatures of at least fifteen
percent of the entire student
body. (C) A Legislata mav he
recalled by a petition wnich
contains the signatures of at least
fifteen peroent of those students
eligible to vae in said Legis-
lator's constituency. (D) The
petition to recaii snail be present-
ed to the Senate which shall have
ten school days to determine the
validity of said petition. If an
absolute majaity of the Senate
declares the petition valid, the
Senate shall direct the Election
Committee to hold an election, in
which the incumbent may be a
candidate. The incumbent shall
remain in offioe pending the
outoome of the election.
Section 6. Elections. (A) E-
lections fa the Legislature and
the Executive shall be held by the
fourth (4th) Wednesday in Jan-
uary of each year. The oath of
offioe shall be administered no
later than eight (8) school days
after the election. (B) The winner
of an election fa the Executive
shall be determined on the basif
of a plurality which must consti-
tute at least thirty five percent of
those vaing. In the event that
such a minimum is na obtained
by any candidate, a run-off
election shall be held within five
(5) school days between the two
(2) top contenders fa this posi-
tion.
Section 7. Election Commit-
tee. (A) The Senate shall be
responsible fa the implementa-
tioi of elections of the Student
Government Association. It shall
have at its direction an Election
Commission whose function is to
insure adherence to and imple-
mentation of the Constitution and
election laws. (B) The Commis-
sion shall be oomposed of no mae
than fifteen (15) members, in-
cluding the Chairperson who is to
be elected by the Senate. The
members are appointed by the
Chairperson but are subject to
approval by the Senate. All
members serve for one year
during which they canna hold
any aher elective offioe. (C) The
Commission will couinely check
full-time student status of each
candidate, and declare a candi-
dacy invalid if thiscondition is na
met. Election violations shall be
investigated by and reported to
the Judiciary of the Student
Government Association.
ARTICLE X:
AMENDENTS
Section 1. Proposition of a-
mendments to this Constitution
must be made by one of ihr
following methods: (A( By a vae
� i nmiyii win i mi
m mm i � mnwin
of two-thirds (23) of the entire
Legislature during two separate
meetings. (B) By a petition
presented in writing to the Serw�M
carrying the signatures of fifteen
peroent of the membership of the
student body.
Section 2. Ratification shall be
by referendum of two-thirds (23)
of the students vO ng provided
that at least fifteen peroent of the
study body vaes.
Section 3. After adopt ion of
the amendment, it shall become
effeaive immediately unless
Oherwise specified in the amend-
ment.
ARTICLE XI:
TRANSITIONAL
ARRANGEMENTS
Section 1. (A) Eleaed
officials of the student Govern-
ment Association Executive
(elected March 24, 1976), shall
hold office until the general
student elections in January 1977.
They shall be eligible fa re-
election a appointment to offioes
specified in this Constitution at
that time. (B) The Legislature will
be re-elected Fall Quarto of
1976, fa a torn to extend until
January 1977, at which time the
Legislature will be elected fa a
twelve moith poiod. (C) The
Senate will be oganized during
Fall Quarto of 1976, to draft
bylaws and prepare fa its famal
beginning afto the genoal
student elections in Januarv 1977.
Section 2. (A) All statutes,
rules, bylaws a aha documents
conflicting with this Constitution
shall be repealed a amended by
January 1977. (B) This Coistitu-
tion shall take effect with the
swearing in of the President and
Legislature elected by the genoal
studoit elections in January 1977.
(C) When this Constitution takes
effect this Article (Article XI -
Transitional Arrangonents) shall
be deleted from this Constitution
and replaced by a new Article XI.
Ratification, which shall state
" This Constitution was ratified by
the East Carolina University
student body " (exact
date).
m
mm
APPENDIX
We, the students of East
Carolina Univosity assert that we
are endowed with certain rights
and responsibilities. Thoefoe,
we seek in this appendix, the
realization, the utilization and the
preservation of these rights. (A)
The freedom of speech and
expression ae an inhoent part of
education free from Univosity
restriction, except whoe the fom
of the expression endangos life,
property, o the equal rights of
Ohos. Free and opon discussion
and expression of ideas are basic
mii iiwmiiiii miniminiu
elements of any education. (B)
The right to fom, join and
participate in any group a
aganizatiai fa intellectual, reli-
gious, social, ecoponic, political
a cultural purposes, including
the right to peacefully assemble.
(C) The right of each student,
subject to reasonable regulations,
to solicit money on campus fa
Studoit Govonmoit Association
recognized student oganizatians.
(D) The right to the usage of all
campus facilities designed fa
public access and activities, sub-
ject only to unifam regulations
govoning these faolties. (E) The
right of students to have repre-
sentation in the fomulatioi of all
Univosity policies pertaining to
studonts Univosity life. (F) The
right to dear and concise campus
regulations available to every
student. Only published regula-
tions reflecting this requirement
will be binding cm the student
body. (G) The right of free access
to student posonal records and
files held by the Univosity. No
privileged information may be
released by any source according
to the provisions of the Buckley
Amendmoit passed by the Con-
gress of the United States. (H)
The right of a choice to decide
ones own living quartos. If a
studoit chooses to live in Univo-
sity owned housing, the student
has the right to negOiate a
contract and agreemoit, specify-
ing the landlod-toiant relation-
ship prio to signing a commit-
ment. (I) The right of each
student residing in university
owned housing to be free from
fear of any unreasonable search
a seizure, as guaranteed undo
the Fourth amendment of the
Constitution of the United States.
(J) The right of each student to
have: (a) Due nOice, (b) An open
hearing upon request, (c) A
speedy hearing, (d) Represent-
ation by student counsel, (3)
Confrontation of accused with
aocusos, (f) Praectioi against
self-inaiminatiov (g) Presump-
tion of innocence until proven
guilty, (h) Proteaion against
auel a unusual punishmont, (i)
A writton recad of the hearing
upon request, (j) The right o
appeal. (K) The rights of no
student to be placed in jeopardy
mae than onoe fa the same
offense. (L) The right of each
student to be exempt from
suspension o expulsion from the
Univosity, exospt fa acadonic
failure, failure to pay a Univosity
debt, o violation of a Univosity
regulation when such violation
constitutes a threat to the genoal
welfare of the Univosity Com-
munity. (M) The right of each
student to initiate action within
the student judiciary structure fo
any violation of rights guaranteed
by this Constitution or its
agencies. (N) The right of each
student shall be guaranteed with
discrimination on a basisof aeed,
race, sex, age, national aigin, a
any Oho arbitrary o unreason-
able consicteration. (O) The gen-
eral statutes of the Student
Government Association shall
elaboate these rights listed a-
bove in complete detail in ado
that a dear and condse meaning
of all rights can be covered.
mmm
mm





14
FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 321 SEPTEMBER 1976
V
mm
n
m
mm
mmmm
Suit cites waste disposal
Oregon takes nuc plant to court
By NORM A N SOLOMON
PORTLAND, Oregon (LNS)-
The nation's largest operating
nuclear power plant is being
taken to oourt by a state agency
for forty-three separate environ-
mental monitoring violations
within five months.
Following a joint state and
federal investigation of the Trojan
Nuclear Power Plant, the Oregon
Energy Facility Sting Council
voted August 10 to file a civil suit
against Portland General Electric
(PGE) fa repeated failures to
maintain a oarect monitaing
system fa waste discharges into
the Columbia River.
The violations are indefensi-
ble said Sting Council chair-
person Dr. J.D. Thape. "Here
was instrumentation that should
have been operating-and it
wasn't
In addition to taking PGE to
oourt over failure to monita
. �,&?
I
FORMER BUC PHOTOGRAPHER catches nature with a quick shutter.
By Frank Barrow
ma
excessive heat discharges and
instrumentation quality - vio-
lations which could total over $1
million in oourt fines - the state
also served notive on PGE that
the company would not be able to
resume operation of the Trojan
facility until it took oorrective
action.
Located faty miles nathwest
of Patland, the Trojan nuclear
plant has been shut down since
May of this year. During its five
months of operation it experi-
enced over a dozen separate
breakdowns of safety water
pumps, including a February 29
malfunction during which two
major safety pumps simul-
taneously failed to wak while
reacta temperatures rose. After
four different automatic starting
systems fa the pumps proved
ineffectual, plant wakers were
able to activate the pumps
manually after about five minutes
had passed.
Other problems with the
Westinghouse-designed nuclear
plant have included a control
panel fire, difficulties with its
steam generata system and radio
active leaks officially termed
"internal
If approved by voters, a
nuclear safeguard measure on the
November ballot in Oregon would
establish safety standards befae
any additional nuclear plants
could be constructed in the state.
Trojan is presently Oregon's only
nuclear power plant, but its chief
electric utility backer, privately-
owned PGE, is seeking approval
fa a pair of larger nuclear plants
at Pebble Springs in central
Oregon-an effat which the safe-
guards initiative could prevent.
Activists are now intervening
against the proposed Pebble
Springs plant construction at
hearings before the federal
Nuclear Regulatay Commission.
Meanwhile, the Oregon Supreme
Court has agreed to hear a suit
filed by anti-nuclear environ-
mentalists and the state Ener-
gency Facility Sting Council to
rescind pria state agency ap-
proval and require renewed hear-
ings befae the oouncil. If that
court effort fails, the state's
Pebble Springs site construction
certificate will go to the governa
fa his signature.
Oregoi Governa Bob Straub,
a famer suppater of nuclear
energy, has recently called
nuclear power "a disaster,
economically, as well as environ-
mentally yet says he would
approve the Pebble Springs plant
construction if convinoed it would
be necessary for the state's
electricity needs.
Anti-nuc foroas DEMONSTRATE OUTSIDE Democratic National convention in New York City, July 12
1976.
m
m
mm
mmmmm
m
mm





