Fountainhead, December 7, 1972






wmmm
ountainhead
and the truth shall make you free'
Rioters ambush former student
GREENVILLE, N. CAROLINA
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1972
VOLUME IV, NUMBER 21
Police shooting sparks violent reaction
Carolina art t m� e;i n.
l
A former East Carolina art student
was shot last night in the wake of black
. violence erupting after the shooting of a
local black man by a Greenville
policeman. The injured man, identified
by hospital officials as Harry Schultz,
was apparently ambushed while driving
his motorcycle down West Fifth Street.
According to details derived from
hospital officials and police. Dean James
Mallory said that Schultz apparently ran
around a blockade erected by police in
the West Fifth Street area and was
�hortly after shot once and then wrecked
the motorcycle. He was then shot twice
in the scrotum and beaten by the rioters.
His motorcycle was then set on fire.
JAMES
The black man who was killed has
been identified as Connie James of 515
ford Street, Greenville. According to an
Official news release from the Greenville
Police Department, Officer Charles A.
Williamson sighted Melvin Brown, for
Whom he had a warrant for larceny, on
West Fifth Street at approximately 3:40
P.M yesterday. Williamson informed
Brown that he had a warrant for his
arrest. Brown ran from the scene and
was pursued by Williamson. Williamson
lost Brown behind a building on West
Fifth Street, and returned to the front of
the building, where three individuals
confronted him. One of them used
abusive and profane language, and
Williamson placed him under arrest. A
second police officer then arrived at the
scene, and a second bystander was
placed under arrest for interfering with
the arrest of the other subject.
The report states that James attacked
Williamson. Quoting the
release officer Williamson drew his
revolver, and, in the ensuing scuffle, the
officer's revolver accidently discharged,
which resuned in the death of Connie
James
the State Bureau of Investigation and the
Greenville Police Department.
Squadrons of Greenville police and
men from the Sheriff's Department
cordoned off an area of West Greenville
late yesterday afternoon in an effort to
keep the violence from spreading and to
control traffic flow.
'the officer's revolver
accidently discharged1
of
RELIEVED
Officer Williamson has been relieved
duty pending an investigation by
Cafeteria undergoes changes
Bv FRFina pure w
By FREIDA REECE
North Cafeteria has undergone a
Change. One of the two serving lines in
the cafeteria was removed to enlarge the
dining area.
Thirty more seats will now be
available to handle the larger crowds
�xplained ARA director, Harry Pitts
According to Pitts, the extra serving line
was not necessary, but the increased
�eating space was needed. Dorm cooking
�ud quick snack establishments have
decreased the number of studente eating
�i the cafeteria, but the number has
increased to the point of needing larger
seating facilities.
"It is hoped that the changes in North
Cafeteria will open new avenues of
employment stated Pitta. Though any
increase would not be large, the enlarged
l cilities may entail the hiring of two or
tl.ree new employees.
Other units of the ECU dining
facilities have undergone changes in
recent months. The dining area located
in Jones Dorm has seen the addition of
tablecloths and original art works in an
effort to do away with the
institutionalized feeling.
Also located in Jones is the
ARA Mart A self-service grocery store,
the ARA Mart is not a large
profit-producing plant, Pitta explained.
"Mainly a convenience for residents of
the Hill, the ARA mart does tend to
keep the traffic flowing through the
dining area, thereby bringing these
students into contact with the cafeteria
services Pitta continued.
Another unit of the campus food
services is the Pamlico Room. This grill
has experienced changes in the form of
posters and colored lights. These, it is
hoped, will add atmosphere.
A call then went to the State Highway
Patrol, who contacted Governor Bob
Scott for permission to assist in the riot
control. Investigators from the State
Burea of Investigation then joined in an
all-night vigil in the area.
Rioters spread first from the West
Fifth Street area down to Memorial
Drive. One police dispatch reported a
group of rioters as far west on Memorial
Drive as Phelps Chevrolet Company.
Although the fire department has been
placed on full-time alert, there have been
no reports of fires. The firemen were
equipped with shotguns, rifles and
bullet-proof vests.
DAMAGE
Approximately 70 automobiles had
been rocked and damaged m the melee
following the shooting of James. Police
received reports before midnight that
many automobile windows were
smashed and the cars were damaged with
pipes and other weapons. Police said
several automobiles were overturned
One car was towed to police
headquarters with a number of dents, a
smashed windshield and a broken side
window.
As of 10 P.M last night 13 persons
had been admitted to Pitt Memorial
Hospital with injuries sustained in the
disturbance. Two of the injured were
identified by hospital officials as Hildc
Jones and Lorraine Decuzzi, both of
Farmville.
ARMED
Holsters were unbuttoned and riot
equipment dispensed at the Greenville
Police Department, as men from all
shifts were called in to maintain order in
the troubled city. Riot helmets, shotguns
and gas masks were quickly distributed
to a number of officers. All of
Greenville's police cars were tied up at
one time. A young secretary waited for a
police escort to carry the woman to her
mother's home on the other side of the
violent-centered area.
'If it's too rough,
can I leave?'
A black policeman, fearful of backlash
from noters, was overheard at the
Greenville police station to say, "If it's
too rough, can I leave?"
Fountainhead reporters who ventured
into the troubled area around 9 P.M last
night were signaled away from the
perimeter by a policeman shouting"Get
out of here! You want to get killed?"
ECU Campus Police were notified of the
situation early, but were not called in to
aid the city police. Campus patrols were
increased as campus security officers
armed themselves with shotguns and
other not equipment.
Jenkins tes legislature future plans,
new university system
Nursing instructor gets national award
By BOB MARSKE
An instructor in the School of Nursing
I has received national recognition for
I research into the Sudden Infant Death
Syndrome (SIDS.) Theresa Lawler
conducted one and one half years of
research into this mysterious ailment,
which effects three out of every one
thousand live births. SIDS, commonly
known as "crib death is the sudden,
unexplained death of an apparently
normal, healthy child.
