Fountainhead, September 16, 1976






THIS ISSUE
20 PA GES
iOLINA UNIVl RSITY
ENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over fifty years
CIRCULATION
8,500
VOl 52 NO ?
16 St PTt MHf H :
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Game traffic parking on sod
Field unprepared as season nears
By JEFFERSON MANN
Staff Writer
In the spring of 1976 a private
contractor was hired by ECU to
repair, level and improve the six
intramural fields next to Ficklen
Stadium. The work was to be
completed by this fall. But it
hasn't been.
According to Dr. Wayne Ed-
wards, of ECU Intramurals
the fields will be used in the fall
anyway.
We have made arrange-
ments whereby an agreement has
been reached to use the fields in
their present condition for fall
quarter said Edwards. "The
company with the contract will
come back in the spring and finish
the work to our satisfaction at no
additional cost
There are other problems
though, according to Edwards.
Whenever it rains the night
before Ficklen Stadium is to be
used, since the intramural fields
are used for parking, the rain
could soften the grass and the
niiiH
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THE INTRAMURAL FIELDS next to Ficklen Stadium be finished by spring quarter The fields are being
which were scheduled to be completed this fall should used for parking at football games
Handicapped student
mugged near Flanagan
By LARRY LIEBERMAN
Staff Writer
Roy Pate, a Junior at ECU and
a disabled student, was robbed at
11 :30 P. M Wednesday, Septem-
8, on campus by three
unidentified youths.
Pate said he returned from
downtown with a friend. When
they got on campus they split up.
Pate was going toward Slay
dorm in his wheelchair when
three black youths stopped him
between Flanagan Building and
the Infirmary, he said.
He was not injured but $5 was
stolen from him.
According to Pate, One of
them put his hand over my mouth
and they asked where my wallet
was I mumbled that it was in my
pockel They took the five bucks I
had and then they felt guilty
about taking it and after arguing
among themselves they gave th
ma " ' hen the 006 th.it
t'�b it asked the money back I
mmm
gave him the money and got the
hell away from there.
Pate then returned to his room
and told his friends who called the
police. The campus police were at
Pates' room in minutes.
According to Joseph H. Cal-
der, chief of ECU campus police,
the three blacks were sought,
immediately, but since Pate can-
not describe them there is not a
lot the police can do.
Pate said, "I was pissed off,
they took my $5, a chunk of my
pride, and what little faith I had
left in humanity
"I knew society was going
downhill-but now I know how bad
off it really is. I don't know how in
the hell I get in these situations
Calder said there is a reward
for persons who can help identify
and convict all criminals. He said
there may be a connection with a
robbery that occured the same
night on Dickinson Avenue.
No parking
By LINDA CHERRY
Staff Writer
Greenville's City Council voted
September 9 to prohibit parking
along Overlook Drive from Elm
t to Berkeley Rd between the
hours of 9 00 a m. to 5.00 p m
Residents along Overlook Dr.
had oomplamed to the council
that parked cars had blocked their
driveways and mailboxes. These
car-soften remained parked in the
same spot days before they were
moved, complained residents
The "No Parking vote was
propi oed by the a unoil on a ti ial
basis
new turf could be torn up by cars.
Such an incident occurred this
past week wfien it rained prior to
the Rose High School football
game on Friday. Parking was not
allowed on the fields Friday night
but was allowed Saturday for the
ECU football game. According to
Edwards, the damage was mini-
mal.
"In the event of rain we have
arranged that the fields won't be
used for parking fa football
;d Edwards, but in the case of
the ECU games that may be hard
to do
Work on the fields was
originally begun through a
$38,000 appropriation from the
University of North Carolina
system fa capital improvements.
No student fees were involved in
the funding fa the construction.
The plan aiginally called fa
East Carolina'sown Maintenance
staff to do the work, but a private
contract a was decided upon at
the last manent.
Acoading to Edwards, the
work hasn't been completed on
time.
At the present time the
fields have not beer' satisfactaily
completed. The operation fell
behind schedule and the complete
project has not been completed.
The fields are playable but they
are in no better conditiai than
befae the wak began
While wak was being under
taken in the Spring, the men's
Softball games were held on the
Allied Health athletic fields. In
the Fall, this is not possible since
the Allied Health area is used by
the women's field hockey team
fa practice and games.
"We are gang to use the
fields as they are said Edwards,
"but the contracta is obligated
by law to oome back later and
finish the job to our satisfaction
It is not complete yet and we
don't intent to pay any more fa
the fields
Dr. Edwards added the
women's fields on College Hill
Drive will remain in use fa the
women's games and every effat
is being made to improve the
fields as much as possible befae
play starts on Tuesday.
The women won't be affected.
We wont use their fields
unless nothing else is scheduled
on those fields and we need the
area As fa the men's fields, the
contractas will oome in this week
and stake out the six fields so w-
can begin play on Tuesday "
Dr. Edwards said he is
expecting at least 75 teams to
register to play, which would total
almost 900 students
Carnegie Report
sites med surplus
By MONIKA SUTHERLAND
Staff Writer
A recent report released by
the Carnegie Commission on
Policy of Higher Education stated
that North Carolina is one of six
states with a surplus of medical
school faahties.
Medical school officials said in
an interview that the report will
have no effect on the developing
East Carolina Medical School.
Aside from the ECU school
Nath Carolina has three other
medical schools, Bowman Gray,
Duke, and the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill In 1975
Nath Carolina was the twelfth
largest producer of medical stu-
dents in the country.
Walter Sheperd. assistant to
Dean Laupus of the ECU Medical
School, said that the committee of
the Carnegie Commission looked
at the education and the produc-
tion of medical students aaoss
the country and not the service
� Nath Carolina is the elev-
enth most populous state and we
produce a large number of
medical doctors but we are
producing them for other areas.
Since 1925 there has been a
definite decline in the number of
iduates from Nath Carolina

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medical schools that remain in the
state to practice. Only 28 per cent
of the doctas in Nath Carolina
graduated from North Carolina
medical schools. This means 78
per cent of our doctors go
elsewhere to practice, said
Sheperd.
The Carnegie report indicated
that there could be a surplus of
doctas by 1985 According to the
report, there is approximately 1
docta fa every 600 people and
that by 1990 the ratio would be 1
docta to every 450 people.
"In Nath Carolina last year
there was one docta fa every 833
people. In eastern North Carolina
the ratio was 1 to 1369 which
indicates that there is a definite
need fa the medical school at
East Carolina, said Sheperd.
�North Carolina ranks thirty-
fifth in the nation on the ratio of
doctas to patient care. It appears
that the Carnegie Report is a
general izatiai and it did not take
into account individual production
results
In 1970 the Carnegie Commis-
sion released a report on Higher
Education and American Health
which discussed speaficall Med-
ical and Dental schools. At that
time East Carolina was recogniz-
e REPORJ, page 9
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 216 SEPTEMBER 1976
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newSFLASHFLASHFLASHFLASHFLASH FLAS
MRC
MRC Election Day is Tuesday,
Sept. 21, 1976. Filing deadline is
noon Monday, Sept. 20,1976. See
your dorm oounselor or floor
advisor.
I
JOSH!
JOSH! I s it a new restaurant?
Is it a new drink? Is it a new night
dub? Who knows? Hang in there
he's coming.
ccc
This Thurs. night at 700
Campus Crusade for Christ will
have its first fellowship meeting
of the new school year. Come join
us at 1509 E. 5th St. (Across from
nursing building) for a time of fun,
singing and sharing. Everybody
is welcome!
Picnic
A picnic for all Sigma Tau
Delta members will be held on
Wednesday, Sept. 22 at 4 p.m. at
the home of Mrs. Dorothy Mills
(1103 W. Wright Road). All
persons attending should contri-
bute one item (catsup, mustard,
rolls, etc.). See Mrs. Marie Farr
in Austin 218 if there are any
questions.
Workshop
Alpha Phi Gamma, the ECU
journalism society, with the Divi-
sion of Continuing Education will
sponsor an all day journalism
workshop on Saturday, Sept. 18
from 9-4. We are expecting about
100 students from across the state
and ask that all society members
be present. Speakers are pro-
fessionals in the journalism field.
Any interested ECU journalism or
broadcasting students should
check with instructors for a list of
topics to be discussed.
Freshmen
FRESHMAN-Pick up your Regis-
ters (Annuals at 229 Mendenhall
from Vice President Greg
Pingston from nowntil Friday
the 24th from11:30P�00.
))
ICF
Inter-varsity Christian Fellow-
ship will meet this Wednesday
night at 730 at the Methodist
Student Center, across from
Garrett Dorm.
Tennis
Hockey
Women's tennis ooach Ellen
Warren is meeting with prospec-
tive players at 4 p.m. on the
Minges tennis courts Monday
through Friday. Anyone interes-
ted in playing should see Coach
Warren for tryouts.
Any women interested in
trying out for women's field
hockey should report to Coach
Laurie Arrantsat 330 p.m. on the
practice field behind the Allied
Health building.
SGA Offices Poop art
Elections- File for SGA Legis-
lature and class offices at 228
Mendenahll between 9-5 P.M.
each day until Monday the 20th.
All candidates must attend the
mandatory meeting at 730 in
room 221 Monday the 20th.
Grooming
A program featuring dog
grooming techniques will high-
light the September 16 meeting of
the Pitt County Humane Society.
The meeting has been set for 8
p.m. at the downtown Greenville
Planters Bank and is open to all
interested persons.
Guest speaker Barbara Pur-
year will discuss and demonstrate
basic principles of dog grooming.
Ms. Puryear, former owner and
oeprator of the Grooming Box in
Greenville, currently grooms in
the Washington area.
Frat Rush
The Intra-Fraternity Council
would like to announce that the
Social Fraternities on campus will
hold their annual Fall Rush Sept.
13-18. Each fraternity will hold its
own recruitment functions during
this time. All interested men are
urged to participate in Fraternity
Rush. Motp detailed information
will bed � buted at a later date.
Any inquii js-call the IFC office
757-6028.
Gamma Beta
The Gamma Beta Phi Society
will meet on Thursday, Septem-
ber 16 at 7XX) P.M. in Menden-
hall room 244. This is an
organizational meeting for Fall
quarter and all members are
urged to attend.
Entertainer
To experience the ultimate in
the publication field and learn the
know hows of the Student Union
(without entering insanity syn-
drome), apply fa the Entertainer
Committee of the Student Union.
We are new and need you to
become one of us. Apply at
Mendenhall Information Desk.
Students who entered work in
the Summer Poop Art Show may
pick up their work on Sunday,
Sept. 19 at 1 p.m. in Mendenhall
Gallery.
Painting
The 1976-77 Student Union
Art Exhibition Committee,
ILLUMINA, is currently featuring
a show of paintings from Paul
Harley's summer classes in
Mendenhall Gallery. The show
features weavings from summer
students. Due to popular demand
the show will remain in the
gallery until Sept. 25. Wake up
your senses with a dose of this
oolorful exhibition!
Hillel
ATTENTION: Jewish stu-
dents! ECU HILLEL rides again.
The first gathering will be Sept.
21, 1976, at 7:15 at the DEN,
located on the corner of Ninth St.
and James behind Mendenhall
Student Center. For information,
call Cory Duber at 752-8190or Dr.
Resnik at 756-5640.
Senior show
Art work by Michael Shepherd
McNeely of Decatur, Ga senior
in the ECU School of Art. is on
display on the first floor show-
cases of Rawl Building.
McNeely's show includes
pencil drawings, india ink and
wash drawings, an intaglio print
and some limestone sculpture.
Concerts
There will be a meeting of the
Special Concerts Committee at 4
p.m. Monday in the Student
Union lounge in Mendenhall.
Rho Epsilon
ECU'S professional real estate
fraternity Rho Epsilon will hold
its first meeting this Tuesday,
Sept. 21, 1976. The meeting will
be a planning session for the
year, including a symposium in
October. All members are urged
to attend at 3:30 at Mendenhall.
Forever
The Forever Generation of
ECU is a Christ-centered fellow-
ship group. We meet every
Friday night for a study or
challenge from the Bible, singing,
refreshments, and warm fellow-
ship. Our meetings are supple-
mented by ocokouts, get-togeth-
ers, weekend retreats, and other
good times.
Why not join us this Friday
night at 730 pm in Mendenhall
244?
GRE
The Graduate Record Exam-
ination (GRE) will be administer-
ed at ECU Saturday, Oct. 16.
Application materials are
available from the ECU Testing
Center in 105-106 Speight Build-
ing. Persons wishing to take the
examination Oct. 16 should com-
plete application forms and mail
them to Educ ional Testing
Service, Box 966-R, Prinoeton,
N.J. 08540 by Sept. 20
Clockwork
The Student Union Films
Committee presents A Clockwork
Orange, Stanley Kubrick's
masterpiece starring Malcolm ff&r
MacDowell and his Droogs. The V IUCU
shows are at 7 and 9 p.m. on
Friday and Saturday. Admission
requires I .D. and Activity cards or
Mendenhall Student Center
membership cards. Come fly with
us!
Law society
ECU'S law society will hold a
meeting this Monday, Sept. 20 at
4 XX) for all its new offioers in Dr.
Stevens' office in Wright Annex.
Republicans
The first meeting of the
College Republicans is set for
Wednesday, Sept. 22, 1976 at
730 in Brewster, Wing B 104.
Mr. Herb Lee will be the guest
speaker at this meeting. Mr. Lee
is the 1 st District Chairman of the
Republican Party and a Trustee of
ECU. All students who are
interested in the political process
and the Republican Party are
invited to attend.
Three faces
The Oscar-winning movie,
The Three Faces of Eve, will be
shown in Mendenhall Student
Center Theatre on Sept. 22, at 8
p.m. The film stars Joanne
Woodward and Lee J. Cobb in
this psychological explorationof a
schizophrenic. The show is spon-
sored by the Student Union Films
Committee. (See the Beatles'
show afterwards!)
Witnesses
Anyone who actually saw the
bicyclist who was struck by a car
at the bottom of College Hill
Drive and 264 April 26, 1976
please call Jeanie Cox at 758-8300
or go by 616 White dorm. The
information is pertinent to a
pending law suit.
This is Video Awareness in
Mendenhal1 Student Center. See
a different show every day
sponsored by the Video Tapes
Committee of the Student Union.
This is T.V. that won't rot your
mind!
Chess club
The ECU Chess Club will
meet Tues. evening, Sept. 21, at
730 p.m. in the Coffeehouse in
Mendenhall Student Center. All
interested persons are invited to
attend.
( oppaaofixo
Cm
Monday-Saturday
9:30-6:00
Friday Nite-Open
Till 9:00PM
Located w In Tan Only
Across the Street from WOOW
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 216 SEPTEMBER 1976
3