MHmi
������
�K
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 321 SEPTEMBER 1976
15
t
at
al
n.
ne
jit
n-
jr-
to
f
w-
at
s
XI
or
t,
ar
d
r,
v
d
it
d
s
Mi
iwww

MARQUEE
The Man Who
Fell to Earth
EDITOR'SNOTE: MARQUEE will be a weekly Trends feature,
dealing with films and drama in Greenville.
By DAVID R.BOSNICK
Staff Writer
NOTE: Cinema is both the easiest and the hardest form of the
performing arts. It is the easiest because there is virtually no limit to the
effects that can be obtained when oni is able to stop, insert, ponder, and
create to fit the need. It has the greatest potential for revision, and there
is no sense of the necessary metamorphasis any film goes through before
completion. It is this same oollosal ability that makes it the most
demanding of the arts. With all of the freedom of sense that the director
is allowed, if there is anything less than a perfect, creative interpretation
of his intention, the movie is a failure. There is no excuse as there is in
the continually shifting dynamics of theater.
If this insistence upon excellence seems harsh, it well may be. There
is a great deal of work that goes into the cheapest B flick, and often a
sincerity of positive creation. There is a difference, however, between
intelligent creative suspension of reality and mere entertainment.
Effecting that differetid is the essence of Cinema.
There is a tremendous Sbi ise of loss at the dose of Nicholas Roeg' s
The Man Who Fell to Earth, loss for Tommy (David Bowie), loss for the
world, and still a larger loss for the audience. The film had the
opportunity to be outstanding, beyond the scope of traditional British
films. In its attempts to enoompass everything, however, the movie falls
shor. That, and the Maudlin ending are the only real flaws in the work.
It spreads itself thin, and there is too much needless melodramatic
symbolism miring the important concepts.
Had Roeg chosen to focus on fewer aspects of man's and Tommy's
degeneration, the film would have been, like a laser, sharp, intense, and
affecting. Instead, it falls into the catefory, however interesting.
Technically, the movie is a series of flashbacks and parallels.
Through the flashbacks, the audience is given a vivid picture of
Tommy's world; his family, his alien masturbation fantasies. It is
intelligent science fiction.
The parallels range from Tommy's inventions being twisted into
mere porno objects, to his gentle homosexual associate being tossed
from his apartment window. The latter is the symbol of Tommy's own
"fall to earth and his subsequent spiritual death.
Tommy's weakness, his flaw, parallels that of his planet-liquid. His
planet is dying fa lack of water, and Tommy's degeneration is due to
alcohol. Like the television he is fascinated by, alcohol robs him of his
sense of purpose, numbs his ear her dedication and sense of urgency. His
family dies, as he is probed by a curious and callous science that preys
on his alcohol addition.
Bowie is the perfect vehicle for the presentation of Walter Levis's
novel. He ishauntingly timidly beautiful.His beauty lies in his innocence
and vulnerability. Bowie does little actual acting; yet one can read the
anguish in his eyes. He is a miasma of betrayed and misguided trusts
and tragic weaknesses. His best moment occurs when Mary Low
(Candy dark) pulls at him when he tries to leave. We can see his
empathetic reaction to her pain tear at him. His subsequent "human"
rage at her offer of cookies signals Tommy's initiation into humanity.
Candy Clark is excellent as his motel clerk girlfriend, and her shock
at his true identity and alien body is well-played. Together, while
making love, they show true sensuality as they use their hands to
express their needs. Her performance suffers when she is made up
(poorly, I might add) to look middle-aged.
Roeg's comprehensive statement on humanity is made early in the
film in the words accompanying the Peter Bruegai painting of the scene
surrounding the fate of Icarius:
"And the delicately beautiful ship,
which had seen something truly
amazing, a boy falling to the sea,
sailed calmly onward
I ommy's final dedication to the memory of his wife is his rationale,
his major truth. He, his voice, us and all we do, we are the television he
detests: "We snow everything, but tell you nothing
And we are all "waves in space
I recommend this movie highly, if for no other reason than the fact
that it is a British attempt at effective cinema, and that Bowie himself
may never appear in films again.
Payne performance scores
despite poor student turnout
By MICHAEL FUTCH
Assistant Trends Editor
The John Payne Band didn't
impress very many people Thurs-
day night in Wright Auditorium.
The irony in this was not because
of the performance, but because
there were very few people
present to impress. Possibly
due to poor weather, lack of
motivation, or slack jazz interest,
whatever the reason, only about
450 persons made their way for
what was to be a fine performance
by a virtually unknown band.
The concert was originally
scheduled on the Mall at 8 00, but
'lue to rain, equipment had to be
moved to Wright, causing a delay
until 827.
The John Payne Band
epitomized the re-emergence and
importance of the saxophone in
the '70's; an instrument nearly
forgotten during the'60'safter its
near necessity in the rocking
'50's. John Payne put it to good
use as his band delivered their
jazz concepts to a small but
enthusiastic audience. Alternat-
ing tenor and soprano sax with
flute, this Boston-based group
gave a superb program, even
considering the poor acoustics of
Wright Auditorium.
The remainder of the quintet
were as follows: Lewis Levin,
keyboards; Scott Lae, acoustic
and electric bass; Henry Murphy,
drums; and Ricardo Tares, pa-
cussion and congas. According to
Payne, he has had this "exact
famatioi a year This shot
span of time failed to hinder a
tight show. Because of the bad
acoustics, Payne kept the music
fairly mellow, a as he described
it during the program, the band
was "playing more down stuff
because of acoustics it would be
hard to play fast stuff
The band played eleven pieces
in all, most of it aiginal material.
Payne set the pace with his tena
sax oi the opening Loiita The
group tried 'to bring the ocean to
us' on the second number,
"Sounds from the Sea's Edge
fron their soon to be released
RAZOR EDGE LP on the Arista
label. A good mood piece, Payne
barowed some Junia Walker
licks fa this ate. He was followed
by a keyboard solo with mellotron
which later transformed into
some funky jazz. The percussion,
na to be overlooked, proved
outstanding on this aiginal num-
ber.
Levin opened "Song for
Love" from the band's first
album, BEDTIME STORIES, with
some delightful acoustic piano.
Payne took off from thae with a
flute solo, followed by Lee's bass
perfamanoe and then completed
the circle with Payne again. This
was definitely one of the two
highlights of the evening.
The band literally 'burned' on
"Arisdne an aiginal by bass
player Lee. Starting with a
percussion intro. the band trans-
famed it into an uptempo jazz
piece. The bass wak was ex-
ceptional on this one (nrte: Lee
began playing the instrument at
the age of 21.)
There was a move from jazz
rock to straight jazz on "Joan's
Song Reminiscent of the big
band sound of the 's, Payne
made mae than ample use of the
tena sax fa this piece; acoustic
bass was also used here.
Accading to Payne, the last
song befae intermissiai, the title
track from RAZORS EDGE
"should be the theme of the new
Star Trek movie, but it isn't
It was very much Chick Caea
influenced; a fam of space jazz
which ended in a lengthy drum
solo.
The band's music is fairly wel I
patterned; Payne plays the theme
from which the band improvises
and expands upon, sometimes
developing it into an entirely new
ooncept, and then slowly evolves
and re-introduces the theme to
complete the circle. Payne related
his method to me during the
break; to him, "technique is
secondary to communication. I
am not thinking about what I do
when I play He stated that he
has been on from 15-20 albums
such as with Van Marisoi a�
ASTRAL WEEKS, Bainie Raitt's
GIVE IT UP and oi sane David
Bronberg wak.
"Snow" started the second
set as Payne and Levin har-
monized on tena sax and electric
piano. This developed into an
electric piano solo accompanied
by fantastic back-up rhythm. The
band seemed to be shaking off
some bound mass of unbelievable
energy as evayone in the unit
shared the spotlight on this piece.
"Kings" wasanaher definite
high of the evening, as it followed
next. A really beautiful tune, it
was introduced with organ and
later grasped by Payne's nan
wak. The band was now concen-
trating on slower pieces because
of poa sound in the auditaium.
This, however, failed to hinder
the 200 a so hard oaes' left, as
the mood appeared to be right fa
the night.
A cut from RAZORS EDGE,
"New Spaces resembling an
old Focus composition,
"Eruption from MOVING
WAVES followed.Levin added
some meliaron and Payne used
flute on this piece.
Payne soared on a vay short
sax solo on "From Past Days
Levin, who writes most of the
band's material, kept the few left
in utter silence with an exception-
al keyboard solo, while the rest of
the band walked offstage.
They returned fa the last
number of the evening, Donald
Byrd's "Fancy Free probably
the longest piece of the night.
Soprano sax and acoustic bass
were spotlighted again on this
intricately woven jazz number.
The John Payne Band pleased
the few present in Wright Aud-
itaium as they moved from jazz
rook to straight jazz to experi-
mental jazz and back again. Sure
to be heard from in the future, the
John Payne Band proved to be an
exceptional plus in an already
saturated music fam.
The oonoert was put on by The
Special Entertainment Committee
of the Student Union.
Veteran journalist Terry Davis
joins English department staff
mm
mm
mm
By BECKY BRADSHAW
Staff Writer
The ECU English department
is fatunate enough to have a vay
interesting young man teaching
this year.
His name is Tary Davis and
he is currently teaching two
English courses and one Jour-
nalism course.
If his name sounds familiar it
could be because he has written
fa sane well-known magazines.
In fact, he is currently doing some
commission wak fa SPORTS
ILLUSTRATED.
Davis is fron Spokane, Wash-
ington where, he says, "the water
runs dear and you can see the
bottoms of the steams - whae
the air is clean and oooi
He attended college at a
small school near Spokane and it
is thae that he became intaested
in literature and writing.
He taught in a high school in
Washington fa ate year and then
See DAVIS page 18.
m
mm
m





