Fountainhead, September 8, 1976






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I. ServicesInformation, page 7
II. OrganizationsCommittees, page 13
III. Academic Departments,page 23
IV. Administration, page 29
V. Athletics, page 33
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FOUN7AINHEADVOL b2, NO. 18 SEPTEMBER 1976
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AND MAYSE- LAST
FIRST REAL
STEREO SALE
It's usually junk that you get "good buvs" on. You don't see Ferraris on sale
that often But Ralph and SOUNDS IMPRESSIVE want you in their store, so
they've put the "good stuff" on sale � A REAL SALE to close out their books
and their fiscal year. You'll probably never even see a sale like this again,
because SOUNDS IMPRESSIVE deals only in top quality merchandise and top
quality service � they're no discount house. But for two weeks they're offering
discount house prices and standing behind each one with their unmatched
service department. To show you he
RALPH'5 5TERBO BRAIN):
KiOT ANAILACLB AT ANY PRlCF,
BUT WEE"TO W&P tfX) 5ELBCT
THAT 'SPECIAL &$T&A
REAL WlfvJGS FOUND HERE ON
TDP UME EQUIPMENT
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means business, Ralph is selling
Audio Tecnica Cartridges for
all Sony Turntables and Avid
Speakers at 15 off. And he's
covering them with his
extended warranties and
excellent service.
RALPH'S STEREO HAND5
AVAILABLE TO HELP
HAND PICK YOUR
COMPONENTS
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His real name is Ralph Graetz. He's been into music since he was 8, and
stereo since there was stereo. He's a real person not an order blank, and Ralph's
available to talk sound advice in tune with your specific tastes and budget.
Ralph's the Wizard because he knows all the specs and has the magic to put that
"perfect" system in your hands. There's only one Wizard, because there's only
one Ralph.
SOUNDS
IMPRESSIVE
409 Evans Street on the Mall 919752-9100
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 18 SEPTEMBER 1976 3
i
8 GOOD REASONS FOR BUYING
YOUR TEXTS DOWNTOWN
1. Low Prices� The University Book Exchange
has got thousands of USED TEXTS that save
you 25 over the price of new texts.
2. Great textbook selection � The UBE has made
an all out effort to have every book used at ECU.
3. Quick Service�This Fall we will have 8 cash
registars to get you through our store quickly!
4. Friendly Personnel-80 of our book rush em -
ployees are ECU students. They can easily re-
late to your textbook needs and problems
5. Mastercharge and Bank Americard- New this
fall at UBE! We now accept America's top 2
charge cards for texts & supplies.
6. Convenient Location- We're across Cotanche
Street from the girl's dorms-down the hill from
Greenville's bars.
7. Extended Hours- The University Book Ex-
change will be open from 7:30 AM to 9:00 p PM
on Sept. 10th, 13th, and 14th.
8. Increased Selection of school supplies, art
supplies, and sportswear. Let us be your only
stop for all your texts 8- Supplies.
UniverityBook Exchange Downtown





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fOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 13 SEPTEMBER 1976
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You're too
busy to write home
and ask for a
college ring.
So ArtCarved has
done if tor you.
CONTENTS
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page 7
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Dear Mother and Dad,
I'd love an ArtCarved College Ring for:
? My birthday
? Not flunking
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page 23
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3S
RING DAYS
That's when the ArtCarved representative will he here
,to help you select your custom-made college ring
It's also the day you can charge any ArtCarved ring
on Master Charge or BankAmericard
MONDAY THRU WEDNESDAY
SEPT 20 -22nd WRIGHT BLDG
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Advertising Manager
Business Manager
Production
Cover Design
Jim Elliott
Dennis Leonard
Ray Brinn
Pat Coyle
Mike Boose
Vicki Jones
. Teresa Whisenant
Jimmy Williams
Helen Moore
Cindy Broome
JedManandldiott
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Fountainhead is the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Student Government Association of
ECU and appears each Tuesday and Thursday during the school
year, weekly during the summer.
Mailing address: Old South Building
Editorial Offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309
Subscriptions: $10 annually tor non-students, $6 tor alumni
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COUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 18 SEPTEMBER 1976
Wachovia
can give you
Free Way checking,
easy ID. with your own
Banking Card,
24-hour banking
at Teller D, and
your own
Personal Banker.
And
because we want
you for a customer,
we have an office
right across
the street.
Wachovia
Bank&Trust
UNIVERSITY
OFFICE
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hOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 18 SEPTEMBER 196
HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH


WELCOMES ALL STUDENTS
BACK TO SCHOOL
"BIG SOUND FOR SMALL BUDGETS"
WE SPECIALIZED IN STUDENT SYSTEMS FOR 8 YEARS
AT HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH AND WE BELEIVE THAT YOU
DON'T NEED TO SPENDALOTOF MONEY IN ORDER TO
GET GREAT SOUND
FROM THE MAKERS OF THE
WORLD FAMOUS BOSE 501 & 901
COMES
CHECK THESE SYSTEM PRICES


SONY SPECIAL
SONY RECEIVER
SONY SPEAKERS
BOSE 301
A FAMOUS BOSE YOU CAN AFFORD
19200 PAIR (DISCOUNT SYSTEMS)
SONY TURNTABLE
SONY RECEIVER
BIC SPEAKERS
GARRARD TURNTABLE
BACK TO SCHOOL PRICE 29995
:
BACK TO SCHOOL PRICE
390��
CRAIG 5501 RECEIVER
CRAIG H 120 TURNTABLE
"HUGE" CRAIG 5701 SPEAKERS
BACK TOSCHOOL PRICE
469
FISHER TURNABLE
TOSHIBA RECEIVER
SCIENTIFIC ACOUSTIC
SPEAKERS
BACK TO SCHOOL PRICE 37395
!
95
WE NEED USED EQUIPMENT- TRADES WELCOME WE A MAINTAIN OUR OWN SERVICE
DEPT. WE MAKE PAYING EASY TOO!
HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH
ON THE MALL
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE 752-awi





IBP
Student Union task:
entertainment for all
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 18 SEPTEMBER 1976
Do you feel boredom creeping up on
you? Are the walls closing in?
Well never fear-the Student Union's
here with plenty of entertainment planned
for fall quarter!
The Free Flicks are back to end those
Friday night blues. This quarter the films
committee will be bringing to you on
Friday and Saturday nights films such as
Blazing Saddles, A Clockwork Orange, The
Longest Yard, Day of the Dolphin,
Claudine, Three Musketeers, Four
Musketeers, The Return of the Pink
Panther, and The Wind and the Lion.
Wednesday Classics include The
Hunchback of Notre Dame, Three Faces of
Eve, The Autobiography of Miss Jane
Pittman, and Lord of the Flies.
A special Halloween Horrorama is
planned for October 31. Rosemary's Baby,
Psycho, and Dr. Phibes axe scheduled to be
shown for your horror and entertainment!
The video tape oommittee will sponsor
Video Awareness Week September 12-18.
The scheduled shows will be oontinually
repeated every hour in Mendenhall
Student Cear.
During the week you will have the
opportunity to see Robert Klein, Rockin in
the U.S.A Inside Bucky's Head and NFL
Football Follies.
It's a week of entertainment you'll be
sure to want to check out!
The major attractions committee is
pleased to bring you' The Average White
Band on Friday night, September 10 at 8
p.m. in Minges Coliseum. They are one of
the top funk bands in the oountry today.
Tickets are available in the Central Ticket
Office in Mendenhall Student Center.
Judy Collins will be presented in
concert on Thursday, October 21 at 8 p.m.
in Minges Coliseum. This ooncert is also
sponsored by the major attractions
oommittee.
The special entertainment oommittee
will present John Payne Band in concert at
8 p.m. on Thursday, September 16 on the
ECU Mall.
For those of you already looking
forward to the end of Fall Quarter, the
travel committee has something for you.
Twotripsare planned for the Thanksgiving
break. You can travel to either Washing-
ton, D.C or New York!
The dates of the trips are November
24-29. Cost of the Washington trip is $59
including transportation and accomod-
ations based on quad occupancy.
Cost of the New York trip is $69
including transportation and accomod-
ations based on quad occupancy.
Ninety places are available for each
trip. Reservations will be taken from
September 15-October 15 in the Central
Ticket Office of Mendenhall Student
Center.
Other events coming Fall Quarter
include "The National Theatre of the
Deaf" sponsored by the Theatre Arts
Committee, and several art exhibits,
including Summerset II and Black Arts
Exhibition, sponsored by the art exhibition
oommittee.
The Student Union has planned the
activities. It is up to you to get involved!
Make this the best Fall Quarter ever.
There's no excuse for being bored-the
Student Union has the answer!
IMPORTANT
DATES
September8,1976
September 9,10,13,1976
Septembers, 15,1976
Septembers, 1976
October 7,1976
October 4-15,1976
October 11-15,1976
November 3,1976
November 10,1976
Registration Day
Drop-Add & Late Registration
Late Registration
Last Day to Register or Apply for
Graduation in November
Last Day to Drop a Course a Withdraw
from School
Change of Major
Preregistration for Winter Quarter
Last Day for students to Remove
Incompletes Received during Spring
andor Summer
Last Day for Instructors'to Report
Incompletes given during Spring andor
Summer to Registrar's Office
Further details, procedures and requirements may be obtained from the University
catalogue andor advisors.
UNION SPONSORED ENTERTAINMENT includes rock concerts, such as Styx which
played at ECU in March.
Directorship goes pro
ECU expands in tramurals
Most part-time help employed by the
ECU Intramural Department oomes from
the student body itself, inthe form of a
Graduate Assistant or on a self-help basis.
Full-time employees of ftie department
are Director Wayne Edwards, an assistant
director, who has not yet been named since
last year's assistant Ann Lowdermilk left to
take a job in Michigan, and Debbie Moss,
the full-time secretary of the department.
In addition there are seven Graduate
Assistants in the department. These
assistants are Walt Estes, Marty Martinez,
Sonny Gundlach, Candy Wedemeyer,
Janis Smith, Gwen Engelken, and Ginger
Parrish. Ms. Negelken is in charge of the
department's trainer program which pro-
vides first-aid to intramural competitors.
The other six assistants work as office staff
in charge of scheduling, officials, stand-
ings and protests. Thev make un the
nucleus of the intramural department
office staff.
Fifty additional students are employed
by the department on a self-help basis.
These students are used as lifeguards,
equipment room and facility personnel,
and officials as needed. They are paid
minimum wage, with officials getting paid
on the basisof ability. Senior Life Saving is
required of lifeguard candidates and all
officials are required to attend the officials'
clinics held before each sport.
Anyone interested.in seeking employ-
ment as either a lifeguard or an official
should contact the intramural department
at 757-6387.
Remember your first day at ECU?
There were butterflies in your stomach,
your nerves were acting up, and you had an
overall feeling of uneasiness. However,
you scon adjusted and everything worked
out fine.
Many students have similar uneasy
feelings about going to the inf.mary for
the first time. These students are skeptical
about adjusting fo new doctors and their
techniques. Dr. Irons, Director of Student
Health Services at the infirmary, would like
fo put your minds and nerves at ease.
The infirmary is here to. take cara of
health needs of the students and if they
have signs or symptoms that make them
think that they are ill, then they should
come to us for assistance he said.
The infirmary is open twenty-tour hour
a day and there are nurses on duty at i�.i
times. The doctors are on duty from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
"We have three full-time doctors, two
part-time doctors and a consulting psy-
chiatrist who oomes in twice a week. The
three full-time doctors are Doctors Iron,
Jordan and McLean, and the part-time
doctors are Dr. W cot en and Dr. Judy
yoogwa, D Atfrad �Yehgue )s the
consulting psychiatrist Dr. Irons related.
"We also have twenty-four nurses who
do an outstanding job and they are here at
all times he said.
"In summary, students having acci-
dents, injuries or illness are treated by
infirmary physicians, and if necessary
information is forwarded
to the student's family andor family
physician he said.
So students put your minds at ease. The
next time you have a health need; come to
the infirmary and everything will work out
fine.
Infirmary
treats, cures
most ills
.� .��?��





B
8
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 18 SEPTEMBER 1976
Food stamp program
available to students
Banking services
Low income students who are North
Carolina residents and are not tax
dependentsof their parents may be eligible
for the Federal Food Stamp Program.
The program, which is authorized by
the United States Department � of Agri-
culture, is designed to subsidize food
budgets of low income households, said
Mrs. Betty Rouse, supervisor of the Food
Stamp Center for Pitt County.
"We merely administer the food
stamps in this county Miss Dorothy L.
Bolton, director of Social Services here,
said. "Every county in the oountry has
basically the same program and stand-
ards
The Pitt County Department of Social
Services at 709 Johnston St. currently
allots food stamp ooupons to 9,469 persons,
according to Rouse. There are 200 student
households receiving ooupons, she said.
To receive the stamps a resident of the
state must apply in the oounty in which he
or she lives. If the applicant meets the
criteria set up by the Department of
Agriculture, he or she becomes certified
for the program.
"I like to see students on food stamps if
they are eligible because someday they are
going to be taxpayers too Bolton said.
"If we can help them get through school
and find a job, I think it is good
To qualify for food stamps the
maximum net income of a single occupant
household can be $215 per month,
according to the January 1, 1976 federal
standards.
Once application has been made the
Department of Social Services legally has
30 days to' respond. However, if the
applicant provides all the necessary
information upon application, certification
of eligibility may be made the same day.
Be sure and go by the Student Bank in
Mendenhall Building on first floor and
observe their operation for your conven-
ience for cashing checks and maintaining
withdrawing accounts of cash, which you
will want them to keep for you as security
measures and savings. By the way they
have another added service fa you - to
save time, you can pay your telephone bill,
whether on or off campus, being a student,
faculty, or staff member makes you
eligible, making one trip fa all trans-
actions.
There are three friendly cashiers to
assist you with your needs, as you present
your ID. and Activity Card.
Hours are from 10:00 a.m. until 4:45
p.m. Mon. thru Fri.
The check cashing policy is up to one
hundred dollars per seven days.
Go by and take advantage of this
service made available fa you - the
student, faculty and staff of ECU.
Student-Faculty-Staff Directory
In compliance with previous Student
Government Association's requests,
Carolina Telephone and Telegraph has
agreed to print a student directory
beginning Fall of 1976.
Aocading to Don A. Collier, CT&T
district commercial manager, the student
directay will be entitled the "Student-
Faculty-Staff Directay"
"The telephone company will bear the
entire oosts of printing and publishing the
directaies said Collier.
The purpose of the student directay is
to list those students, both day and dam,
who are na namally listed in the city
directay that is printed annually.
Accading to Collier there will be
approximately 2,250 phones in service in
the dams next fall.
"Begininng August 1st any new
students who apply fa the service will be
included in the directay and the cut off
date win be the third week in September a
as sooi as we have 90 percent of our
customers.
Forever Generation
Faever Generation - what's that? Gladfellowship too. Our meetings are supple-
you asked. The Faever Generation of ECUmented by cookouts, get-togethers, week-
is a Christ-centered fellowship group. Weend retreats, and other good activities.
believe in the free gift of salvation by theWhy nO come out this Friday night?
gracb J God to all those who receive theWe'ii he having a special "Get Acquaint-
Lad Jesus as their personal Savio.ed" meeting and showing a unique slide
We meet every Friday night forpresentation, "Introducing Forever
fellowship and fun. There'll be a study,Generation ECU
discussion, a challenge fron the Bible.Come join us Friday, September 10,
Singing, games, refreshments, and warm730 p.m in Mendenhall 244.
m
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pAMCrUptitHIA
BIGGS DRUG STORE
300 EVANS- ON- THE-MALL
DOWNTOWN
PHONE: 752-2136
FREE PRESCRIPTION PICKUP
AND DELIVERY
OLD FASHION SODA FOUNTAIN
DRINKS MADE THE WAY YOU
LIKE THEM: FRESHLY SQUEEZED
LEMONADES AND ORANGEADES-
MILKSHAKES MADE WITH ICE CREAM!
PRESCRIPTION DEPT WITH MEDICA TION
PROFILES: YOUR PRESCRIPTION ALWAYS
AT OUR FINGERTIPS, EVEN THOUGH YOU
MAY LOSE YOUR Rx BOTTLE.
COSMETICS-
SUNDRIES-
TOILETRIES-
DELIVERFD TO
YOUR DOOR
GREETING CARDS-
SCHOOL SUPPLIES
TIMEX WATCHES
COSTUME JEWELRY
ATHLETIC SUPPORTS,
CONVALESCENT SUPPLIES,
FIRST-AID SUPPLIES
SUNGLASSES BY FOSTER
GRANT AND COOL RAY

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FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52. NO. 18 SEPTEMBER 1976
to
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You tow the line or they'll tow your car
9
The Traffic Department at ECU regu-
lates the registration of student cars and is
an omnipresent watchdog over campus
parking.
Students must go to the Traffic Offioe,
located across from the old heating plant
on main campus, to register their cars for
the academic year, 1976-77. Freshmen
students are not allowed to have cars on
campus, but may register their vehicles as
a freshmen driven cars. The purpose of
freshman registration is to allow freshmen
to park on campus during the weekends
and to notify the Greenville Police
Department that an ECU student is driving
that particular car.
Students having 48 hours or more are
termed sophomores and are eligible for
obtaining either a Dorm or Day student
parking permit. There are restricted areas
on campus that the Day and Dorm students
are not welcome and it is in these areas
that the towing business of Greenville
thrives on. All staff parking places are
forbidden for students to park in, and dorm
students are not allowed to park in the day
student parking lot at the bottom of College
Hill Dr. There are various university
registered parking areas on campus that
aie open for anyone who gets there first. It
is very important to note that all students
must have their cars registered on
campus or you will surely face a parking
fine, plus a towing charge.
The towing chaYges range from $20 to
$25, depenging on the time of day the
vehicle was towed.
The Traffic Department also handles
the registration of bicycles on campus and
if students are fond of their two-wheelers,
they should have their bikes registered.
The registration requires a small fee, plus
the description of the bike and the serial
number. There have been many bike thefts
on campus in the past years and it is
advisable to regist 'your bike so that it can
later be identified if stolen.
There are numerous traffic violations
on campus for moving vehicles, both
motorized and people-powered. Students
should go to the Traffic Office and obtain a
oopy of the ECU Traffic Regulations
pamphlet so that they can become better
acquainted with traffic violations, regul-
ations, and penalties at ECU. If you make
the effort to drop by tor a copy, you may
save yourself time and money in the future.
Library offers more than just books
Bibliographies. Bibliographies and guides
to the use of indexes are available in the
Reference Collection are.
Book returns. Books should be returned
to the circulation desk. For your conven-
ience, a book deposit box is located in front
of the library for use when the library is
closed.
Computer terminal. A computer termi-
nal is located in room BOI of the Reference
Collection area. It is available for use by
patrons having computer account codes.
Copying machines. Coin-operated
copying machines are available for use in
the lobby of Joyner Library. The price per
pag is 5 cents. Theses may be copied on
the 2400 copying machine located in the
Library Administration office.
Film service Faculty and students may
borrow 16 mm films from the North
Carolina Film Library in Raleigh. A catalog
of films available is located in the
Reference Collection area. Requests
should be placed at least three weeks in
advance of the showing.
Interlibrary loans. An interlibrary loan
service is available for faculty members
and graduate students. Applications for
loans should be made in the Reference
Collection area.
Lectures on library use. The reference
staff offers lectures on use and interpret-
ation of library resources in various subject
areas to dass groups. Faculty members
desiring such a presentation should contact
any member of the reference staff at least
one week in advance.
New books. Each week a selection of
new books is displayed in the lobby. These
books may be checked out during the week
they are on display.
Public telephone. A public telephone is
located in the lobby near the card catalog.
Smoking lounges. Smoking lounge'
are provided on each floor of the ne
addition to Joyner Library.
Tours. Tours of the library are off'
by the reference staff.
Typing facilities. Typing room'
located on each floor of the new additi-
Joyner Library. Some typewriters
available for student use.
Democrats VOTE!
Many students at ECU are registered to
vote in Greenville, but due to the date of
the August Primary, many students did not
vote.
On September 14, 1976, there will be a
second primary. Democrats will decide in a
runoff their Lt. Governor. Howard N. Lee,
former mayor of Chapel Hill with 28
percent of the votes will be seated against
Jimmy Green, Speaker of the House, with
27 percent of the votes. Also, Lillian Woo
(42 percent of the votes) consumer
advocate will go against Henry L. Bridges
for the State Auditor with 46 percent of the
votes. John C. Brooks (34 percent of the
votes) and Jesse Rae Scott (47 percent of
the votes) will play their hand for the
Commissioner of Labor.
All registered students are urged to go
and vote on September 14, 1976. Polls are
open from 630 a.m. to 730 p.m.
E.C.U.
STUDENTS
Come by and open an account
and register for free prizes at:
BANK
OF
NORTH CAROLINA
N. A.
1 GRAND PRIZE
STEREO
COMPONENT SET
FREE CHECKING TO
ALL COLLEGE STUDENTS
1 SECOND PRIZE
AMFM RADIO
WITH CASSETTE RECORDER
2818 E. 10th Street Ext.
Fourth and Cotanche Streets
Sept. 7th-14th � Drawing on Sept. 14th
� 4 THIRD PRIZES
AMFM
PORTABLE RADIOS
FREE REFRESHMENTS
AND MUSIC ALL WEEK
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0 f-OUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 18 SEPTEMBER W7(j
Co-oping expands consciousness
Lynn Handd, along with two other
Foreign Language majors from ECU,
Maria Durham and Diane Harris, have jobs
in the nation's capital with the National
Ae.onautics and Space Administration.
They daily scurry back and forth between a
fascinating collections of agencies,
commissions, congressional offices, em-
bassies, and consulates. How did they get
their jobs? By participating in a unique
co-op program sponsored by the university
and their major department.
Co-oping is fun, and very, very
profitable. You take a quarter off from your
regular studies and sign on with a
business, industry, or government for a
three month period. As a foreign language
major, you will find your linguistic and
humanistic skills in considerable demand.
These days, government and industry look
first for young people whose training has
made them world-conscious
Co-opers are paid well for their work,
and they find this extra infusion of cash a
real boon. But the profit is more than
merely monetary. Out in the big world,
they are able to experience before
graduation what most of us have to wait
until later on for: the real feel of
professional involvement. And this, they
find, clarifies their thinking about career
possiblities in a way no dormitory or coffee
cup bull session ever could. They have a
head start over their classmates.
Want to find out more? If you're
interested in our major programs and our
co-op on-the-job opportunities, come to see
us! We look forward to meeting you
DOULGASW.KRUGER
Coordinator of Cooperative Education
PROFESSOR MARGUERITE A. PERRY
Chairperson
Foreign Languages and Literatures
Brewster Building A427
East Carolina University
Greenville, N.C. 27834
(919)757-6232
SGA retains Legal Rights Service
The Student Government Association
has expanded its Legal Rights Service,
doubling the number of hours open to
students for counseling and increasing the
work loan of the law firm it has hired.
After spending "at least fifteen hours
interviewing nine Greenville law firms
Student Body President Tim Sullivan
decided to oontinue the services of Blount,
Crisp and Grantmyre. The firm SGA has
retained for the past several years.
In opening bids for a new contract, SGA
sent out over thirty letters to law firms in
Greenville, and received nine of those
firms to discuss a possible contract. The
terms discussed, according to the letter
sent out by Sullivan were:
1. Up to 12 hours a week for free legal
servioe (twice the present number of
hours).
2. Drawing up contracts fa SGA and
organizations it sponsors.
3. Notary Public work with students.
4. Taking cases to court fa SGA with
the approval of the Attaney General's
office.
The contract written fa the firm called
fa a summer schedule with six hours per
week, and the following schedule fa the
school year:
Monday 200-500 p.m. (One attaney
available)
Tuesday 800-900 a.m. (two attaneys)
900-1000 a.m. (oie attaney)
Wednesday 200-500 p.m. (oie attaney)
Thursday 800-900 a.m. (two attaneys)
900-1000 a.m. (oie attaney)
Sullivan also oonfirmed that the firm
would be available at other times if an
emergency case arises. "But no one sees
the lawyers unless they wak through the
SGA first. We have to make sure they are
students To make an appointment,
added Sullivan, a student should oome by
the SGA office at Mendenhall and talk with
Millie,Murphrey, SGA Seaetary.
provided
The Career Planning and Placement
Service isavailableto all graduates of ECU
and graduates of other institutions who
have completed at least fifteen quarter
hours of oourse wak at ECU.
Fams fa registratiai and infamation
fa completing and filing these fams may
be obtained from the Placement Servioe
Office. Hours 800-12:30, 1:30-500 Mon-
days through Fridays.
It is requested that you oome to the
office in person during the hours listed
above to secure the necessary fams. Since
the directa wishes to get acquainted with
you personally, it is desirable fa the
oanpleted fams to be returned by you.
Please read and follow the printed
instructions included in the packet. Neat-
ness and accuracy are necessary since
these resumes represent you to prospective
employers.
Registration by mail is not reoommend-
ed as students must visit the professas
and ask them to serve as references. When
a professa agrees to serve, please ask him
to send the referenoe to the Placement
Office in the envelop provided, as early as
possible. Your aedentials can not be
furnished to employers until your file is
compel te.
The Placement Office is located in the
Jenkins Building.
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hOUNTAINHL ADVOL 52, NO. USSLPltMBER 1976
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Student Union offers involvement
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 18 SEPTEMBER 1976