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Tired of hitting the hot pavement,
dodging mad cars, falling off your bike?
Student government runs, with your fees,
the SGA Transit: 4 big buses that make 44 stops
per hour all over campus and Greenville.
SGA Transit is run for students by students.
Use it!
PURPLEGOLL1
PLACEDEPARTPLACEDEPARTS
SpeightOn half hour10th & Hill25 after hour
East brook25 till hourCollege Hill26 after hour
River Bluff22 till hourMingeson half hour
Kings Row18till hourAllied Health27 till hour
Village Green15tillhourPitt Plaza24 till hour
Memorial Gym12 till hourOakmont21 till hour
Mendenhall10 till hourMendenhall16 till hour
SpeightOn the hour10th & Hill5 till hour
East brook5 after hourCoilegeHill4 till hour
River Bluff8 after hourMingeson the hour
Kings Row12 after hourAllied Health3 after hour
Village Green15after hourPitt Plaza6 after hour
Memorial Gym17 after hourOakmont9 after hour
Mendenhall20 after nourMenoenhall14 after hour
BROWN
PLACE
Speight
Memorial
Mendenhall
5th & Elizabeth
Avery & Holly
WillowWoodl.
Elm & Willow
Speight
Memorial
Mendenhall
5th & Elizabeth
Avery & Holly
WillowWoodl.
Willow & Elm
Willow and CV
DEPARTS
on half hour
281
261
221
18t
16t
15t
II hour
II hour
II hour
iihout
II hour
II hour
on the hour
2 after hour
4 after hour
8 after hour
12 after hour
14 after hour
15 after hour
17 after hour
(For pocket schedules, come by SGA.)
And something else:
If you want to charter a bus-
to a rock concert, gamelike State or Chapel Hill)
we're here to help.
Call Gary Miller at 752-9121 for more information.
SGA Puts Students First!
j�v ��i � iMfii
� ��� �, � '����� �� . '
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4
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 216 SEPTEMBER 1976
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What's ahead
ECU students this year will have the opportunity
of observing first hand several events which are erf
major significance to the University, now in its tenth
year with that status. Students who become involved
in their campus' activities will also share in
the making of decisions which could attect ECU tor
years to oome, as we approach the end of an old tenure
and the dawn of a new era.
Dr. Leo Jenkins announced at the 68th annual
convation last week that his last project as Chancellor
of the university would be to expand Fickien Stadium
to nearly double its present size and to support a hike
in faculty salaries. Jenkins will reach mandatory
retirement age of 65 in May, 1978. The first step in
choosing a new chancellor will be the selection of a
search committee which could begin its task this year.
Student participation could be a decisive factor in the
selection process.
One of the venerate chancellor's most prized
accomplishments has been the development of a
four-year medical school, a project Jenkins has
eagerly pursued for over a decade. Final accreditation
of the program is expected sometime this year,
despite a recently released study by the Carnegie
Council on Policy Studies in Higher Education which
claims that ECU'S med school is unneeded.
The 1976-77 school year will also mark the end of
the quarter system at this university. After being
talked about on this campus for many years the
semester system will finally become a reality in Fall
1977. However, there are still many points in the
transition left to be finalized. Fa example, when will
classes begin and end and how will the oourse
requirements of the quarter system translate into the
semester system's curriculum?
The Universitys fact-finding arm, Institutional
Research, is evaluating the rate of failure for blacks as
opposed to whites and males as opposed to females.
The results of this study should become public as will
undoubtedly an explanation of why from the faculty
and administration. Another survey to come out later
this year will try to determine the value of a degree
from ECU for graduates seeKing careers related to
their academic pursuits.
And, as many expect, this will be the year ECU will
begin its venture into big-time football. Now that the
Southern Conference stint was only a phase
of the Fighting Pirates, we are faced with the task of
proving ourselves worthy of membership in a loftier
realm.
These are but a very few of the issues and
questions which lie ahead. Their impact upon this
University and its students will be without a doubt
considerable, therefore student interest should be
sought, considered and encouraged if we are all to be
involved citizen in the ECU community
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HF ISA7" THE BOY UNO CRIfD Wfflf J
TheForum i
Prisoners seek correspondence
Rxjntainheod
Serving the East Carolina community tor war fifty years
Senior EditorJim Elliott
Business ManagerTeresa Whisenant
Advertising ManagerDennis Leonard
Production ManagerJimmy Williams
News EditorsDebbie Jackson
Neil Sessoms
Trends Editorpat coye
Sports EditorSteve Wheeler
Fountainhead is the student newspaper of East Carolina University
sponsored by the Student Government Association of ECU and appears
each Tuesday and Thursday during the school year, weekly during the
summer.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C. 27834
Editorial Offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309
Subscriptions: $10 annual! tor non-students, $6.00 for alumni
To Foe. itainhead:
What would happen if you
took an animal, let's say a dog,
and put him in a cage, then
everyday throw his food at him,
kick that cage, and rattle that
cage for a period of a year?? After
that said amount of time, release
that dog. Most likely, that dog
isn't going to oome out and lick
your hand, chances are good it'll
attack you. Now what happens
when you take a human-being
and put him in prison where he is
constantly locked-up, harrassed
and subject to cruel and unusual
treatment in an unnatural en-
vironment with little or no
rehabilitation programs or
nothing to prepare himself for the
ever-changing outside world? Are
you conoerned? Our names are
Robert Oides and Blaine Malone.
We have seen and are still
experiencing such treatment and
wish to share our views and
experiences with others. We
would like to correspond with
anyone who wishes to write us.
We are very sincere and will
answer all letters. We don't have
to limit ourselves with just the
prison scene, it you would just
like to get to know us or even
become friends, we would be
more than happy to write to you.
So if you would like to know more
Congratulations
To Fountainhead:
I would just like to oommend
the Marching Pirates on their
show last Saturday night. We are
always aware of how much time
and effort that foes into athletics.
Since I live on the hill, I actually
hear how many hours that go into
the Pirates' practice.
Keep up the good work!
Dianne Moore
Nursing Major
Forum Policy
Forum letters should be typed
or printed and they must be
signed and include the writer's
address. Names will be withheld
upon request. Letters may be sent
to Fountainhead or left at the
Information Desk in Mendenhall
Student Center.
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about our surroundings or if you
just dig people, please write to
one or both of us at this address.
Robert Oides 00675-103
Blaine Malone 19243-101
P.O. Box 4000
Springfield, Mo. 65802
Tenants beware
To Fountainhead: '
I wanted to take this time
during the first full week of school
to tell those students who are
thinking of moving into an
apartment or house to please use
the Student Government Legal
Service to get advioe on the type
contrad they will wind up sign-
ing. The lawyers have told us that
a lot of students are signing
contrads they don't fully under-
stand.
Also, all those students who
have received tax notices from
Pitt County should see our Legal
Service before paying.
Call the SGA office at 757-
6611 from 9-5, or oome by 228
Mendenhall.
Tim Sullivan
Student Body Prez
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FOUNTAINHEDVOL 52, NO. 216 SEPTEMBER 1976
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Judge acquits executives in kepone case
NEW YORK (LNS)T-Two Al-
lied Chemical executives were
acquitted September 2 of conspir-
ing to conceal from government
agencies Allied's polluting of
Virginia waterways with the
pesticide Kepone.
Allied Chemical Co. has al-
ready pleaded no contest to
nearly 1,000 counts of actual
pollution violations stemming from
the Kepone dumping, and the
corporation's former Kepone sub-
contractor, the Life Science Pro-
ducts Company, also faces crimi-
nal charges as well as civil
damage claims by about 80
former employees.
Kepone is a pesticide of white
powder used to kill rats, roaches
and potato bugs. It was developed
by Allied in 1951 and manu-
factured at Life Science in
Virginia until the summer of 1975
when the plant was closed by
State health authorities.
Unaware of the danger, many
of the Life Science workers didn't
bother to wear rubber gloves and
others ate their lunches on tables
oovered with Kepone dust. "No-
body said this stuff was danger-
ous said Dale Gilbert, an
operations supervisor at the
plant. "I was told it was not
harmful
Gilbert was hospitalized in
June of 1975 and has not worked
since. He suffers from liver and
spleen damage, has become
sterile, and there is a possibility
that he could develop cancer-all a
result of the Kepone poisoning.
Last July the state of Virginia
closed the James River to com-
mercial fishing because of the
Kepone contaminated fish.
FIRST KEPONE TRIAL
The first trial of executives in
the federal prosecution of cor-
porations accused of the Kepone
polluting lasted only two days.
During the trial, Walter F. Lee, a
regional coordinator of the En-
vironmental Protection Agency
(EPA), testified that Allied's
Trade group to meet
Jackson A. Rigney, dean of
International Programs at N.C.
State University, will address the
Coastal Plain World Trade Assn.
(CPWTA) at a meeting here
Thursday night.
Officers of the newly-
organized CPWTA are to be
installed at the dinner meeting.
An initial organizational meeting
was held at ECU earlier in the
summer.
Rigney has been dean for
International Programs at N.C.
State since 1968 and served for
six months in 1975 as interim
Acting Chancellor of the Raleigh
school. He served as department
head of statistics at State fa 13
years before becoming involved
with international programs.
He spent two years as leader
of the NCSU Agricultural Mission
in Peru and later was campus
director of the project fa three
years. He has been on shat
assignments in Brazil, Ecuada,
Costa Rica, Nicaragua, India, the
Philippines and Indonesia.
In 1963, he aoanized and
headed the U.S. agricultural
delegation to a United Nations
conference in Geneva on the
applications of science and tech-
nology in less developed nations.
He served as Overseas
Researcher fa the CIC-AID Re
search Project in 19667 while
living in India and ocvaing the
Near East and South Asia. Later
he participated in the final repat
fa that waldwide study.
Officers and directas nomi-
nated and scheduled fa install-
atioi include John Howard of
Greenville Tobacco Co Green-
ville president; J. Edgar Kirk,
Weyerhauser Cap New Bern,
vice president; Graham Flanaga,
North American Fiberglass
Cap Greenville, treasurer; Ms.
Mary Campbell, Barbour Boats
Waks, New Bern, seaetary; and
Louis M. Wallace, Southern
Overseas Corp Wilmington,
Robert P. Michaels, A.C. Monk
Co Farmville, R.D. Whedbee,
WindsaattaneyandC.R. Blake,
assistant to the chancella, ECU,
Greenville, as directas.
aiginal application fa waste-
water discharge permits �
required under federal law - had
given no indication that the
oompany was then dumping up to
15 gallons a minute of water
laden with Kepone into a tribu-
tary of the James Riva.
The prosecution had sought to
prove that the two Allied execu-
tives, Frank Piguet and Gerald
Williams, had knowingly
schemed with the prosecution's
key witness, a famer Allied plant
manager, to withhold the pol-
lution date from the EPA.
The manager, Virgil Hund-
tofte, turned state's evidence
befae the trial, but when it came
to the oourtroom, he said he was
not alleging oonspirataial con-
versations and that he was na
even aware of a conspiracy in
1971 and 1972 when the
defendants were preparing the
incomplete federal water-
discharge applications.
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SEPT 19th IN
GREENVILLE, NC
from
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89