h m
16
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 321 SEPTEMBER 1976
m
f
Crosby and Nash travel
the long road to recognition
By MARK LOCK WOOD
Staff Writer
Way back in 1969, even before
the Beatles went their
separate ways, there were two
young musicians who were striv-
ing for recognition in their own
groups. Unable to gain this
recognition, they eventually de-
cided to strike off into newer
directions.
Graham Nash left the Hollies
fa greener pastures and David
Crosby followed suit, leaving the
Byrds. They eventually hooked up
with Neil Young and Stephen
Stills, who in turn had departed
from Buffalo Springfield. The
result was the famatiai of one of
the great supergroups of the early
seventies-Crosby, Stills, Nash
and Young. Although only mak-
ing three actual albums per se,
they left a distinct impression on
American music and helped to
greatly influence what came to be
known as country rock.
The group, despite several
attempts at reunion, is no mae.
However Crosby and Nash have
continued to compose exceptional
wak separately, most recently
together with WIND ON THE
WATER and their just released
WHISTLING DOWN THE WIRE.
WHISTLING DOWN THE
WIRE is Crosby and Nash's first
attempt at producing an album
and they do a very competent job
indeed. The distinct simplicity of
the album comes through as a
definite asset. As always, the
harmonies and contributing vo-
cals are mellow and vibrant, as
has always been characteristic of
Crosby and Nash. The lyrics also
seem to have taken a turn fa the
better. Meaningful, mind pro-
voking lyrics aeate a mood of
thoughtfulnessthat will keep you
wondering and thinking, some-
thing that seems to have been
missing from earlier albums.
It is most unfatunate that the
first cut off the album is probably
the wast. This is entirely due to
Nash, who co-wrote the song, but
due to a triteness apparently
influenced by Danny Kotch, who
obviously is not experienced in
writing lyrics a music fa that
matter. The song comes off
entirely too rinky-dink. The slide
guitar is oppressive and the
harmonica doesn't fit, but the
drums are excruciating.
Fortunately, it is over in a
� merciful two minutes and forty-
nine seoaids. Dai't be alarmed
folks, the going gets better (much
better).
Kotch redeems himself in the
next song along with David
Lindley, providing somu soft
guitar licks as background fa
some beautiful harmonies in the
song entitled Broken Bird The
blend is beautiful-Crosby and
Nash were made fa each other.
"Time After Time" brings a
nostalgic sigh, as one goes back
to the days of Crosby's "Laugh-
ing from his first and only solo
album. "If I Could Only
Remember Your Name Nash
provides some good piano and
beautiful backkground fa a very
endearing piece of emotional,
soulful music.
The next song, entitled
"Dancer shows the genius of
Crosby in his tracking of voice
over voice, which was his trade-
mark as far back as the Byrds.
The song has no wads, but then,
he doesn't need them; thevoice
carries the whole song. The
12-string by Crosby in this song is
impeccable.
In past albums both Crosby
and Nash have expressed social
concern for change in world
problems (ecology, etc.) such as
the fate of the whale in the title
song from the WIND ON THE
WATER. "Mutiny appears to be
the only song to oontain any real
social comment, where we have a
"bluebird waiting fa the sea
�Jry This song features sane
mellow vocals by Nash.
"J.Bsdlues the first song
on the second side, indicates
some surprisingly good lyrics on
the part of Graham Nash. The
funky beat borders oi the verge
of reggae, but really fits in well
vith some good piano wak by
Nash, also some excellent guitar
playing by Kotch and Lindley.
"Marguerita a soft love
song by Nash, features some
good violin as David Lindley
provides more than adequate
background.
"Taken At All the next cut
from the album, again features
some good dual vocals by Crosby
and Nash. The beauty lies, as
afaementioied in the simplicity
of the song. Acoustic guitars and
voice carry this song, well-
balanced with Nash's harmonica
and some mae good violin by
David Lindley.
"Foolish Man" is all David
Crosby. The "crooning" style of
Crosby makes this a song to
remember. Graham Nash, as
always, sets off the low with the
high as he blends in a welcome
background. The feeling of the
song really hits when he sings out
- "it's so damn close to the
bone Sane beautiful electric
piano by Graham Nash is fea-
tured.
In oontrast to Kotch, Craig
Degree, who plays agan and
piano on the album, does a
commendable job on "Out of
Darkness which he wrote music
and lyrics fa. Perhaps oie of the
most beautiful cuts on the album,
some good vocals by Crosby and
Nash (on background) make this
one a masterpiece. The string
arrangements by Lee Aldridge
are truly magnificent on this final
cut.
Oh yes, if you find out what
David Crosby is laughing about
on the back of the cover, let me
know, ok?
FORYOURMRIED LIFE,
AMRIETYOFWATCHES
BY SEIKO.

i
i
v
As
HEAD
a new
added
sectia
fam
enterti
Th
hopes
hensiv
reader
attenti
ment,
No. AH103M-J155.00.
17J. chronograph, self-winding,
98 2 ft water tested.
bilingual calendar, luminous.
Stainless. HARDLEX mar-resist
crystal, black dial.
No. AC062M-S125.00.
17J. self-winding.
98 2 ft water tested, day-date
calendar, instant date setting
Yellow topmocha brown dial.
luminous
Today a man lives many lives. The elegant lite,
the executive life, the sporting lite. That's why many
men have more than one Seiko watch. Superb
Thin Seiko Quartz. Handsome, efficient
DX watches, self-winding, with instant daydate
setting calendars. Ruggedly masculine
Seiko Chronographs. And those sophistic ated Seiko
(olored dials. Come in and dec ide which of these
outstanding watches tit into your lite. 0-C,TTY")
Floyd G. Robinson Jewelers
V
"If it don't tick - tock to us
�lJ
On The Mall
321 Evans St.
Downtown Greenville
Students
Central News & Card Shop
Is Your Headquarters For:
Current best selling paperback novels
Hardbacks
Craft Books
Bibles
Dictionaries
School Classics
Daily & Sunday local & out-of-town
Newspapers
Central News & Card Shop
Open Daily & Sunday Til 10 P.M.
On The Hill
Vernon Park Mall
Kinston, N.C
RECORDS
6.98 LIST ALBUMS 499
HEAD EQUIPMENT, JEWELRY, & MORE
COTAIMCHE ST. ACROSS FROM CLEMET DORM
m
m
m



�M
m

jam





������
miHHHHBHMHHBHHBflHMHHIBHHHHi
l�F i
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 321 SEPTEMBER 1976
17

What is Trends?
i itmim Him �ii i pi � wiim �nwiiwiiwiiiiiii
Got the Greenville blues?