Committees, organizations make decisions
It is amazing to see just how many
misconceptions exist about the Student
Union.
In asking students on campus, I was
astounded at the diversity of answers I
received.
One tall good-looking guy smiled and
said, "That's the place where I go to shoot
pool at least once a week
ishort, not so good-looking chick
with him said, "That's the place where
they show the Friday night Free Flick
One freaky looking guy I stopped to ask
said, "I don't know exactly, man, but I
think they have something to do with the
concerts in Minges
Others thought the Student Union was
an arm of the SGA, the building that
houses the snack bar and bowling lanes,
and an organization of student protesters.
Well folks, they were wrong!
The Student Union is the organization
on campus which programs entertainment
for the student body.
It is probably the most misunderstood
organization on campus. Now, more than
ever before, however, the Student Union is
having a major impact on the lives of the
students.
The Student Union is totally separate
from the SGA. It receives $3.50 of each
students' activity fee each quarter. With
this money, the oommittees which make
up the Student Union plan activities which,
they feel will appeal to the students.
The Student Union consists of twelve
oommittees.
The art exhibition oommittee provides a
variety of art displays in the Mendenhall
gallery. Bill Bass is the chairperson.
The artists series oommittee programs
cultural and musical attractions. Curtis
Pitsenbarger is the chairperson.
The coffeehouse oommittee provides
nightclub type entertainment in the
Coffeehouse located in Mendenhall. The
chairperson of this oommittee is Ruth
Morris.
The Entertainer oommittee publishes
the Entertainer, which tells about upoom-
ing events in the Student Union. Georgina
Langston heads this oommittee.
The lecture committee selects and
plans a series of lectures by widely
recognized personalities and topics of
interest. Dennis Ramsey is the chairper-
son.
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Mendenhall Student Center
The minority arts oommittee oommit-
tee, headed by Coretha Rushing, presents
programs aimed to meet the needs of those
who desire minority arts programming.
Students of Afro-American cultures and
international interest should take parti-
cular interest in this committee.
The theatre arts committee presento
professional theatre to the students. In the
past they have presented "1776 and
Vincent Price in "Three American
Voices Charlotte Cheatham heads this
oommittee.
The travel oommittee organizes low-
cost trips for the students, staff, and
faculty of ECU. The trips are usually
planned for the Thanksgiving and Easter
Breaks. The chairperson of the committee
is Becky Bradshaw. '
The video tape committee presents
video tape programs weekly for the
students. Steve Huggins heads the com-
mittee.
The films committee presents the Free
Flicks on Friday nights and the Inter-
national and Classic movies on Wednes-
days. Larry Romich is the head of the
oommittee.
The major attractions committee pro-
vides the concerts which nearly everyone
looks forward to. In the past they have
presented James Taylor, Linda Ronstadt,
and Goose Creek Symphony. Bob Seraiva
heads this oommittee.
The special entertainment committee is
responsible fa the concerts on the mall.
They bridge the gap between major
attractions and coffeehouse. They also are
responsible for recreational events, such as
ice cream bingo. Bruce Whitten is the
chairperson.
Yes, readers, it's true. The Student
Union is not a building or a subversive
organization.
What the Student Union is, is a group
of crazy, fun-loving people who want to
provide as much entertainment as possible
fa your enjoyment.
So now, if someone asks you, I hope
you'll be able to tell them what the Student
Union is!
The East Carolina Litaary and xs
Magazine is an award winning magazine
that has represented a creative outlet fa
the artistically inclined student here at
ECU fa many years. There are many
mediums of expression available to stu-
dents through the magazine. The magazine
oonsiders shat staies, plays, poems,
illustrations, paintings, phaography, and
generally, any aspect of litaature and the
visual arts that a student many wish to
submit fa publication. The East Carolina
Literary and Arts Magazine is one of the
few such university publications that can
offer the artist a small stipend fa wak
accepted fa publication and there are
oppatunities fa the artist to gain artistic
recognition from the North Carolina
Council of the Arts.
There are also oppatunities fa the
student who wishes to become directly
involved in the production of the magazine.
The salaried positions of edita, associate
edita and art directa are selected every
year by the publications oommittee. There
are volunteer positiais to be filled in
business management, circulation, proof-
reading, public relations, lay-up and
design.
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One of the few tangible things that gees
with a student after he a she graduates
from college in a yearbook. It is the one
thing that has pictures and wads
recapturing the fond memaies and special
moments of being in oollege. Genaations
later, dusty books will be taken from the
attic and looked at by grandchildren who
will no doubt laugh at the ciahes and ask
"Who was James Tayla? What is a
Pirate?" a "How do you drop-add?"
The BUCCANEER, the yearbook of
East Carolina, is published by students fa
the student body so the memaies will
faever be alive in print long afta they
have faded in the mind. Paid fa by student
activity fees the yearbooks arrive in
mid-fall and are distributed to all students
from the office located in the Publications
Center. No experience is necessary to wak
ai the staff and everyone is welcome to
contribute staies, phaographs and ideas
to help make it a better and mae
representative book of ECU. Fa infam-
atiai call 757-6501 a drop by the office
between 9 and 5.
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The students on the staff of Fountain-
head are special and so are you. Waking
fa a campus publication keeps you in
touch with the latest events, current
gossip and student views. It also pays in
aher ways-like money.
One dees na need to be a journalism
student towakai Fountainhead, although
it is encouraged. There are several
positions which are periodically open that
require only keen intaest and conmon
sense.
Of course, most of the jobs do involve
writing, but nere again freshmen and
sophonaes, who have na had time to take
oourses in writing, are still encouraged to
get invoived-on the job training, so to
speak.
So, if you want to help the student body
by keeping accountable the administration,
faculty and aher students too, come on by
and give us a hand. We are located on the
second flood of the Publications Center,
aaoss from the Joyna Library Annex.





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��������������������������IP
FPUAMAHEAPVOL 52, A0. 18 SEPTEMBF.h 1976
Involvement insures
student representation
on Faculty Senate
Editor's Note:
The learning experience at a University
involves more than iust attending dasses,
studying for tests and doing term papers.
Becoming involved with the Faculty
Senate gives the individual student a
chance to see the workings behind the
departments and to become a part of
University planning and functioning.
Interested students are encouraged to get
invotved-because if you don't, who will?
For further information contact Tim
McCleod, Secretary of Student Affairs, at
the Student Government office in Menden-
hall Student Center.
Committees
Admissions Committee -1 student member
The Admissions Committee recom-
mends policies governing undergraduate
admission and readmission to regular
sessions and to the summer sessions for
entering students and transfer students. It
serves as an appeals board for students
who for sufficient reason cannot meet
admission requirements. This committee
suggests to the Dean of Admissions such
research studies as are helpful for
evaluation of the efficiency of current
practices.
Continuing Education Committee - 1
student member
The Continuing Education Committee
acts primarily as an advisory group on
programs and future directions of continu-
ing education. In addition, the committee
examines and recommends policies relat-
ing to the entire conoept of work outside
the regularly assigned departmental loads,
including extension teaching and consult-
ant activities.
Credits Committee - 1 student member
The Credits Committee recommends
policies and practices pertaining to acade-
mic credits and academic standards. It
serves as an appeals board for students
who wish to appeal administrative deci-
sions involving the interpretation and
enforcement of policies pertaining to
academic credits and standards.
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Calendar Committee - 1 student member
The Calendar Committee decides (1) on
the number of days the University shall be
in session during the regular terms and on
the beginning and closing dates; (2) on the
number of days and the beginning and
closing dates for each quarter and summer
session term; (3) on the scheduling of
examination periods; and (4) on the
scheduling of holidays and vacation
periods.
University Curriculum Committee - 2
student members
The University Curriculum Committee
studies undergraduate curricula and eval-
uates their effectiveness in meeting the
objectives of the University; receives,
considers, and recommends to the Faculty
Senate curriculum changes, new courses,
or new programs of instruction including
general education requirements fa all
undergraduate curricula; recommends po-
licy for deletion of courses from the
curricula and the catalogue.
Library Committee - 1 student member
The Library Committee formulates and
recommends policies, governing the deve-
lopment of collections of books, periodi-
cals, and other instructional materials, and
the apportioning of the library budget;
serves in an advisory capacity on matters
relating to the services and facilities of the
library; interprets the problems and
policies of the library to the faculty and
brings faculty opinion and needs to the
library staff.
Student Recruitment Committee - 1
student member
The Student Recruitment CommiVee
recommends policies governing recruit-
ment and orientation of students entering
ECU. In addition, the committee makes
special recommendations to the Dean of
Admissions and to the Associate Dean of
Student Affairs for Men regarding special
recruitment and orientation problems
relating to minority groups.
Student Scholarships, Fellowships, and
Financial Aid Commmittee - 1 student
member
The Student Scholarships, Fellowships,
and Financial Aid Committee recommends
policy in the granting of scholarships and
fellowships, interviews nominees and
selects recipients of the ECU academic
scholarships and merit scholarships, and
reviews periodically the overall financial
aid program.
Career Education Committee - 2 student
members
The Career Education Committee
studies present vocational and career
education curricula of ECU; recommends
that curricula be added as needed; studies
statewide programs; determines the pat-
terns of career education needed; recom-
mends the procedures and changes
necessary in career education programs;
publicizes and promotes the career edu-
cation programs of ECU.
Teacher Education Committee - 1 student
member
The Teacher Education Committee
studies the present teacher education
curricula of ECU by department; recom-
mends to the University Curriculum
Committee that duplication of courses be
Continued on page 15.
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1
�Hi
COMMITTEES CONT
fOUNfAINHLAUVQL. 62. NO 1tiSEPTPMBER 197b S
corrected and that needed curricula be
added; studies the changes in the teacher
education program which should be made
in order to keep pace with modern trends;
studies teacher education programs of.
statewide organizations to analyze the type
of teacher education that now exists,
determines the type of teacher education
needed, and recommends the steps that
should be taken to obtain it; promotes
various means of encouraging students to
enter the teacher profession.
Instructional Survey Committee - 5 student
members
The Instructional Survey Committee is
charged with the responsibility of studying
the methods and procedures for the
identification of excellence in teaching,
developing a program that assesses
student and colleagial opinion, utilizing
professional statistical procedures for
analysis of data, assuring maximum
confidentiality, cooperating with the
Alumni Association and others in identify-
ing recipients of teaching awards.
General College Committee - 1 student
member
The General College Committee's
charae is to advise the Senate on matters
relating to the General College and its
functions; formulate policies and criteria
governing students' declaration of major
Buying Club fights high prices
The Community Buying Club, Inc. was
organized as a non-profit buying club in
February of 1974. It is located at 802 Evans
St behind the Greenville Art Center. Its
purpose was to provide the members an
opportunity to work together in a coopera-
tive spirit toward the achievement of the
advantages of combining their mutual
buying needs so zi to gain the economic
benefits of purchasing products in quanti-
ty. The membership cost is $5.00 for the
first ytar and $3.00 for each year
thereafter. The membership year runs
from Sept. 1 to Aug. 31. All memberships
must be renewed as of Sept. 1.
The types of merchandise handled have
been grocery products and natural foods.
The natural foods have been maintained in
inventory while grocery products have
been ordered weekly based on member
requests. Orders for items wanted for the
next week may be made by placing the
order in the orders box. Such orders are
filled and waiting for the member in so far
as possible. Special, unusual orders may
require payment in advance. Specifications
for special orders like vitamins or case lots
are available in catalogs. If an item wanted
is not seen in inventory, a specific request
should be made for it.
There are six operating oommittees
which perform the work functions related
to the operation of the Community Buying
Club. Each member is required to be a
working member of one committee. Each
new member is asked to express pre-
ference for committee assignment. Final
assignment is based on dub needs as well
as the member's desire.
The prindples of operations of the
Community Buying Club as expressed in
the constitution are as follows
1. Open and voluntary membership
based on payment of an annual member-
ship fee and a contribution of time and'
energy of the work required to carry out the
administrative adivities of the dub.
2. Each member is entitled to only one
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515 COTANCHE ST. - DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
vote on matters submitted for approval by
the membership of the aganization.
3. To promote tranquility and a spirit of
cooperation in the relationships among the
members and to avoid diversion from
achieving the overall goals and purposes of
the organization, a policy of neutrality shall
be maintained on all political, sodal, and
religious issues.
4. The organizations shall pursue a
continuing program of education for its
members on such matters as nutrition,
uses of merchandise purchased, and other
purposes and goals of the aganization.
5. A policy of service to the members
shall be the guiding prindple in the
management of the Community Buying
Club.
6. The aganizatioi and its eleded
offidals shall pursue a policy of cooper-
-Ttion with other buying dubs or buying
cooperatives.
For further information contact John
Summey; Call 756-7373 in the evening.
study, as well as their entry into, tenure in,
and exit from the General College;
recommend to the Senate procedures for
the seledion of General College advisors
from the various units with students in the
General College; recommend to the Senate
polides, concepts and procedures for most
effective utilization of the General College
by the academic groups concerned; ami
review, study and propose to the Univer-
sity Curriculum Committee changes to,
additions to, or deletions from the
University's general education require-
ments.
Course Drop Appeals Committee - 1
student member
The Course Drop Appeals Committee is
charged with the responsibility of review-
ing the appeals submitted by students who
have been denied permission by the
Provost, Vice Chancellor of Health Affairs
or Dean of Continuing Education as
appropriate to drop a oourse following the
system in effed.
Campus Facilities Planning and Develop-
ment Committee - 3 student members
The Campus Fadlities Planning and
Development Committee shall meet
regularly with appropriate university of-
fidals and advise them of university
community interests regarding esthetics,
landscape, space utilization, building
locatioB, traffic and parking, and other
pertinent areas. The committee shall
report to and seek the recommendation of
the Faculty Senate on the above matters at
least every fourth Senate meeting.
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ft FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 18 SEPTEMBER 197b
O
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There are a number of social fraterni-
ties and sororities on the ECU campus
which help play a major role in student
affairs on campus.
Besides SGA and Student Union, many
high student positions at East Carolina are
filled through the ranks of greeks at East
Carolina.
In addition, the fraternities and sorori-
ties at ECU make up a large part of the
strong following given the school's athletic
teams.
Greek Rush takes place in the fall
during the first month of school. Look for
exact dates in the FOUNTAINHEAD and
on the information areas around campus.
Fraternity Rush is open to all with no
registration required, while Sorority Rush
isa bit more formal as each girl is required
to attend every sorority's rush party.
The greek life is not for everyone, but
f most of those who choose it, it is a
emorable and lifelong experience.
MVAJO
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(X 6)
Ar. CLT �il5 p
(X 6)
Lt. CLT i20 Lt. RDU
(Iii7) Ar. HT�
Ar. DU 5.05 p.a.
(X � A 7)
MVAJO
ruan rra.
Lt. PCV �i05 p.a.
. (X 6 � 7)
Ar, ISO ��35 P
(X7)
Lt. IDU 5il0 p.a.
(X 6 A 7)
Ar. CLT 6.00 p.a.
(X 6 7)
Lt. CLT 6.05 p.a.
(X o)
Ar. AVL 6.W p.a. (I 6)
Wa'tT
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LT. RDU lili p.
Ar. PCV li�5 p.
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Lt. RDU ).25 p.a.
Ar. PCV Ji55 P-�.
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Lt. RDU 6.16 p.a.
Ar. PCV 6.50 p.a.
Lt. PCV 6i55 P.�-
Ar. KhH 7.25 p.a.
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5.00 p.a
MVAJO
Connections to All Major Cities Through
NORFOLK � RALEIGH � CHARLOTTE
FOR RtSERVATlONS OR CHARTER INFORMATION CALL
Anywhere in North Carolina (Toll Free)
(800) 662-7995
OUTSIDE OF NORTH CAROLINA
(800) 334-9298
TTWW.WWW
-wmp �m
man-ite
Lt. AVL 6.5 p.a,
(X 6 A 7)
Ar. BW 7.
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Ar. PCV 8i35 p.a.
(X 6)
ObJj)
Lt. CLT 220 p.
AT. AVL 300 p.
Lt. PXH 7.30 p.
Ar. RDU 8.25 p.
Lt. RM- 2.15 p.a.
Ar. PCV 2i�5 p.a.
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Ar. RW 3.25 p.a.
PGV-
RDU-
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Pitt-Greenville, NC
Raleigh-Durham, NC
-Morehead City, NC
Elizabeth City, NC
Norfolk, Va
Asheville, NC
Huntington, W.Va
Charlotte,NC
� � � ���
SL