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HAMBURGER
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Chili Tomato, Cheeseburger
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Coconut Dainties, Oatmeal,
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ROLL-ON
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COCA
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64 OZ. BTLS.
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8 OZ. BTL.
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6
FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 216 SEPTEMBER 1976
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GREENVILLE AREA TRANSIT WELCOMES THE ECU STUDENT BODY
great
TAKE YOU FOR A RIDE!
ROUTE ONE
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5 155�5 355 425495 55 6 006096 09M3
i' FOR TRANSIT INFORMATION
CALL 752-4137, ASK FOR GREAT.
Greenville
LJ
SCHEDULES AVAILABLE AT
THE STUDENT UNION AND
JOYNER LIBRARY.
WHERE ELSE CAN YOU BE
CHAUFFERED IN AN AIR-
CONDITIONED MERCEDES-BENZ FOR
A QUARTER?
i
n

ed
rei
00
la;
St
Inl
th
ci�
Cs
IF WE EVER FAIL TO LIVE UP TO OUR NAME, PLEASE BRING IT TO OUR ATTENTION

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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 216 SEPTEMBER 1976
7
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7"S RAINING in Greenville. Ho what else Is new?
Concert cancellation
settlement reached
ByBECKYBRADSHAW
Staff Writer
A settlement has been reach-
ed with Ike and Tina Turner in
regard to the cancellation of their
concert on Homecoming weekend
last year.
According to Barry Robinson,
Student Union president, the
International Executive Board of
the American Federation of Musi-
cians of the United States and
Canada awarded the sum of
$2,287.83 to be paid by members
of the Ike and Tina Turner Revue
and Dennis Rubenstein, their
manager, to the ECU Student
Union.
Failure to pay will result in the
removal of Ike and Tina Turner
from the Federation of Musicians.
The settlement is for money
owed for publicity and ticket
expenses incurred before the
cancellation of the concert, accor-
ding to Robinson.
Robinson also said the Aver-
age White Band cancelled the last
three days of their tour because of
total exhaustion.
He said the band never
notified the school of the cancella-
tion and the Student Union
learned of it through a promoter
in Norfolk who was also affected
by the cancellation.
Robinson plans to file a
oomplaint against AWB with the
National Entertainment Confer-
ence of which the Student Union
is a member.
"Unity Star Natural Foods"
10 SALE NOW THROUGH SATURDAY
V itiman & Mineral Supplements Whole Grain Breads
Natural Cosmetics Yogurt-Raw Milk Cheeses
Ice Cream
Located
EAST 10th STREET
Colonial Heights Shopping Center CALL 752-9336
ONE DOLLAR
OFF
ANY NOW �SALE ALBUM OR TAPE
AT
ROCK N SOUL
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
OFFER GOOD THUR SATURDAY SEPT. 18
Tadlock named
ROTC commander
Lt. Col. Carl E. Tadlock has
been named commander of the
ECU Air Foroe ROTC detach-
ment, replacing Lt. Col. Ronald
F. Henderson, who has been
assigned to Norton Air Face
Base, California
During his three-year term
here, Tadlock will serve as
professor of Aerospace Studies as
well as chief administrator of the
ECU AFROTC program.
An alumnus of ECU, Tadlock
received the MA denrp in
Education from ECU in 1967 and
the Ed. S. degree from Troy State
University in Alabama in 1975.
His military career has in-
cluded an appointment to the
faculty of the Air Force's
Academic Instruct a Course at
Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala, an
assignment as air staff officer
with the Pentagon's Policel
Project Branch and a previous
faculty position with the AFROTC
at ECU.
Tadlock is a native of Pine-
tops. He and his wife, the former
Susie Spivey, are the parents of
three daughters.
� AJR HHWUttA
- IMMLU - HIU - BtANk -CHILI CUM CARNI
s
5
AUTHENTIC TEXAS-STYLE
MEXICAN
mrr1 i
GREENVILLE'S
GREAT NEW
TASTE TREAT
ECONOMICAL
SUFFICIENT
VARIETY
TO SUIT EVERYONE.
INCLUDING VEGETARIANS
HOUSE
US 264 BY-PASS (ADJACENT PEPPI'S PIZZA)
11 30-9 30 Weekdays
I - 3ih - rwirjp NOP mto - nrwrmvn - mnimi -

I
a
DINE IN
TAKE OUT
5 TIPPY'S
o
I
This week at the
ELBO ROOM
THURS "SMACK DAB"
FRI
SAT 10th AVENUE
SUN
EVERY SUNDAY IS LADIES NITE
BEAT STATE
Welcome, Students
Come In This Week and
REGISTER
FOR FREE BRAS, BY
� Bali
� Warner's
� Lily of France
DRAWING WILL BE
HELD SEPT. 25TH
you don't have to be present
to win!
j
DOWNTOWN
PITT PLAZA
� im u i urn
a
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8
FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 216 SEPTEMBER 1976
M
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Homecoming proposal defeated
By KIM JOHNSON
Assistant News Editor
The Homecoming Steering
Committee Tuesday defeated for
the second time a proposal for
additional entertainment for
Saturday, Oct. 30 of Homecoming
Weekend.
SGA President Tim Sullivan
made the proposal which called
for "one a two' on-campus
concerts to be held simultaneous-
ly with the scheduled Count Basie
Dance and Show.
According to Sullivan, the
SGA was willing to contribute up
to $5,000 fa free-admission con-
certs in hopes of curbing antici-
pated crowds in the downtown
Greenville area Saturday night.
Sullivan said he felt the
scheduled agenda fa Oct. 30 is
weak and will not attract enough
of the student body to avoid an
occurrance such as the 1975
Halloween weekend.
The committee voted nine to
four in seaet ballot defeating the
proposal.
Barry Robinson, Student
Union president, gave his reasons
fa the defeat of the proposal, "I
feel that those concerts might
cause the same type trouble
anticipated downtown on campus.
Also, I think the Count Basie
Dance & Show plus the Greek
function planned fa Oct. 30 will
be sufficient to draw students
away from the downtown area
Rudolph Alexander, Associate
Dean of Student Affairs for
Activities and Directa of Men-
denhall Student Center com-
mented on possible profit loss the
Student Union might face if the
free concerts were allowed to take
place.
Greenville Maya Percy Cox, a
regular member of the Steering
Committee and Jim Caldwell,
Greenville City Manager, were
present at the Tuesday meeting.
What actions the city will take
to prevent trouble in downtown
Greenville Halloween weekend
depended on whether a not
Sullivan's proposal was accepted
by the committee, accading to
Cox and Caldwell. Both men
supported the proposal and
voiced disappointment at its
defeat regardless of the belief
that the Count Basie Dance and
Show and Greek functions sche-
duled fa Oct. 30 will sufficiently
draw aowds away from down-
town.
"I feel Sullivan's proposal
would have taken the edge off the
large aowds anticiapted fa that
night said Cox.
Accading to City Manager
Caldwell, no definite plans as to
how the city will handle the
expected aowds downtown have
been finalized. Howeva, he did
say the city will be well prepared
especially now that Sullivan's
proposal is defeated.
In a later interview, Sullivan
mentioned alternatives fa deal-
ing with the aowds Halloween
weekend being discussed in City
Council meetings. These alterna-
tives include a city curfew and
mmmmmmmmm � ii
closing the downtown bars Sai r-
day night.
Robinson said he had no
previous knowledge of the
"alternatives" the city might use
befae the Tuesday vote was
taken.
Marshal McAden, Seaetary
of Minaity Affairs, present at the
meeting voioed suppat of Sulli-
van's proposal with the stipu-
lation that one of the proposed
bands be directed towards the
black students' musical tastes.
McAden was also disappoint-
ed at the outcome of the vae and
said it could have done much to
"at least draw the black students
away from downtown Green-
ville
After this second defeat of his
proposal, Sullivan said he was not
waking fa the citizens of Green-
ville in making this proposal but
fa the students: "All we (SGA)
wanted to do was help take the
edge off the aowds downtown
that night and give those students
who wanted to avoid the area a
place to go.
"I'll fight to see that the bars
downtown are not closed Satur-
day night but the troublemakers
there that night can easily pull
students back into a firey
atmosphere
Sullivan predicted "plenty of
trouble downtown" if the city
does decide to close the bars the
night of Oct. 30.
The concern over Saturday,
Oct. 30 stems from the fact that
the downtown bars will be dosed
all day Sunday. This is being done
"voluntarily and unanimously"
by the bar owners, according to
Caldwell.
In other business, Jim Mai
lay, Dean of Men, reported a
treasury of $4,702, $4,625 of
which is being spent on Home-
coming activities.
The committee also passed a
motion fa seven to eight bands to
participate in the Homecoming
Parade, each band receiving $100
instead of $70 as last year.
Bill Cain, Directa of Athle-
tics, repated to have one ECU
"Hall of Famer" to appear at
half-time of the Homecoming
football game.
The committee also passed a
motion for purchasing 5,000
pompoms at $850 fa students to
use at the Honecoming game.
The committee is still seeking
any non-commercial entry into
the Homecoming Parade, accad-
ing to Charles Brown, Directa of
Institutional Development and
co-chairperson of the oommittee.
Robinson, also co-chairper-
son, rumaed that Charlie Rich
will be one of the maja at-
tractions fa Honecoming Week.
The total agenda of Home-
coming activities will be publish-
ed at a later date.
10 MINUTES
OF YOUR TIME
COULD SAVE
A FRIEND'S LIFE
4
In the time it takes to drive
your friend home, you could save
his life.
If your friend's been drinking
too much, he shouldn't be driving.
The automobile crash is the
number one cause of death of people
your age. And the ironic thing is
that the drunk drivers responsible
for killing young people are most
often other young people.
Take ten minutes. Or twenty.
Or an hour. Drive your friend
home. That's all. If you can't do
that, call a cab. Or let him sleep
on your couch.
We're not asking vou to be
a doctor or a cop. Just a friend.
rr
DRUNK DRIVER, DEPT. Y
BOX 2345
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
I want to save a friend's life.
Tell me what else I can do.
My name is
Address
CityStateZip
1
�YOn H HIGHWAY SAI-M V ADVISORY I OMMII ' H
IF YOU LET A FRIEND DRIVE DRUNK, YOU'RE NO FRIEND. 0
I S III I'AMIWI SI Ml IKASM'OKIAIIOS � SA 1(1 ISM IIK.IIW IHAI Ml SAI I- I Y AIIMINIS I HA I KIN
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 216 SEPTEMBER 1976
9
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f
ling
id a
000
s to
king
into
ord-
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and
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DORMITORY NOW CONVERTED to Mod school offices.
REPORT
Continued from page 1.
ed as a developing medical
facility.
The 1976 report on Higher
Education by the Carnegie Com-
mission is about 90 pages long
and deals with all aspects of
education on the college level.
The report also stated that there
is already a surplus in teachers, in
Ph.D programs and a potential
surplus in law schools and health
science programs, all of which
North Carolina schools are invol-
ved with.
LEARN TO
Belly Dance
i
call sunshine
for more info
752-5214