As many loyal FOUNTAIN-
HEAD readers may have noticed,
a new department has been
added to the paper this year. That
section, Trends, is a combined
form of the old features and
entertainment pages.
The change was made in
hopes of bringing a more compre-
hensive, lively section to our
readers. We intend to focus more
attention on campus entertain-
ment, events, and personalities,
leaving the goings on in the
"outside world" to our full-time,
professional colleagues in the
news world.
The staff of TRENDS will be
experimenting and improvising
throughout the year, in order to
improve the quality of our pages,
and we would like you, the
reader, to let us know what you
like about TRENDS, and what you
think we should change.
-PatCoyle
Travel committee offers relief
By BECKY BRADSHAW
Staff Writer
School, Greenville, and the
general oondition of the world can
get you down. Want some relief?
The Student Union Travel
Committee has the answer.
Visit either New York City or
Washington, D.C. over the
Thanksgiving break.
Four days and nights you can
tour two of the nation's most
famous aties.
The Washington, D.C. trip is
only $59 which includes trans-
portation on Trailways buses and
aocomodations at the Quality Inn
Downtown.
The New York trip is only $69
which includes transportation on
Trailways buses and accommoda-
tions at the Hotel Taft in the heart
of the city.
The costs of both trips is
based on quad occupancy.
Reservations are now being
accepted through October 15 in
the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center.
Twenty-five dollars must ac-
company each application with
the balance due by October 15.
The early deadline is due to
the fact that the hotel bills must
be paid to insure the accommoda-
tions.
Don't miss out on this op
portunity of a lifetime! Only 90
places are available fa each trip,
so sign up tomorrow.
Economical basics. Powerful slide rules.
And? a programmable powerhouse.
A
TI-1200
TI-1250
TI-1600
TI-1650
Goes where you go. Adds, sub-
tracts, multiplies, divides. Per-
centage, too. Automatic constant.
Full floating decimal. 8-digit dis-
play. Replaceable battery. Optional
adapter available.
Everything the TI-1200 has-plus.
Full function memory: add, sub-
tract, recall or clear with a single
keystroke. Also, a change sign key
Replaceable battery. Optional
adapter available.
$995
$125
Super slim. High-styled. Four func-
tions. Percent key. Automatic con-
stant. 8-digit display is easy on the
eyes. Use it 3 to 5 hours before
recharging. AC adaptercharger
and carrying case.
$2495
Super slim. Powerful 4-key
memory. A change-sign key. Press
the keys just as you would state the
problem. Fast-charge battery off-
ers 3 to 5 hours continuous use.
Adapter and carrying case
included.
$29�5'
SK-50A
SK-51A
TI Business Analyst SR-56
The classic slide rule calculator.
Algebraic keyboard and sum-of-
products capability with single-
function keys. Versatile memory:
add, store, or retrieve data. Set
angles to degrees or radians. Cal-
culates to 13-digits, display rounds
to 10. Operates on rechargeable
battery pack.
$5995
Even more power. Three user-ac-
cessible memories. Least square
linear regression. Factorials. Ran-
dom numbers. Permutations.
Mean, variance, and standard de-
viation. 2) conversions. And more
� plus, everything that can be done
on the SR-50A. AC adapter char-
ger included.
$7995
Saves working with books of tables
and charts. Financial and statistical
operations are preprogrammed.
Handles: annuity, simple and com-
pound interest, sinking fund, amor-
tization, cash flow, cost control
and depreciation - and more. AC
adaptercharger and carrying case
included.
$4995
SR-56
SPECIAL
S10.00
rebate
Super slide rule that's program-
mable. A powerhouse. 10 memo-
ries. 100 program steps. 9 levels of
parentheses. 4 levels of subroutine.
AOS (Algebraic Operating System)
lets you handle complex problems
naturally, left-to-right. Battery
pack, AC adaptercharger and Ap-
plications Library.
$10995
Special SR-56 $10.00 rebate.
Texas instruments will rebate $10.00 of your original
SR-56 purchase price when you return this coupon
and your SR-56 customer information card post-
marked no later than October 31,1976. To apply:
1. Fill out this coupon
2. Fill out special serialized customer information
card inside SR-56 box
3. Return completed coupon and information card to:
Special Campus Offer
P.O. Box 1210
Richardson, Texas 75080
Name
Address
City
State
Z�P
University
Name of SR-56 Retailer
SR-56
Serial No (from back of calculator)
Please allow 30 days lor rebate
Suggested retail price
� 1976 Tmm Instruments Incorporated
Texas Instruments
INCORPORATED
mm
m
m
m
m
mm
i&ffiS w;m.v .
� 1 ���-�"�' , : �- PEg





� f � 'W'i
18
FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 321 SEPTEMBER 1976
mmmm
m
mmmm
�M
mm
mmm
m
m
mn im
mm
Dorm cooking: have hotplate, will travel
By PAT COyLE
Trends Editor
After 18 years of hot breakfast
and fried chicken on Sunday,
many of you are now plunging-or
being pushed, into the world of
dorm cooking.
As a three-year veteran of
"Home on the Hotplate I can
tell you that preparing good,
nourishing food in the confines of
a small room is, quite literally, no
picnic. There are, however, a few
simple tricks that make dorm
eating much simpler and more
pleasant.
The first subject of conoern is
equipment. Even the most ex-
perienced chefs will find cooking
on a hotplate to be a less than
fulfilling experience. If you
haven't bought a hotplate already
try to purchase (or borrow) one
with adjustable heat control. These
heat quicker and cook nrwp
accurately than the cheaper,
,io-control types.
Convenient and inexpensive
as hotplates are, they can't
compare in efficiency to an
electric frying pan. Talk your Mom
(or roommate's Mom) into sacri-
ficing hers to you. (Tell her it's in
the interest of your nutrition and
survival at college.)
An electric frying pan cooks
quickly, and it can also accommo-
date more food than a normal
frying pan. If it's the immersible
type, it will be super-easy to
clean.
If you don't already have a fridge,
get one! Buying foods as you cook
it can lead to economic disaster.
The SGA rents a small refrig-
erator that will aocommodate a
week's worth of essentials for
two. Also, there are always plenty
of people trying to sell them,
usually at a pretty good price.
No one on campus has a great
deal of space fa storing dishes,
but it's a good idea to have
extras, especially glasses. It's a
pain to do dishes every time you
want a glass of Hawaiian Punch,
which brings us to the subject of
food; what to buy, where to buy
it, and what to do with it.
Greenville is an expensive
town, and the grocery stores are
no except ion. Most of us have to
watch what goes into the grocery
cart (or learn to cope with writing
bad checks). The following are
some "g-store pointers:
1. Do not buy groceries at
convenience stores. Their prices
aren't nearly as handy as their
location.
2. Try to work out a once-a-week
trip to the store with your
roommate, and avoid extra trips
during the week.
3. Don't buy frozen vegetables.
They take up precious freezer
space.
4. Learn to enjoy alternatives to
soda. It's raoidlv becoming as
expensive as beer.
5. Don't overdo it with "meat
helper" type casserole mixes.
They tend to be heavy on starch
and calories, but low on other
nutrients.
6. Get into making meal-sized
salads, with meat and cheese.
They're fairly cheap, and they're
super-good for you.
7. Don't let food rot. iry to pian
meats so that all food gets eaten.
8. Don't plan on cooking break-
fast during the week. Eating
cereal hot or cold is no thrill, but
it beats washing dishes at 7:15 in
the morning
9. Boxed pizza mixes cost less
than a dollar, and they make a
surprisingly good weekend meal.
10. A tin of canned biscuits baked
with cinnamon sugar and mara-
gine make a great snack. If you
have a toaster-oven.
11. it Mom is wuimy, stock up on
tin foil, napkins, canned goods,
etc. when you go home.
12. Bread keeps longer in the
refrigerator.
13. Either pack your lunch or
return to your room for it. A
homemade ham sanowich is
MUCH cheaper than one of those
wrapped numbers sold on
campus.
These hints barely scratch the
surface of the shortcuts to campus
cooking, but experienoe is the
best teacher. Experiment a lot,
have some patience, and by
thanksgiving, you' II be a pro at th
art of dorm cookery.
NOTE: Purchase a large bottle of
Alka-Seltzer to accommodate
those first r-oermental efforts.
Davis
Continued from page 15.
taught fa a year in a private
school in Rio De Janeiro.
From Rio Davis went to the
University of Iowa fa two years
and waked in a pharmacy at the
hospital there.
It was at the University of
Iowa that he met his wife who was
teaching French. They have been
married fa two vears.
After leaving Iowa, Davis
returned to Rio where he began
wiritng.
He then went to Stanfad and
then on to France with his wife to
Dijon, her hometown. While
there he taught English to factay
wakers.
Davis visited his hone fa
several weeks after leaving
France and then he and his wife
came here to Greenville.
He said he is happy to have
the job.
East Carolina
Kennels
Will be sponsaing classes
in Basic Obedience Training.
Class starts Oct 7th.
Cost 30.00
Call Ed Perry 752-9864
fa mae infamatiai
Rt. 7 Box 128 Greenville, N.C.
THE TALKING LEAVES
BOOK STORE
BUDDY RICH, known as the world's greatest drummer will perform
at Wright Auditorium, Thursday, Sept. 23. The drummer, along with his
Killer Force Band will play at 8ti0 P.M.
WE CARRY A WU)E VARIETY OF BOOKS
AND WILL SPECIAL ORDER ALL TITLES.
108 EAST FIFTH ST.
752-0354
I
OLDE TOWNE INN
117E.5THST.
758-1991
Eat a home cooked family style dinner with us.
I One entree (choose from three) and all the f
I vegetables you can eat - served family style
1 (tea or coffee included) ONLY$22s (plus tax) j
SUNDAY-THURSDAY 4:30-7:30PM REAR DINING ROOM
�mmm
� ����k-
m . ����. k
mmsammmoummmmm





FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 321 SEPTEMBER 1976
19

m
mm
m
Pirates whip State with trick play
By STEVE WHEELER
Sports Editor
The water bucket is taid to
play an important part on the
football field. But Saturday night,
a different kind of water bucket
saved the day for East Carolina as
they took their first victory since
1971 over N.C. State, 23-14, in a
game played in Raleigh at Carter
Stadium.
After fumbles, penalties, and
mental mistakes allowed the
gutsy Wdfpack to pull within
16-14, the Pirates came back on
an 80 vard, 14 play drive that ate
up more than 6 minutes off the
dock to score on a water bucket
reverse, off a formation Head
Coach Pat Dye has r !s team set
up in on all extra point and field
goal attempts.
It was fourth down and a little
less than four yards to go for a
first down and just over four
yards to go for a touchdown. ECU
called for a timeout to plan
strategy. When Mike Weaver
returned to the field after the
timeout, it appeared the Pirates
would be going for the field goal.
They then set up in the water
bucket formation with snapper
Gene Winters at the ball, Weaver
in holding position, and Pete
Conaty readying to kick. The
other six linemen were way to the
Sports
Bill Keyes
Injured Pirate shares team's wins
Emerson Pickett is not wearing East Carolina purple and gold t his
season as he was expected to, and his absenoe is regretted by all on the
scene. But I have enjoyed immensely the time I have been able to spend
with him in the last oouple of weeks.
Athletes are oontinually psyching themselves or being psyched by
others to believe that they are exceptional, the best for the position.
They want to make their presenoe felt, to be spectacular. And when their
playing days are over they sometimes wish deep down inside that their
team would have some problems, or that the players succeeding them
might not perform as well as they once had, that people might say "I
wish old so-and-so was here But not so with Emerson Pickett. (The
6-2, 220 pound junior from Beulaville was the starting weakside
linebacker at the beginning of the '75 season, but lost his starting
position following a musde injury in the fourth game of the year at
Southern Illinois.)
Pickett, who spent the night at my apartment, woke me up early
Sunday morning following the Southern Mississippi game with, "Man,
did you see that game last night? I mean to tell you there was some
hitting going on out there. We did it to 'em boy!
"Man, I wonder now many yards Hicks and Hawk got. They ran
last night. And did you see Weaver? He was running that option like he
invented it. There ain't nobody who could run the option better than
Weaver did last night. Man, they did everything right!
"And the defense wasstickin' it to'em, too. (Harold) Randolph and
Harold Fat and Brut (Oliver Felton) and Jake (Dove) and Cary (Goddett)
and Zack (Valentine) and Time (Swords) and, man, all of those guys
were hitting. They played some football last night
Pickett went on and on. I probably woke up and went back to sleep
three or four times while Pickett, like Coach Dyeon his TV show, spoke a
mile a minute praising everybody except the waterboy. He was ecstatic.
Nobody could have been more ecstatic than the former Pirate linebacker.
When I finally woke up completely and finished laughing over the
fad that Pickett seemed to be relishing the Pirates' vidory over
Southern Miss like a young child relishes presents from Santa Claus, I
was flattened again when I realized that I had been listening to a man
who shared that team vidory and was so much a part of that team even
though he wasn't a Dart of that team anymore.
Then I knew what Coach Pat Dye meant when he talked so frequently
about "that oneness, that unity, that singleness of purpose which has
many times enabled this football team to accomplish things that they
otherwise might not have been able to accomplish
Haven't seen "Pick" since the State game. But there is no doubt in
my mind that wherever he is, he's talking somebody's ear off praising
his team and his coaches fa a super job well done.
jiMUHifUJiiiiWiumil
left along the line of saimmage
with Willie Hawkins and Eddie
Hicks right behind them.
Winters then picked up the
ball and flipped it over to
Hawkins near the sideline, who in
turn, handed off to Hicks. Hicks
then ran to the right and a block
by Winters on the only defender
to that side spring Hicks fa the
scae.
The throng of 49,700, third
largest in Carter Stadium histay,
looked on in confusion as Pete
Conaty added the extra point to
complete a 23-14 Pirate viday.
The approximately 15,000 ECU
supporters were bringing the
house down with their wild
cheering of the ad ion.
"I called only one play all
night stated an elated Pat Dye
after the game, "that was the last
one fa the scae. That was our
reverse off the water bucket. I
had called fa the field gcal, but
they had been shifting way over
on that set. At the last minute I
had a brainstam and dedded to
call that play
After completely controlling
the first half of play and running
to a 13-0 lead, the Pirates began
fumbling and having key
penalties in the second half to
bring the Pack back dose in the
second half.
With second down from his
own 24 yard line in the third
quarter, Weaver went right on
the option and fumbled the
football. Ron Banther recovered
fa the Wolfpack at the ECU 20
yard line.
On first down, quarterback
Johnny Evans handed off to
all-ACC running back Ted Brown,
who went up the middle, broke a
couple of tackles and scaed.
After Jay Sherrill's extra point
the Pirate lead was trimmed to
13-7.
After the kickoff and a first
down fa the Pirates, Weaver
went to pass. His pass intended
fa Terry Gallaher was picked off
by Wolfpack defensive back Mike
Nail. Nail had caught the ball in
the air but dropped it when he hit
the ground. The offidal ruled it
an interception and no fumble a
drop.
Taking over on their 26 yard
line, State's Ted Brown fumbled
on the second play from scrim-
mage and cornerback Ernest
Madison recovered on the Wolf-
pack 29 yard line.
On fourth down and one at the
Pack seven, Dye called on place-
kicker Pete Conaty to try from 24
yards out. Conaty hit fa his third
three-pointer of theaame in as
many tries, msny tries. These
three field goals tied the school
record held jointly by Ricky
McLester and Jim WooqV
About midway in the fourth
quarter, a mental erra on the
part of punt returner Gerald Hall
eventually led to a Wolfpack
scae. State had to punt on fourth
down from their 42 yard line and
Johnny Evans ga off a boomer.
Hall ranged back to the ball and
called fa a fair catch. When he
caught the ball he as on his own
one-yard line. This left the Pirates
in very poa field position.
Tom Daub punted at fourth
down from his seven and the
Pack's Woodrow Wilson fielded
the ball on the Pirate 44 yard line
and returned it to the 37. Brown
slashed up the middle fa nine
yards and 15 mae yards were
tacked on for a personal foul,
leaving the Pack on the Pirate 14
yard line. Evans then handed off
to Brown who ripped his way
through the Pirate line and
danced into the end zone. Sherrill
added the point to pull the Pack to
within two points.
That was when the Pirates
started their clinching drive
culminating in the water bucket
reverse.
The first half, thoroughly
dominated by the Pirates, started
much as the second half did. State
stopped ECU on the first series.
After a Daub punt, Evans pitched
bad on the first Wdfpack play
ana Ernest Madison recovered fa
the Bucs at the State 27.
Weaver then returned the
fava by fumbling afta losing
eight yards with Richard Carter
recovering fa the Pack.
But, Johnny Evans, still be-
lieving in the old diche that it is
better to give than receive, threw
a pass that all-America Jim
Bolding intercepted at mid-field.
The theft was number 20 fa
Bolding during hiscareer, leaving
him just nine shat erf the NCAA
lifetime mark.
Later in the quarter, starting
on their 34, the Pirates drove fa a
touchdown in just five plays with
Weaver going over from the ten
on an option cutback. The big
play in the drive was a 44 yard
pass-run play with Weaver hitting
Willie Hawkins in the left flat.
The junia speedster then turned
it on and got to the Pack ten to set
up the scae. Caiaty added the
point after and the Pirates led 7-0.
After stopping the Pack once
again, the Bucs started on their
46 after an Evans punt. Weaver
moved the Pirates down to the
Pack 17 yard line befae the drive
stalled. Conaty came on to
attempt a 34 yard field goal.
Making it, Conaty put ECU out in
front 10-0 just into the second
period.
Just befae the half, East
Carolina got the ball on a punt at
their 33 yard line. In just 45
seconds, Weaver engineered 56
yard, 6 play drive that netted the
Pirates another Conaty field goal
as the half ended. This three-
pointer was from 31 yards out.
East Carolina dominated the first
half stats as if they were the only
team on the field. The Pirates got
13 first downs to just three fa the
See FOOTBALL, page 21