Lawler's research was restricted to
several area counties, including Pitt. "My
studies produced certain unique,
iignificant results said Lawler. 'These
tesults have aroused speculation that
8IDS may be caused by a disease in
combination with certain adverse
environmental and psychological
conditions
The award was a Commendation and
Honorable Mention from the National
Council of Family Relations. Dr. Nash
Love, Chairman of the Department of
Child Development and Family
Relations, advised Lawler on her
�Ssearch. "This research " he said, "is
One of the most comprehensive and
conclusive ever completed on SIDS
The study involved in-depth
Student injured
in auto mishap
on Tenth Street
jj ECU student Charles Phillip Butler
Sustained minor injuries in a
Vuhicle pedestrian accident accident
Tttssday, as he attempted to cross the
Intersection of Tenth St. and College Hill
Dliveat about 12:50.
I The driver of the vehicle, Roman
A&thony Williams, was not charged with
tite accident. Greenville policeman J. B.
Sullivan said Butler was hit by the car
uucause he was "thinking about classes
�ad failed to see it
Butler was taken to Pitt County
Hospital for x-rays and sent to the
CIBipus infirmary to receive treatment
for ssinor bruises and abrasions on his
Up.
Tenth Street, recently widened to five
I, separates five dormitories from the
campus. It was rated the town's
feSeond most heavily travelled roadway
by a 8tate Highway Commission study

interviews with mothers whose children
died from the syndrome and their
families. The results of these interviews
were combined with data compiled from
hospital and pre-natal records, and were
submitted to Love for interpretation.
Patterns were found which pointed to
such factors as the mother's weight and
mental condition as possible partial
causes. Both experts agree that these
findings warrant a continuation of the
study.
Partial funding for the project was
provided by the ECU Graduate Research
Council. Lawler hopes that the favorable
results will arouse added interest in
SIDS, and that they will encourage the
donation of additional funds. "With
these funds, the research can be greatly
expanded said Lawler.
Eisenhower, Ration orders
comments on
By SYDNEY ANN GREEN
Chancellor Leo Jenkins made a
"surprise" visit Monday to the SGA
Legislature and addressed the group on
the advantages of the consolidated
university plan and the future
expectations of American universities.
"We are officially ECU of the
University of North Carolina now said
Jenkins. "There's one bossman.
President William Friday, and the others
are chancellors. We hope this means easy
articulation
Jenkins said the reorganization should
involve booking concerts for much less
money, since groups could be booked to
appear on each campus under one
contract. Hopefully, there will be a
discount in books as well by buying in
large volumes.
Jenkins added that there should be
four or five programs in Europe.
to insist on having this he said. "The
need is real and genuine
COMPLEMENTARY PROGRAMS
"We envision that the programs will
complement each other he said. "Any
student in the 16 university branches
should be able to spend his junior year in
Europe and not have it cost any more
than it does here, except for plane fare
"Formula Budgeting" will be used in
the new university system. The state will
support everyone in the same program in
any university with the same amount of
money. In addition, the universities will
pool their funds for use in campus
improvements.
Jenkins is optimistic about the ECU
medical school. "I think people are going
LAW SCHOOL
However, he was doubtful as to the
possibility of an ECU law school in the
near future. "I just dont want to get
involved in another fight he said.
Jenkins offered a number of
speculations regarding the university of
the future.
In the future, he aaid, student will
travel at their own speed. If a student
misses a lecture, he will go to a computer
and get tapes. A student will be allowed
to finish in one year or six years,
whichever suits his ability.
The university will not be involved in
the feeding, laundry and housing of
students, however, since private
businesses will do a better job.
Jenkins sees the future of the
out-of-state student as "unfortunately
expensive The state legislature tends to
generalize, he said; if one out-of-state
student is involved in a not, tuition for
all non-resident students is raised.
"I don't know any answer other than
to convince these people that
out-of-state students are good to have
because of educational value they bring
new ideas. Also, the out-of-state students
spend a lot of money here. It's just poor
business not to welcome out-of-state
students "In a democracy he said,
"all colleges ought to be free, because it
is society that benefits
Jenkins believes there ought to be a
vigorous athletic program. "If you are
going to do anything, do it right he
said. "If you are going to have sports,
have the best darn program you possibly
can Jenkins feels women complain in
the future because their money is used
to support the athletic program, but
they are not allowed to participate
There is no reason a woman can't be on
the golf team, swimming team, SSWUSSal
team, basJcetbaiJ team even the football
team if she's good enough aaid
Jenkins.
MO CENSORSHIP
The chancellor doesn't foresee any
censorship of student publications. "I
don't think there will be any
censorship he said, "but I think the
students are working on a code "I
know the men on the board, and I don't
think they would call for any Jenkins
said, however, that there might be a need
for responsibility if a person is called a
liar.
On another topic, Jenkins commented
that he was surprised at Skipper Bowles'
loss in the gubernatorial race. He said he
was also surprised that Nick Galifanikas
lost. "I campaigned quite a bit for him "
In other SGA legislature business,
Sandy Penfield, day student, William
Beckner, Belk Dormitory, and Kitsie
Higgins. Fleming Dormitory took the
legislative oath after being screened by
the screenings and appointments
committee.
Joyner Library receives military correspondence
By SKIP SAUNDERS
Correspondence and military orders
from World War II Generals Eisenhower,
Patton and Bradley are among the 2,000
items recently donated to East Carolina
Universit bv Major General Ira T.
Wyche.
General Wyche, a native of eastern
North Carolina, commanded the 79th
SHOWN ABOVE with Major General Ira Wyche (right) is the famous General George
Patton. Maj. Gen. Wyche has just donated some 2,000 personal items from World
War II to the Fast Carolina Manuscript Collection.
Infantry Division in Europe during
World War II and later became Inspector
General of the Army. Upon landing at
Normandy, June 12, 1944, Wyche's 79th
"Cross of Lorraine Division' traveled
more than 2,300 miles across Europe
until V-E Day found it deep in the Ruhr
Valley of Germany.
The 79th Division under Wyche's
command is credited with taking
Cherbourg with its "impregnable" Fort
du Roule, and was the first to cross the
Seine River in the Allied drive on Paris.
The 79th also established a precedent in
river crossings at the Rhine which is still
studied by the Army Corps of Engineers.
ONE OF FINEST
ECU Manuscript Collection Director
Donald R. Lennon commented that the
Wyche papers constitute "one of the
finest World War II collections anywhere
in the nation The collection was
donated to ECU because of Wyche's
close ties to this part of North Carolina.
Included in the collection are Wyche �
complete personal files from his
appointment as commander of the 74th
Artillery Brigade in 1942 to his
retirement from the Army.
Correspondence, bat e strategy, maps,
military orders, secret documents,
photographs and texts of speeches
constitute the maor portion of the
material. Two day-by-day diaries reflect
Wyche's activities between March, 1944
and January, 1947 The diaries, kept by
the general s aide, have been referred to
by the Pentagon for information
concerning the war.
RARE INSIGHT
Lennon said the diaries and collection
as a whole "provide a degree of insight
rarely available in a single private
collection The diaries describe one
instance in which a portion of Wyche's
division "was pinned down by enemy
gunfire from a pillbox said Lennon.
The general then picked a small group of
soldiers which he led himself in
overtaking the enemy positions.
AVAILABLE
Lennon speculated that the donation
of the Wyche collection to ECU should
increase the possibilities of future
collections being donated by other
distinguished personalities. After proper
arranging and description is completed,
the collection will be available to
students and historians for research in
the later part of spring quarter, 1973. A
selection of campaign maps,
photographs, flags and other material
will be on public display in the lobby of
Joyner Library shortly after Christmas
break.
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IW 2. KounU.inhM.cl, Thursday, DC�mb�! 7, 1972
In Review
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Gregory raps Nation's calm
O Q D I 1 ' C Q A D C� � r- Li liauU. llII .
Around Campus
By BRUCE PARRISM
I'r isclv placing barbs in nearly all
American institutions from the
pTMkkncj to the CIA noted tociaJ
protestor, Dick Gregory, romhmed both
entertainment, protest, and instruction
into a three-hour lecture here Tuesday
night.
Qregorjr; currently in his twenty first
month of various fastings from any
nourishment except water, fruit juice,
and air, brought his cause of "human
rights' to the people he thinks are most
receptive "the honest, ethical,
hard-working college student But even
his favorite activists were attacked as
lacking the quality he admires most, that
of being informed As Gregory stated it.
"You're too busy to be informed and
the trick is being playedon you. It's very
important you young people find a need
to reform yourselves. "
Impugning President Nixon almost
immediately. Gregory said, "Nixon must
really be feeling sassy now that he
carried the election with til per cent of
the vote Why if he needed an operation
now he would probably have it in the
Watergate Hotel "
CIA HAS THE TRICK
He further revealed what he calls "the
tnck" in the CIA Gregory infers CIA
involvement in the Hremer shootings,
while inviting the public- to check out his
claims Wallace was shot five times with
a five-shot automatic, however, three
other victims were shot at the same time
You re so busy playing your funky
games, you don't stop to realize what
the press and government doesn't bring
out Gregory stated He further
emphasized that young people must
check these things themselves because
the will not necessarily be brought to
light in the media
Gregory's critiques against the system
and continual challenges for being
informed brought a succession of
applauses However, a few challenges and
critiques against the youth did not meet
such favor
me if these instances brought light
to this fact when Gregory termed many
of the activists today rev tlutionary
pimps He blasted forth at the youth
who claim an allegiance of death to
revolutionary change in the country
"while drinking alcohol and smoking
reefers. All you're doing is creating .i
degenerate, weak body, not a change in
America If you think this would solve
the problem, then we i Blacks i would
have solved those problems SO years
ago
DRUGS HELP CONSPIRACY
Again, Gregory inferred CIA
conspiracies saying they are working in
the international drug traffic and using it
as a way of control on America " The
increased drug traffic allows their greater
involvement by law in the peoples
affairs.
Further speaking on revolution, he
DICK GREGORi rev
(Pnoto by Rom Mmn
�als "Ihe trick
-aid. 'You've got to In- insane to bomb
something Once you're violent, the law
can control you That's not the way to
acci mplish anything Bombing is
notning but a degenerate ego trip
In the next moment, applause reached
a crescendo when he spoke of the
grading system not grading what counts
in life, in contrast to the lengthy silence
during the revolutionary discussion.
GET HIP
Gregory further commented on the
poor assessment of priorities in the
country the stupidity in America " He
cited the case of the sickle cell anemia
drive Anybody attacking the
twenty-first killer of Black folk and not
the other twenty first is not my friend
Nixon's not welcoming POWs arriving
home with a phone call as he did a
particular football team is another case
in point, he reminisced.
The Black White condition in America
evoked much comment from Gregory.
He prefaced and concluded many of his
remarks with statements like: "The
sooner you get hip, the sooner we might
solve the proolems facing our country
today; our problems won't get solved as
long as we're getting took in by the
trick and "Why don't you know us
(Blacks)?"
He spoke of the Black condition and
himselfI didn't find out how savage I
was until I went to Africa. I saw all my
hangups; I saw I was just a
chocolate-covered White boy. I've found
out in my travels, we're the only Black
folk to take you White folk serious.
We're the last niggers you're going to
have
AFRICA HOLDS BAG
The energy crisis, he said, is another
issue to look at and know. He cited a
fuel deal with Russia and Africa's
abundance of natural energy. Nixon will
take care of the integration issue so that
he'll be able to deal with Africa over the
fuel crisis, he mused.
What moves this man who at one time
weighed 288 pounds and now weighs
between 92 98, who jogs up to 20 miles
a day, and lives the greater part of his
life on the nourishment of fruit juice
Gregory claims the Law of Karma, the
universal power of positive and negative
forces, give him the knowledge and
strength to live his seemingly tortuous
existence. He notes harmony, peace, and
love result in him for people, country
and life.
"I'm born with god. I'm born with
what 1 need. There is the universal
power. Religions are just another thing
In his role as self-proclaimed
statesman and humanitarian, Gregory-
says, "It's hard to assess what has
happened from my efforts. All I do is
what is positive
Gregory appears as a man doing what
is positive even with respect to
himself, rather than a man only thinking
what is positive.

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I
-PUBLICITY COMMITTEE
OPENINGS-Want an opportunity to
express yourself?? The ECU Student
Union Publicity Committee is looking
for students with ambition to help
establish the most important and
worthwhile committee on campus.
Meetings are only once a week, and
generally will be very short
-CHRISTMAS PARTY-Delta Phi
Alpha will have their Chnstmas party on
Dec. 12, at 8 p.m. Those who have not
paid their dues should see an officer
immediately. Dues must be in by Friday.
Members may bring a guest for an
additional $.50, paid with the dues. New
members will be given their certificates
at the party.
-WOMEN'S SWIM CLUB
MEET-There will be a double dual meet
at 11 a.m Saturday, Dec. 9, at Minges
Coliseum, sponsored by the Women's
Swim Club team. Guest swimmers are
from UNC Greensboro and Duke. The
public is invited to attend free of charge.
This is the only home meet this year.
-PHYS ED & RECREATION
CONFERENCE FOR HANDICAPPEC
CHILDREN-A conference- on physical
education and recreation for the
emotionally handicapped child will be
held at East Carolina University Friday
Dec 8.
Sponsored by the ECU Department of
Health and Physical Education and the
Division of Continuing Education, the
conference is structured for instructors
or administrators in programs for
emotionally handicapped children.
The purpose of the one-day workshop
conference is to provide a better
understanding of the emotionally
handicapped in recreation settings and to
bring together ideas upon which to base
sound programs for these children.
Interested persons may visit or
telephone the ECU Division of
Continuing Education for further
information and registration materials
- CHRISTMAS CAN All Student
Nurses' Association members and other
interested persons should bring their
canned goods and toys to the lobby of
the Nursing Building and place them in
the "Christmas Can These items will be
given as a Christmas gift to needy people
in the Greenville area.
-STUDENT ADVOCATE
SOUGHT-Applications are now being
taken for Student Advocate (a paying
cabinet position) in SGA Office room
303. Wright Annex. Deadline for
applications is Dec. 12.
Screening for Student Advocate will
take place in SGA Office, room 303
Wright Annex on Dec. 13, at 4 pjn.
-JOINT SCIENTIFIC
EFFORT-Pre Med and Pre-Dental Club,
Student Nursing Association and the
student affiliates of the American
Chemical Society invite all members to a
Christmas party, Thursday night, Dec. 7,
at 8 p.m in the party room at Stratford
Arm Apts. Admission: 25 cents. Mixers
and food provided. BYOL.
JAZZ ROCK ENSEMBLE The new
Jazz-Rock Ensemble marks its first
appearance Sunday, Dec. 10, at 8:15
p.m in the recital hall of the Music
Building. The group embodies a new
concept in sound combining
contemporary idioms of jazz, rock, pop,
and electronic synthesized sound
Vocalist Jimmy Cnbbs will be featured,
along with a nine-piece instrumental
ensemble composed of the most talented
musicians on campus.
-POSITIONS AVAILABLE IN
STUDENT UNION-Two positions have
become available in the Student Union.
The Recreation Committee chairmanship
position is available for any student who
wishes to apply. The Recreation
Committee heads up the intercollegiate
games tournaments along with
sponsoring Bingo, Casino day, Bridge,
and other indoor activities.
The Art Exhibits Committee is
likewise in need of a chairman. The
Committee sponsors art shows displaying
student and faculty works for the
pleasure of the campus community.
Have a MERRY CHRISTMAS
with PAIR ELECTRONIC
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�iAI REEL
Stereo b
KENWOOD
Classified
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GX-280D
GX-220D
REAL CRISIS INTERVENTION Phone 758 HELP, corner
of Eighth and Cotanche Sts Abortion referrals, suicide
intervent10n, drug problems, birth control information,
overnight housing. Draft counsel Thursday. 5 m jmght
All services free
Thursday, December 7
Beverly Wolff in Wright Auditorium at 8 15
Artist Serie;
p m
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3 "lOIO'J -�J� lulomiiic �IOp �n0 llnjl
� � iMck , .��') lounoon loond
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ECU Playhouse
p m
"Galileo" in McGinnis Auditorium at 8 15
KR-5200
FOR SALE Gibson 335 hollow body guitar. Two
hum-backing pick ups, plus hard shell case $425 Contact
Phil Lamer, 316C Belk
Friday, December 8

�JK-jBuX-JX
WORK ON A SHIP NEXT SUMMER' No experience
required Excellent pay World wide travel Perfect summer
lob or career Send $2 for information SEAFAX. Box
2049 NN Port Angeles, Wash 98362
'Mary. Queen of Scots" in Wright at 7 and 9
Free Flick:
p.m.
ECU Playhouse: "Galileo" in McG.nn.s Auditorium at 8 15
P m.
SANYO
6

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CHARCOAL PORTRAITS by Jack Brendle 752 2619 Saturday, December 9
FOR RENT 2 & 3 bedroom apartments available Hooker
Road, Glendale Court Apts 756 5731
Small battery powered ELECTRONIC CALCULATOR for
rent on a monthly or quarterly basis Portion of rent may
be applied to purchase price Creech and Jones Business
Machines. 103 Trade St Call 756-31 75
WANTED Campus representatives to sell quality audio
Equipment good cor mission. Send resumes Jack Hoskins,
1143 Prince Ave Athens, Ga. 30601
LOST Black average-sized dog witi brown markings (black
lining around eyes and mouth), wearing chain choke collar
with no tag, has been missing since Thanksgiving Answers
to 'Toulousse Anyone knowing whereabouts please
contact Kathryn Day at 756-6366 (or leave message) or
bring by 2313 College View Apts
Basketball ECU vs Appalachian ,n Minges at 8 p m
ECU Playhouse: "Galileo" in McGinni. Aud.lorium at 8 16
p.m. J
Sunday, December 10
ECU Orchestra Concert with Beverly Wolff in Wright at
3 15p.m
Wednesday, December ?3
International Film "Mon Oncle" in Wright at 8 p.m.
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performance engineered to outlast vour car
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Sm-OUKE JAMES
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Chii�-II 50 lor Holiday
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�30 12 � Saturday L?
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aoooocoao
iS CAN All Student
on members and other
ns should bring their
d toys to the lobby of
ding and place them in
in These items will be
nas gift to needy people
irea.
NT ADVOCATE
nations are now being
nt Advocate (a paying
I in SGA Office room
Annex. Deadline for
c. 12.
Student Advocate will
?A Office, room 303
Dec. 13,at4pjn.
SCIENTIFIC
d and Pre-Dental Club,
Association and the
tes of the American
invite all members to a
rhursday night, Dec. 7,
arty room at Stratford
�ion: 25 cents. Mixers
I BYOL.
ENSEMBLE The new
nble marks its first
y, Dec. 10, at 8:15
lal hall of the Music
up embodies a new
ound combining
ms of jazz, rock, pop,
synthesized sound
ibbs will be featured,
le-piece instrumental
i of the most talented
us.
AVAILABLE IN
I-Two positions have
n the Student Union,
mmittee chairofenship
1 for any student who
y The Recreation
Jp the intercollegiate
nents along with
Casino day, Bridge,
tivities.
ibits Committee is
of a chairman. The
�art shows displaying
ilty works for the
ius community.
Eksjjneet with fej
Bu
By DON TRAUSNECK
Sooni Edilo,
The Pirates were denied
their opportunity to prove
supremacy ln Southern
Conference swimming as
no title meet was held last
winter.
c mermen host Richmond
Now with a regular
conference schedule ahead
of them, the Pirates figure
to put another trophy ir.
the Minges Coliseum
trophy case.
A meet with Richmond
K's Natatonum
go a long

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Saturday will
way in showing coach Ray
Scharf and his tankers
whether or not their goals
can be realized in 1973.
The 2 p.m. encounter is
the first dual meet in
ECU's thus far successful
season.
But the Pirates had
better not look on past
laurels Saturday as the
Spider tankers have an
ambitious program.
"Richmond's strength is
unknown to us right
now says Scharf, who
has been putting his squad
through a tough work-out
all week in preparation
"This will be the first
time we face Richmond,
and they are trying to get
a good program started
this year. Their coach,
Norris Eastman, is a good
one, and they will also get
(ECU diving veteran) Dick
Tobin as their diving coach
in January
TOP TEAM
Scharf counters with
one of the top teams in
the Southeast, however
and he feels the team has'
tome a long way this year
in only three meets.
They opened the season
Nov. 9 with the annual
Purple-Gold intra-squad
meet and then had a time
trial meet at the State
Relays before heading to
the Penn State Relays last
weekend.
"1 have been real
pleased so far said the
coach. "We have met a lot
of our objectives. This is a
balanced team, and we
have great team spirit
The intra-squad meet
did much for the coach m
the way of determining his
major strengths and
weaknesses and, as he puts
it, "The whole team was a
winner. There were no
losers
Statistically, however,
the Purple squad just did
come up with a 60-56
victory over the Gold.
Wayne Noms and Jack
Morrow were double
winners as they paced the
Purple triumph. Norris
won the 200-yard
individual medley in a
meet record time of
2.04.67, and he won the
500-yard freestyle.
NO RECORDS
Although he didn't
break any records, Morrow
won the high board and
low board diving events,
indicating another strong
year for him is just around
the corner.
Mike Bretting set a meet
record by winning the
200-yard butterfly in
2:08.05; Jim Hadley set
another standard with a
200-yard backstroke
triumph in 2:10.75; and
Chris Vandenoever
completed the seven
individual Purple triumphs
with a first in the 200-yard
freestyle.
Three of the four
individual Gold winners
also set meet marks. Larry
Green won the 1,000-yard
freestyle in 10:47.92; Paul
Trevisan, a co-captain
along with Norris, won the
100-yard freestyle in
49.26 seconds; and David
Kohler won the 200-yard
breaststroke in 2:24.51.
CHECK TIMES: ECli swim team co-captains Paul
Trevisan (left) and Wayne Norris (right) check over the
times of their teammates with Swim Team "Hog" Lissa
Smith in preparation for the upcoming meet with
Richmond. Saturday's home debut is set for 2 p.m. in
the Minges pool.
�JTtffWWWWWwWWWWWW�Wy
BICYCLE STORAGE
STUDENTS
LEAVE YOUR BIKE AT
JOHN'S ANY TIME AFTER 6:00 P.M.
Cost: $3.00
During Vacation
Monday - Saturday, 10AM - 8 PM
The other Gold winner
was Kevin O'Shea in the
50-yard freestyle.
The relay events were
split with the Purple
taking the 400 medley and
the Gold team of Ricky
Prince, Trevisan, Greg
Hinchman and Bobby Vail
setting a meet standard in
the 400 freestyle with a
time of 3:25.30.
Purple's medley team
consisted of Hadley, Bill
Prehn, Bretting and
Clifford Bristow.
Girls win
tri-meet
ECU's women's
gymnastics team came up
with an astounding
performance in Durham
last weekend and won a
tri-meet with UNC-Chapel
Hill and Western Carolina.
Final scores showed
ECU with 55.85 points.
Western Carolina with
50.10, and Carolina with
45.85.
The girls, who have a
heavy schedule this season
including a home meet
Jan. 19, against
Appalachian State, were
led into this outing by
coach Catherine Bolton
and assistant Julie
Schilling.
Competing in the events
were Joan Fulp, second on
the bars, fourth on the
floor and sixth on the
beam; Cindy Wheeler,
second on the beam and
third on the floor; Sandy
Hart, fifth in vaulting,
third on the bars, first on
the beam and second on
the floor; and Gail Phillips,
fifth on the bars.
The Penn State Relays
were won by Maryland
with 314 points, and
Bucknell edged the Pirates
for second place with 218
markers to 208.
The meet was "a very
exciting event Scharf
noted.
ECU won one event, the
one-meter diving relay, as
Jack Morrow and Jim
Burden rallied for the win.
The ECU diving unit also
finished third in the
high-board event.
Several other relay
teams for the Bucs
finished high enough to
give them an overall third
best finish in the meet.
"We did a real good
job the ECU coach said.
"We maintained our place
in the meet and had better
times. But the other teams
are also improving their
times, and there are more
teams entering this meet
every year
Now Scharf has to look
ahead to Richmond and
the beginning of the
defense of the conference
title ECU has never lost.
ROUGH WORK OUT
The coach claims that
Monday's work-out was
the roughest yet, "and we
will continue to work
hard I will schedule
double work-outs for aft r
the Christmas break when
we come back Dec. 26
Two other meets will be
neld in the ECU pool this
weekend as the junior
varsity squad will also
compete.
Saturday, immediately
following the Richmond
meet, the jayvees entertain
Grimsley High School of
Greensboro, the state
champions the past eight
years. The meet should
start about 4 p.m.
Grimsley is coached by
a former ECU great, Bob
Sawyer.
In the other encounter,
Sunday at 1 p.m the
Solitar Swim Club from
Maryland will come to
Minges. The coach, Ed
Solitar, has an Olympic
medalist on his squad,
Melissa Beloit, although
she naturally will not
compete here Sunday.
The next varsity meet
after Richmond will not
be until Jan. 6 when the
Pirates entertain
Connecticut and Marshall
in a double dual
encounter.
i
I
m.
Crew
tops
UNC
Fountainhead, Thursday, 1)miner 7, 1972. Page 3
Cagers drop first-
tackle Mounties

Ai Heam's debut as
head coach of the varsity
crew was a successful one
Sunday afternoon as the
Pirate rowers outdistanced
UNC-Chapel Hill in an
exhibition on the Tar
River.
Runner fourth in race;
Olympic hopes remain
Hearn, a native of
Alexandria, Va who
assumed the head position
after being co-coach last
year, was very pleased
with the racing of his
crew.
Several hundred
spectators who watched
the event were stunned,
however, as equipment
failure allowed Carolina to
squeak past ECU in a very
close four-oared race.
This is the ninth season
for ECU crew Hearn had a
hand in the inception of
the program when it was
still on a club basis in
1965. He rowed for the
Bucs in 1966. 1967. 1970
and 1971.
The crew season is being
looked upon with high
hopes for success as the
team has had much more
organization thus far than
in the past years.
Winter practice is
scheduled to begin soon
after the Christmas
vacation.
Ed Hereford continued
his trek toward Olympic
competition in 1976 by
finishing fourth in the
Ahoskie Runathon last
weekend.
The run is said by
Runner's World Magazine
to be "the fastest certified
AAU (Amateur Athletic
Union) 10-mile run on the
east coast It is run
between Ahoskie and
Aulander.
Hereford's time of
50:27 is one of the top 15
performances by an
American this year. He
achieved it while being
pushed by two Olympic
veterans, Jack Bachelor
and Jeff Galloway of the
Florida Track Club.
Bachelor won the race
in 47:16. He had placed
ninth in the Olympic-
Marathon run in Munich.
Galloway, who ran the
10,000 meters in Munich,
was second at Ahoskie in
48:35.
By EPHRAIM POWERS
All Sportj Editor
A whopping 37
turnovers plus a red-hot
Davidson club were too
much for Tom Quinn's
Pirates Tuesday night.
The Wildcats shot a
blistering 60 per cent from
the floor with John
Falconi leading the assault
He tallied 23 points for
the 'Cats.
Davidson had six men in
double figures in the
100-80 win and the
Wildcats could do little
wrong. The Pirates played
an excellent first half,
hitting 78 per cent from
the floor, but they cooled
off considerably after
Davidson applied a
tenacious full-court press.
The press proved a
potent weapon for
Davidson all night as they
forced the high number of
turnovers.
ECU trailed by a single
Trials start
Lacrosse practice has
begun for the 1973 ECU
varsity season.
Anyone interested in
trying to make this year's
squad the first winning
team in ECU's stick
history should contact
coach John Lovstedt in his
office in Minges Coliseum
Practice is held daily at 4
p.m.
point at the half, 49-48,
but the Bucs were
swamped in the second
half by the hot-shooting
Wildcats.
In the second period,
the Bucs hit several cold
streaks and Davidson kept
the heat on for the final
spread.
Bright spots for the
Bucs, as they fell to 2-1
overall in this conference
debut, were AJ Faber with
17 po ints and Dave
Franklin with 15.
Nicky White and Roger
Atkinson, each with 12
points, were also stalwarts
in a losing cause.
The Bucs return home
Saturday, at 8 p.m
against Appalachian State.
AS I has yet to win in
three starts, but the
Mounties are always
competitive under new
coach Press Maravich.
The Buc jayvees
entertain Chowan
Saturday at 5:45 p.m.
"I couldn't believe my
smoothness and speed
said Hereford. "The
weather was excellent, and
the competition pulled me
to a time I thought I
wouldn't see for at least a
year. I had personal best
times at five and six miles
onward
Hereford now expects
to complete a few road
runs until his next big race
at Boston in April.
fau clearance sale!
NOW IN PROGRESS
�VASAVf
nttflWSrSHDIGUOM
JtrrwioimTPwas
ISO
lurtiTi
FOR A SAFf If fill OMf oi r
ABORTION
C�U T0DAT ON A CONFIMN-
TMU FUST NAME OMIT IASIS
VIITTMINC CAN IF PRO-
VIOfD FOR TOUR CARE. COM-
FORT ANO CONVENIENCE IT
rKONE IT OUR UNDERSTAND
JNC COUNSELORS, time isl
IMPORTANT SO CALL
TOLL FREE TODA'
BOO 523 5308
A I Z. SERVICES
15 S35 1646




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Also ahead of Hereford
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MERRY CHRISTMAS





CountJunhed
b ditonals
ommentary
Slu.lfiil N��vp�p(
�'ulH.f.n,l t r � iiI HvtriHy
P I i Mo- lilt Kt) SlJll1
Of nirlHi Nniti' CaroHni 4'�i
l MCpllOfM '� 636b or 8 bib'
Violence cannot
be rationalized
Yesferday's tragic death of a black
citizen does not justify the terrorist
I
Best of luck in crossing Tenth Street safely,
Fountainhead
TM� STUDENT CROSS OF TEISTM STREET �S ABOUT To SrJG.N READS.
actions that followed. Violence will not Arnold WTnTfMD
revive the dead or resolve legitimate
black grievances.
Freshmen organize to fight apathy
By CARL EALY
F'Hfimln C'�i
Vfea ftfsidvnt
Apathy is a common word in student
affairs on the East Carolina campus
today However, through the efforts of
our freshman class, the word apathy may
soon be a word of the past
The class officers of past years did
iittle to benefit the welfare of the
student body This year, the freshman
class officers, with the support of other
members in the freshman class, decided
it was time that things be done to
benefit all students at ECl'
To (jet the representation, the
freshmen devised a plan for true student
representation This plan consisted of
appointing two representatives off each
floor of each freshman dorm These
representatives, approximately 100,
work on projects and committees
H�rtaining to student affairs. This plan
has been a great success.
This organization has been designed to
benefit the entire student body. By the
efforts of various committees in this
organization, the University will have
Junior Varsity cheerleaders These
cheerleader) will cheer at all J.V.
sporting events and also at other sporting
events such as soccer
Another accomplishment was the
decoration of Rawl building for
Homecoming. The spirit behind this
project was fantastic. And the building
won first place in the independent
division.
The freshman class is truly marking
progress in the right direction. Further
plans for improving the campus will be
discussed at the next representativi
meeting of the freshman class.
Looks on positive side of headlines
Bv N M JORGENSON
It is good to emphasize the positive, as
a popular song of a few years ago
indicated
In a stimulating article in "Challenge
of Our Times Charles L Gould did just
this as he said
"Last Year, for example:
"More than 196 000,000 of our
people were not arrested for any cause
"More than 89,000,000 married
persons did not file for divorce.
"More than 115,000.000 individuals
maintained a formal affiliation with
some religious group
"More than 75,000,000 citizens and
corporations paid more than 160 billion
dollars in income taxes.
"More than 49.000.000 students did
not not or petition to destroy our
system.
"More than 4,000,000 teachers,
professors, and preachers did not strike
or participate in riotous demonstrations.
"More than 9,000.000 of our young
men did not burn their draft cards
Unfortunately vice is given the
headlines, and thereby is thrown far out
of proper proportion in relation to the
status of society at large
Crime occupies the headlines Drugs
are given so much publicity that many
youths, who would never, have given
them a thought, are tempted by this
same publicity to experiment.
Broken homes are emphasized far
more than the millions of good homes
when- love does prevail and where there
are no generation gaps, no serious
misunderstandings between parents and
children, but where companionship and
good feeling do prevail
Let us not suppose that "everybody
does if when we speak of the sins of the
world. Everyone does not. There are still
many millions of good people in the
world and hosts of wholesome youth
who have no sympathy with the lowered
moral standards.
No one needs to be misled into
believing that just because the noisy
minorities lower their standards, and
endeavor to make sin look like glittering
gold, that it is desirable. Sin always was
sin. no matter in what guise it appeared,
and there never was any happiness in it.
On the other hand, the price of sin is
dreadful, and takes a frightening toll.
Downward living puts us on a
toboggan which most assuredly can give
us our fill of excitement (of a kind) at
every curve on the hill, but it takes us
down, and down and down
Everyone knows there is more to life
than fun, with its so-called "thrills"
derived from physical satisfactions.
There also is hardship and grief, suffering
and disappointment. No one can have
fun exclusively m this world. Even on a
toboggan, breathtaking as it is, there is
always the bottom to contemplate as we
race downward, not to mention the
hazards of the dangerous curves, rocks
and trees on the coasting hill. And who
can really shut their eyes to them try as
they may
If we are going to follow the crowd,
let us choose the nght one. If we are
going to follow the real the big- trowd,
let us remember that most people do not
not, bum draft cards, or seek to upset
the government, most people are not
excessive drinkers nor users of narcotics.
And most people are not irreligious.
Philip E. William
Editor in-chief
Mick Godwin, Business Manager Tin. tt i u rj
-� I mi Wehner. Managing Editor
Ron Wertheim, Adverting Manager
Bo Perkins
News Editor
Don Trausnerk
Sports Editor
Bruce Parrifth
Features Editor
Ross Mann
Chief Photographer
QUESTION: It is easy to obtain
contraceptive information concerning
intercourse, however, what precautions
are necessary when petting to orgasm
while nude? If some semen soaks into
the lied, is it still safe for the woman to
sleep there?
Doctor offers personal counsel
ANSWER: Sperm cells are incapable of
jumping out of bed, leaping tall buildings
in a single bound, are far slower than a
steaming locomotive and incapable of
making a woman pregnant, unless they
are deposited into the opening of th
vagina. Therefore, when petting to
orgasm in the nude, it is merely
necessary to make sure that ejaculation
does not occur with the penis in
immediate proximity to the vaginal
opening.
QUESTION: I am writing to obtain your
opinion of penis enlargement. Though I
have been told that the size of the penis
has little consequence in sexual
intercourse, I would prefer to have an
extra inch or two if it can be done
safely I am enclosing a brochure from
one company which markets a vacuum
system. It works by hand or motor
driven pump I would like to know if
this type of product can be harmful, and
if the effects are permanent. I have no
problem in attaining and maintaining an
erection, but they are usually only five
to five and one half inches long.
ANSWER: After very carefully
examining the ad you enclosed, it was
clear that the manufacturer made no
claim tp produce permanent enlargement
of the penis. What they illustrated was a
transparent tube one places over the
penis with a pump type device attached
by a rubber hose. The system costs $116
with an electric motor or you can do it
THEVF0RUM
by hand at a special price of $39.95
(plus shipping.) They claim the system is
designed to "operate with very little
work on your part
I would advise you to save your
money. A five to five and one half inch
long penis is a perfectly fine organ.
Having been provided with only one
penis to last a lifetime, I would not want
to mess around with shoving it into any
motor driven pump oi snd suction
operated thing to watch it Income
enlarged artificially because of decreased
pressure in the chamber A fairly large
number of men would like to have an
extra inch or two added to their penis,
regardless of what size it is. Quite
clearly, what makes a penis highly
desirable by a woman, has to do largely
with things that occur inside the head of
a man the penis is attached to. Contrary
to myth, the vast majority of women are
not turned on by contemplation of a
large organ.
.�XsX��-X4��w:w�Xx-xxWvs:
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!88t��S�jW�f&g$ft&9
Ira L. Baker, Advisor
Art 'stolen'
To Fountainhead:
I was going to make this short story
long, but I'm just too pissed off. There
are two paintings that were taken from
students to be placed in a high place of
honor, that are hung upside-down in that
very high place of honor the transcript
room. Also, a friend of mine had a
beautiful ceramic bowl taken to be
displayed in a high place of honor as an
ash tray in an office. The bowl was
rescued. How about someone rescuing
the paintings in the transcript room and
rescuing future artists from such honors?
Put an end to art stealing in the name of
honor. I am withholding my name
because letters like this affect grades in
the confiscation (art) department.
Signed,
An "Honored" Art Student
Knocks jocks
To Fountainhead:
This Sunday, the residents of Belk and
Tyler dorms got to witness another of
the antics of our
EZU jocks when
a few of these
fine upstanding
young men (with
the intelligence
of junior high
school graduates)
exhibited their
animal-like
behavior at the
expense of others.
It seems they
don't know the
difference between
a trampoline and
the roof of a car
which they proved
by bouncing from
one car to another
while their buddies
applauded. Who cares'
if his or her car
is dented as long
it is done
by one of our campus heroes?
The boys also enjoyed pushing around
a couple of passers-by, inquiring, "You
want some of me?" Who would want
any of a big clod who can hardly count
his fingers?
Of course, when the campus police
arrived, nothing could or would be done
because these "men" play such an
important part in the life of our
students they were running back to
their rooms anyway.
The time has come to ask yourself as a
student if these ass-holes will be allowed
to live in free rooms, eat free meals, use
free books, pass tests and courses they
don't know the first thing about, and
destroy the property of students just
because they can break heads on the
football field. Most of us are sick of
paying their way. Nothing can be done
now, since it's the American college way,
so let's just say to Hell with the SC
champs (chimps?).
Unsigned
Revises letter
To Fountainhead:
The statement in my recent letter that
Oregon had allotted one per cent of
federal highway money for bicycle ways
was not exactly accurate. What they
actually did will probably result in much
more money for this type of roadway.
Oregon appropriated one per cent of
state highway funds. One way that this
money can be used is for the state's
share of the cost of bicycle ways
constructed in connection with
federally-aided highway projects. Federal
money pays 50-90 per cent of the total
cost.
Edith Webber
English Department
College di
To Fountainhead:
For those of you who are on top of
the news, it is no surprise to hear that
Southwood College will be closing its
doors Dec. 13. Approximately 160
students will be looking for new homes
during the next few weeks. Southwood,
located in Salemburg, N.C will turn
over its buildings and grounds to
Sampson County, who may open it as
the new home of Sampson County
Technical Institute.
Southwood, formerly Edwards
Military Institute, is closing for lack of
funds. Many of the students here may
remember a week sometime in their
childhood summers when they spent six
days of Christian fellowship and learning
on the Southwood campus. This was the
Baptist summer camp where many
young people gave their hearts in a
complete
commitment
to God. Even then,
the buildings
were somewhat
antiquated with
the exception of
a few new
classrooms and
relatively new A
auditorium. t�T
has gone so far as to agree to accept all
160 students, if they wish to transfer.
Consider, if you will, our colleges and
universities as soldiers fighting a war
against ignorance and other foes of the
advancement of mankind through
education. And, accept the fact that one
of our soldiers has fallen from the ranks.
Williem P Anderson
Urges amnesty
To Fountainhead:
Based upon my experience in Vietnam
with a Marine combat unit and upon
observing the polarization and
turbulence of our nation during these
war years, I propose that the subject of
amnesty be closely examined as one
means of healing old wounds and uniting
us again Although I feel strongly about
those who have seen fit to break the law.
amnesty be closely examined
as one means of healing old
wounds and uniting us again
I believe that
vengeance, exile
and imprisonment
solve nothing. I
therefore urge that
amnesty be
granted-not to
the draft resisters
and deserters -bu
to those American
officials who have W
violated the U.S. fl
Constitution, the
1954 Geneva 14
Accords, and the B1
principles of the
n

u i
X
The campus itself is quaint but small,
surrounding a large common centered by
a missile donated by the Army in 1964.
when the college was a military institute.
The faculty and staff for the most
part have already been placed and plans
for the buildings are nearing completion.
But the students have been left to fend
for themselves This they are doing;
many schools from Florida to Delaware
are recruiting students. Campbell College
Regardless of what they havpdoneet
as come
the judgment of these 0ffi
from God and from historv a"
now would only add ndett
overabundance of mw ' 'he
i u- � K ' anri
Nuremberg Trials by waging such a war
Amnesty is not necessary for those
Americans who refused, out of
conscience, to be forced to fight a war
that violates national and international
law (the present Chancellor of Germany
Willy Brandt, was a military "evader"
from Hitler's war machine and today
holds the Nobel Peace Prize) th
resisters need merely be set free Th
amnesty that I urge is for Johnson and
Nixon, the officials in the past three
administrations, the Joint Chiefs t
Staff, the judges who have sentenced
draft resisters, the intellectuals who ha
hungered for governmental ncottSl
and power, and for whoever else sh
responsibility for the horror of th
which is so counter-productive 7
American interests (after witness
destruction of Vietnam, how mT he
nations welcome U.S. rotml0nM
caused by this senseless war I
amnesty in the hop tha( T�
from public life and i�fluen
misery
Rob,r I C.�


Title
Fountainhead, December 7, 1972
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 07, 1972
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.211
Location of Original
University Archives

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