SayHeltoto
our Hot Diggety Dog Sale.
BUYONE
HOT DOG.
GET ONE
FREE AT
Offer good at all Greenville,
N.C Hardee's Restaurants
until September 30, 1976. Limit
of 10 free Hot Dogs per
customer.
Hardeer
Chartxoil Burgers
GNCOA plans action
By LOUIS TA YLOR
Staff Writer
In an effort to solve the
perennial Halloween night ten-
sion in "downtown" Greenville,
city officials and members of the
Greenville Nightclub Owners
Association (GNCOA) have met
seveieu in lies over trie pas year.
ECU upperdassmen no doubt
remember Halloween 1975 when
riot-equipped police used tear gas
to clear bars and disperse about
2,000 angry young people. As a
result, 56 persons-many of them
students-were arrested.
Greenville Police Chief Glenn
Cannon said city officials have
been "discussing the situation
with the (nightclub) owners in
order to come up with the best
possible solution
Elbo Room owner Dan Bercini
said that present plans are
tentative, but something concrete
should be forthcoming.
Bercini added that the preva-
lent feeling among GNCOA
memoers is one or general
concern for public safety and
personal property. The GNCOA
fear that some individuals may
feel that Halloween confront-
ations have become an annual
institution in Greenville.
According to Bercini, any
GNCOA plan approved will be
one which creates a "festival
atmosphere" so that everyone
can have a good time.
Chief Cannon added that any
definite action will be taken at the
discretion of the dub owners in
conjunction with dty regulations.
Of the 56 arrests during the
1975 inddent, 47 were dismissed
in open court.
As a result of police adion in
1975, the ECU Organization of
Students' Rights retained Dur-
ham attorney Jerry Paul to
initiate legal action against
Greenville. A dassadion suit was
filed in federal court on behalf of
the OSR. Legal adion in the dass
is still pending.
East Carolina
Kennels
Will be sponsoring dasses
in Basic Obedience Training.
Class starts Od 7th.
Cost 30.00
Call Ed Perry 752-9854
for more information
Rt. 7 Box 128 Greenville, "N.C.
DOWNTOWU
PITT PLAZA
Brody's Has Sport
Shoes By
� ADIDAS
� TRETORN
� KEDS
Come See Them All!
bar oiil
TIRED OF BREAD & LETTUCE SANDWICHES?
coMETObaroni's
AND GET MEAT ON YOUR BUNSI!
Open Everyday 11 - till 1 752-8351
free delivery: campus, fraternity, & downtown area
Fulltime student desiring
parttime work selling life
insurance for 7th largest in
nation.
Career upon graduation.
Call B. L. Hunt, CLU, for
appointment. 752-4080
BILL L. HUNT, CLU, District Agent
I O. Rox 206, Contanclic Streel
Greenville, NC 27834
Phones: Ofi'irr 752-4080, Residence 752-3015
NOKTHWISlf KN
MUTUA1 MM �
MILWAUKEI
NML
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TO
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 216 SEPTEMBER 1976
m
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SGA balloting scheduled
ByROGERWHITSON
Staff Writer
Elections for Student Govern-
ment Association (SGA) students
legislators and class officers will
be held Tuesday and Wednesday,
Sept. 28 and 29.
With a total budget of
$250,000 to $300,000 a year, the
SGA is responsible for the
funding of such campus services
as the transit system, various
publications, student loans, re-
frigerator rentals, free legal aid,
and student body representation
on the Greenville City Council.
The elections include balloting
for approximately 50 student
representative positions, about
half of which will be fa dam
students. Each dam will select
two a mae representatives.
Filing fa these posts will be
Sept. 14-Sept. 20 in Room 228
Mendenhall. A mandatay candi-
date meeting is scheduled in
Room 221 Mendenhall on Sept. 20
at 7:30. The following week will
be devoted to campaigning.
Coupled with the voting fa
legislatas will be a refrendurr. oi
the current and proposed SGA
budget, oovering such expendi-
tures fa Fountainhead, transit
system, Buccaneer and fine arts
programs.
Since this referendum will
directly influence the SGA's
budgeting plans, SGA President
Tim Sullivan stated, "Thoseclubs
and aganizatiois which depend
co student government suppat
need to be active in this election;
quite a lot will depend on it
The ballot also includes op-
pat unity fa students to accept a
reject the proposed SGA Consti-
tution.
SGA ELECTIONS - Sept. 28 and
29.
SR-56
The super slide rule
programmable powerhouse
with 10 memories and 100 program steps.
$
109
95
The SR-56 is a tremen-
dously powerful slide rule
calculator. Yet you can pro-
gram it whenever you're
ready.
There are 74 prepro-
grammed functions and op-
e rations. You can do
arithmetic within all 10
memories It has AOS - a
unique algebraic operating
system that lets you handle
problems with up to 9 levels
of parentheses. There's also
polar to rectangular con-
version�built in. Mean.
Standard deviation. De-
grees, Indians, grads. And,
it works with TI's new
printer - the PC-100.
Chances are, you'll be pro-
W T ?
gramming. That's what pro-
fessionals in your field are
doing�right now. And with
an SR-56 you're ready. It
has 100-merged prefix pro-
gram steps. 6 logical deci-
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subroutines. You can decre-
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iterate a loop as many times
as you specify. There are 4
levels of subroutine to let
you use your program steps
to maximum advantage.
And, you can even compare
a test register with the dis-
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branch. So you can check an
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for convergence, or a Sm)
maximum. J
The edge you need. Now. And in your career.
Texas Instruments will rebate $10.00 of your original
SR-56 purchase price when you return this coupon
and your SR-56 customer information card post-
marked no later than October 31,1976. To apply:
1. Fill out this coupon
2. Fill out special serialized customer information
card inside SR-56 box
3. Return completed coupon and information card to:
Special Campus Offer
P.O. Box 1210
Richardson, Texas 75080
Name
Address
City
University
Name of SR-56 Retailer
SR 56
State
Zip
Serial No (from back of calculator)
Please allow 30 days lor rebate
' Suggested retail price
HI with the T register
1976 Teas Instruments Incorporated
Texas Instruments
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INCORPORATED
m
( 19
.VV





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��
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 216 SEPTEMBER 1976
11
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Would you believe
Helpful hints
for EZU
newcomers
ByPATCOYLE
Trends Editor
Would you believe it's already September, and a new school year is
upon us? I know you'11 all agree it's really great to be back in Greenville,
back with the same old roommate, haunting the same old party places,
standing in the same old lines. What? There are people out there for
whom this is a new experience, people who aren't embracing and being
embraced by those old flames from last year?
Some of you new faces are transfer students, right? There isn't much
I can tell you, exoept to congratulate you fa having the good taste to
leave crummy Chapel Hill, slimy State, a some other second rate hall of
learning. What? Some second-rate hall of learning kicked you out? Well,
uh, try not to say it too loud, okay?
The rest of you newcomers are the ones who real ly need the advice of
someone with infinite wisdom, someone who has fully grasped the EZU
experience, someone like, ahem, ME.
To start out, let me tell you a few things about EZU.
First, in spite of what your Aunt Mildred told your nervous parents,
ECU is NOT a party school. Just because Health 12 includes an entire
chapter on curing hangovers, that doesn't mean we're students at a
party school.Just because we take joy in a little friendly Halloween
triok-or-brickbatting, that doesn't mean we're a bunch of rowdies. Just
listening to the liberal references to Our Creator in normal conversations
on campus is a sure indication that we are as straight as they come.
This isn't to say that the student body at this noble institution doesn't
enjoy social activities. To the contrary, many of us enjoy nothing more
than a trip to one of the local nightspots for a little friendly socializing.
Just go downtown on any given night and you're sure to see couples
"socializing" in corners, in alleys, in parked cars; the list gees on and
on. So does the socializing.
You may have questions about the morality of the average student.
You have, perhaps, heard those nasty rumors about how the infirmary
doles out the Pill like M & M's. That's utterly ridiculous. The infirmary
does not give out M & M's. If that isn't enough proof for you, ask any
girl on campus about the state of her virtue and she'll tell you she's pure
as the driven snow. (What? The driven snow back in your hometown is
not very pure? Well)
A major part of campus life revolves around the Greeks. No, I don't
mean a bunch of foreign exchange students; the term Greek refers to
the sororities and fraternities, so-named because their name consist of
letters in the Greek alphabet. You ask "Why the Greek alphabet?" I ask
you, would YOU join a sorority or fraternity called "G-W-F'?
Anyway, the Greeks are an integral part of the campus community,
serving the public in any way possible. Their generosity is well-known,
especially among the beer distributors, motel owners, and torture-tool
salesmen.
In naming the most important people on campus, we could never
leave out the athletes, ESPECIALLY with football season around the
corner. When you goto your first EZU game, you' II know the players by
the vicious looks on their faoes, the wild manner in which they run
around, the manner in which they hurl a brown object back and forth.
What? That description fits the seven guys sitting in the row behind you
at the game? That's not a football they're throwing, dummy. It's an
empty Seagram's Seven bottle.
Some of you may wonder why I've gone through all of these
paragraphs without mentioning academics; classes. Well, we do have
classes at EZU, a at least I heard we do. Seriously, you attend classes
regularly, whatever your conoept of regularly is.
There is one more vital part of EZU life I haven't mentioned. I
wanted to save the best for last. Every Tuesday and Thursday,
something great is delivered to the dorms. No, not money from home,
you turkeys The great item is none other than Fountainhead, ECU'S
great emblem of truth and integrity. Although I want you to get the most
out of every section of this wonderful example of ace journalism, I must
advise yc. to turn to this, the TRENDS section first. I head that dogs that
are being traned have "cast their vote" two to one, on the TRENDS
section, and �jveryone knows that discriminating dogs don't just "drop
their praise" everywhere.
Kilpatrick to lecture here
James J. Kilpatrick, one of
America's most respected news-
papermen, will speak at Menden-
hall Student Center on Tuesday,
September 21 at 8�X) P.M. The
appearance is being sponsored
by the Student Union
Lecture Committee.
Mr. Kilpatrick has identified
himself in a term once used by
H.L. Mencken: He is a critic of
ideas. In that capacity, he serves
as columnist, commentator,
author, editor, and observer of
our times. He is a conservative,
but not a knee-jerk conservative.
He is a Southerner, but not a
professional Southerner. Kil-
patrick is known among his
oolleagues as a craftsman and a
stylist who writes with humor and
understanding of the world
around us.
Kilpatrick was born in Okla-
homa City in 1920. He was
graduated in 1941 from the
University of Missouri. He began
his newspaper career as a report-
er on the Richmond News Reader,
specializing in politics and court
coverage In 1964, while still in
Richmond, he began writing his
three-a-week syndicated column,
"A Conservative View
Today Kilpatrick works from
his home office in the Blue Ridge
Mountains, 80 miles west of
Washington. Here he has origi-
nated some of his most popular
oolumns under the dateline of
"Scrabble, Virginia Hisoolumn
now appears in over 320 news-
papers. Kilpatrick also serves as a
regular oommentator for CBS and
for its Washington television
affiliates. He travels widely in the
United States and abroad. He is a
contributing editor of National
Review and a regular essayist for
Nation's Business.
Tickets for the lecture are
priced at $3.00 fa the public.
Admission fa EC students will be
by ID and Activity Card and ECU
faculty and staff by Mendenhall
Student Center Membership
Card.
JAMES J. KILPATRICK
Buddy Rich drums Thursday
BUDDY RICH, recognized as the
"Wald's Greatest Drummer
will appear in concert with his
Killer Face Orchestra en Thurs-
day, September 23 at 8 flO P. M. i n
Wright Auditaium.
It could be said that Buddy
Rich came into the wald swing-
ing. Hisparentswereavaudeville
team playing the best national
circuits and in the tradition of true
showmanship, they introduced
Buddy to audiences having him
play the drums on "STARS AND
STRIPES FOREVER at eigh-
teen months old. When he
reached the ripe old age of three,
he became a permanent part of
the act and by the time he was
seven he was a single, touring
mmm
B
'The World's Greatest Drummer
ECU Wednesday.
Rich, will bring his beat to
m
with the Vaudeville circuits.
After a tour with the U.S.
Marines, Buddy joined the Tom-
my Dasey Orchestra. It was
during this period that Rich
earned the title "The Wald's
Greatest Drummer While with
the Dasey Band, Buddy roomed
with Frank Snatra and although
their feuds sometimes made front
page news, it was Frank who
booked Buddy's first band after
they brth left Tommy Dasey.
Rich is a showman, a oonsumate
and dedicated art i st, a young man
of music whose music is fa the
young. Buddy does na compro-
mise and he has come into this
age of youth domination with a
free swinging spirit. He plays the
music of today distinctively Rich
with no bending in any direction,
whether toward a complete youth
audience a to the keepers of the
past. Buddy Rich is a contempa-
ary music maker, aiginal, with
no label.
Tickets fa the concert are
available from the ECU Central
Ticket Office and are priced at
$1.50 fa ECU students, $2.00 fa
groups of 20 a more and $3.00 'or
the public. The concert is being
spoisaed by the Student Uniai
Special Entertainment Commit-
tee.
m
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. � ���� -�.�A&





12
FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 216 SEPTEMBER 1976
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Dylan succeeds, in spite of visual problems
By MICHAELFUTCH
Assistant Trends Editor
The Bob Dylan "Hard Rain"
concert presented on NBC Tues-
day night has to be praised
because of the visual similarity to
his studio work. Dylan is known
for recording an album in a very
short span of time, trying to
achieve a raw and primitive but
concrete tone on his efforts. This
concert, taped last May at
Colorado State University in Fat
Collins, appeared to visually
attempt this same mood.
The live oonoert, plagued by
poor camera work in many places,
clicked in others. There were
some fantastic shots focusing on
Dylan's back with the audience in
full view - thishasalways been an
intimidating angle with his lyrical
genius. The sound was quite good
fa television recalling ABC's In
Concert, Don Kirsohner's Rock
Concert as terrible examples of
TV sound reproduction.
Dylan, perfaming with old
friend Joan Baez, and backed by
The Rolling Thunder Revue,
looked somewhat healthy and
energetic. The Charlie Chaplin
mannerisms were there from the
beginning; humaous, sardonic
and somewhat biting. He said
only four wads during the show -
"Joan Baez" and "Thank you" -
and failed to play his usual
acoompaniment, the harmatica.
To my delight, it was all music
and to Craig stereo's expense,
there were only three ad breaks.
This was Dylan's third tele-
vision appearance; appearing on
the old Johnny Cash Show and
last year's PBS tribute to
Columbia Recads executive John
Hammond Se.
"Hard Rain" was not aigi-
nally planned fa televisiai view-
ing by NBC. Dylan, however,
displeased with the aiginal plan,
offered this concert in its place.
Needless to say, NBC grabbed it.
The special opened with two
of Dylan'sold protest songs: "It's
a Hard Rain Going to Fall" and
"Blowing in the Wind The
revivalist vocal tone used on the
Before the Flood was missing
here, but it still remained hard-
hitting.
Dylan surrounded himself
with some fantastic people fa his
recent tour and they were seen on
the opening number: Joan Baez,
oger MoGuinn, Mick Ronsoi,
Scarlet Rivera and many mae.
The poor camera work was
initiated here and there was a
great deal of reliance on close-ups
(Dylan's chops are about as bad
as Keith Richards used to be).
After the first commercial
break, Dylan and Baez joined fa
a shat acoustic set. After giving
"Blowing in the Wind" an
unusual sporadic vocal treatment,
they harmonized further on
"Railroad Boy" and "De-
portees I felt it was ironic that
Channel 7 flashed a run-off
election result wire over the onoe
hero of political radicals. Baez
Beatles tribute
Away With Wads is the wald's largest traveling multi-media
production. This unique production is not a rrovie and is not a rook-n-roll
show, it is most nearly classed with productions such as"Godspell" and
Jesus Christ Superstar "Away With Wads" has played mae than
800 individual perfamanoas, and has without incident drawn mae than
600,000 people, breaking 36 all time house recads. The show utilized 32
slide projectas, 3 film projectas and 360 degree sound, that aeates a
panaamic voyage of sound and sight.
Come to Wright Auditaium fa two unfagettable perfamances of
the most beautiful Beatle tribute ever presented, on:
Wed. Sept. 22,1976
8.00
10OO
Advance t icket s are:
Students $2.00
Public $2.50
Tickets at the dcor will be:
Students $2.50
Public $3.00
Advance tickets are on sale at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center and The Recad Bar. This evening of "mind
boggling" entertainment is sponsaed by the Student Uniai Special
Entertainment Conmittee. Roll up fa this Magical Mystery Tour. Step
right this way!
stood out on the last number with
vocal s as beaut i ful as she has ever
delivered. Again, however, shaky
camera wak plagued the num-
ber.
The Rolling Thunder Revue
reemerged fa aie of the high-
lights of the Dylan special, "I Pity
the Poa Immigrant definitely
electric Dylan at his best with a
bit of funk. Baez accompanied
with Caracas while Dylan display-
ed evident influence.
Another high point was
"Shelter from the Stam Dylan
tempaarily replaced his Fender
fa a Guild, playing some slide
with conviction, although not
authaity. He was seen aloie in
froit and playing like electric
Dylan can; not brilliant but
moving. He sang solo on this
number, with eyes closed.
Mick Ftonson, David Bowie's
ex-guitarist, added some Chuck
Berry licks on "Maggie's Farm
The way that Dylan looked
humaously lost on this one can
only be justified by his hanging
around Clapton too much. It was
done in a joking manner with his
band of misfits plugging along
behind their leader in comic form.
Mae out of focus camera
wak presented "One Tco Many
Manings" but was balanced by
some great angles. Dylan's fiddle
player on Desire, Scarlet Rivera,
was featured co this tune as well
as the next, "Mozambique
This cut, off of Dylan's last
LP, was given-the full treatment
and was a great reproduction of
studio wak.
Dylan delivered his "Messiah
Will Cone Again" vocal energy
on "Idiot Wind The guy has
been around a long time and his
sheer vocal strength was never
mae apparent. The camera re-
mained in a primitive position fa
the first half of the song; close up
of Dylan's face. He's not getting
any younger as lines showed
around his eyes. He did show an
unusual amount of physical
energy on this tune as he pranced
around the stage.
For some stupid reason,
WITN-TV broke into "Knocking
on Heaven's Doa with a spitfire
of commercials. McGuinn was
sounding very good on backup
vocals and it could have been the
high of the night.
Overall, "Hard Rain" was
good, not great but enough.
Although at times visually poa,
the sound was solid. It was
enjoyable if only fa Dylan's
presence, a mystique as sane
call it.
Fun parks change with times
ByBARBAFIA LEWIS
A generation ago, amusement
parks oonsisted of not much mae
than a roller coaster and a milk
bottle toss. And no one really
expected much mae.
But, amusement parks have
evolved into multimillion dollar
playgrounds, offering almost
every type of entertainment
imaginable. And during this
summer of the Bicentennial year,
turnstiles are twirling at these
parks at the recad pace.
Still, although parks ranging
from Sea Wald in San Diego to
Busch Gardens in Williamsburg,
Va. are enjoying enamous suc-
cess, some have nevertheless
discovered that their elaborate
famats are not enough to lure
everyone-particularly young
people in large numbers.
�"Most theme parks have a
terrible time attracting the 18 to
25 visita admits David De
Motte, president of Sea Wald,
which has parks in San Diege,
Orlando and Auraa, Ohio, 30
miles from Cleveland.
"Our experience is that
teenagers like parks with rides
and active participation, like
Disneyland. But they aren't near-
ly as interested in a park which
requires them to sit and watch a
whale a a group of dolphins
perfam fa them
Of oourse, the marine shows
featured at Sea World have
tremendous appeal, even to those
young adults, who attend. Sea
Wald's biggest market is fami-
lies with children up to age 13.
And they have made it possible
fa Sea Wald to grow into a $7
million a year enterprise in
slightly mae than a decade.
Still, amusement parks are
well aware of the immense
market that the 18 to 25 age group
encompasses. Some, like Great
Adventure in Jackson, N.J have
the types of rides that already
attract these young people. But
other parks are just now making
attempts to lure the youth mar-
ket. Sea Wald in San Diego and
Orlando have added a few rides in
keeping with the park's theme.
Several, for instance, are
booking pop music acts into their
outdoor amphitheatres, ranging
from The Miracles to Three Dog
Night. Others, like Opryland in
Nashville, have date nights,
during which a section of the park
is roped off frr dancing to lock
music. Disney Wald recently
added River Country, a water
reaeation complex specifically
designed to attract the 18-25 set.
Some parks have added dar-
ing rides to attract young people.
The Texas Chute Oou ride has
gained almost instant popularity
among the young at Six Flags
Over Texas in Dal.as. On the ride,
patrons are raised at the top of a
235-foot tower, from which they
are dropped 30 feet in just three
seconds. At that point, a para-
chute opens, and thpy drift gently
to the ground.
At the new Enchanted Village
in Buena Park, Calif which
features 32 acres of natural
tropical setting and hundreds of
animals, visitas may ride oi a
live elephant a a live Arabian
camel a pet a wandering llama.
Among the nation's most
successful parks are those that
combine both rides and animals.
Great Adventure has adopted this
concept, merging a drive-thrajgh
animal preserve where lions and
tigers roam at will with a series of
trained animal acts and rides,
including the popular log flume
ride. The park also features date
nights on the weekends (two
admission fa the pnoe of one), as
well as live oonoerts featuring
maja rock ads.
Interestingly enough, al-
though some parks do not have
mass appeal among the youth
market, many of their executives
are quite young.
John Baltes, general manager
of Sea Wald of Ohio, is 29 years
old, and began waking fa the
Sea Wald parks nearly 11 years
ago when he was hired as a
sweeper. He eventually was
promoted to operations manager,
then assistant general manager,
and finally two years ago to
general manager of the Ohio
park.
"Sea Wald has offered career
oppatunities to a lot of people
who started out at the low rung of
the ladder explained Baltes.
"And we're a big souroe of
summer jobs fa young people.
There are 800 students waking at
Sea Wald of Ohio this summer,
ranging from ticket takers to
animal keepers
Bruce Stevens, the training
manager at Sea Wald of Ohio, is
also 29 and initially began
waking at the park overseeing
the music fa the marine mammal
shows. Not long thereafter, he
asked to be transferred from the
park's production staff to the
training department, and he has
been there ever since.
"Most trainers get into the
training business by accident
remarks Stevens. "They have to
show ability as not only trainers,
but as showmen as well. And it's
difficult to find someone good at
both. To be a good trainer, a
person must be patient and
steady. To be a good showman,
he has to be an extrovert and an
excitable-type individual. Those
qualities aren't often found in the
�-line person
HKHW
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it�&&��





FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 216 SEPTEMBER 1976
13
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Check out the exciting new sound
of the AR-14
I
I
A true and acurate loud speaker
for your dorm or listening room.
Sold exclusively by Pair Electronics.
Located at 107 Trade St. (Next to Tarheel Toyota)
TELEDfNE
ACOUSTIC RESEARCH
When music
becomes more than just something to listen to,
PAIR ELECTRONICS AUDIO CENTER is involved.
��)�m
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mmmwm�r40mmmmmm
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14
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 216 SEPTEMBER 1976
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John Payne Band to play jazz-rock on mall
The John Payne Band will be
featured in concert on September
16 at 8.00 P.M. The ooncert is
scheduled for the ECU Mall and
is under the sponsorship of the
Student Union Special Entertain-
ment Committee.
The John Payne Band is based
in Boston. Led by their multi-
instrumented horn player John
Payne, the group handles a wide
variety of ambitiously structured
music which ranges from light
pieces dominated by acoustic
piano and flute, to funky "jazz-
rock to highly improvisational
works. John Payne has recorded
with such notables as Van Morri-
son, Bonnie Raitt, and David
Bromberg.
John Payne's new album
called Bedtime Stories is remark-
able, not only for its high musical
quality, but because Payne pro-
duced it himself on his own label.
It features Payne's new quintet, a
tight, exciting group with lots of
energy which can play some very
danceable funk as well as more
cerebral works.
As an improviser, Payne is the
analytical type. He will play the
theme, then begin to restate its
intervals in funky little phrases.
Within a chorus or two he is
usually experimenting on the
individual notes, bending, vibrat-
ing and reshaping them. It is a
style that dramatizes the
musicians' use of the word
"chops to mean technique,
because Payne is usually right on
the beat, literally chopping out
pieces of soto music.
If you are into the sounds of
Weather Report, Return to For-
ever, or the Mahavishnu Orches-
tra, you will not want to miss the
John Payne Band.
Trends needs:
Reviews writers
Feature writers ANY writers
Meeting: Tuesday, Sept. 21,
4:00
Publications Building
H.D. LEE
Jeans and Cords
SHIRTS and
SALE
THUR WEDNESDAY
DOWNTOWN ON EVANS STREET MALL
L
WRANGLER
helps you warm up to
the semester with jeans
and a jacket of Cone
indigo denim. A casual
favorite, this all-cotton
denim has enough comfort
and style to keep you
looking good in school and
out. Jeans 27-42; pile-lined
jacket 34-46 regular,
48-50 long. Ask for Wrangler
jeans and jackets at your
favor, te rVff-A$
campus AAl 1CW
s,oe denim
Cone makes fabrics people live in
CONE MILLS I mOBROAOWAr NEW YORK 'NY 1001





of
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ie
FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 216 SEPTEMBER 1976
15
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Sports
Sideline Chat
with Steve Wheeler
East Carolina enters another athletic year, the last of which the
Pirates will be competing in the Southern Conference. Many people have
mixed emotions about the proposed stadium expansion and the Pirates
leaving the conference. But, in the end it will be to ECU's advantage to
leave the 'dying' Southern.
The biggest advantage will be in football, of oourse. East Carolina is
playing before aowds of less than 10,000 people when playing SC teams
and this yields a very small return when playing on the road. On the
road, teams get a percentage of the gate or a set sum and when you play
before 10,000 spectators or less the return is minimal at best.
Also, East Carolina has a fine all-around program and it does not
help prestigiously to play VMI, Furman, a The Citadel. This makes the
job of getting class teams on the schedule much harder. In the last five
years, East Carolina has had the 18th best record among major colleges
and universities and has cracked the top twenty rarely and has not gone
to a bowl game.
During the ECU press day in August, Head Coach Pat Dye described
the importance of schedule. "When we can get major independents like
South Carolina and Georgia Tech on the schedule, we can bring money
into our athletic program
Having strong teams on the schedule with large stadiums can move
the Pirate program up. "Raying teams like The Citadel and VMI do
nothing for our program added Dye.
With teams such as ASU, VMI, Southern Illinois, and The Citadel on
the schedule last season, the Pirates averaged just over 20,000 in
attendance, with 47,000 at State and 42,000 at Carolina helping the
average.
With the stadium enlargement that is planned, exiting the Southern
Conference, and putting bonafide Division I NCAA members on the
schedule, East Carolina can very easily average doee to 35,000 fans a
game.
The stadium question has been a somewhat controversial one in the
last year, with critics asking the question, If you cannot fill up the 20,000
seat stadium, how can you expect to fill up a 35,000 seat facility?
The answer is not simple, but is understandable. When our athletic
director goes to some big name school with a scheduling proposal, that
school isgoina to want the game at their stadium. ECU has played State
six times, all in Carter Stadium, while playing Carolina three times at
Kenan Stadium. With a larger stadium, these schoolsoould come here to
Greenville. But with a 20,000 seat facility they will never think of it.
Playing these kind of teams week-in and week-out would net the ECU
program a significant increase in financial resources, which in turn,
would aid the entire program. The more money athletic department
makes, the more they have to spread around to all sports, not just
football. And with big-name teams ooming into Greenville to play the
stadium-expansion will not go to waste.
Most of the minor sports will be unhurt by the exodus of the
Southern. All the women's sports programs are in the North Carolina
Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (NCAIAW) and they
will not be affected by the change to independent.
As for swimming and wrestling, they have never needed to schedule
SC teams. They are continually routing their conference competition.
With scheduling strong independents, the wrestling and swimming
programs would aet strong competition throughout the season instead of
just at the end (in regional and national championships.)
The track team depends on qualifying times to get its athletes to the
nationals and does not even schedule a meet with other conference
members except in the conference meet.
Basketball, baseball and tennis are the main sports hurt by the
withdrawal because they depend on their championships in the
conference as stepping-stones to national championship tourneys.
PIRA TES A TTEMPT TO REGAIN CUP
East Carolina failed last year to defend their Commissioner's Cup,
which they picked up the previous two yers. The Commissioner's Cup is
presented to the school each year in the SC that shows the best overall
athletic program.
Losinq by three points to William and Mar'in the Cup standinqs, th�
See SIDELINE CHAT, page 16.
Pirates roll past
Southern Miss.
By STEVE WHEELER
Sports Editor
Working like a well-oiled
machine, East Carolina executed
near-perfect I y on offense and
swarmed on defense to romp over
the favored Golden Eagles of
Southern Mississippi in the
season-opener fa both teams,
48-0.
The Pirate offense, with
senia Mike Weaver at the helm,
used the wishbone offense to
perfeaion, repeatedly churning
out gains of ten a more yards.
When Weaver wasn't turning
upfield oi the option fa big
yardage, the lithe quarterback
was pitching the ball out to
speedy backfield combo of Willie
Hawkins and Eddie Hicks fa
sizeable gains.
Weaver was so efficient at
quarterbacking the wishbone at-
tack that the Bucs scaed on all
six possessions he fiuided, soa-
ing four times on touchdowns and
twice on field goals.
"Mike Weaver was just un-
believable tonight commented
Head Coach Pat Dye on his field
general's feats on the gridiron.
Mike is a tremendous individual
and there's na a better wishbone
quarterback around. And when
he pitched the ball to Eddie and
Willie they ran the ball just as I
had anticipated
East Carolina's veteran de-
fense, led by Zack Valentine,
Harold Randolph, Oliva Felton,
Cary Godette, Wayne Poole, and
Jake Dove, repeatedly gang-
tackled the Golden Eagles fa
losses and quarterback sacks.
"Our defense was really super
tonight said Dye. "Especially
Zack Valentine and Harold Ran-
dolph. And newcomers Wayne
Poole and Gerald Hall were great
too
The kicking game was big also
fa the Pirates. A punt return fa
a touchdown and a blocked punt
setting up another were the
bright spots along with Pete
Conaty's perfect night of place-
kicking.
"Our kicking game gained us
two TD's in the ball game Dye
stated. "And Conaty sure looked
good with his place-kicking. And
he (Conaty) sure was making
them start out on the 20 (yard-
line) a la with his long kickoffs
The Pirates did ail this in front
of a new opening-day reoad
aowd of 17,400. The aowd was
up roaring most of the time giving
Dye "our proverbial 12th man on
the field
The fans in attendance had
hardly gaten the seats warm
when the Bucs took the opening
kickoff and drove from their 13 to
the Southern M iss eight when the
drive fizzled out. Pete Conaty
came on to convert a 25 yard field
goal. Fullback Raymond Jones
and Weaver did the bulk of the
ball carrying in the possession
getting 30 and 25 yards, respect-
ively.
The Pirate defense stiffened
after the kickoff and faced the
Golden Eagles to punt. After
Jones gained three yards up the
middle to the 21, Weaver went
right on an option play. After
picking up15 yards and seemingly
down, Weaver pitched the ball to
Willie Hawkins on the sidelines.
The junia running back finished
the 79 yard scoring play by
tight-roping the sidelines and
eluding a couple defenders.
Conaty added the point after to
take the Pirates to a 10-0 lead.
Lightening struck again fa
East Carolina afta the defense
again stopped the Golden Eagles.
Punter Mike Wright ga off a
beautiful punt fa Southern Miss,
a 51-yarder. But he outkicked his
coverage and Gerald Hall, taking
the punt on his 30, weaved his
way through defenders and pick-
ed up some key blocks and went
the distance. Harold Randolph
took the last Southern M iss player
off his feet at the 25 to spring
Hall. Conaty was again perfect
with the extra point.
On the vay next series, the
ECU defense again came up with
the big play. Afta allowing the
Golden Eagles two first downs,
the Pirate defensive line hit
quarterback Kenny Alderman as
he crossed the 50 and Zack
Valentine recovaed on the ECU
45-yard line.
Weava then engineaed a
drive down to the eight-yard line
of Southern Miss. Afta failing to
get a first down, Conaty came on
to kick his second 25 yard field
goal. This put the Pirates up by 20
with ten minutes left in the half.
East Carolina added another
touchdown befae the half as
Weava took them on a 76-yard
drive in the last two minutes of
the paiod without throwing a
pass. Eddie Hicks went the final
14 yards and the Rrates had
staked out a 27-0 halftime lead
with Conaty'soonvasion.
Fa all intents and purposes
the game was in the bag, but
nobody tad the Rrates because
they did na let up one bit in the
second half.
The Golden Eagles took the
second half kickoff and the Pirate
See FOOTBALL, page 16.)

First Dowms
Rushes-Yards
Passing Yardage
Passes A-C-l
Return Yardage
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Southern Mississippi
East Carolina
USMECU
1121
44-6155-416
11256
18-11-16-3-0
10101
9-38340
3-14-1
8-522-20
0000-0
1710147-48
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ECU'S JIM BOLDING hits Chris Pieper 30 after a Golden Eagle pass completion
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16
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 216 SEPTEMBER 1976
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Bill Keyes raps with John Evans
Editor's Note: Each week,
FOUNTAINHEAD assistant
sports editor, Bill Keyes, will
interview a prominent sports
figure or one with valuable sports
knowlede. His first interview is
with last year's sports editor,
John vans. Evans is presently
employed as assistant sports
editor of the Kinston Free Press
One of his chief possibilities at
Kinston is covering ECU
athletics.
By BILL KEYES
Assistant Sports Editor
FOUNTAINHEAD: In the two
years that you worked as sports
editor for Fountainhead you
learned alot about our athletic
program, and about the teams we
play against as well. What kind of
year do you expect at ECU
athletically speaking?
EVANS: I expect this to be
another fine year for ECU in
terms of athletic excellence. The
football team should be improved
and the track, swimming, wrest-
ling and baseball teams should do
as well as last year, even though
the baseball team loses alot of key
players. Athletically speaking it
should be a very good year.
FOUNTAINHEAD: Does the
Southern Conference award a
Commissioner's Cup each year
like many of the other con-
ferences do?
EVANS: Yes it does. The Cup,
much like the ACC's Carmichael
KAip, stands for athletic excel-
lence in the overall sports pro-
gram based on competition in
every varsity sport sanctioned by
the Southern.
FOUNTAINHEAD: Who won the
Cup last year?
EVANS: Ironically no one in the
Southern Conference has ever
won the Cup but ECU and
William and Mary. The Indians
won the cup last year and ECU
won it in '74 and '75. I believe
ECU finished just behind William
and Mary and ahead of Ap-
palachian State. I think there was
a three or four point difference.
FOUNTAINHEAD: Now looking
at our program, what do you think
the chances are of us winning the
Commissioner's Cup in our last
year in the Southern?
EVANS: Of course I think that is
what the fellow? jver in the
athletic department are looking
for, especially Bill Cain and Dr.
Jenkins. Overall, ECU'S program
should be improved, but sports
like cross country, tennis and
riflery can only go up. Alot will
depend on the basketball team's
improvement since it is always a
tough race between ECU and
William and Mary. Last year the
basketball team finished ninth.
Swimming, wrestling and football
can be looked upon as almost
definite championships and track,
golf and baseball will always stay
on a conference level. Basketball
and soccer were disappointing
last season but both teams should
improve. The others will not do
anything but help because they
mmmmmmmmm
can only do better.
FOUNTAINHEAD: What is the
effect of winning championships
in the various sports on the total
program?
EVANS: I'm not sure I know what
you mean by that question. To
win a championship obviously
brings prestige to the program
and pride to the individual
coaches and athletes, but what
other rewards result vary. In
soccer, baseball and basketball,
winning the conference
championship qualifies the team
for the NCAA playoffs. The
wrestling champions in each
weight class also qualify for the
NCAA's. Track and swimming
are determined by times to
qualify for the NCAA. Not
speaking for the coaches, but
speculating, I 'dhave to say that a
conference title is the first goal all
the coaches aim for and across
these is the intra-conference
rivalry that always exists for
being number one. With swim-
ming and wrestling, tradition is
involved since these sports are
perennial conference champs. In
golf and track, rivalries with
Fur man in golf and William and
Mary in track make a conference
championship a worthwhile goal
to shoot for. The same should
hold true with football, I would
believe.
FOUNTAINHEAD: Is the pur-
pose of the addition to Ficklen
Stadium primarily to enhance the
chances of scheduling on a
home-and-home basis teams
which will be big attractions at
the gate, or primarily a selling
point fa the University in their
bid to join either an already
established a a newly-famed
conference?
EVANS: You could go on for
hours about Ficklen Stadium and
its importance to the program,
and the reasons and plans for its
expansion. A better person to talk
to would be Athletic Director
Bill Cain, Dr. Oitf Moore or those
connected with the stadium ex-
pansion program. I �assume some
sort of announcement will be
made soon about it. Surely, in
order to attract larger and more
prestigious football teams to
Greenville a larger stadium is
needed. The reason for this is
primarily financial since a team is
more interested in the guaranteed
gate it is to receive when it goes
to a school.
Money talks, it seems The
games at State and Carolina are
big draws up there because there
is a rivalry that exists that will fill
a 40,000 seat stadium. Why play
in Greenville where you can draw
only 20,000 at the present.
From my under star ding, the
stadium size has long been an
excuse for the larger schools not
to comehere and certainly in most
cases it wvild be a legitimate
excuse. A lot of people have
argued that enlargement of the
stadium is a silly idea because we
can't fill the stadium now. But I
think if State, Carolina, VPI and
schools like that came to Green-
ville the need for a 35,000 seat
stadium would be supported by
the crowds It's an ambitious
idea and certainly one geared
towards building ECU into a
football power. So far as the
larger stadium being an enticing
inducement to admittance to a
new conference - of course it is
Again, any conference looks for
the advantage it will receive from
admitting a school to its member-
ship. Certainly a 35,000 seat seat
stadium is more enticing than a
20,000 seat stadium.
FOUNTAINHEAD: When it was
first suggested that ECU might
pull out of the Southern Con-
ference, everybody went wild
dreaming the possibility of us in
the ACC, but the ACC made it
clear, and fa understandable
reasons. The ACC has four
members in Nath Carolina within
about a hundred mile area with
Maryland and Virginia to the
nath and Clemsoi all down to the
South. In basketball season, fa
example, Maryland doesn't like
the idea of playing four games
plus Clemson down here already,
so you know they won't go fa the
idea of ooming down here again,
and I can't blame them.
EVANS: One of the biggest
reasons the ACC has given
everybody for not Allowing new
members is the financial gain
from leaving the loop as a seven
team league. At present, gate
receipts from home and tourna-
ment games are split seven ways.
So why add an eighth school and
cut down on the revenue you
bring in. The ACC schools seem
happy as they are.
FOUNTAINHEAD: What kind of
conference will ECU end up in,
John?
EVANS: I ca 't answer that one
without a crystal ball. They've
talked to other schools about a
mid-Atlantic based or Southern
based conference consisting of
current Southern Conference
teams and independents. As to
how far these talks have gone, I
really don't know. It leaves
interesting possibilities and spec-
ulating open, though, doesn't it?
FOUNTAINHEAD: I thinkthe
latest reports had us talking with
Virginia Tech, Richmond, South
Carolina, West Virginia, William
and Mary, VMI, and some others
about the possibilities of faming
a new conference. Would that
arrangement provide the rivalries
that are so vital to interconference
play - rivalries like Ohio State and
Michigan, Oklahoma and
Nebraska, State and Carolina
though? We don't really have that
in the Southern anyway, do we?
EVANS: What essentially you are
looking at there, with the ex-
ception of South Carolina, is an
updated version of the old
Southern Conference made up of
either those schools who have
dropped out in the case of VPI,
West Virginia and Richmc 1d, er
those that have at last decided to
drop out like ECU, VMI, and
William and Mary. In such a
conference there will be the old
rivalries between ECU and Wil-
liam and Mary and Richmond
which do already exist in the
Southern Conference. A rivalry of
sorts exists already between VPI
and Richmond and West Virginia
and the other Virginia schools. It
obviously would be a Virginia
based conference if these schools
named all joined, which would
afford quite a few rivalries. But
date the larger crowds. The
present stadiums at Richmond,
VMI, ECU and WillUunand Mary
just aren't big enoug right now.
ECU's biggest rivalrit right now
are State and Carol77 �. don't
think anyone would dilute that.
A rivalry of sorts has developed
with Appalachian State over the
last few years and it could be a
good one if the game between the
two could be played in a central
location in the state where both
ASU and ECU fans could attend.
That's about the biggest inner-
conference rivalry ECU has now
that Richmond has left.
Field hockey
Anyone interested in playing
women's field hockey should
meet at 3:30 on the practice field
behind Allied Health with coach
Laurie Arrants.
Women's tennis
Anyone interested in playing
women's tennis should meet any
afternoon at 4XX) p.m. on the
Minges tennis oourts with coach
Ellen Warren.
Women's golf
Anyone interested in playing
women'sgoii should meet tonight
(Thursday) at 7 p.m. in Room 142
with Coach Mac McLendon.
then again, you have the absence
of the larger capacity stadiums
that would be able to accommo-
SIDELINE CHAT
Continued from page 15.
Pirates' main failings were in basketball and baseball. Both were
expected to do well in oonferenoe competition but each finished fourth. If
both had finished second, the Cup would have once again been in
Greenville. Football, tying fa second, was also expected to finish first. If
each of the maja spats had moved up one notch ECU would have tied
William and Mary. The Pirates won firsts in swimming, track, and
wrestling.
PIRA TES HIGH IN NCAA STA TS
East Carolina, with its big 48-0 win over Southern Missisippi last
week, has six individuals in the NCAA statistics leaders and six in team
catagaies.
Eddie Hicks and Willie Hawkins rank 14th and 16th in the individual
rushing catagay, averaging 133 and 128 yards per game, respectively.
Hicks and place-kicka Pete Co�aty are tied fa eighth in the nation with
12 points apiece, Hicks coming on two touchdowns and Conaty's on two
field goals and six extra points. Conaty is also ed fa sixth in field goals
Punt-returner Gerald Hall seventh in his spe alty with 15.3 avaage.
In the team catagaies, the Pirares rank third in rushing and scaing,
eighth in total offense, tenth in total defense, eighth in rushing defense,
and first in scaing defense.
FOOTBALL
Continued from page 15.
defense again stiffened. East
Carolina took over on their 46 and
after three plays and a first down
at the Southern Miss 44, Weaver
caught the Eagle defense nap-
ping. After faking up the middle
to fullback Vince Kolanko,
Weaver faded back to pass. He
picked split receiver Terry Gal-
laher up 15 yards behind the
secondary and hit him fa a 44
yard touchdown. After the point
after, the scae stood 34-0.
On the next series the Pirates
had the ball, Jimmy Southerland
came in to take over as quarter-
back. Starting on the ECU ten,
Southerland moved the Pirates up
to the 35 in three plays. On third
and one, Southerland handed off
to Hicks up the middle. After
getting through a huge hole made
by the line, Hicks was off to the
races fa a 65 yard touchdown.
When Conaty added the point the
Pirates led 41-0.
The Bucs got on the board
once more in the fourth quarter
after reserve defensive end John
Maris blocked a Mike Wright
punt and recovered on the
Southern Miss seven. On third
and goal at the seven, Souther-
land hooked up with third-string
tight end Eric Walker fa the TD.
Individually, the Pirates were
led by Hicks and Hawkins. Hicks
ended up with 133 yards rushing
on just eight carries fa a 16-6
average per run. Hawkins carried
11 times fa 128 yards while
Weaver had ten carries fa 55
yards.
Leading the Pirate defense
was Zack Valentine, Harold Ran-
dolph. Oliver Felton, Tommy
Summer and Mike Brewington.
Valentine had 12 tackles, one
fumble recovery, and a pass
interception. He also caused a
fumble, had a quarterback sack
and two tackles fa losses.
Randolph picked up 11 tackles
and a sack of Kenny Alderman,
while Felton had eight stops, two
being fa losses. Reserve line-
backers Summer and Brewington
each had eight tackles in less than
two quarters of play, one of
Brewington's being a quarterback
sack.
The big win fa the Pirates
should give them plenty of
momentum going into Saturday
night's battle at Carter Stadium
against arch-rival State, a team
the Bucs have beaten only once.
The Wdfpack is 0-2 fa the
season.
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 216 SEPTEMBER 1976
.17
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18
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 216 SEPTEMBER 1976
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Pirates face Winless Wolf pack
By BILL K EYES
Assistant Sports Editor
Due to East Carolina's 48-0
victory over SoutheinMississippi
the season opener and N.C.
State's successive losses to Fur-
man and Wake Forest, many are
favoring the Pirates to leave
Raleigh Saturday night having
successfully avenged their four
straight losses to the Woifpack
since 1972, including last year's
26-3 setback.
All 44,000 seats at Carter
Stadium as well as the grassy hill
at the scoreboard end of the
stadium field will be filled as the
Pirates and Woifpack square off
to do battle. Here is the scouting
report for that game, as told to
Fountainhead by Wright Ander-
son, offensive backfield coach.
Offense
State, running from their twin
veer offense formation, is one of
the most outstanding offensive
teams around, as they have
displayed by rolling up consider-
able yardage against both Fur-
man and Wake Forest in spite of
numerous fumbles.
They have outstanding per-
sonnel, especially at the skilled
positions. Ralph Stringer, who
was moved from defensive back
to running back last spring, is out
for the season due to a shoulder
injury. But the State backfield is
well-manned by 6-1, 200 pound
Ricky Adams and 5-10,190 pound
Ted Brown, last year's ACC
Rookie of the Year. Reserve
running backs Timmy Johnson
and Scott Wade will also play.
Quarterback Johnny Evans is
respected for his ability to read
defenses as he executes the triple
option, for his strength and ability
as a runner, and for his ability to
launch aerials to tight end Ricky
Knowles, flanker Mike Crabtree
and Elijah Marshall, who many
consider one of the finest wide
receivers in the country. Though
unexpected at this point, fresh-
man Kevin Scanlon will play if
Evans is still bothered by the sore
shoulder which kept him from
starting the Wake Forest game
last week.
The offensive line was a big
question mark during the pre-sea-
son as only Bill Druschell and
Mike Fagan returned, but the line
has performed adequately in the
first two contests.
These players are coached by
first-year man Bo Rein, at age 31
the youngest head coach of a
major college football team in the
nation. Rein and his staff know
the split veer offense as well as
anybody in the country. Accor-
ding to Wright Anderson, people
go to Rein and staff when they
want to know anything about the
veer.
Defense
This offense will be up against
a Pirate defense which against
Southern Mississippi made
Blackboard look like a VISTA
volunteer. The starting assign-
ments are the same: Cary Godette
and Zaok Valentine at the ends,
Jake Dove and Wayne Poole at
the tackles, and Oliver (Brut)
Felton at nose guard. Nick
Bullock will also play nose guard.
The two Harold's - Randolph and
Fort - are at linebacker with the
deep secondary consisting of
Reggie Pinkney and Ernie Madi-
son on the corners and Gerald
Hall and All-America Jim Bolding
at the safeties.
JOHNNY EVANS
m
ZACK VALENTINE
A few personnel changes were
made in the Woifpack defense
following their season-opening
loss to Furman. In the line, John
Hall replaced returning starter
Jeff Easter as the strong side end.
Tom Prongay was moved to right
tackle and 6-5, 272 pound fresh-
man Bubba Green was moved to
left tackle. Coach Wright Ander-
son calls Green a fantastic athlete
whose quickness and speed are
amazing for a man his size. The
Pirate ooach expects the mam-
moth tackle to give the ECU
offense some problems during the
course of the game.
In the secondary, Mike Noll
replaced senior Richard Wheeler,
and Tommy London has replaced
Alan Blaltras at one cornerback.
Highly regarded freshman Wood-
row Wilson may see reserve
action at free safety.
This defense, which Anderson
termed "very enthusiastic and
extremely aggressive will do
everything in their power to slow
down ECU'S highly productive
wishbone offense.
Everytime a defensive player
changes his alk iment, blocking
assignments change for the offen-
sive team. The State defense will
show several different looks to
oonfuse Pirate blocking assign-
ments. But basically, they will
run from a 5-2 defense which is
similar to the Pirate defense on
paper.
That Woifpack defense will
have to play to the best of its
M�WHil��!� Mil !�!���
ability, plus some, if the Pirate
offense is to be stopped. Center
Tim Hightower, guards Randy
Parrish and Wayne Bolt, and
tackles Ricky Bennett and Matt
Mulhoiland, along with tight end
Clay Burnett will hope to blow
holes through the defensive line
of N.C. State as they did against
Southern Mississippi last week to
allow the Pirate backfield ?o
operate with the same effective-
ness. Mike Weaver, who execu-
ted the triple option as well as and
maybe better than- any other
quarterback in the nation last
week will again have fullback
Raymond Jones and halfbacks
Willie Hawkins and Eddie Hicks
working with him. Hawkins and
Hicks both rushed for over 100
yards last week. Weaver's wide
receiver is Terry Gallaher.
Specialty teams
In a close oontest, the special-
ity teams may be the biggest
factor in determining victory as
they can either gain or prevent
good field position. State has an
outstanding punter in Johnny
Evans. He was ranked fifth in the
country last year with a 44.6 yard
average. Evans is dangerous from
punt formation because he could
catch the opposition off guard and
run or pass for a first down.
Jay Sherill almost always
kicks off into the end zone and is a
consistent field goal kicker.
State's top return men are
Woodrow Wilson on punts and
Rickey Adams on kickoffs. After
two games, Adams is sixth in the
nation in kickoff returns, with a 28
yard average.
At least half of Pete Conaty's
kickoffs went into the end zone
and all had good hang time. He
was six for six on PAT's, and two
for two on field goals, both of
which were from 25 yards out.
Tom Daub punted three times
for an average of 40 yards.
The Pirates' punt return man
is Gerald Hall, who against
Southern Miss, returned six for
92 yards and a 15.3 yard average
which earned him a ranking of
seventh in the nation. Willie
Hawkins is the middle deep
receiver and will handle the
kickoff returns.
shut off State's running game and
oontain quarterback Evans, keep-
ing him from scrambling on
passing downs. Offensively, the
Pirates need to score points. But
just as importantly, they need to
control the ball. Sustained drives
are needed to give the defense
adequate rest.
Now the pre-game story has
been writen, read, and can be
thrown away. Just remember that
both squads see this game as
more than just another football
game. Pride and bragging rights
are on the line, and you can bet
the 44,000-plus people in Carter
Stadium will see more than their
money's worth when the Wolf-
pack and the Pirates tangle.
Golf meeting
Intramurals
by John Evans
'Welcome back to East Carolina University fa another year of fun and
excitement with the Intramural Program. Since the spring there have
been many changes in the program with the hope of making intramural
activities meaningful to more students.
NEW PROGRAMS, NEW FACES
This year there will be a number of new programs in the intramural
scene. Added have been touch football in place of speedball for the
women and soccer for the men. Men's and women's track and field have
been switched to the fall.
A new face in the intramural department will be Rose Mary Adkins,
the new assistant Intramural Director. Ms. Adkins will be in charge of
the recreational swim program, lifeguards, women's intramurals and the
co-recreational program.
In addition there are six Graduate Assistants working with
Intramural Director Dr. Wayne Edwards to help organize the program.
We also hope to make this oolumn a little different this year -
bringing the students up to date every Tuesday with what is going on in
the program, in addition to reporting the action over in Minges and
Memorial on the intramural fields. From time to time there will be
features concerning the intramural program on topics which concern the
student.
GETTING UP-TO DATE
Summary
New happenings in the office concern the club sports, which will now
be under the auspices of the Intramural Office. The office will not only
establish laws and rules for the clubs to follow, but it will also supply the
dubs with limited funding.
The intramural fields by Ficklen Stadium have not been completed
yet, but they will be used fa football this year nonetheless. Under an
agreement with the contracta, the fields will be used in their present
state in the fall fa men'stouch football. In the spring the oontractas will
complete the wak at no additional cost. The women's fields on College
Hill Drive have not been affected and will remain open fa women's play.
Raoquetball courts must now be reserved through the office in
MemaiaJ Gym on a day-by-day basis. Those wishing to reserve a court
��must cone by in person and sign up with Debbie Moss, the intramural
secretary.
Sociological and geographical
factas contribute to the State-
ECU rivalry. But the biggest
inoentive fa victay is pride.
After State has wen the last four
games against ECU, they do not
want to end that string now, and
fa the same reason, the Pirates
do not want to come back to
Greenville without the victay
unda their belts.
After losing to Furman of the
Southern Conference and then to
Wake Faest fa the second year
in a row, State is extremely
embarrassed; too embarrassed,
they think, to lose their third
game of the season, especially to
ECU. But the Pirates see it this
way: If Furman beat em, we
oughta beat em.
The ECU coaching staff hopes
the Pirate defensive front can
FALL SIGN-UPS CLOSING SOON
Final registration dates fa several fall spats are fast approaching.
Asa matter of fact thisaftanoon will be the last day to sign up fa men's
and women's touch football and men'steam tennis.
In the next week registration fa Haseshoe singles and doubles,
one-on-one basketball and men's and women's track and field will take
place through Sept. 27. Women's tennis singles registration dates are
through Sept. 23, and women's track and field from Sept. 20-24.
Play will begin in team tennis Monday, Sept. 20, and men's and
women's touch football will begin on Sept. 21.
OFFICIALS NEEDED
Officials are needed to help officiate several of the intramural events
during the year. Offiuals fa touch football have already been chosen but
officials fa volleyball are still needed. To be eligible one must attend the
official's clinic fa volleyball, to be held on Oct. 4 in Minges Coliseum.
Graduate Assistant Sonny Gundlacj is in charge of the program.
Well that's about it fa now We'll be back Tuesday where we will
appear fa the rest of the year. Hope this year is a good one fa you and
an active one in intramurals.
J

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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 216 SEPTEMBER 1976
19

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Booters begin season in
Campbell Tournament
ByANNEHOGGE
Staff Writer
Coach Curtis Frye sees his
team as finishing "no worse than
third place, possible in first" in
Southern Conference soccer
standings. It is with this deter-
mination that East Carolina soc-
cer opens its 13th season, hoping
to improve its 3-6-2 record of last
year.
Frye, a 1974 graduate of ECU,
beginshisthirdyearasooach, the
fifth person to hold the position.
Due to the high turnover of
coaches, he is in the process of
rebuilding his team, but still
predicts "a winning season He
coaches the European style of
soccer but feels a combination of
both European and South Ameri-
can styles is ideal.
This year's team is a mixture
of old and new talent. Offense
and defense are built around two
returning seniors, Pete Angus
and Tom Long. Coach Frye claims
that Angus, last season's leading
scorer, is "the best ever to play
soccer at ECU A versatile
halfback who has been playing
the game since the 8th grade, his
the nucleus of the team's offense
and only injury will stand in his
way of having an outstanding
season.
Fullback Tom Long, Angus'
counterpart on defense, has only
five years' experience but played
well enough last year to become
an All-South honorable mention
and chosen for the All-Southern
Conference's second team.
Two sophomores, forward Jeff
Karpovich and fullback Jeff Klu-
ger, are expected to play well at
SOCCER SCHEDULE
Sept. 16-1?Campbell College Tournament at Bute's Creek, N.C.
Sept. 21atN.C. State 4 OO
Sept. 24-25Old Dominion Tournament 4.00 & 6XX) at Norfolk, Va.
Sept. 30at Duke 4.00
Oct. 2Appalachian St. 12.00
Oct. 5North Carolina 4.00
Oct. 9at Furman 2.00
Oct. 11at Davidson 4.00
Oct. 14Pembroke St. 3.00
Oct. 16at The Citadel 00
Oct. 23V.M.I. 9:30
Oct. 27UNC-W 3:30
Oct 30William and Mary 11.00
ROSTER
PLAYERPOSITIONHOMETOWNCLASS
Pete AngusHalfbackDenville, N.J.Senior
Soott BalasFullbackChatham, N.J.Senior
Wayne BarrowGoalieRaleigh, N.C.Junior
MikeFetcokoForwardOrange, N.J.Senior
Charlie HardyFullbackKinston, N.C.Junior
Jay HighForwardChapel Hill, N.C Senior
John JonesHalfbackWaocamaw, N.C. Freshman
Jeff KarpovichForwardRamsey, N.J.Sophomore
John KeenerGoalieRaleigh, N.C.Sophomore
Jeff KlugerFullbackEngield, N.C.Sophomore
Tom LongFullbackHampton, Va.Senior
Phil MartinWingbackGreensboro, N. C. Freshman
Paul SearsHalfbackAome-Deloo,N.C. Freshman
Dave WasolekFullbackChambersb Pa.Junior .
Curt WinbornWingbackWilson, N.C.Sophomore
Promising newcomers-Tim Harrison, Halfback; Billy Hamme, Forward;
Ken Askley, Halfback; Mike Bullock, Goalie; Mike Darnell, Fullback;
Kehinda Tokuta, Forward.
Head Coach-Curtis Frye.
Introducing Th�
Greenville Dating Service
For more Information and descriptive question-
naire send $1.00, name and address to:
Greenville Dating Service
P.O. Box 2541
Greenville. N.C. 27834
All correspondence is strictly confidential
"Give us a chance to help you"
m
their positions. Soot Balas, a
senior fullback, is a mobile player
with nine years experience. He is
smart on the field and in the
classroom, which Frye feels is a
winning combination.
Freshman Phil Martin is the
only team member who uses a
foreign touch and, at his wing
position, is skillful and has good
speed and oontrol.
The starting goalie has not yet
been chosen, but the job will go to
either Wayne Barrow or John
Keener. Keener was last year's
starter but Barrow has shown
much improvement during
practice. Frye has confidenoe in
whoever he selectd.
talents made him an All-South
pick, the first ECU player to ever
do so, along with being selected
All-Southern Conference. He is
A tough schedule is in store
for the Pirate booters as they face
many regionally and nationally
ranked teams. Appalachian and
UNC-Wilmington, who has lost
only three matches in two years,
are strong opponents. William
and Mary is termed by Frye as
"an outstanding team
ECU opens its season today in
the Campbell College Invitational
Tournament, with Campbell host-
ing Florida Tech, William and
Mary and ECU. Frye predicts a
first round victory against Camp-
bell.
The success of Pirate soccer
depends on the players and
coach, but also on the students. A
lack of student support can end
the soocer program. The matches
are free and are played at the
Minges soccer field when at
home. Coach Frye urges student
support and participation in the
soocer program.
CLASSIFIEDS
Antique Show & Plea Mkt.
Greenville Collectgrs Club's 5th
Annual - Sun Sept. 19,12-6 p.m.
at Antiek Curiosa, 4 112 miles E.
towards Grimesland. Info call
752-3456.
Can you help a foreigner with
grammar and conversation? Call
after 6 pm 752-3176.
For Sale
2.5 cu. ft. refrigerator $50. 4.5 cu.
ft. refrigerator $120. Call 758-
7098
FOUND-LadiesTimex Electric
Watch found in Allied Health
Parking lot-Call 752-9641.
Male Help Wanted
Short-order cook, must be 18
years old, and available to work
some weekends, apply in person.
Sam& Dave's Snack bar. (located
in Darwin Water's Service Sta-
tion.)
For Sale
1 blue rug, 12" x 12 $10. Call
752-4013.
Wanted: Keyboard player for
weekend band - top 40 and
pop-country - Bookings through
January - Days call 758-3378,
nights call 752-6566.
House Fa Sale
9 rooms; Wall to wall carpet in
Living-room and dining room;
Drapes; new inlaid in kitchen and
den; spacious back yard with
shrubbery. For further informa-
tion, call Hooker & Buchanan -
752-6186.
Room in attractive Greenville
suburb for rent to young lady.
Full house privileges. $79month.
Call 756-0698 or write P.O. Box
6065.
'75 Corvette, low mileage, white,
all accessories. 758-8883 (bus.)
756-5465 (home).
Lost Instamatic 110 Camera at
Game, Saturday. Reward offered
Need the pictures taken. Phone
756-6376.
dp this coupon!
And get three games for only $1.25.
Bring three friends along. Well let
them in on the deal, too.
WASHINGTON HWY
GREENVILI E, N.C
Expires Oct. 31, 1976
ATTENTION ALL ECU STUDENTS
AFTER THE GAME DROP BY
CHARLIE GOODNIGHTS
861 WEST MORGAN ST RALEIGH 832- 7021
Near State Campus off Hillsborough Street
FRIandSAT FEATURING
EPIC RECORDING ARTISTS
MOTHER'S FINEST
ONE OF THE HOTTEST ACTS
IN THE SOUTHEAST
m





FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 216 SEPTEMBER 1976
THE FIRST REAL
STEREO SALE
IT'S USUALLY JUNK THAT YOU GET "GOOD BUYS ON.
YOU DON'T SEE FERRARIS ON SALE THAT OFTEN BUT
NANCY, FRANK, STEVE, BUZ, AND SOUNDS IMPRESSIVE
WANT YOU IN THEIR STORE, SO THEY'VE PUT THE
"GOOD STUFF" ON SALE-A REAL SALE TO WELCOME
YOU BACK TO ECU
SPEAKERSTURNTABLESi
RegSaleRegSale
Used Bose 301 96.00ea7500eaDemo Dual 1226169.5010900
Used Interaudio 3000 249.80pr19900prDemo Dual 1228199.5013900
Used Interaudio 4000 397.80pr20900prUsed Dual 1218189.509900
Used E SS AMT 5 378.00pr134��prDemo Dual 601355.0027000
Used E SS AMT 1 600.00pr39900prNew Garrard 440M114.857900
Used JBC L-26 336.00pr27600prNew Garrard 770M159.959900
Demo JBC L-65 924.00pr74900prNew Garrard 990M259.9519900
Demo Infinity 3000 216.00ea15900eaNew Sony PS-1100100008900
Demo Infinity 1001A 155.00ea13200eaNew Sony PS-55201900013900
Demo Avid 102 65.00ea 5400ea
Demo Avid 103 139.00ea 12400ea
RECEIVER - AMPLIFIERS
Reg Sale
TAPE DECKS
New Sony 7015 220.00
New Sony 5800 500.00
New Sony 6800 600.00
Demo Sherwood S9400 300.00
Demo Yamaha CA-400 270.00
Demo Sony TA-3650 300.00
19500
44900
53900
24800
21000
2 7 300
Reg
Demo Teac A 170 239.50
Demo Teac A 360S 389.50
Demo Teac A 2300SD 739.50
Demo Yamaha TC 800GL 390.00
Used Sony TC-131SD 270.00
Demo Concord CD 10000 379.50
New Sankyo STD-1410 199.00
Demo Philys'a GA427 100.00
Demo Philys's GA209 300.00
Demo Yamaha YD YP-701 220.00
SOUNDS
IMPRESSIVE
409 Evans Street on the Mall 919752-9100
Charlotte-Green ville-Knoxville





Title
Fountainhead, September 16, 1976
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 16, 1976
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.408
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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