FINAL TEAM STATS
ECUNCS
First Downs239
Rushes-Yards71-25638-102
Passing Yards11326
Return Yards510
PassesA-C-l10-5-115-5-1
Punts-A vg.5-397-47
Fumbles-Lost6-45-3
Penalties-Yards6-686-53
MIKE WE A VER fumbled four times in the 23-14 win 14 play drive cumulating in a four-yard water bucket
over N. C. State, but came back to direct an 80-yard, reverse score by Eddie Hicks. Photo by Pogue.
aaaai; irifflWinf 11
. .





20
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 321 SEPTEMBER 1976
We were on the streets and in the dubs on Friday night holler ing "Hey EC, you look so
good to me Early Saturday afternoon we boogied on Fraternity Row to the disoo sound of
Bite, Chew, Spit. We camped out in the stadium parking lot and devoured Kentucky Fried
Chicken while watching buses role in from Sheraton Crabtree carrying Pirates Club
members - laywers, bankers - who yelled, "Go to hell, State
On to the stadium. Whether in the stands a on the grass, we sat down only to jump up
again. We hollered, we screamed, some cried. We saw-yes, some of us saw-Mike Weaver
dash into the end zone for the first six points and place kicker Pete Conaty add the seventh
then tenth, and then the thirteenth.
At halftime we refilled our cups. In the third quarter we hoped we were only imagining
St ite dosing the gap, but in the fourth quarter we saw a guy with a blurry number 28 on his
chest run into the end zone. There was only 1 23 remaining on the dock, someone said so
we knew we had the vidory. Little ECTC had risen up to defeat N.C. State of the powerful
ACC, and we had what amounted towell, Helter Skelteri
tmmmm0mmmm
mm
m
BILL KEYES
�BHHfflinHj
HHBBHaHBBH
.jfe-a
liHHaBH





�I
k
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 321 SEPTEMBER 1976
21
mmmm
FOOTBALL
Pack, 115 yards rushing to just
two, and 88 yards through the
airways to just 24 for State.
Ted Brown was the game's
leading rusher with 83 yards in 12
carries, while Weaver had 80
' yards in 29 carries. Willie
Hawkins picked up 62 yards in 12
rushes while Raymond Jones and
Eddie Hicks had 54 and 39 yards,
respectively.
Defensively, the Pirates were
led by Harold Fort with eight
tackles and Oliver Felton with
seven. Cary Godette and Jake
Dove each had a quarterback
sack, while Ernest Madison
pounoed on two fumbles and
Reggie Pinkney one. Jim Bolding
intercepted an Evans pass.
The Pirate defense played
pretty well, though. They limited
the Pack to just 128 total yards in
the game, which is the least State
has had in any one game since the
Pirates beat them in 1971.
On the number of turnovers
and penalties the Pirates had,
Dye said, "I don't want to take
anything away from our victory,
but I don't think we played a good
game. We made too many
mistakes, had too many penalties,
mmm
and left the ball on the ground far
too much
The Pirates will try to iron out
their rather sloppy play of-
fensively this week in preparation
for their visit to Williamsburg,
Va. Saturday. William and Mary
will be the opponent in the game
and they are 2-0 on the season,
with victories over VMI (34-20)
and Virginia (14-0).
Basketball needs
managers,
hostesses
The 19766-77 East Caroline
basketball team is looking fot
earn managers and hostesses.
Assistant Coach Dan Kenney
wants any prospective mant ers
to come by Room 162, Minges
anytime for interviews.
Any ladies wishing to be
hostesses should also see Coach
Kenney at anytime.
m
m
mm
m
m
m
rtntramurals
by John Evans
Touch football action and tennis competition for the men begins this
week as the intramural season gets on the way. The pre-season favorite
in football will be the Pack.
Registration for Horseshoes singles and doubles, one-on-one
basketball, track and field, women's tennis singles and co-rec tennis
mixed doubles and racquetball mixed doubles begins this week.
Horseshoe events, one-on-one basketball and women's tennis singles
begin next week, with the men'sand women's track and field meet being
held September 29.
Sports counting towards the men's intramural team championship
will be team tennis, touch football, track and field, volleyball and cross
country.
Officials are needed for volleyball. A meeting will be held on Oct. 4 at
7:30 p.m. in Minges Coliseum for anyone interested. Officials are paid
for their work on an hourly basis.
POOL AND RECREA TIONAL HOURS
The swimming pools in Minges and Memorial will be open for
recreational use to all students and faculty at certain times during the
week. In Minges the pool will be open Monday through Friday from 8
p.m. to 10 p.m. and on weekends from 3 to 9 p.m. The pool in Memorial
Gym is open Monday through Friday from 6 to 9 p.m. Lifeguards will be
on hand to supervise the pods. Faculty and students may also swim
between 12 and 1 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday, and 11:30 to
12:30 Tuesday and Thursday at either pool.
Swimming caps must be worn by anyone whose hair reaches the
collar and an I.D. is required for students, faculty and faculty children.
No children under 12 will be admitted to swim without a parent or
guardian.
Pat Cox will be the supervisor for the equipment rooms this year and
will coordinate this service to the students. The Minges and Memorial
equipment rooms will be open seven days a week. Equipment may be
checked out with an I.D. card. The rooms are open from 8 a.m. to 10
p.m. during the week, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturdays, and 1 p.m. to 10
p.m. on Sundays.
SCHEDULES, STANDINGS POSTED
Schedules and standings for intramural events will be posted on the
glass-enclosed bulletin board outside the intramural office at 204
Memorial Gym.
Each week's schedule is posted the preceding Friday and standings
are kept up-to-date weekly. Team points for the overall intramural
championship are updated at the end of each quarter's competition.
Again a reminder that racquetball courts may be reserved in person
in Memorial Room 204 on a daily basis. The tennis oourts on College Hill
Drive are reserved for student use on a first-come, first-served basis.
Next week we will bring you more up-to-date on the week's football
and tennisoompetitionandeventscoming up in the intramural program,
but for now there isn't much more to report.
Scoring Summary:
East Carolina 7 6 3 7-23
N.C State 0 0 7 7-14
ECU-Weaver 10 run (Conaty kick)
ECU-Conaty 34 FG.
ECU-Conaty 31 FG.
NCS-Brown 20 run (Sherrill kick)
ECU-Conaty 24 FG.
NCS-Brown 14 run (Sh -rill kick)
ECU-Hicks 4 run (Cot ity kick)
Att. - 49,700
Tennis meeting
Anyone interested in playing
tennis for the men's varsity
should meet in room 142 Minges
tonight. Newoomersat 7 p.m. and
returnees at 8 p.m.
GREENVILLE'S NEWEST DISCO
EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT
IS LADIES' NIGHT 8- 10pm
COME JOIN YOUR FRIENDS
AT CHAPTERX
With our unique atmosphere and the
best disco sounds around.
QAideje QJou Come 7iist !
t