ATTENTION
FRESHMEN
People's
AND ALL
ECU
STUDENTS!
APTST
WELCOMES
YOU!
&EMPLE
TO SHOW OUR WELCOME THERE IS A
FREE MEAL
AWAITING YOU
FOLLOWING THIS SUNDAY MORNING'S SERVICE!
US SCUEPULE
(&&neCOTTONSCOTT
SUN. MORN.9:30 am.9:35 am.9:40 am.
SUN. EVE.6 oo pm.6:05 pm-6'JO pm.
WED. eve.630 pm.fe:3? pm.fo'AO pm.
Barry Bagwell, Ph D
Pas for. par
Bob Karl. MA Ed
Teacher. College Class
The Guitar Workshop
stringed instrument repair
-Hefinishing -Custom Work
-Factory Parts -Accessories
�Guitar, Banjo, Violin Lessons
403A Evans 9-1 & 2-6 Daily 758-1055
Rock Poster Exhibit
MORNING STAR
-Handmade Pottery -Planters
-Wall Hangings -Mirrors,
-Prints, Photographs, Drawings
403A Evans On The Mall
Upstairs
m�
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 18 SEPTEMBER 1976
11
A COLLEGE (URLS FRIEND
IN GREENVILLE
Serving college students for over four decades,
Brody'a has been known to bring you the latest col-
lege fashions of the time, Big name jean selections
of Levi. Humble Seats. Faded Glory and Male are
accented along with $Of,i by Collage. Melange and
Organically (wrown. Sweaters, leather and suede coals,
Frye boots. Topsiders. clogs and (Harks can all be
found at Brady's. All of these brands along with
many others lead us in being the Number One Fash
ion Center in Fastern North Carolina. Stop by and let
us help you select the 1976 Fall look.
Service is what makes Brady's a good place to
shop. We offer free check cashing, free in town tele-
phone service, free gift wrapping and smiling sales
personnel to always make you feel welcome. College
girls have always found a charge account a great con-
venience
May we have the pleasure of serving you soon
Your friends at
Brodfi
Downtown and Pitt Plaza
UNIVERSITY
WRECKER SERVICE
EXON
v
WE GIVE SERVICE
-Road Service-
it GAS & OIL
� TIRES�NEW & RECAPS
LUBRICATION TUNE-UPS
BRAKE SERVICE MINOR AUTO REPAIRS
ESTItVUTES
GIVEN
RADIATOR SERVICE
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
WOtK
GUARANTEED
1101 E. 5TH
GREENVILLE
758-1094
BRUCE WILLIAMS � OWNER





I
18
FOUNTAINHEADVQL 52 NO. 18 SEPTEMBER 197b


I
1
1
Student Union Major A ttractionsCommitteei













I



t





rSt r& rA e&n A $f llf llf rll llf
JL. Jf- JJ- Jt- JJL JJU JJw WjW JjW tfW
PRESENTS
ROGER BALL ALAN GORRIE ONNIE MclNTYRE STEVE FERRONE MOLLY DUNCAN HAMISH STUART
AVERAGE WHITE BAND
rim
ATLANTIC
Friday, September 108:00 p.m.
MINGES COLISEUM
mwiiiiiwMiiiiiniiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
Tickets on sale at the Central Ticket Office
in Mendenhall Student Center
i







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r3fr"l"fC'F9lealt

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i





hOUNJAINHLADVOL. 52, NO. 18 SEPTEMBER 1976 fl
USED TEKT5
THAT'S WHAT WE'RE ALL ABOUT!
WITHIN THE NEXT WEEK YOU'LL BE
BUYING YOUR TEXTBOOKS FOR FALL
QUARTER 1976. USED TEXTBOOKS
COST 25 LESS THAN NEW TEXTS. USED
TEXTS AND NEW TEXTS ARE BOUGHT
BACK FOR THE SAME PRICE. BUYING
USED TEXTBOOKS CAN CUT YOUR TEXT
BOOK COST AS MUCH AS 50. THIS
FALL, CHECK DOWNTOWN FIRST AND
BUY USED TEXTBOOKS. SAVING YOU
MONEY- THAT'S WHAT WE'RE ABOUT
TOO!
UBS
528 Cotonchc 5t. Downtown
LRJ . v.yi' �?'� ,V.v.v.v.v. v v.v.s ;�� y.v. . vyvvv- . ��v: tf;ffSi





.0m,
mm
��? �
Mm
����
I
r
,�� �yfJ
S 201 E. 5th St. Greenville
we brim; to you-
-a wide selection of turquoise & silver jewlery
-indian print bedspreads
-plants and handmade pottery
-wicker and rattan furniture and accessories
-wall hangings and much more . . .
INCLUDING MANY NEW AND BEAUTIFUL SURPRISES
COME SEE US!
m3
�i
INC.
208 E- 5th St. "your downtown music headquarters" 208 E. 5th St.
WELCOME BACK , YA'LL! IT'S BEEN A FUN SUMMER FOR US & WE HOPE FOR YOU,
TOO! BUT WE'VE DONE ALSO BEEN DOING A LITTLE WORK AT ROCK N' SOUL TRYING
TO IMPROVE OUR SERVICE TO YOU BY DOING THE FOLLOWING THINGS!
DOUBLED OUR ' "JAZZ" SELECTION
DOUBLED OUR "CUT-OUT" SELECTION
ADDED A NEW "IMPORT" DEPARTMENT
ADDED A NEWT-SHIRT " LINE
ADDED A NEW "DISPLAY RACK" FOR
EASIER BROWSING
ATTENTION FRESHMEN!
Show us your new ID card &
get your first album from ROCK
N' SOUL FOR for only $3 49
(Limit 6.98 list) or get a tape for
only $4.49 (Limit '7.98 list)
WE REALLY LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING ALL OUR OLD FRIENDS & MEETING NEW
ONES DURING THE NEW SCHOOL YEAR & HOPE ALL OF YOU WILL COME BY AND SAY
"HI" SOON!
COME SEE US,
TOM, FRANK, JIM, & SUSAN
WHY
SHOP ROCK N' SOUL?
1) SELECTION- Over 4,000 LPs & 1,500
tapes to choose from
2) SERVICE Fast, courteous, knowl
edgeable staff always smiling
3) PRICE- All things considered, you'll
come out cheaper at ROCK N' SOUL
4) NO HASSLES WITH RETURNS
5) CONVENIENCE-Located on 5th St.
across from Jolly Roger
6) FREE ALBUM & TAPE CLUB
7) $3.99 SPECIALS EVERY WEEK
OUR STOCK CONSISTS OF:
-Albums, 8 tracks, cassettes, 45's
-Posters, blacklights, incense,
T-shirts
� Waterbeds
� Cut-outs & imports
� Blank tapes & phono needles
� BEST selection of "head gear"
in town!
Bongs from 6" to 48"
GO PIRATES!
OPEN TIL MIDNIGHT MON. thru SAT.
IF WE DON'T HAVE WHAT YOU'RE LOOKING FOR YOU CAN BET IT'S HARD TO FIND!
4
ft





ft
hOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 18 SEPTEMBER 1976
If you saw "BIMffiSW OTS SB MBS Sffl" then you won't want to miss M
Dll ixiB i OUfiJ Cl S , you'll actually experience how we've blended our proven good taste with
A SFSC2AU.7CESATEDECIIFLM. M be hew spellbind by the transformation of Big Mac
from seven great ingredients into one great taste! Eavesdrop, as
T.M.
unselfishly admits that
see Hotca kcs and Sausage
. togetherOH th0
same bill f mm DELIGHT ZH TEE ACEOBATICS i English
Muffin, Cheese, Canadian Bacon and Fried Egg s they form
5
Vi
&
you'll feel a lump in your throat
when you EXPERIENCE DEEP PURPLE the room expecially

created for ?T�wr���j'T-? ��wv��iiwiii� yours
when you're actually taken back through the years TOTOWf?!? 8-
Quality, Serviee and Value actually aPPear together in TWO
DIFFERENT PLACES at the same time on Greenville Boulevard
and at 10th and Gotanche! It's all here, uke lib itidiag ibdid wi-i
when Fillet-O-Fish and Tartar Sauce team up to steal your heart. And the remarkable
performance of Hamburger, Small Fries and Regular Coke as they effortlessly StyU Jq&uU&
CHANGE OUT (HP A DOULAJL B313S 337513 with such good
C4�
taste
. Don't miss it. "SDH W MOUUPS
in Greenville at 10th and Cotanche.





am
������1
ra
2Z hOUHTAINHtAUVOL. 52, NO. 11S StPTtMBLr 19b
DON'T DELAY! BUY
YOUR TEXTBOOK TODAY
BELOW IS A PARTIAL LIST WHICH CONTAINS
JUST A FEW OF THE THOUSANDS OF TITLES
YOU'LL FIND AT THE UNIVERSITY BOOK
EXCHANGE.
COURSE
NEW USED SAVINGS
Psychology 50 13.95 10.45
Biology 70
Physics 5
Art 117
Economics 111
� English I
� English II
11.95
11.95
7.95
5.95
5.95
6.95
Anthropology 10 12.95
Home
Economics 203
12.50
8.95
8.95
5.95
4.45
4.45
5.20
9.70
9.35
3.50
3.00
3.00
2.00
1.50
1.50
1.75
3.25
3.15
� Two Major English 1 Textbooks
If you shop early and buy your textbook used you'll save
25 over the price of a new text. Check us first and save
money. We'll be open from 7:30 AM to 9:00 PM Sept. 10th,
13th, and 14th for your shopping convenience.
University Book Exchange 528 S. Cotanche St Downtown
-H





njUtilAiNHEAU.VQL 52. NO 118 SEPTEMBER 1976 23
V
ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS
EDITORS NOTE: Ther are many
academic departmens at ECU available so
that the students can have a broad study
spectrum. Each individual department is
not listed below due to lack of space in this
edition, but the staff has assembled a large
portion of the various departments so that
the newer students can in some way be
academically oriented. All incoming
students should consult the the 1976-77
ECU Catalogue for more information about
the academic community existing at ECU.
Allied Health
The School of Allied Health and Social
Professions is a professional school which
offers degrees in nine disciplines and
course work in four healtr, related areas.
The degree programs, each of which fully
prepare the individual as a qualified entry
level professional, are: Health Sciences
(Statistics) B.S Environmental Health,
B.S Medical Record Science, B.S
Medical Technology, B.S.M.T Occu-
pational Therapy, B.S Physical Therapy,
B.S Rehabilitation Counseling, M.S
Social Work and Correctional Services,
B.S Speech Language and Auditory
Pathology, B.S. and M.S. The Department
of Community Health presents a portion of
the curriculum for the School and
Community Health Education B.S. degree
offered by the Department of Health,
Physical Education, Recreation and Safety.
A "concentration in health" is offered for
them in Administrative Services degree
sponsored by the Graduate School. Under-
graduate and Graduate level courses in
Alcoholism, Biostati sties, Epidemiology
and Human Sexuality Dysfunction are
presented by the faculty of the School.
Students are admitted to majors in the
undergraduate degree programs in their
junior year following a competitive admis-
sions process. The academic standards are
high and the prerequisite requirements are
strict and the number of students in each
program are limited. Contact by interested
students during their freshman year with
the faculty of the department of their
interest is recommended and welcomed.
This school represents the largest and
most comprehensive Allied Health edu-
cational program in the state. It has the
only Occupational Therapy and the only
Environmental Health programs in the
state and are one of two Physical Therapy
programs. All of the programs eligible
have full national accredit ion.
Biology
the bachelor's level or work in biological
research. For those students preparing for
professional schools, the oourse of study is
based on the requirements of those schools
and recommendations of national organi-
zations qualified to represent their re-
spective fields.
Many faculty members in Biology have
research grants, the majority of which are
concerned with estuarine and swampland
ecology. These grants, and other faculty
research projects, provide research
opportunities for students.
Biology graduates with a baccalaureate
degree may find employment in labora-
tories in industry, government, and
nonprofit research organizations. These
jobs would include basic and applied
research, teaching and administration,
testing, development of products, technical
work, and positions as scientific librarians,
writers, illustrators, and editors. Begin-
ning salary for a baccalaureate
graduates is about $9,500.
A basic introduction to the biological
sciences is important to every educated
person whether or not it is pursued as a
career. The continuing scientific-techno-
logical revolution increasingly affects our
ives. A student may take a minor in
biology to supplement any major field of
choice or simply take courses of interest
that will not necessarily be applied to any
degree.
Business
The School of Business is the largest
professional school at ECU. Approximately
15 percent of the students at East Carolina
are enrolled in business. Students seeking
the B.S.B.A. degree may select a
concentration from nine areas which
include the following: Accounting,
Finance, General Business, Management,
Marketing, Real Estate, Banking, Econo-
mics, and Quantitative Methods.
The undergraduate program of the
School of Business is one of three programs
in North Carolina accredited by the
American Assembly of Collegiate Schools
of Business�the highest accrediting
association for schools of business in the
United States. The undergraduate program
was first accredited by AACSB in 1967.
This accredition was reaffirmed in 1976.
At the graduate level the School of
Business offers the Master of Business
Administration degree. The Master's
program is one of two in North Carolina
which has been accredited by the American
Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Busi-
ness. This accredition was achieved in
1976.
Chemistry
The Department of Biology offers
degrees in preparation for entering careers
in the biological and health sciences, in
teaching, in biochemistry, and for entering
the professional schools of medicine,
denistry, veterinary medicine and
optometry. The B.A. degree is offered to
those students who desire a degree in
biology but who do not care to teach or
continue in graduate school. The B.S.
degree is the most scientifically rigorous
degree and is designed for those who mav t
wishito continue their education tSeybhJ
The Chemistry Department has three
undergraduate degree program; the B.S.
professional degree, the B.A. degree, and
the B.S. teaching degree. The
The B.S. degree program is
accredited by the American Chemical
Society and this is the program that is
normally taken by chemistry majors whose
goal is to either work in industry as a bench
chemist or to go on to graduate school to
further their education. The B.A. degree
program is frequently taken by premedical
and predental students as well as by
students who plan to obtain jobs working
under close supervision in industry, or,
"selling chemicals or sdentifiC'euiprnWif.
Students in this program can take more
rigorous courses than required in the
program and then by taking a few remedial
courses at graduate school they can
proceed with an M.S. degree. The B.S.
teaching degree is designed to prepare
high school chemistry teachers.
One of the advantages of a degree in
chemistry is the fact that there is a good job
market available. There have been more
inquiries from employers than the number
of chemistry majors graduating for the last
several years.
English
In addition to the inevitable freshmar.
composition, the English Department will
offer a variety of oourses for the General
Education Humanities requirement, for
English majors, and for journalism minors.
Of particular interest will be courses in
creative and professional writing, English
203 and Journalism 319a, taught by two
new faculty members.
The General Education numanities
requirement may be satisfied by a number
of 200-level literature oourses, including
English 220: The Bible as Literature,
English 221 : World Masterpieces in
Translation, English 225: The Short Story,
English 226: Introduction to Poetry,
English 277: Western Drama: Tragedy,
English 229: Modern Fantasy, English 234:
Classical Mythology, English 272: Ameri-
can Folklore, English 277: Black Litera-
ture, and English 282: Science Fiction.
Also meeting the General Education
humanities requirement are 100-level
courses, English 140: Major British
Writers I, English 160: Major British
Writers II, English 170: Major American
Writers, and English 180: Recent British
and American Writers.
English 203: Creative Writing (1:00
TWF) will be taught by Dr. Peter Makuck,
who has joined the English faculty this
September. Dr. Makuck has published
short stories in the North American
Review, The Virginia Quarterly, the
Sewanee Review and the Mississippi
Review and poetry in Southern Humanities
Review, College English, the Illinois
Quarterly, the Ohio Review, the Chicago
Review and Poetry Northwest.
Another new faculty member, Terry
Davis, will teach Journalism 319a: Special
Problems Seminar (11300 MWF). This
writing course is designed for the potential
professional writer of specialty or popular
magazine articles. Techniques of research-
ing, writing, and marketing non-fiction
prose will be stressed.
Mr. .Davis has published several
articles in Sports Illustrated as well as
fiction and poetry in College English and
other magazines.
Foreign languages
The Department of Foreign Languages
was inaugurated at ECU in 1923, when a.
single teacher offered oourses in Latin and
French and the institution was known as
East Carolina Teachers College. Since that
beginning, Foreign Language instruction
has never ceased to grow stronger in
response to the needs of students. Divided
in the late sixties into separate Depart-
ments of German and Russian and of
Romance Languages, language studies
were reorganized in 1973 into the prefect
' becart'rnent' 'of Foreign Languages and
Literatures.
The department offers work in French,
German, Italian, Latin, Russian and
Spanish. Of these, French, German, and
Spanish can be chosen as a major or a
minor and lead to the A.B. and B.S.
degrees. The department also sponsors
along with the University a co-op program,
that is being meet with great enthusiasm.
In the elementary oourses the student
acquires the four basic skills necessary to
his eventual mastery of the language:
listening, speaking, reading and writing.
At more advanced levels special oourses in
composition and conversation, syntax and
phonetics continually reinforoe these skills.
Courses that explore culture and civili-
zation are also offered and enjoyed by
students.
And, needless to say, the advanced
student will spend much of his time
reading, talking about, analyzing and
criticizing the great masterpieces of prose,
drama and poetry in which the human
spirit embodies itself in every age and
land.
Who can (or should) study languages?
The answer, in short, is practica'ly
everyone. The study of foreign languages,
cultures and literatures is not a narrow
interest but a very, very wide one. It
enriches diverse career objectives. Stu-
dents in many fields find elective language
study a valuable adjunct to their major
programs.
Even the introductory language oourses
(levels 1 through 4) are intellectual and
professional money in the bank, always
there when you need to draw on them. And
in today's world it is not so much a
question of whether you will need them,
but when.
If you have any questions concerning
Foreign Language study, please call or feel
free to visit the Department of Foreign
Languages and Literatures, located in the
A-wing of the Lawrence F. Brewster
Building.
Geography
The Department of Geography, with a
staff of 15, offers degrees in both
geography and urban and regional plan-
ning. Today's geographers and planners
are employed in a wide variety of
occupations, most of which fall within the
three broad categories of education,
governmeni, and industry. In order to
prepare the student for employment in
these fields, the department offers the
following degrees: B.A.and B.S. in geo-
grapny; B.S. in urban and regional
planning; and the M.A. and M.A. Ed. in
geography. Currently, 115 undergraduates
are pursuing majors in geographic edu-
cation, geography, and planning; while 25
students are actively pursuing a graduate
degree in geography.
Most of the oourses scheduled oy the
Department of Geography for Fall Quarter
remain open. Several courses are parti-
cularly noteworthy since they are seldom
offered more than once a year. These
courses are: GEOG. 266-Underdeveloped
Nations; GEOG. 322G-Regional Develop-
ment; GEOG. 365G-Economic Geography
of Africa; GEOG. 386-Geography of Soils;
PLAN 314-Urban Form; and PLAN 349G-
Coastal Area Planning. Coastal Area
Planning is a new course and will be
offered for the first time during Fall
, ,� � �. .�.� �.� � ,? � �.�
Continued on page 24.
'Srititifete f t





uHMHHaHHSHHIHHMIHHI
fl FQUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 18 SEPTEMBER 196
ACADEMICS CONT'D
Quarter. Students interested in a more
inaepth exposure to the geography and
planning fields are invited to enroll in
GEOG. 296-Geography Seminar, which
provides an introductory overview of these
two fields.
Freshmen and transfer students desir-
ing additional information regarding the
department's curricula may contact Dr.
Ennis Chestang, Chairperson of
the Department of Geography, or any
geographyplanning faculty member.
Geology
The geology program at ECU is a
relatively small but very active and
growing concern. With seven full-time
faculty members and approximately 35
undergraduate majors, there exists an
excellent faculty to student ratio. This
promotes increased sensitivity and at-
tention to individual student needs and
enhances the quality of professional
preparation. Both undergraduate and
graduate programs are available within the
department. The number of students
pursuing an M.S. degree has stabilized at
about 15.
Despite its modest size, the department
offers a rather impressive selection of
scientific equipment for student and
faculty use. This includes interpretive
instrumentation housed in Graham Build-
ing, specimen preparation labs in the
basement of a nearby building, and several
research vessels stationed along the ooast
of North Carolina.
The acquisition ot much of the
aforementioned equipment has been
through research grants. Eastern North
Carolina is well suited for varied investi-
gations within many subdisciplines of
geology. Perhaps the major area of
concentration has been marine geology and
contemporary coastal processes, specifi-
cally those operative in the Outer Banks
system. However, current projects within
the department span a broad geographic
area from Canada to Mexico.
Activities other than formal oourse
work are also an integral part of the
program. An active geology club sponsors
socials, field trips, and guest speakers.
Special events, such as last spring's
weekend retreat with a program on
professional opportunities in geology, are
offered occasionally. These events are by
no means limited to geology majors.
Anyone with even peripheral interest in
geology is welcomed to all activities and to
visit the department at any time.
History
The Department of History of ECU
offers a wide variety of courses in the fields
of American, European, Latin American
and Asian history. There are period
courses in all four areas plus a wide
assortment of topical courses.
The Department of History has a
faculty of 28 members, most of whom have
their doctoral degrees from reputable
American and European universities.
The faculty of the Department of
History is dedicated to the principle that
hi stay as the broadest of all disciplines,
lies as the heart of a liberal arts education.
Concerned not only with facts and
chronology, the students of history seek an
understanding of oonoeptsand movements
in politics, economics, the arts, and social
relations. Because of the breadth of
historical inquiry, students sufficiently
trained in the discipline of history are
particularly well equipped for careers in
teaching, law, theology, public service and
politics, journalism, personnel administra-
tion, the military, and museum and
archival work. Because historical adminis-
tration and museum and archival work are
fields which are especially expanding, the
department offers special courses in these
areas in addition to the regular American,
European, Latin American, and Asian
courses. To an increasing extent liberal
arts majors in history are recruited for
managerial training programs in the
nation's largest business establishments,
and the state and federal governments.
Of oourse, history is not basically a
vocational course; it is above all a humane
study primarily designed to help improve
the quality of living. In an enlightened
society, it is incumbent upon everyone to
prepare themselves by a study of history.
Home Economics
Home Economists (men and women)
can expect to have continued employment
opportunities through the 1980s. The
School of Home Economics offers a
selection of programs.
If students are interested in under-
standing people and how they relate to
their environment, how preschool children
learn, and how members of a family relate
to each other, the Department of Child
Development and Family Relations offers
you a firm "footing" in classroom
instruction with emphasis in developing
attitudes and skills. The flexibility in this
program allows students to prepare for
such jobs as preschool teaching or
supervision; social agency counseling; or
working with exceptional children and their
families.
If one is interested in positions relating
to: changes and trends in fashions, using
new fibers and fabrics in design, textile
chemistry, writing, promotion, or mer-
chandising, an area within the Department
bf Clothing and Textiles is available
through merchandising and clothing and
textiles.
Challenging and rewarding vocations,
in an industry that today is one of the
largest in the oountry, are offered by the
Department of Food, Nutrition and Institu-
tion Management in preparing food service
managers and clinical dietitians. Gradu-
ates are interested in attractive and
efficient food service for large groups of
people�translating nutrition needs into the
needs of groups-focusing on managerial
aspects of the hows and whys of arranged
food services and helping people under-
stand nutritional needs. Internship exper-
iences are available in hospital, college and
university food service, restaurant and club
management. The program isaDDroved bv
the American Dietetics Association.
Are you interested in teaching young
adults in the increasingly important field of
consumer and homemaking education? Or
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FGUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 18 SEPTEMBER 1976 2 5
J
j �
ACADEMICS CONT'D
would you prefer a position Th tne
agricultural extension service? Or in
business and industry? Or in consumer
service? Or in social agencies? If so, then
serious consideration should be given to
the program offered by the Department of
Home Economics Education where stu-
dents learn about clothing and textiles,
child development and family relations,
housing and management, food and
nutrition, and home economics education.
In the Housing and Management
Department students are prepared for
exciting and rewarding positions working
as teammates with home builders, archi-
tects, city planners, sociologists, and other
professionals. Students design residences
of all types, prepare renderings and swatch
boards, plan lighting and wiring layouts,
refinish and reuphdster furniture, test
appliances, and practice management of
time, money and human resources.
Library Science
Having trouble choosing a major? Do
you believe in the right to read? Want a
profession where the supply has not met
demand? Do you find media exciting?
Interested in information handling and
retrieval?
ECU'S Department of Library Science
can meet these needs. Their program for
training school media coordinators is both
up-to-date and dynamic and involves the
selection, acquisition, organization, and
circulation of all communication media.
The emphasis of the program is on public
service and prepares students for hundreds
of challenging positions available in media
centers.
An experienced, well-informed faculty
aware of current trends in communication
and storage and retrieval of information
keep the courses oriented toward present
and future service in an ever changing
profession. This exciting program offers
opportunities for ta competent man or
woman who wants to enter a profession
that is different, satisfying, and stimula-
ting.
If school librarianship is not your
nterest, you may prepare for librarian
riedia positions in other types of libraries
such as public libraries, collegeuniversity
libraries, special libraries, or technical
institutescommunity colleges by pursuing
graduate programs leading to the Master
of Library Science degree or the Master of
Arts in Education degree with a media
major.
Mathematics
The Mathematics Department would
like to take this opportunity to welcome
returning students, freshmen, and trans-
fers to the ECU campus. The Department
offers the B.S. and B.A. degrees in
Mathematics, B.A. in Mathematics with an
Option in Information Science, and a B.S.
Double Major in Mathematics and Physics.
Minors are of ferei in the A.B. in Computer
and Information Science and in the B.S. in
Mathematics. Students desiring inform-
ation concerning these programs may stop
by Austin 119.
The Mathematics Department also
operates a Math Lab. Any student taking a
Mathematics course and needing help in
that course is welcome to come by Austin
110 any class day between 8:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m.
If a student needs to take MATH 63 or
65, but has not taken the required
mathematics pre-test, he (she) should stop
by Austin 110 and make arrangements to
take this test before registering for MATH
63 or MATH 65.
Information concerning the Freshmen
Mathematics Program can be obtained in
Austin 110 and Austin 119.
Medical School
The growth and development of the
ECU School of Medicine continue at a
steady pace. During the past 14 months the
core faculty selection in the Basic Sciences
has been nearly completed with the
addition of 10 new faculty members - only
3 Basic Science faculty positions remain to
be filled.
The Clinical Faculty is growing and
Departmental Chairmen in Pathology,
Pediatrics, Psychiatry and Internal Medi-
cine have been appointed. Acting Chair-
man are functioning in the Departments of
Family Medicine, Obstetrics and Gyneco-
logy and Surgery while Search Committees
are working to recruit permanent Chair-
men for these Departments.
The first Residency Training program,
appropriately in Family Practice, was
accredited in July and similar programs in
Internal Medicine, Pediatrics and Psychia-
try are now entering the accreditation
process.
The Medical School additions to the Pitt
County Memorial Hospital are under
construction and will be completed by
mid-1977.
Pre-doctoral (Ph.D.) programs in some
of the Basic Science disciplines are being
readied for review consideration within the
University system. The target date for the
establishment of these programs is
September 1978.
The architectural planning for the
Medical Science-Health Affairs Library
complex is moving from the program
planning to the schematic phase at this
time, with progression to working draw-
ings and to bid in late 1977.
Much has been accomplished but much
remains to be done. The School of
Medicine will be an increasingly visible
member of the ECU family in the next
year.
Music
The School of Music serves both
non-music majors and music majors during
their college careers.
Non-music students may become mem-
bers of performance groups by audition.
These groups are the symphony orchestra,
the wind ensemble, the marching pirates,
the concert band, the varsity band, the jazz
ensembles, the concert choir, the chorale,
and the women's glee dub. No audition i5
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)
2&
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 18 SEPTEMBER 1976
� � � �
ACADEMICS CONT'D
required fa enrollment in the women's
chaus. Offerings also include several
service courses fa education majas. Many
students who are interested in partici-
pation in music oontinue this interest
throughout their lives with enrollment in
church choirs and other community
aganizatiois.
Undergraduate music majors earn
Bachelor of Music Degrees with the
following majors: performance, music
education, theory-composition, church
music, music therapy, piano pedagogy and
voice pedagogy. Graduates earn Master of
Music Degrees in perfamance, church
music and music education.
A large patioi of School of Music
Graduates secure teaching positions both
in public schools and oolleges in North
Carolina and other states. Other students
find jobs in churches, hospitals (music
therapists), music businesses, and per-
famance (symphony achestras, opera).
Some graduates set up private studios fa
private and group music instruction.
Not of small importance to the campus
and the surrounding communities is the
School of Music's continued efforts to
provide concerts and ether musical ser-
vices to aid in the cultural life of the area.
Philosophy
The Philosophy Department offers a
B.A. Maja and a Mina in Philosophy.
There are no specific courses required fa
either, although some basic subjects (like
Logic) are strongly recommended to
everyone.
Philosophy majas have many options
open to them at graduation. Some go into
careers in government, business and
industry, where a liberal arts background
i s an asset. Others go on to graduate school
in philosophy, usually to prepare fa an
academic career. Still others do wak in
other areas. One of these areas is Law. A
recent survey conducted by the Depart-
ment revealed that Deans of Law schools
considered an undergraduate degree in
philosophy a good preparation fa the
study of law; many of the Deans thought
that concentration on philosophy as an
undergraduate was in fact the best way to
prepare fa Law school.
Those who mina in philosophy fre-
quently are majas in such disciplines as
English, Histay, etc where an ability to
critically analyze abstract ideas is an
important asset.
Many students interested in taking
courses in philosophy mistakenly think
they must begin with Philosophy 1, which
is a course in the philosophy of Plato. But
given the nature of philosophy and the way
our program is set up, there are a number
of courses suitable as an introduction, such
as Ethics (Phil. 160), Ancient Philosophy
(Phil. 103) etc.
There are ten faculty members in the
department, and they have a wide range of
philosophical interests, include Pheno-
menology. American Philosophy, Ancient
Philosophy, Aesthetics, and Far Eastern
Thought. One of the members, Professa
John Kozy, the Chairman, spent the past
academic year on leave, waking fa
Senata Robert Magan, in Washingtoi.
When he returns in the Fall Quarter, he
will conduct a course in Social and Political
Philosophy in which he will share some of
the insights he has gained.
Students interested in philosophy are
invited to become associated with Phi
Sigma Tau, the national hona society in
philosophy, which has an active local
chapter. Wellyn Dawson is President, Ed
Ferrell is Vice President, and Andrea
Sullivan is Seaetary. Professa Ernest
Marshall is the Faculty advisa of the
group.
Physics
The Department of Physics at ECU
offers programs in physics for the
preparation of professional scientists as
well as teachers fa two-year colleges and
high schools. There is also a program in
applied physics designed to prepare
students fa careers in the area between
pure science and engineering. The ECU
graduate in physics has received modern
training in physics, mathematics, and
computing science as an integral part of a
liberal education.
The faculty consists of eleven (11)
professas who supervise the activities of,
on the average, mae than sixty (60)
students who are pursuing degrees withii
the Department of Physics. The Depart-
ment is housed in a new building
mntaining offices, classrooms, student
laborataies, and research space.
Sane of the facilities housed in the
Department of Physics are a modern
particle accelerata, nuclear spectroscopic
labaatay, solid state laboratay, astron-
omy laboratay, miaowave labaatay,
plasma labaatay, iai-source development
labaatay, and a magnetic resonance
labaatay. Departmental conputer facili-
ties include a minicomputer system with a
number of peripherals, a miaocomputer,
multi-terminal programmable calculata,
computer interfacing setups, and terminals
fa communication with large computersoi
a off campus. Suppat facilities include a
well equipped Electronics Shop with two
full-time technicians, an Instrument
(machine) Shop with two full-time staff
members, and an office staff with two
full-time staff members.
Graduates in physics with undergrad-
uate a masters degrees are fully qualified
to continue at other institutions fa Ph.D's
in such fields as Physics, Engineering,
Textile Science, and others. The applied
physics program also prepares students fa
oppatunities in industry. Many students
also prepare fa careers in high school and
two-year college teaching. There is a
two-year program which enables students
to transfer at the end of their sophomae
year to Nath Carolina State University in
engineering.
Political Science
A new Political Science mina program
in Comparative Government and Inter-
national Relations is now available fa
students who are majaing in Political
Science at ECU. Students may maja in
CONTINUED ON PAGE 36.
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OUNTAINHEADVOL. b2, NO. 11S StHJtMBFR 1976
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 18 SEPTEMBER 1976
29
i
��
O
Administrative offices at ECU
help to keep University afloat
Counceling Center
The Counseling Center is located in the
Wright Annex for the purpose of counsel-
ing students in minor problems they may
encounter while at ECU.
Dr. George Weigand is the counselor at
the ce.iter and willing to help all students
that come by for aid.
The Counseling Center handles all
kinds of problems such as family,
academic, soda emotional, and monetary
which may arise during the course of the
year.
Last year the Counseling Center
the oenter.
According to Dr. Ball, the primary
service of the Counseling Center is to play
a supportive role and help any students
that may have adjustment problems blend
into the ECU oommunity.
The Counseling Center is always
available for students who have problems
and students who feel they need the
services, shoulc" feel very free to drop by
the Wright Annex Office and discuss their
particular problem.
counseled 1,194 students ranging from
undergraduate to graduates.
Counseling is done primarily on a
one-to-one basis by both Dr. Ball and Dr.
Weigand.
Dr. Weigand also teaches a special
class on study skills which the students
find helpful in obtaining better study
habits.
The Counseling Center also serves as a
practical teacher because many students in
various social and psychological fields are
able to do their field placement work within
See Financial Aid for money
"The primary concern of the ECU
financial aid office is to work with the
parents and students contributions in
comparisons with the cost of education
said Kenneth Wheeler, assistant financial
aid officer.
"In order to become associated with the
financial aid office a student must complete
a needs analysis said Wheeler.
"The needs analysis involves filling out
a combination of 3 of the following 4 forms,
The Basic Opportunity � Grant, Student
Confidential Statement, The Basic East
Carolina Grant, and Parents Confidential
Statement.
When asked what advice he would give
Robert Boudreaux
persons who might require financial
assistance Wheeler said, students should
irto plan in advance for money they will
need in the future.
Wheeler also commented that students
who are applying for loans should have the
necessary material completed about 8 to 10
weeks ahead of time.
Some of the services that the financial
office offers are temporary off campus
work study, on campus work study, and
numerous grants, scholarships, and loans,
Wheeler said.
The office hours of the financial aid
office are from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m Monday
through Friday. The office is located in
room 201 of the Whiohard Building.
Housing Office sets dorm policy
The Housing Office is located in the
Whichard Building and is designed to
handle all housing assignments and
problems that students may encounter
while living on campus.
The director of housing is Dan K.
Wooten and his job is to regulate the
dormitorieson campusand to see that they
are operating properly.
The Housing Office will handle all
problems pertaining to the various dorm
rooms; including room assignments, main-
tenance, and resident advisors. The
Housing Office is one of the many
administrative departments on campus
that students should become very familiar
with.
Since it is a university policy to require
all freshman and sophomore students to
reside in the dorms, there is going to be
some problem that a student must get
corrected in the housing office.
A dorm student should take main-
tenance problems to the Floor Advisor, or
to the Resident Advisor first. If these
avenues seem to be oongested, the next
student stop should be the Housing Office.
The Housing Office is willing to help all
campus dwellers adjust to their new
acoomodations, and the student should be
willing to adjust to the new environment as
well.
The Housing Offioe also prints an
off-campus housing list and they are free
for the asking. Simply go by the Housing
Offioe and ask the secretary for one of the
lists.
DROP-ADD FORM East Carolina University
. �
"Be aware of dates and follow
instructions on all forms are two of the
most important things that a student can
do said J. Hubert Moore, associate
registrar.
The registrar's office is located in room
102 of the Whichard Building and is open
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m Monday through
Friday.
Suggestions made by Moore to make
things easier for the students were: (1)
students should preregister to curtail later
problems, (2) students must have course
cards that allows them to go through
drop-add, (3) note carefully the 3 steps on
the drop add forms.
One service that the registrar's office
offers is figuring up a student's academic
standings.
nti in � i
PHINI
UalNama Frrsl Nam Middle
MAJOR
DEPARTMENT REASON FOR CHANGE
l To tw valid, fhis form must de dated and signed bv adviser and signed by inaiot dept head
7 Student must obtain from instructor a course card for each course being dropped
3 Student must have copv of present schedule to drop add
COURSE NAME ANO NUMBE H
Date
NOT VALID UNLESS OATEO
ID NUMBER
Not. It studi'Ht is r.nsiny
Signed
t in
How
Approval
I course form must be attached
Signed
Faculty AoVnai Appruval
lHinMm.Mitl Chairman
�ftaafe
Major Department Head1 Approval
No of Hour Carrying Attar Change
-� � ������ �'��� �"�"� '��'��'�������������"��
Dr. George Weigand
Student Affairs
Regardless of the problem oome to the
student affairs office said James
Mallory, dean of men at ECU.
When asked about the services that are
under his office he said, we handle
standards of security for the dorms,
ooadvisor to the SGA, and we offer a course
quarterly on how to study-
Working with Dean Mallory on many of
these areas is Dean of Women, Carolyn
Fulghum and her assistant Nancy Smith.
"We serve as a liaison between
students and other offices of the university
and oommunity said Smith.
Services provided by this office are
completing applications for student gov-
ernment loans, issuing of absences from
class, withdrawals from school, counseling
service for day and or dorm students, and
providing references for women transfer
students.
Both offices are located in the
Whichard Building and are opened from 8
a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.
Provost Office
i he Provost Office exists in its own
corner of the Brewster Social Science
complex for the purpose of maintaining
academic harmony at ECU.
The provost office is headed by Dr.
John Howeil, who has had quite a few
years of experience in the academic
community.
Any academic problems that a student
at ECU may have with a course grade, a
professor, or an advisor may go directly to
the Provost Office if their general college
or departmental advisors are not doing
their jobs sufficiently.
Dr. Howeil has two assistants, Susan
McDaniets and Carl Faser that are both
equally qualified to help the student.
One of the major problems with the
Provost Offioe is that not enough students
know very much about the academic
services it provides and the help that can
be found.
All freshmen and transfer students
should become familiar with the Provost
services because there is more than likely
going to be a time when they need
SK�t1emfccOunsetlng.





I flQgg
HHHHI
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 18 SEPTEMBER 1976
BACK TO SCHOOL
READING, WRITING, RECORD BAR
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 18 SEPTEMBER 1976
Intramurals get bigger and better
i
The ECU Intramural program reached
an all-time high last year in the number of
students and faculty that participated in its
many events and services.
A total of 3,457 students competed in 43
e in the men's, women's and
co- jreational programs. The number was
over one-third of the student body at ECU.
The credit for the increased interest
among the student body at ECU is to be
given to Dr. Wayne Edwards, Director of
Intramurals, and his intramural staff.
In addition to providing intramural
programs for the students, the Intramural
Department also handles equipment check-
outs, handball and racquetball court
registration and the recreational swimming
program. The use of these programs
increased by record numbers in the
1975-76 school year.
Programs Offered
The men's program oonsisted of 23
sports last year. A record number of 2,397
students participated in one or more of the
sports offered. The most participants were
in basketball and Softball, with touch
football and volleyball close behind. 1,179
students oompeted in basketball (from 729
the year before) and 1,450 students
participated in softball (from 720 the year
before). The men's program will add a new
sport this year - soccer - and track and field
will be held in the fall instead of in the
spring.
The women's program offered 13
events in 1975-76. Softball, volleyball and
basketball were the most popular sports
among the women. 16 events will be
offered to the women this year and touch
football will be added to replace speedaway
in this year's program.
The oo-recreational program offered
eight activities last year for men and
women. Among the events offered last
year were archery, badminton, the "Any-
thing Goes" carnival, volleyball, innertube
water basketball, Putt-Putt golf, racquet-
ball and tennis doubles. The most popular
event was the innertube water basketball,
with 241 participants on 22 teams. The
co-rec program will offer 11 programs in
1976-77
Registration and Schedules
Registration and play dates will be
posted in the fall and periodical reminders
will be included in the Fountainhead
Intramural column and the Intramural
Update, which is published weekly by the
Intramural office. Schedules will be posted
in Memorial.
Team roster forms and registration
rules may be picked up in the Intramural
office, which is located in Room 204
Memorial Gym. Debbie Moss, the depart-
mental secretary, handles these operations
and is always ready to answer questions.
Fall
Try outs
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
PHONE 757 6387
HOURS 8 00 am to 5 00 p.m.
OFFICE Memorial Gym. Room 204
1976 -1977
intramural
MEN'S INTRAMURAL PROGRAM
FALL QUARTER
Entry Petes
September 13 16

Sport
"Team Tennis
�Touch Football
Horseshoe Singles
Horseshoe Doubles
One on One Basketbal
�Track & Field
�Volleyball
' Run-tor -the-Tutkey
(Cross Country)
September 13-16
September 20 23
September 20 23
September 20 23
September 20 24
September 27 30
November 8 11
Play Begins
September 20
September 21
September 28
September 28
September 28
September 29
October 6
November 15
SPORTS
Don't just
spectate. . .
(
OFFICIALS' CLINICS
(Men and Women) "
WINTER QUARTER
'Basketball
'Bowling
Racquetball Singles
Racquetball Doubles
free-Throw Shooting
Arm Wrestling
"Swimming
�Soccer
November 29
December 3
December 13
January 6
January 3-6
January 3-6
Reg. at time of
Competition
January 24-27
January 31
February 4
January 31
February 4
SPRING QUARTER -
Badminton Singles
Badminton Doubles
'Wrestling
'Sotttiall
Tennis Singles
Tennis Doubles
Handball Singles
Handball Doubles
�Goll
March 7 10
March 7-10
March 7-10
March 7-11
March 21 24
March 21 24
March 21 24
March 21 24
April 4 8
Decemoer 8
January 10
January 10
January 10
January 19
January 31
February 8
February 9
March 14
March 14
March 14
March 16
March 28
March 28
March 28
March 28
April 21
Sport
Touch Football
Volleyball
Basketball
Softball
OaleTirne
September 1 5
4 00 pm
October 4
7 30pm
December 6, 7
4 00 pm.
March 9. 11
7 30 p m.
v
Memorial Gym
Rm 105
Minges Coliseum
(Gym Area)
Memorial Gym
Rm. 106
Memorial Gym
Rm. 105
"WOMEN'S INTRAMUKr.i PROGRAM
FALL QUARTER
Entry Dates
September 10 16
Sport
Touch Football
Tennis Singles
Track and Field
Volleyball
Racquetball Singles
Run-tor the-Turkey
September 15 23
September 20 24
October 4 14
October 14 21
November 3 11
Play Bonne
September 21
September 27
September 29
IMeetl
October 18
October 25
November 16
Basketball
Bowling
'INOICATtS POINT SYSTEM SPORTS
Dial
INTRA�ACTION
757-6562
(weekends and after 5:00 p.m. weekdays!
For "WHERE THE ACTION IS" in
ECU INTRAMURALS
Recorded information on co-rec. women's and men's
intramurals (entry deadlines, schedules and postponed
games), free play facilities and recreational swimming
Free Tr ow Shooting
Racquetball Doubles
Swimming
WINTER QUARTER
November 22
December 9
December 13-
January 6
January 19
January 19 27
February 2 tO
Decemoer 13
January 10
January 19
January 31
February 1 5
IMeetl
SPRING QUARTER
Soltbaii
Badminton (Singles and
Doubles!
Archery
Golf
Tennis Doubles
February 21
March 10
March 16-24
March 23 31
April 4-8
April 20 28
March 15
March 28
April 4
April 21
May 2


Sport
Tr-nms Mixed Doubles
Racquetball Mixed
Doubles
Co-Rec "Almost Any
thing Goes"
Two on Two
Baskilba"
FALL QUARTER
Entry Dates
September 22 30
September 22 30
October 1 11
October 21 28
Play Besjin,
October 4
Oc tober 4
October 13
November 1
CO RECREATIONAL PROGRAM
WINTER QUARTER
Spon Entry Dates
Sports Trivia Contest November 17- December 6
December 3
February 1 10
Play Baoina
Badminton Mixed
Doubles
February 14
Sport
Co Rec Volleyball
Innertube Water
Basketball
Putt-Putt
Horseshoe Mixed Double
Co-Rec Archery
SPRING QUARTER
E ntry Dates
March 9 1
March 23 31
Apr �
Apr.
�'0 28
8 May
April 28Aay 5
Play Begin
March 21
April 4
May 2
May 9
May 10
She is one of the most important persons
connected with the Intramural department.
Another service provided to the ECU
students is the Intra-Action telephone
service. The service provided information
to ECU students at times when the offices
are closed. The number is 757-6562.
Divisional Competition
Intramural competition is divided into
divisions for both men and women. In the
men's sports, there are four divisions of
competition; Residence Halls, Clubs,
Fraternities, and the Graduate-Inde-
pendents. Each division oompeting has a
team champion and the champions meet
for the overall campus championship. The
general organization of these divisions is
controlled by the Men's Intramural Coun-
cil, which along with the Women's Council,
helps to make policies and procedures
concerning the program.
Each division oompetes for an indivi-
dual team or organizational champion on
the basis of competition in certain sports
which count towards the overall title. This
year these sports will be team tennis, touch
football, track and field, volleyball, and
East Carolina will offer eight non-
revenue interoollegiate sports during the
Fall Quarter this year, three being men's
and five being women's sports.
In the men's bracket, cross oountry,
soccer and golf will be offered. Anyone
interested in running aoss oountry should
meet in room 118 of Scales Field House on
Monday, Sept. 13 with Coach Bill Carson.
In soccer, Curtis Frye will be guiding
the Pirates, trying to improve on a
second-plaoe finish of last year. Frye will
be meeting with prospects every afternoon
at 3:30 on the soccer field beside the
Minges parking lot
Mac MoLendon's golf team finished
second to Furman in the Southern
Conference race and will be having two
cross-country in the fall; basketball,
bowling, swimming and soccer in the
winter; and wrestling, softball and golf in
the spring.
There is no classification for champions
in individual competitions.
The women's programs are divided into
two divisions: Residence Halls and Inde-
pendents and Sorority-Clubs. Team
champions and spv tsmanship awards are
given for women's play.
There is no divisional breakdown for
the oo-recreational programs, the only
requirements being that participants be
students, faculty or staff at ECU.
Other Functions
Other functions of the Intramural
Department are the maintenance and
operation of the swimming pool program,
the equipment rooms and the handball-
racquetball courts; in addition to providing
on-the-scene trainers to insure prompt
medical attention in the event of injury to
participants.
Minges Coliseum and Memorial Gym
are open for informal recreation by
students, faculty, and staff when not being
matuies in the fall season this year.
Anyone interested in competing should
meet with Coach MoLendai on Tuesday,
Sept. 14 at 7 p.m. in Minges uOiseum.
Golf, volleyball, field hockey, swim-
ming, and tennis will be offered fa the fall
quarter in women's interoollegiate ath-
letics. East CaroJina is a member of the
North Carolina Association of Inter-
collegiate Athletics fa Wanen (NCAIAW)
and fields one of the best progams in the
state.
McLendon will also be coaching the
women's golf team this fall. McLendon
would like to see quite a few golfers fa the
Thursday, Sept. 16 meeting that will be
held at 7 p.m. in Minges. McLendon had
the individual state champ last year, but
utilized by classes, varsity teams or
intramural spats activity. The buildings
are open from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday
through Saturday and from 1 p.m. to 10
p.m. on Sundays. Reaeational swimming
is allowed in the evening and on weekends
in Minges and Memorial pools when they
are not in use by varsity teams a
intramural activities.
The equipment checkout rooms are
located in Minges Coliseum and Memaial
Gym. Hours fa these roans coincide with
fadlty operational hours. I.D. cards are
required to check-out equipment.
To use the two handball racquetball
courts, reservations must be made in
person in the Intramural office on a
first-oome, first-service basis.
The ECU intramural program is
designed to give the students the utmost in
reaeational activity during their college
years and the value to the student depends
on the use of the facilities and activities
offered. Student fees help pay fa the
intramural facilities, equipment and staff
and all students are encouraged to make
use of these programs.
East Carolina did not qualify fa the team
championship because they did not have
enough players on the team.
Laurie Arrants will be coaching the
women's field hockey team this fall.
Anyone interested in playing should call
Coach Arrants at 757-6442.
Women's swimming will be ooached in
tne fall by Stevie Chepco. Prospects
interested in swimming should call Coach
Chepco at the Women's Athletics Office at
757-6442.
Ellen Warren will be the mentor fa the
wanen's tennis team this fall. Anyone
interested in tennis should call Coach
Warren at 757-6442.





54
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 18 SEPTEMBER 1976
Gridiron squad gets set for Fall
This oould be a year of greatness fa
East Carolina football - the year the
program matures in its effort to reach
major-college respectability. The architect
will be Pat Dye, now in his third year as
head coach of the Pirates. In their last year,
as Southern Conference members, the
Pirates and Dye will likely win the title
which has eluded them the last two years.
That is - if the Pirates don't get too over
confident.
SCHEDULE
As in any case when one tries to predict
how a team will perform in a given year,
the schedule is an important factor. The
1976 schedule is the hardest in years. Dye
is well aware of this.
Looking down the schedule the Pirates
may have a hard time improving on last
year's 8-3 record even though they should
breeze through the five conference games,
including a season finale with Appalachian
State on November 20. Outside the
conference, though, the Pirates have only
one sure victory-Southern Illinois. The rest
will all pose a threat to the Pirates.
Of the rest, Western Carolina is vastly
improved and Southern Mississippi is
underrated. The positioning of these
games. Homecoming for WCU and the
season opener at home for Southern M iss,
make these probably wins fa the Pirates.
That makes eight wins with games against
N.C. State, Nath Carolina and Richmond,
all on the road, the deciding factas as to
whether the Pirates have anaher 8-3
season a improve the level accomplished
during the years 1972-73 under Sainy
Handle. ECU should win at least one of
these three games, but could win all three.
That is where the success of the season
lies. We see the Pirates finishing no wase
than 9-2 with an undefeated season within
the team's grasp.
To follow is a rundown on what the
Pirates should look like in 1976.
OFFENSE
Dye says of his offense that "we are
much better off on offense this year than
we were last year, but we've lost good
linemen in Jimbo Walker and Larry Lundy.
We seem mae mature this year than last
year
Last year Dye played around with the
pasmg game fa five games befae going
back to the wishbone - which saw the
Pirates win their final six games of the
season after going 2-3 in the first five
games.
Leading the wishbone this year will be
senior Mike Weaver. Weaver finally
appears to be settled as the top man after
losing his job during last season, befae
winning it back. He was the quarterback
during the six-game Pirate string last year.
The string included wins over Nath
Carolina and Virginia, which any 1975 ECU
fan will remember.
Any wishbone attack needs a flock of
good running backs to carry the ball and
the ECU team has them. Willie Hawkins,
second on the team in rushing last year,
returns. But the most promising back fa
the Pirates could be sophomae Eddie
Hicks. Hicks electrified the aowd last year
with two long TD runsagainst Carolina and
Virginia. He wound up averaging over 12
yards a carry on 24 carries last year. This
year he should be a starter when the
season opens. The tandem of Hawkins and
Hicks is one Dye calls "super Of his two
speedsters Dye says they are future stars
if they don't get hurt.
Fullback could be the problem with the
Pirate offense this season. Dye has three
players returning from 1975, but only
Vince Kolanko is assured of making the
team academically. Ray Jones and Ton
Daub would provide experienced help at
the slot if their grades improve - and they
could provide mae relief than a Bufferin
tablet to whatever offensive headaches Dye
may have.
Another possible blue-chipper may
exist in freshman Perry Allred. Allred,
from High Point, stood out in the
East-West All-Star game in Greensbao
earlier this moith and may surprise a few
people. Back Willie Hdley was another
All-Star standout who could give needed
help in the backfield.
In the line, Dye seems to have
replacements fa Walker and Lundy. In the
tackle slots will be a pair of 230-pounders
in Ricky Bennett and Matt Mulholland and
the guard spots will be manned by Wayne
Bolt and Randy Parrish. Tim Hightower
returns at center where Ricky Holaday will
give him a challenge. The line is a little
weak after the front five, but Dye should
fine some backup help by the opener.
Clay Burnett and Barry Johnson man the
tight end spot - an impatant oie oi the
wishbone option.
Even though the Pirates did not pass
often in 1975 they were improved over the
year befae. A lot of that had to do with the
wishbone-related patterns installed by Dye
and the receiver Terry Gallaher. Gallaher,
a sure-handed receiver, caught 13 passes
in 1975 fa seven touchdowns and a 33 yard
per catch average. So the passing threat is
there is Dye wishes to use it.
DEFENSE
For the first time since reaching
maja-college status ECU placed a man as
high as second-team all-America. In 1976
the Pirates have two bonafide all-America
candidates. Jim Bolding, a second-team
AP all-America and the nation's number
one pass intercepta, returns to lead what
could be one of the nation's top
secondaries. Cary Godette, an A-A hona-
able mention selection last year, will return
at defensive end and could bring home
some higher All-America honors for
himself. At 6-0, 240 pounds, Godette earns
the respect of his opponents wherever he
roams. That is usually somewhere near the
opposing ballcarrier.
With these two bastions to work from,
the remainder of the Pirate defense should
be improved over last year. Two spots,
however, have Dye waned.
The two positions Dye refers to are at
Continued on page 35.
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ht)UNIAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 18 SEPTEMBER 1976
J6
ATHLETICS CO N'T
right tackle, where Willie Bryant is gone,
and at strong safety, where Bobby Myrick
has graduated.
The secondary is the strong suit on
defense. Bolding and cohorts Ernest
Madison and Reggie Pinkney have played
together as starters for the three years and
Greg Pingston, a 1974 starter, will return
and battle Hall for the job he lost to Myrick
last year.
In the line, Dye sees Jake Dove as the
only sure-fire "winner but he expects
help from Oliver Felton and Donald Smith
at nose guard. Sophomore Zack Valentine,
a starter last year, returns at end with Fred
Chavis, another sophomore. Godette holds
down the other end of the Pirate line.
The Pirate linebacking was good last
year and with a year's experience and a
good recruiting year it should be improved.
AII-SC Harold Randolph leads the corps
and his supporting cast includes veterans
Harold Fat and Emerson Pickett. A
freshman who could move right in is
Greenville's All-America Mike Brewing-
ton. At 6-4, 225 pounds Brewington is a
bear who could growl his way right into a
starting linebacking spot - if Dye chooses to
use him there. Brewington can also kick-a
fact that ECU'scoaching staff undoubtedly
is aware of.
RECRUITS
Incoming freshmen are something
speaal. Last year Dye got a considerable
amount of help from his freshmen (Tim
Swords, Mullholland, Valentine, Chavis
and Hicks) and he hopes for some help this
year.
Dye had a chance to see a number of his
North Carolina recruits this summer in the
Greenville Boys Home game and the
East-West game in Greensboro and he
should have liked what he saw.
ECU had 11 players in the East-West
game. Besides Brewington, Allred and
Holley, ECU recruits Alvin Sparks (6-2,215
DE), Billy Ray Washington (6-3, 190 DB),
and Tony Tripp (6-3, 195 QB) proved very
impressive. Tripp could possible be the
wishboner of the future for the Pirates,
having led the Havelock wishbone for three
yearsand the East All-Stars to a record 416
yards rushing. So Dye should get his wish
and some help from the newcomers.
CONCLUSION
A lot of talent returns to the ECU fold
this year and there is a lot of good, young
talent waiting to get a chance. The Pirates
schedule will be tougher, but so will the
Pirates. If ECU can get past the opening
grind of Southern Mississippi, North
Carolina State and the Citadel in its first
four games a perfect season is in reach. We
pick them for a conference title. How
appropriate that would be in, this, the
Pirates' last season in the Southern
Conference.
1976 SCHEDULE
DateOpponentLocationTime
Sept. 11 Sept. 18 Sept. 25 Oct. 2SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI N.C. State University William and Mary THE CITADELGREENVILLE, N.C. Raleigh, N.C. Williamsburg, Va. GREENVILLE, N.C.700 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 130p.m. 7:00 p.m.
Oct. 9(Bicentennial Night) SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITYGREENVILLE, N.C.7:00 p.m.
Oct. 16 Oct. 23 Oct. 30(Youth Night) Virginia Military Institute University of North Carolina WESTERN CAROLINA UNIVERSITYLexington, Va. Chapel Hill, N.C. GREENVILLE, N.C.2:00p.m. 1:30p.m 130 pm
Nov. 6 Nov. 13 Nov 20(Homecoming) University of Richmond Furman University APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITY (Band Night)Richmond, Va. Greenville, S.C. GREENVILLE, N.C.1:30p.m 1:30 pm 7:00 p.m
'Southern Conference Games
1975 RESULTS
Overall: 8 3-0 Southern Conference: 4 2-0 (2nd) Home: 4-1-0
Road:4 2 0
Opponent
N.C. State University
Appalachian State
WILLIAM AND MARY
Southern Illinois
UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND
The Citadel"
WESTERN CAROLINA UNIV.
Univ. of North Carolina
FURMAN UNIVERSITY
University of Virginia
VMI
'Southern Conference Games
Location
Raleigh, N.C.
Boone, N.C.
GREENVILLE, N.C.
Carbondale, III.
GREENVILLE, N.C.
Charleston, S.C.
GREENVILLE, N.C.
Chapel Hill, N.C.
GREENVILLE, N.C.
Charlottesville, Va.
GREENVILLE, N.C.
ECU OPP Attendance
3
25
20
41
14
3
42
38
21
61
28
26
41
0
7
17
0
14
17
10
10
12
47,000
13,781
15,542
8,614
16,542
16,842
16,487
42,000
15,424
21,950
13,689
296 154 227,871
Home 77,684
Average 15,537
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36 FQUNTAINHtAU VOL -V. NU 1 8 !k h'l t MtiLK N
ACADEMICS COIMT D
Political Science, accentuating American
government and politics, and minor in
Comparative Government and Internation-
al Relations within the same Department.
The new minor is also available to students
majoring in any other B.A. Degree
Program offered by the University.
The minor in Comparative Government
and International Relations is designed
especially to meet the needs of students
who desire a greater concentration of
course-work in the discipline of Political
Science in order to claim unique compe-
tencies and skills which better qualify them
tor careers witn governmental, business,
industrial, and cultural agencies operating
internationally. Supplemented by foreign
language skills, the new minor should
provide an educational experience which
may open doors for exciting and profitable
employment.
An additional reason fa the new minor
is that it strengthens the undergraduate
major program and makes it consonant
with the Political Science graduate major
program, which from the beginning has
included a minor in Comparative Govern-
ment and International Relations.
A new dagree program, a quasi-pro-
fessional B.S. Degree in Political Science,
is now available to students in the
Department of Political Science. The new
program requires special research and
communications skills in lieu of a foreign
language and a duster of social sdence
cognates rather than a traditional minor
field of study.
The new program is espedally design-
ed to prepare students for certain types of
jobs with governmental agendes, survey
research organizations, and with private
businesses and industries seeking employ-
ees with spedal skills. It is also recom-
mended as a strong major for pre-legal
students. It requires, in addition to 54
quarter hours in Political Science, a
concentration of courses in the cognate
disciplines of Economics, Geography,
History, Psychology, and Soddogy. Re-
search and communication skills can be
gained in such required courses as
Statistics, Computer Math, Advanced
Composition, and Business and Profes-
sional Speech. A total of 190 quarter hours
is needed for graduation.
All in all, the new B.S. Degree
Program, along with some form of
vduntary internships to be worked out in
the future between the Department of
Pditical Sdence and governmental and
sodal agendes, promises to provide more
encouraging and definitive answers to the
question asked by many students, "What
sort of job can I get with a degree in
Pditical Sdenoe?"
In its promotion of the new B.S. Degree
Program, the Department of Political
Sdence has emphasized the fdlowing
arguments:
1) Students have fa a long time been
asking fa a program which is mae
professionally oriented than the A.B.
Degree Program in Pditical Sdence. The
new curriculum goes far toward meeting
student needs fa a quasi-professional
approach which in no way diminishes the
intellectuaf respectability of the degree.
The uniqueness of the new program
oonsists in (a) a stronger concentration in
Pditical Sdence and the other sodal
sdences;(b) preparation in the mathemat-
ical skills needed fa survey research; (c)
stronger preparation in the communicative
arts (grammar, composition, and speech).
2) The B.S. Degree Program offers majas
a chance to prepare themselves in
computer sdenoe and statistics in ader to
utilize the research skill option at the
graduate level.
3) The new program may well serve as a
platfam fran which the Department may
launch governmental and institutional
internships fa its majas, thus providing
fa them an entree to job oppatunities.
4) The program offers a sound educational
experience from both an academic and
pradical perspedive.
Psychology
The Department of Psychdogy is one of
the departments in the Cdlege of Arts and
Sdences at ECU. Degrees offered are the
Bachela of Arts, and the Master of Arts,
the latter having three areas of spedali-
zation; clinical, school, and general
theoretical psychology. There are 26
full-time faculty members whose training,
experience, and interests cover the entire
field of psychology. This year, the
department has initiated a cooperative
program with the Division of Cooperative
Education to help both undergraduate and
graduate students gain pradical exper-
ience while gdng to school. This provides
on-the-job training fa our students, and
has the additional advantage of giving
them training which will enhance their
opportunities for future employment.
Students who have completed most of the
work in the general education area, and
transfer students who have completed
most of their sophomae level wak, can
enrdl as majas in the Department of
Psychdogy.
Technology
The School of Technology offers
undergraduate degrees and academic
programs in two separate departments.
The Department of Business Education
and The Department of Industrial and
Technical Education.
The Department d Business Education
and Office Administration is housed on the
third floor d Rawl Building. Space utilized
by the Department indudes a modern
office-simulation labaatay, a distributive
education labaatay, a secretarial sdences
laboratory, and a teaching methods
labaatay. The space also indudes dass-
rooms, an administrative suite, and offices
for faculty and graduate assistants.
Departmental office located in Room 305
Rawl Building.
The Department of Industrial and
Technical Education occupies approxi-
mately 20,000 square feet d floa space on
the first and second floas of Flanagan
Building.
?
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FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 18 SEPTEMBER 1976
f

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J 9 0 � 0 0 $J
MARANTZ 2235
IY!
-bantz
2220 B
HD 55
ONLY AUTHORIZED
MARANTZ DEALER
21
LET MARANTZ PAIR YOU WITH QUALITY
SOUND & GOOD ENTERTAINMENT.
x
t
t
?
WE ALSO CARRY MARANTZ
CASSETTE DECKS & TURNTABLES
PAIR ELECTRONICS AUDIO CENTER
107 TRADE ST. (NEXT TO TARHEEL TOYOTA)
HOURS MON-FRI 8:30-5:30 SAT 8:30-12:30





2&
FOUNTAINHEADVOL. 52, NO. 1b SEPTEMBER 1976
WELCOME BACK
E.C.U.
WE MISSED YOU!
OVERTON'S
SUPERMARKET, INC
E.C.US MEETING PLACE FOR
GROCERIES IN GREENVILLE!
m&4
IMMM
' i -
- n.
THE HOME OF
GREENVILLE'S BEST
MEATS!
GREEN STAMPS
PICK UP YOUR FREE
DESK BLOTTER HERE!
COLLEGE5th STREET
4th
3rd
OVERTON'S
2 BLOCKS
FROM E. C. U.
2-C WOIMTAl.lt T t-A
A congenial atmosphere
makes dining out fun for everyone!
Serves a selection of
19 salads, 8 deserts,
12 meats, and 11 vegetables
all prepared fresh daily.
Serves a full meal for only
$1.59 during the first
45 minutes of each meal;
1 meat, 1 salad,
1 vegetable, and 1 drink.
Serving from 11:00-2:00 &
4:45-8:00 Monday thru
Saturday.
Cafeteria Style
For Your Conveniance
J
BUFFET
Pitt Plaza
Serving Creative Foods!
Also visit us in Raleigh-Wilimington
. j ��irtjga





ADVERTISER LOCATION MAP
hOUNtAINHEADVQL. 52, NO. 18 SEPTEMBER 1976
vr
STUDENT SUPPLY STORES
UBE
Art & Camera
Student Supply Store
Talking Leaves
Book Barn
Page BANKS
19,22,3 6 NCNB
11 7 Wachovia
35 8 BankofN.C.N.A.
32 9 Planters Bank
T fiiVfrr?
A
Greenville
W(T
uOOO
OODO
JV � J 1J 311130 5 iV- 26
r
MUSICALINST.& REPAIR
10 Eastern Keyboard
11 Guitar Workshop
r
VBffiRE
j81- 26
4"H 4112
! 32 V
o 17 !614
3

�?
'H.
20
15
'&
RECORDS
12 Rock-N-Soul
13 Record Bar
kJi4 Razz Jazz
U RESTAURANTS
S 15 McDonalds
16 Stuffy's
17 Jason's
18 Treehouse
19 Western Sizzlin
20 Hadees
21 Balentine's
;

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4
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!6"2l�
39
Page
40
5
9
Page
19
(�
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37
35
43

23
39
� ii
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15
20
10
JWL R
V 31
21
13

ff1
3Rg�2
VlLUS
B'
Uifii
SOUND EQUIPMENT
22 Sounds I mpreseive
23 Pair Electronics
24 Electronic Supermarket
25 Harmony House
NIGHT CLUBS
26 Jolly Roger
27 Cowboy Saloon
MISCELLANEOUS
28 Creep's
29 Shirts & Stuff
30 Larry'sShoes
31 Brady's
32 Scrap's
33 Overton's
34 Bigg's Drugs
35 Coggins Car Care
36 John's Bike Shop
37 People's Baptist Temple
38 At Barre
39 Sunshine Garden
40 Robinson's Jewelers
41 H.L. Hodges
42 University Exxon
43 Eastern Carpets
, �����,
���iW





4fc
FOUNTAINHEADVOL 52, NO. 18 SEPTEMBER 1976
ANY BANK THAT'S
ONLY

N WHEN YOU'RE IN
CLASS MUST NOT WANT YOUR
BUSINESS VERY MUCH.
Take a look at your class schedule. Then take a look at the
business hours of the average bank.
You'll probably notice some remarkable similarities.
Because the only time most banks seem to be open is be-
tween 9:00 and 5:00. On school days
Well, at NCNB we think you should be able to get your money
at the times when you're most likely to peed it. Like 8:00 on Tuesday
night. Or 4:00 on Sunday afternoon. When your wallet is as empty
as your stomach.
So, when you open an NCNB checking account, we'll give
you an NCNB 24 card. (And that's in addition to the most flexible
choice of no-service-charge checking plans in North Carolina.)
Your NCNB 24 card lets you use NCNB 24 pushbutton tellers
anytime of the day, any day of the week. Just by pushing a few
buttons.
And it's so simple you
don't have to be a math
major to use it.
NCNB 24 will even
tell you how much
money's in your account.
So you'll know how much
you can take out.
When you pick a
bank, just remember: The
only time you can't get money
. out of your NCNB checking
account is when you don
any money in it to begin with
North Carolina National Bank
Please drop by our East End Branch today for open-all-night,
open-all-weekend, open-all-holidays banking.
Also, don't miss our "24" Day at our East End Branch on Sep-
tember 11. We're having free hotdogs, cokes, money, and even a
country music band!





Title
Fountainhead, September 8, 1976
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 08, 1976
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.407
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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