STUFFVS SANOWtCHES��Supar
No. 1 Spwad Han Cookad Salami Chaate 95�
No. 2 Omam Provolona Swia American1 152 25
No 3 How � Svnsi 1 IS2.35
No 4 Ham Soiami SowI 152.25
No. 6 Turn Saual1 352 65
No. 6 Roaal Baaf1402 75
No. 7 Turkay I3S2 65
No. � CM) Ham Turkey Chaaaa1 35265
No. 9 Stuffy'i Famous Htm-Cappacola Salami Chaaaa135265
No. 10 Stuffy i Star Ham Cappacola Protciurrm
Salami Chaaaa 1402 75
All Stuffy f Garnitfmf at no axtra cost with Tomatoat.
krrtuct onion, oil. nnaoar oragano. and talt
BEVERAGES
Coca Cola Sprita Tab Oranaa Juice Root Baar Draft BawCoffaa
lead Taa Lamonada Mi Hawaiian Punch Grapa Hot Cnocomiw
i

Campus Delivery
6:00pm -11:00pm
50 Delivery Charge
Phone 752- 6130
521 COTANCHE STREET
IN GEORGETOWN SHOPPEES
EAT FOR JUST
� T
plus tax
CLIFF'S
MonThurs.
(Irabcakes slaw, french fries plus hushpuppies.
V pound hamburger steak, slaw, freneh fries and rolls.
Fish, slaw, freneh fries, hushpuppie � -I H
and Oyster Bar
Open 4:30-9:00 MonSat.
2 miles east on highway 264 (out 10th St.)
752-3172
m
m
m
mm
mm
mmmm
m
m
m





22
FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 321 SEPTEMBER 1976
PI) m m I JM
fl

��W
m
m
imtim

Bill Keyes raps with John Evans
EDITOR'S NOTE: Following is
the remainder of the interview
with John Evans, last year's
sports editor, which was printed
in part on Thursday, September
16. Interviews of this nature are a
regular Thursday feature. They
are handled by FOUNT AINHEA D
Assitant Sports Editor Bill Keyes.
FOUNTAINHEAD: When will the
people in this state get to the
point where they see East
Carolina on the same level with
the ACC schools?
EVANS: Probably never com-
pletely. An awareness of the
growth of ECU athletics exists
now, I believe, but too many
people from Raleigh west are too
Big Four conscious to really give
ECU equal time. In my opinion
ECU is equal to the majority of
A CC schools in a lot of sports, but
I wouldn't say football and
basketball are yet. For two games
a year football might be equal to
the ACC, but one would have to
play a five-game schedule with
them before really being able to
judge.
FOUNTAINHEAD: Aren't local
newspapers and TV stations
missing the boat, though, when
they fail to give ECU and the
Southern Conference as much
space and time as the ACC?
EVANS: They're dong a lot better
now than they used to. You're
talking to a local newsman, you
know But outside this area, not
enough seem to care. The local
stations and papers on a whole do
a good job with ECU but some do
miss the boat.
FOUNTAINHEAD: Well, there
are a lot of things involved in
athletics which can make or break
a program, such as publicity and
scheduling. But the most import-
ant factor is performance on the
fields and in the arenas. In our
overall competition against both
conference and non-conference
opponents, how will we fare?
EVANS: I believe you asked that
question before, but I guess you
want it in more specific terms,
sport by sport. Football will be
improved and should win the
conference and do well overall.
Soccer, I can't say. Let's skip
cross country, but the other track
programs will be successful.
Baseball, golf, wrestling and
swimming will be strong. Basket-
ball is wait-and-see and the
others can only get better.
FOUNTAINHEAD: What would
the results be if you were to tally
the losses and victories against
the highly regarded AGO teams
this year?
EVANS: Last year we won two of
three in football, were 0-2-1 in
soccer, and 0-3 in basketball.
Wrestling was 2-0 and swimming
was2-2, I believe. And, of course,
we had that fine 7-0 record in
baseball versus the ACC. That
would make us 13-8-1 if I figure it
right. You can make what you
want from that, but we need to
play a mo
really tell. To me, the really
important results are what we do
against State, Carolina and, in
some cases, Duke.
FOUNTAINHEAD: I understand
you were quite interested in
women's athletics.
EVANS: As one of the improve-
ments for FOUNTAINHEAD
Sports last year, I sought to do a
better job of covering women's
sports. It helped to have an
assistant who knew something
about these sports and had
interest in them herself. The
women themselves were also a
big help. I guess the basic
philosophy there was that there
was something there to cover so
why not cover it. Certainly there
were some fine women athletes
who deserved credit for their
achievements. I know a lot of the
men athletes, particularly in the
non-revenue sports, who were a
bit upset the women got so much
coverage, but I did what I thought
was right and best and I 'd do it
the same way again.
FOUNTAINHEAD: Well, John,
you should be proud of a job well
done. Everybody on the staff here
was pleased with the way you ran
Sports.
EVANS: What do you want me to
say to that?
FOUNTAINHEAD: Nothing,
John, just accept it.
Cfipthtecoifxxi
i
ri 3 w1
i
I And get three games for only $1.25.
I Bring three friends along. We'll let r
� them in on the deal, too.
I
WASHINGTON HWY.
GREENVILLE, N C
Expires Oct. 31, 1976
10 MINUTES
OF YOUR TIME
COULD SAVE
SUFE
In the time it takes to drive
your friend home, you could save
his life.
If yourfriend's been drinking
too much, he shouldn't be driving.
The automobile crash is the
number one cause of death of people
your age. And the ironic thing is
that the drunk drivers responsible
for killing young people are most
often other young people.
Take ten minutes. Or twenty.
Or an hour. Drive your friend
home. That's all. If you can't do
that, call a cab. Or let him sleep
on your couch.
We're not asking you to be
a doctor or a cop. Just a friend.
17
DRUNK DRIVER, DEPT. Y
BOX 2345
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
I want to save a friend's life.
Tell me what else I can do.
My name is!
Address
City
l
.State.
Zip.
�VOI III MKiMMrAY SAI H I ADVIMIKY I'OMMI I'll-F
IF YOU LET A FRIEND DRIVE DRUNK,Y0U'RE NO FRIEND. Q
I MIH'AHIMIMUI IHASM'OHIAIION.NAIiONU HIGHWAY I MAM II SAH I Y ADMINIM HAI l(!





�HHHHHHH

FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 3121 SEPTEMBER 1976
23
�iupimiipiWM
m

9MM
Booters fourth in tourney
ByANNEHOGGE
Staff Writer
Florida Tech was victorious
Thursday and Friday, winning the
Campbell College Soccer Tourna-
ment. Campbell took second
while William and Mary finished
third, with ECU finishing last.
ECU'S first match was aginst
host team Campbell. Coach
Curtis Frye thought his team
"played well, but I was dis-
appointed" with their 4-2 loss.
The Pirates scored early in the
match, with ECU soon receiving a
blow as starting goalie, John
Keener, injured his leg requiring
six stitches. Wayne Barrow was
substituted fa Keener and allow-
ed Campbell to score two quick
goals, leaving them ahead 2-1.
Campbell scored onoe more
before the half to take a 3-1 lead.
Keener returned in the second
half but could not prevent Camp-
bell's final goal, which was made
on a penalty kick.
Forward Jay High scored both
ECU goals, with halfback Pete
Angus adding two assists.
ECU's second match, which
was against William and Mary,
resulted in the loss of two things.
The game, by a 4-0 score, and
John Keener, who was again
injured and remained sidlined for
the rest of the match. Keener may
be out for half the season.
Wayne Barrow was again
substituted fa Keener but oould
not stop William and Mary's
strong offensive drive, in which
they soaed twice in three min-
utes. He came around and
finished the game with 18 saves.
Coach Frye felt his "defense
played well citing fullback
Charlie Hardy as outstanding.
Hardy missed being chosen fa
the All-Tournament Team by one
vae. Jay High was the only ECU
boaer selected to it.
ECU travels to Raleigh today to
meet N.C. State at 4.00.
The final results of the
tournament were:
Flaida Tech-1, W & M-0
Campbell-4, ECU-2
W & M-4, ECU-0
Flaida Tech-4.Campbell-1
Fountainhead
needs sports
writers, call
757-6366
Women's tennis opens
with Atlantic Christian
By KURT HICK MAN
Staff Writer
Coach Ellen Warren's ECU
women's tennis team opens its
1976 season hae today and the
squad is oonfident about the
upcaning year.
The Lady Pirates go against
Atlantic Christian College on the
Mingesoourtsat 3.00.
Accading to Warren, this
year's team should be one of the
school's best eva. "This should
be out best team as far as depth is
concerned Warren said.
"Women'stennis is really on the
upswing at East Carolina
Coach Warren has nahing but
praise fa her playas. "I couldn't
be mae pleased with a team
said Warren. "These girls are
waking hard and are showing a
la of enthusiasm
ROSTER
PLAYER
Sarah Casey
Karen Clark
Patty Collins
Ginny Gainey
Kathy Harry
Susan Helmer
Lee Jefferson
Joyce Johnson
Vicky Loose
Cathy Portwood
Marie Stewart
Dorcas Sunkel
Head Coach-Ellen Warren
HOMETOWN
Potomac, Md.
Durham, N.C.
Shelby, N.C.
Raleigh, N.C.
Livingston, N.J.
Elm City, N.C.
Rocky Mount, N.C.
Goidoboro, N.C.
Beaufort, N.C.
Durham, N.C.
Winston-Salem, N.C.
Baltimore, Md.
CLASS
Soph.
Fresh.
Soph.
Junior
Fresh.
Junior
Senior
Senior
Senior
Junior
Junior
Soph.
DATE
Sept. 21
Sept. 22
Sept. 28
Oct. 1-2
Oct. 5
Oct. 7
Oct. 11
Oct. 12
Oct. 14
Oct. 19
Oct. 21
Oct. 28
Nov. 2
SCHEDULE
OPPONENT TIME
A ttantic Christian 3 .00
St. Mary's 2:30
N.C. State 2100
Methodist
Invitational TBA
ECU, Guilt or d,
UNC-W, Metho-
dist, High Point,
Campbell, ACC,
PSU
N.C. State 3.00
St. Mary's 3.00
A t Ian tic Christian 2.00
Methodist 3.00
UNC-Greensboro 3.00
UNC-W ilmington 3.00
Duke Jr. Varsity 3.00
UNC-W ilmington 3.00
Meredith 2.00
PLACE
Home
Raleigh
Raleigh
Fayetteville
Home
Home
Wilson
Fayetteville
Home
Home
Home
Wilmington
Raleigh
ECU's six starters fa 1976 are
Dacas Sunkel, Cathy Pat wood,
Karen Clark, Patty Collins, Susan
Helma and Vicky Loose.
Sunkel, a sophomae from
Baltimae, Maryland, is ranked
number oie on the team.
"Dacas' strength is ha cai-
sistency said Warren. "Her
ground strokes and serve are
strong and she oombines this with
a la of detamination.
"Patwood is probably our
most powerful playa Warren
said. "She is somewhat incon-
sistant but has a la of skill and
has the best serve on the team
Aocading to Warren, Clark is
the best strategist on the squad.
"Karen is an extremely smart
player Warren raid. "She
combines this with potential and a
great attitude which makes ha
tough to beat
Collins, a newcomber this
year, is a transfa from UNC-
Chariate. "Patty is sanewhat
inooisistent but she has good
quickness and powa said War-
ren.
Helma oould be the best
all-around athlete on the
team. Warren likes ha aggres-
sive play and winning attitude.
Loose, last year's captain, can
be depended upon to give the
team a good effort. "Vicky is a
good athlete and she has tre-
mendous oonoentration Warren
said.
According to Warren, the
Lady Pirates should have a
banna season if they play up to
their capabilities.
"We have sane good com-
petition on our schedule and it
will be a vay interesting year fa
us said Warren. "This team is
detamined to win and I am
confident they can be success-
ful
ECU'S next match will be
Wednesday as they travel to
Raleigh and take on St. Mary's
College at 230.
CLASSIFIEDS
HELP WANTED: Male shat-
ada cook, must be 18 years old,
and available to work some
weekends, apply in pason. Sam
& Dave's Snack Bar. (located in
Darwin Wata's Savice Station.)
FOR SALE :1 blue rug, ,12" x12
$10. Call 752-4013.
WANTED: Keyboard playa fa
weekend band, top 40 and
pop-oountry. Bookings through
Jan. Days call 758-3378, nights
call 752-6566.
HOUSE FOR SALE: 9 rooms, wall
to wall carpet in living room and
dining room; drapes, new inlaid
kitchen and den, spacious back
yard with shrubbay. Fa furtha
information, call Hooker &
Buchanan, 752-6186.
FOR RENT: Room in attractive
Greenville suburb to young lady.
Full house privileges. $79 mo.
Call 756-0698 a write P.O. Box
6065.
FOR SALE: '75 Corvette, low
mileage, white, all aocesaaies.
758-8883 (Business) 756-5465
(home).
VNTIQUE SHOP & Flea Mkt.
Greenville Collectas Club's 5th
LOST: Dog, Black Scottish Taria
answas to name of Soottie. Black
all cva. If found call 758-4922.
FOR SALE: 1970 Honda CL-175,
vay good oondition; asking $300,
includes two helmets. Call
758-9322.
HELP WANTED: Washington
Yacht & Country Club, we need
waitas a waitresses, oone fa
intaview Wed Fri Sat aftaL
4.
FOR SALE: Realistic staeo oom-
ponent. Best offa. Call Jack
752-7596.
FOUND: 4 mo. old black & tan
female dcg, mixed breed, mostly
shepard. Found 9-15 in Brewsta.
No oollar. 75&0747 afta 5.
CAN YOU HELP a faeigna with
grammar and oonvasation? Call
afta 6 p.m. 752-3176.
FOR SALE: 2.5 cu. ft. refrigaata
$50. 4.5 cu. ft. refrigaata $120.
Call 758-7098.
Introducing Th�
Greenville Dating Service
For more Information and descriptive question-
naire send $1.00, name and address to
Greenville Dating Servk
P.O. Box 2541
Greenville, N.C. 27834
All correspondence Is strictly confidential
"Give us a chance to help you"
V appoqaix
Monday-Saturday
9:30-6:00
Friday Nite-Open
Till 9:00PM
Located ln Tan 0fi,Y
Across the Street from WOOW
H. L. Hodges �r Company
TUESDAY THRU SATURDAY
LADIES TENNIS WEAR
PRICE
1 GROUP OF TENNIS SHOES-
MEN'S AND LADIES PRICE
210 East 5th St. 752-4156 Greenville, N.C.





24
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 321 SEPTEMBER 1976
M
MM
Low, Low Prices on all ECU Sportswear
Appreciation Sale
at the
You - the students of ECU have made this fall
the best in our history- We at the UBE are
gratef ul to vou - and to show our gratitude
we're slashing prices on all our sportswear!
1 ECU T- Shirts 1 ECU Jerseys (ECU Tank Tops;1 Women's Tops
1 n.95 !1 4-95 11 1.95 11 3.95 �
� with this coupon j� with this coupon �� with this coupon �� with this coupon i
. reg. 2.95 �reg. 5.95 �. reg. 2.95 �. reg. M.95 �
Save 1.00 on these items
I '1.95 I I SWtQSlchirtS I I 2.95 I I 7.95
� I � ��fo i . i
with this coupon with this coupon with this coupon with this coupon
reg. 2.95 reg. '5.95 reg. 3.95 reg. 8.95
Save 2.00 on below items
Hooded 1 Sweatshirts '1 ECU Jackets j1 ECU ! 1 Lined Jackets 11 ECU ! 1 Sportshirts '
1 '6.95 !1 7.95 �1 ?! 1.95 '1 6.95 !
with this coupon i� with this coupon i with this coupon � with this coupon �
. reg. 8.95 j. reg. 9.95 j1 reg. 13.95 1 reg. '8.95
All other sportswear 50� off regular price.
Personalize your sportswear - 10� per letter
University Book Exchange
528 S. Cotanche St.
Downtown in Greenville
MO
m

wmm
��
mmm

rtmmm





Title
Fountainhead, September 21, 1976
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 21, 1976
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.409
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy