The Teco Echo, January 14, 1936






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AMELIA
EARHART
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ECHO
HEDGEROW
PLAYERS
EAST CARdINArWASmkS COLLEGE
VOLUMl XU
GREENVILLE, N. C TUES DAY, JANUARY 14, 1936
NUMBER 5
LA TE TREASURER
IS PAID TRIBUTE
B Y PRESIDEN T
v.J.
Mai
B s. Iman is Described as
Who Balanced His Books
R s oss and in Life
Beloved Official
m MEADOWS WAS CLOSE
FRIEND OF TREASURER
PUT IN CURRICULUM
College Soon to Offer Certificates
in Commercial Field
of Business
ELLEN JENKINS
REPRESENTATIVE
Treasurer Were
i in Affairs of
College,
� V Januarv 7.
; H M.a'
w s
bod
r. b.
Hem
ti
puiuan.
is it-
Is is a
.� and
t. di-
! -Hal-
art 'IT
ter I
d the
Hire.
this
IV -treet
Store 1
15. Spil-
y my
he said
!��
ago
the
1H
Mi
r "1
- 1 (rug
Mr. .i.
en to g�
a while
he nnist go back
alance hi- books.
r we were stand-
irner end I asked
� room and again
back to the office
He said.
may drop
i-t always
Most of
nineteenth
I go-
Kast Carolina Teachers
i- introducing this quarter,
uluni for tin' preparation
era ol commercial subjects
schools. There seems to he
demand for teacher- in thi

College
a currie-
of teach-
in high
a strong
- field in
Harper Barnes of University of
North Carolina. Made Treas-
urer of Association
J. B. SPILMAN
�K
nape
the
. spuuian a
arlv in the
.1.
k a tehph.
: �. the hospital un-
i died six day- later.
touch d your life an.l
rays than you per
Vour meals, your
. �: e :� xthooks you arc
se things were paid
- wrote. Often you
- offio and he spent an
trying to hlp you
altiea. Perhaps you
Ughl him a little hit
think that wlnn you
: j on realised that he
: alp YoU aii-1 at the
i form hi doty of eol-
all. I would ay Mr.
is a sympathetic man. a
lerstanding. He wna
lie, and particular-
its who wanted to go
. ollege career. I iun
aber of you here this
dl instances in which
. i stay m coBoge and
arse. II- was always
: � d was humorous. "We
h unor in life. He was
- story teller. 1 have
be would have coni-
��. 11. nry. partieularly.
h uaor was more along
turn to page four)
T FIRST
OF TERM IS 1034
Number Exceeds Enrollment for
Winter Term of Last Year
By More Than 100
One thousand and thirty-four -tu-
dents reported for classes when
formal work began on Friday.
January 3. Though the majority
Kegis-
Janu-
Xorih Carolina and it i- the aim
ot this college to meet the demand.
A carefully prepared four year
curriculum for the preparation of
commercial teacher- will le carried
in the next issuethe college cata-
logue.
The State Department of certifi-
cation in North Carolina requires
a minimum of 54 quarter hours for
a major in commerce and a certifi-
cate to teach in that field. The
work must consist of shorthand,
typewriting, bookkeeping, and office
management, in addition to such
other courses as the college may of-
ter and require of those registering
for this curriculum.
Typing is being taught every day
except Saturday and Students are
required to take it every day; while
shorthand is being taught all week
days, hut students are only required
!o meet the class three times a week.
These commercial courses have
been received with a great deal of
enthusiasm by our students. A good
Dumber have been denied entrance,
tine to lack of equipment to accom-
modate them.
NEW SOCIETY IS
ESTABLISHED BY
MEN STUDENTS
Bruce Simmons Elected President
Pro Tern of Tau Sigma
Sigma
AMELIA EARHAR T
TO LECTURE HERE
I TOMORROW NIGHT
American Heroine
morn- of the students registered cm
pole; tration lav which was held
ary 8, they will continue to conn- in
until .January 10, when registration
will close.
The number enrolled so far is
about thirty less than the entire
enrollment for fall term and is ap-
proximately one hundred more than
the number enrolled for last winter
term. The past fall term enrollment
for the college had more students
than had ever registered for any
term before. Most of the students
are hack again for this terms work,
and also a number of new students.
DR. SIMPSON INTERESTED BY
JONES-LONG CONTROVERSY
Attended Modern Language Asso-
ciation Gathering During
Holidays
if the Kng-
FRANCIS FAIRLEY DISCUSSES
FUTURE OF AMERICAN WOMEN
Dr. C. M. Simpson,
lish department of the college, has
recently returned from Cincinnati.
Ohio, where he read a paper before
the Modern Language Association.
Over twelve hundred members of the
association gathered for three days
during the Christmas holidays to
hear addresses and papers delivered
by almost a hundred professors and
scholars. Dr. Simpson's subject was
Deputation From University
North Carolina Conducts
Vespers
of
WOMEN LAWYERS BOOST
LEGAL PROFESSION
s'uae
,�!
tted Collegiate Press)
rk. There's plenty of
�� cl profession for
i the bar has much lo
omen lawyers.
the pinion of Miss Agnes
� woman municipal court
� elected in Xew York
Magistrate Anna M.
ro of the most successful
iwyera in America.
- took ! a woman lawyer,
voman, and then as a law-
- Justice Craig. "There
g die can teach them, and
.giiity. She must not as-
attitude of a man. either
�r manner of speech. But
try her eases in a manly
by which I mean simply
most he thoroughly pre-
1 capable.
A Deputation Team from the
University of North Carolina very
splendidly conducted the Y. M.
A. Vesper Services Sunday night.
Billv Yandell. President of the Uni-
versity Y. M. C. A. was in charge
of the program. Instead of a text
for the Scripture reading, the team
saw fit to choose an editorial on
"Belief by Dr. Xorris of Prince-
ton University.
Francis Fairley, a graduate stu-
dent and a member of the Phi Beta
Kappa, delivered a message on
"The Future of American Women
He began with the early days when
women held a very inferior place
in life and eame up to today, where
they are on an equal basis with men.
Women, he pointed out take, advan-
,f educational opportunities
o than men. Since men, he
cannot solve alone the prob-
which confront them today, it
is up to the women to make Amer-
ica a trulv great nation. He urged
that women take a more definite
place in religion and help the coun-
try to keep peace.
James Dees sang two solos.
Firm a Foundation and
ing the Bar
tastes mm wmmmm
(Bv Associated Collegiate Press)
stte Collese. Pa.�Compared to
tages
more
stated
lems
How
"Cross-
�lgtiteen yean ago, when I be-
tiee, there was curiosity
gn
aont any woman who went into
ww. today there is less curiosity,
� there is the attitude that every
oman who steps into a courtroom
�t prove her individual worth.
wb must ask no favors because she
a woman, she must expect no en-
rament from men. But if she
able, she wiH reflect credit on her-
� ad her prof r-4� "
State College,
his wall tent with its kerosene lamp
and sturdy army cot J�hn Uen-
deniu, Perm State freshman, doesn t
think much of the room in town that
snow and colder weather have
forced him to move mto.
Until just the other day Clendenin
was camping in the woods outside of
town, doing his own cooking on a
small wood stove, and studying by
lamp light with no sound to disturb
Urn except the rustling footsteps of
an occasional small animal.
"Early Rhode Island Pronuncia-
tion
When interviewed by a Teco
K ho reporter. Dr. Simpson seemed I
reticent about discussing his part on
the M. L. A. program, beyond con-
riding that his study had been based
on the spellings of unlearned clerks
in Rhode Island town records of the
seventeenth century. "If I should
go on to try to explain to you what
I tried to do he said "you would
quickly become bored. Ami I
shouldn't blame you. After all, there
were many things that happened at
this convention which have a more
compelling interest
"What, for example we
ventured.
"There was a great deal of ten-
sion the morning that Professor
Howard Mumford Jones of Michi-
gan was to address the convention.
His subject, 'American Literature
and Scholarship had been an-
nounced in advance, and a summary
of his speech had been printed. It
was a very forthright paper, and
minced no words in treading on the
feet of several important persons,
notably Percy Long, who edits the
quarterly, PMLA, published by the
association. Mr. Jones contended
that we as a nation have been too
content to look up to British and
continental civilizations, cultures,
and literatures; and it was his feel-
ing that we are paying altogether
too little attenti n to life and litera-
ture in our own country. In
particular, he scored the PMLA for
printing too many articles concern-
ing Middle and early modern Eng-
lish, too few concerning American
literature. It is true, I think, that
a good deal is to be said for his point
of view.
"But Percy Long did not think
so. So wrought up was he by Mr.
Jones' criticisms of his magazine
that he launched into a defense of
himself�even before Jones could
Ellen Jenkins, president of tin
Student Government Association,
represented East Carolina Teaehers
College at the University of Kan
sas, Lawrence. Kansas, which was
host to the eleventh annual Con
gross of the National Student Fed-j
eration of America from December
�27 to December 81 at the Hotel
Muchlehach. Kansas City. Missouri.
One hundred and forty-five dele-
gates were present to discuss the
collegiate life of the American stu-
dent and to express the student's!
opinions concerning student prob-
lems and policies.
(�unnar Mykland acted as con
gross chairman and he, with his
committee, was responsible for the
mechanical success of the congress
and for the delightful arrangement
of the program.
Thomas Xehlett, graduate of
Millsaps College, Jackson, Missis-
sippi, brought to the attention of
the group the founding of the Na-
tional Student Federation at
Princeton in 1S2 Today this Fed-
eration stands as the only student
unit which represents the typical
philosophy of Undergraduate Amer-
ica, and it serves as leader of the
large cross section of our popula-
tion.
President Roosevelt wired his
greeting to the congress and ex-
pressed his wishes for its well be-
ing and success.
Such men as Bryce Smith, Mayor
of Kansas City; John U. Stude-
haker. United States Commissioner
of Education; Gustav Kullman,
League Secretary of Geneva; Mr.
Brown. Assistant Director of the
National Youth Administration;
and Agnes MacPhail. member of
the Canadian Parliament aided in
making the congress a manifold
success.
Resolutions for the eleventh an-
nual X. S. F. A. Congress were
adopted and officers for the coming
year were elected. Arthur Xorth-
wood, Jr. of Princeton University
was elected president. Margaret
Taylor of the University of Arizona
was again reeleeted vice president,
and Harper Barnes of the Univer-
sity of Xorth Carolina was made
treasurer.
Xot only was the congress a busi-
ness body, but a social body as well.
An informal dance was given to the
delegates on Friday night, Decem
GOAL IS MEMBERSHIP IN
NATIONAL FRATERNITY
Society to Sponsor Benefit
formance January 24
Per-
anot her
(Fleck
the campus took
when Bruce Sun-
lit nro tem
presn
of
f-
vice pres-
seeretary and
Organization
letter society on
place last week
llions was elected
of the Tau Sigma Sigma. The
ciety hopes to become a menxbei
a national fraternity. Other
ficers are Roy Barrows
ident ; Howard Anian
treasurer; Lester Ridenhour, pub-
licity manager: Gherman Smith,
sergeant-at-arms; Hyatt Forest,
Chaplain. A constitution to be
drawn up by Bruce Simmons, How-
ard Anian, and Hyatt Forest will
he presented at the next meeting.
A benefit performance of the local
"Major Bowes's Amateur Hour"
coached by Miss Hunter, and show-1
ing of "Mississippi" with Bing
Crosby will Ik1 given the night of
January 24. Local talent of the
finest order will be introduced to
the students.
Charter members of are Bruce
Simmons, Lester Ridenhour,
Howard Anian. Elmer Smith.
George Willard. Hyatt Forest, Jud-
son White, Jimmy Carr, Francis
Sinclair, Gherman Smith, Thornton
Stovall, Roy Barrow. Xew mem-
bers are Durward Stowe, Fran Fere-
bee, Hoot Gibson, Robert Dowd.
Entrance requirements are to lx
gradually raised. A fraternity room
in the Campus building is to be pro-
vided. Dr. Flanagan is faculty ad-
viser.
World's Premier Aviatrix is Also
Delightful Speaker
LECTURE SUBJECT IS
"AVIATION ADVENTURES"
Miss Earhart is Favorite of Ameri-
can Public Due to Her
Leadership
Amelia Earhart, America fore-
aviatris and possessor of more
than probably any other
if this country wiF
ampus Building an
'firsts
ivOHian
n the
January
hart has
oines of
IN DECEMBER HERE
Three Have Been Placed
Are Now Teaching in
Schools
and
JAMES A. GULLEDGE IS
NEW LIBRARIAN HERE
Masters Degree Taken at University
of Illinois Library
School
ber 27, and various smaller social
units coming to a climax when a
dinner and ball was given on the
last night of the meeting of the Fed-
eration. December 31.
KAGAWA FEATURES
AT METHODIST MEET
Ruth Kiker and Viola Smith At-
tend Young Peoples Meeting
At Memphis
East Carolina Teachers College
is very fortunate in securing as its
new librarian, James A. Gulledge.
of the University of Illinois. Mr.
Gulledge is a native of Albemarle,
Xorth Carolina, and is a graduate
of Old Trinity, now Duke Univer-
sity. He holds his Masters Degree
from the University of Illinois Li-
brary School. Prior to his going
to Illinois he was acting librarian
of the Texas A. and M. College,
The Xorth Carolina State College,
and The Mississippi A. and M. Col-
lege.
At one of the recent chapel pro-
grams, Mr. Gulledge made a talk
acquainting the students with his
ideas concerning library behavior.
He insisted that the library le used
for
ing.
According to the report issued by
the office of administration there
were seven girls to graduate in De-
cember at the end of the fall term.
Four of the graduates received the
Bachelor of Arts degree and the
other three graduated from the two
year normal course.
The A.B. graduates were Hilda
Boyce of Tyner. who majored in
Grammar Grade; Alma Hammond,
of Bethel. Grammar Grade; Mrs.
Bertha Hart TrLpp. Primary and
Elizabeth Clark of Jackson
Springs, a Home Economics major.
The two year normal graduates
were Myra Lee Bell, of Rocky
Mount. Primary work; Virginia
Lee Ellis of Clark. Grammar; and
Dorothy Smith of Walstonburg.
Primary.
Alma Hammond, Hilda Boyce
and Elizabeth Clark have been
placed.
appear
litorium
15, at 8:30. Miss Ear-
long been one of the her-
the American public. She
registered permanently on the front
page when she wa in lits. the
first woman to fly as passenger
aero the Atlantic and in lo2
when she made her daring solo
flight aero� the same ocean her high
position in aviation circles was
fixed. Among her "firsts" are:
First woman to rly the Atlantic.
First woman to fly the Atlantic
twice.
First woman to .toIo across the
Atlantic.
i irst woman to fly an autogyro.
First person to cross the United
States in an autogyro.
First woman to receive the Dis-
tinguished Flying Cross.
First woman to receive the X'a-
tional Geographic Society's gold
medal.
First woman to make a transcon-
tinental non-stop flight.
Holder of Women's transconti-
nental speed record: 17:07:30.
Former holder of Woman's In-
ternation speed record�181.18
P. H.
licensed in the
carry passengers
1 weighing
"LIVE A FULL LIFE" SUGGESTS
VESTER MULHALLAND
place of studying, not socializ-
SCIENCE CLUB ENDS QUARTER
OF INTERESTING PROGRAMS
�peak. In bitter tones, with resent-
ment flashing in his countenance, he
let loose a barrage of statistics to
show that if American literature
had been slighted it was the fault
not of the editor, but of the con
tributors. You can imagine what
this impromptu display of temper
(Plaaae torn to pace four)
Miss Ruth Kiker and Miss Viola
Smith, both students of East Caro-
lina Teachers College, attended the
Southern Methodist Young Peo-
ples Conference which was held at
Memphis, Tenn December 27-31,
1935. Miss Kiker represented the
Xorth Carolina Methodist Student
Conference and Miss Smith repre-
sented the Methodist Students of
Eastern Carolina. There were ap-
proximately six thousand delegates
representing all the Southern
States, and Japan, China, Poland,
Africa, Cuba, and the American
Indians and Negroes.
Probably the most outstanding
speaker was Kagawa, the greatest
Christian in the world and a great
Japanese worker in the slums. He
spoke twice on Saturday, December
28, which was known as Kagawa
Day. In the morning his theme
was "What Christ has Meant to
Me?' in which he stated that the
law of love was the greatest thing
in a Christian life.
The phases of Christianity that
were discussed during the confer-
ence were 1frar and Peace, World
Friendship, Missions, The Chris-
Opening the past quarter, the
Science Club had a program devot-
ed to current topics. It included
discoveries from a chemical stand-
point.
With chemistry as a central theme
for the quarter, the subject of
photography furnished material for
a good program. The details of
film making, developing, printing
and enlarging were explained. Ac-
tual prints and enlargements were
made.
The last meeting of last quarter
was a gala Christmas party. Old
Santa attended and distributed
gifts, which had been selected as il-
lustrations of the receiver's charac-
teristics.
Physics is the main objective for
this quarter, and promises programs
fully as entertaining as those on
chemistry.
"I hope you will live all your
life a quotation from the book.
"On Being Alive was the source
of Mr. Vester Mulhalland's talk at
Y. W Sunday night, December
Very few people, he stated, exer-
cise all the opportunities that are
afforded in life. There is a possi-
bility, he said, of width, depth, and
height in life, but many people do
not live; they only exist.
Be alive to beauty, adopt an at-
titude of attempting to realize it,
and make a habit of sensing it. Be
alive to truth, was the advice Mr.
Mulhalland left those who would
truly live. He said no wise man
ever wished himself a day younger.
Mr. Mulhalland is an English
teacher in the Greenville High
School.
Special music was furnished by
Misses Helen and Eoline Sawyer
and Mary Hoover Boyd.
DUKE STUDENTS
SHOW REVOLT
tian Home, Race Relationship, and
the Youth and Marriage. The gen-
eral theme for the conference was
"Facing Life with Jesus Christ
Other noted speakers during the
conference were Bishop Mouzon,
Bishop Kern, and Senator Kye.
(By Associated Collegiate Press)
Durham, X. C.�Aroused by an
article he had written, Duke Uni-
versity students hung Dan Parker,
veteran sportswriter for the New
York Daily Mirror, in effigy and
then burned the "body
A column by Parker, entitled
"Xorth Carolina Burns Up Duke
was reprinted in the Chronicle, stu-
dent paper. The students, already
at a high pitch of excitement over
the impending Xorth Carolina
game, found the article annoying.
A gallows was immediately erected
and Parker given the leading role
in a lynching by proxy.
Duke won the game.
M.
First woman
United States to
for hire in cabin planes
up to 7,700 pounds.
First person to solo across the
Pacific from Honolulu.
First person to solo from Mexico
City to Xew York.
Miss Earhart took her first fly-
ing lessons in 1920 near Los An-
geles. She pawned jewelry and her
fur coat in order to keep up her les-
sons.
In private life she is Mrs. George
Palmer Putnam, wife of the Xew
York publisher and noted author
and explorer. Mrs. Putnam herself
is an author. Her two books
"Twenty Hours and Forty Minutes"
and "The Fun Of It" have proved
quite popular with the reading pub-
lic.
Her connections with aeronautic
activities -how that she is a good
business woman as well as a good
flyer; she holds directory positions
with National Airways, and Lud-
ington Airlines. Inc. She is also
a director of the Institution of
Women's Professional Relations and
is a member and honorary mem-
ber of a number of aeronautical as-
-ociations. She has been decorated
by the Chevalier Legion of Honor
( Trance) and was presented the
gold medal of the Xational Geo-
graphic Society by President Hoov-
er in 1932. Eight men had at that
time received this medal; Amelia
Earhart was the first woman. Since
then it has also been presented to
Anne Lindbergh.
Miss Earhart is an accomplished
lecturer. She tells her story, which
is this time "Aviation Adventures
simply and to the point. Her grace
and modesty, which have won for
her the affectionate admiration of
the world, and her excellent choice
of words, together with her always
gracious manner, make her a lec-
turer of the most charming type.
NYA DOES NOT ATTEMPT
TO UPSET NATION'S EDU-
CATIONAL SYSTEM
Baltimore
Md.�The Xational
Youth Administration is absolutely
free of any intent to interfere po-
litically in the nation's educational
system, recently declared Charles
W. Taussig, chairman of the advis-
ory council of the XYA. ,
"I want to emphasize the fact
that we are acting only as fiscal
agents in our relations with the edu-
cational world Mr. Taussig said.
"It is our firm belief that formal
education should be left to the edu-
cators and that the Federal govern-
ment has no business in this field.
Malicious propagandists sometimes
try to make it appear otherwi8e
t





r"
PAGE TWO
THE TECO ECHO
Ihe TECO ECHO
t�T . IHOT.Vt TF OtCHS COLLEGE
Published Biweekly by the Students of Boat Carolina
Teachers College
STAFF
Donors? Hooks
Josephine Ranks
Assistant Editors
II Kl K.N T LOB
J ex NIK Gai i- I
VI U
Editor-in-Chief
. Business Manager
Eleanor Taylor
Carolyn Brinkley
'vnthia Etherhioe
'liRlxTlXE MoSWS
. 1 dreei ising Managers
Ban
Circulation Managers
f N
Doris Mewborx
ITelex Downing
Sara Lee Yatks
Sara Laiohlix
iffr
P
Su bscri Postoffi ' HBeeptioai Price $1.50 per College Year '� BosNumber 182 Room 2
Enter-Postias second-class matter December 3, 1925, at the U. S. ffice, Greenville, X. C, under the act of March 3. 1S79.
935 Member 1936
Fbsocidod Cblle6iate Press
Distributor of
Golle6iate Di6est
w
RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT
Student Body
t Fast Carolina Teachers College, are privileged
3. B. Spilman. who
j ears his wisecounsel
ideals have betD an ai
fiie membeig of ill
student body
ute to our 1
�;sm-d away Deeember 25, 1935. For twenty-three
as active work, and his desire to promote higher
tl
; .v ti
ilman, who
�rise counse
!� been an a:
embers of tl
ions our grief over the loss
xpn- our deep sympathy to
reby resolve:
copy of these resolutions be recorded in the fih
Association;
copy be sent to the family;
it to the TlBCO Echo and
are you acquainted with the work of the American Newspaper Guild?
Do you understand why the NSFA praises it ?
There are numerous questions which arise from a careful study of these
resolutions. Some of them have direct bearing on our campus. Following
is a list of items you too may have thought about as you read the
resolutions :
1. Why do we have no societies, fraternities, and honorary societies on
our campus?
2. Do we have an Honor System?
3. Is there an adequate amount of Sex Hygiene offered here? Is it
campus wide or confined to limited groups, such as Science and Home
Economics majors? Is there a vital need for more of it here?
4. What is the Nye-Kvale Bill?
Do we have a voice in our assembly program ?
Do we have freedom of the press here?
Who is Dr. Krans, and why was he dismissed (
What is the American Youth Act?
What unfavorable criticism is justifiable of the XYA at work on this
ampus ?
10. Would an International Relations Club be a success here? Why!
11. What is the "Mirror?"
12. How is the curriculus of the college prepared?
13. Do we stress Women's Athletics here to a sufficient degree?
(�.
1.
S.
9.
LIKE TO TACKLE IT?
Everyone has observed, no doubt, that Gotten Hall parlor has been
greatly improved this year. It came about like this : At the end of last year
the budget committee voted $500 of the surplus from the student fund
for use in the renovation and redecoration of Gotten Parlor. During
the summer the floors were refinished and the walls painted. At the
beginning of the fall quarter $370 was turned over to the class in Home
Economics 326 to spend for the improvement of that room. The money
was spent in the following way:
8 rugs 6x9 feet.
8 rug pads 6x9 feet. W5
1 rug 9 x 12 feet H
1 rug pad 9 x 12 feet.
1 chest of drawers.
1 drop leaf tabb
1 desk.
1 sofa.
1-1 pairs curtain?
2 etchings.
6 wall beaches repainted and recovered.
6 sofa pillows recovered.
Radiators repainted.
The results are certainly praiseworthy. The effect produced on one
J
in carrying on the life of our institution,
student body wish to attest through these resolu-
i of a faithful friend ami adviser,
family in their bereavement.
the
and do
we do
1.Tba
t;1 V Tnm
0Tha
Tiiar a
f.r 1(ttblb
of the Student
�py t
Urn
local papers of Greenville
friend and treasurer-of thisjnstitution, Mr. by the parlor is much more desirable now than it was previously.
For contrast, all one needs do is walk down the campus from Gotten
to Jarvis. Stumble across the broken porch, open the front door, and
step inside.
Only a short time is required to realize that the room is practically
vacant. Its contents may be enumerated as follows:
S ordinary straight chairs.
2 tables (1 heavy and 1 long and narrow).
1 rocking chair (cream wicker with blue cushion).
12 bookeaaes (or shelves for some purpose, painted red inside).
There are no rugs on the floor. No soft lights from lamps lend a com-
fortable atmosphere. There are five ceiling lights, only three of which
burn.
Think what an opportunity is here. Jarvis parlor could be fully as
lovely as Fleming or Gotten. At present, even Wilson surpasses it. The
amount spent on Gotten indicates that Jarvis could Ik- furnished for a
sum so small that it might be possible for an energetic person to "scare up"
the necessary amount. Anyone interested would certainly find splendid co-
operation in the president of the college and those members of the faeultv
who are acquainted with the work involved.
A nicely furnished parlor in Jarvis Hall might prove an advantage to
many students. Eventually, someone is going to have to date somewhere
other than in Gotten Hall parlor on Sunday nights. The seniors entertain
their guests in Fleming. Perhaps another group might date in Janus.
Surely those students rooming in Jarvis would like to have a parlor there
for social purposes. Problems like this are ones in which students could take
the lead.
Respectfully submitted,
Lucille Clarke,
Chairman.
Margaret Banek.
Elizabeth Wagner,
Committee.
Faculty Staff
A: tin- first meeting of the faculty after the death of J. B. Spilman,
President Meadows appointed a committee from the staff to submit
1 solutions or tributes to be presented to him at the next meeting.
This committee has well expressed the sentiments of the faculty, the
student body and community as a whole.
Of the three who make op this committee two have worked with Mr.
Spilman since be started bis official duties here, the other has been closely
associated with him in the office.
The resolutions of respect are as follows:
"We, the tnemb rs of the staff of East Carolina Teachers College, wish
air appreciation of the life, character, and personality of our
The Kibitzer
IS
Well, the Christmas vacation
over, and about enough time has
elapsed for all you boys and girls
to get off a liquid diet and go back
to good old solid food. Wonder bow
many quarts of tomato juice were
consumed after Xew Years Eve?
During the past few weeks your
correspondent has had very little
to do, and school opening is a life
saver. We read several good books,
and herewith recommend Mr. (be-
lieve it or not) Evelyn Waugh's Vile
Bodies. It is remarkable to note the
resemblance of eccentric characters
in certain hooks to real characters
we know. No names here, but we do
think the part of Amelia in the
Senior Play could have been given to
another girl, had she been eligible,
who could have just acted natural.
Our friend, Mr. Humphry, u
missing this term. We miss Jack
for several reasons�mainly because
he always had something interesting
to discuss. His favorite gag, about
the cross-eyed marksman, cannot be
given here, we're afraid, but see us
about it.
with onlv one hump.
Syrup-part of saddle foot goes
in.
Smock�a kiss.
Herahey�baby talk for I- quiet.
Beech nut�insane Min-worship-
per.
'an,lv�Powerful Indian states-
H0W WTSTA
L-n n tm
of fancy
l-v
man.
Glass�what one has to meet at j
.8:00 a.m.
.1 nice�group of Semite
Customers�makers
dress.
Booths�alcoholic drink.
$��the lowest form, the bae
all humor.
Potato ehipa�boaia made
children.
Cup�policeman.
I'ump�glory.
Coke-slang for
Cash�long cut.
Shaker�"Kooeh
Shots in the dark :
Priiny seems to
long and loud
don't see how
The X (
Once thi
hired aim
prophet bii
evening th
fishing and
u;i righl
toose, bo tl
bis beet . I
king
med
; 1 � w ft
to
MBALL SEASON
FOR PIRATES WAS)
prop)
before
all right.
" dancer.
1h- stringing as
a line as ever. We
anv one man could
n
keep it up. Dr. Simpson is at present
residing in an unfurnished room�
maybe some of youse gals would kiek
in with a few of the more essential
kick-knacks. The day our new-
librarian spoke in chapel We noticed
Youse guys and youse gals have j that the library was quieter than
been keeping under cover lately�to y(. had ever seen it�also that it
much so in fact. We're not blind. was full to capacity. We wonder
we haven't seen any signs of budding ju-hen the striped uniforms for stu-
romance around here in a long tUQ�,dent8 will !� coming into style, what
and it just ain't natural. Maybe the with the locked doors, chains, etc.
weather has something to do with it, Alvnh's ertwhile playmate seems as
or maybe these diamonds some ofjf.0ld as a dormitory radiator since
the gals are wearing have the effect, j! 'hristmas. The couples of longer
but whatever it is, it will pass over 1 .standing on the campus, like Jimmy
soon. We notice some more Gentle-j and Louise, seem very settled�no
men added to the faculty�in fact 1 inrtfr disturbances. Friend Troy
this was called forcibly to our mind j Burnette, who used to 1 seen over
in chapel the other day when we dirre, baa gone and got hisself hitched
nays: .
not eve
f king In
started
And ah
jackass,
"Kiiitr.
them cl
back hoi
to rain
washer
hired 1:
prophet
lows hit sii
a sizzh
ahad and :
and a gulb
clothes wa
girl she -� 1
the king �
hi Prophet
that there f
him. And
T throwed 1
I aims to h
weather fr
the farm.
prophet. .
was to
if'n hits B
lops down,
the hard, r
Pirates Scored Total of 77 Pc
and Made 54 Rrsl
Downs
c r T C. WON HALF OF
f THE GAMES PLAY
Wext Year's Team Will h H
Onlv One of This Y.
Members
l air
and
and
this e
a-lopp
home.
THE COLLEGIATE REVIEW
heard a girl behind us say "Oh, isn't Up Fitzgerald, better known aaljaekass
he cute She wasn't pointing, just u. Count, has cine back to the fold and the
paying attention to the talk. j-�but. ladie remember the story'all the !
shoal sheep clothing! If nothing (ever sine
CUta loose around here there won't
;l�e anything to say in this column
; next time�and so Goodbye for now.
Believe it or not, Joe liraxton is
back in circulation. We don't know
which side the kicking came from.
but our bet would be on the young
lady. Maybe Joe hadn't read the
latest Pruma Shave sign�
If you think she
Likes your bristles.
Walk bare-footed
In some Thistle
Or perhaps he used his razor to
open bottles with I Pop, Oscar,
Yeah), or, again, maybe he just
wants to keep warm�anyway, the
crack about doe licenses is in order.
DM m
rumen: kA
Mk
PUBLICATION OF POEM
LEADS TO DISCIPLINE
COLLEGE THEATRE SHOWS
(iiven be!��'� � th k
tainments for � �
A
resi
Literary Editor and Two Co-editors
of Literary Magazine at University
of Pennsylvania Placed on
Probation
Philadelphia. Pa. (XSFA)� The
Literary Editor and two co-editors
of The Red and Blue, University of
Pennsylvania literary publication,
were placed oil probation until
February and barred from all extra-
curricular activities in the future
as a result of the publication of a
poem, " Wanted. One Twin called
�i IB
Ol tl
his
i
1. S
lleg
pitman, our just pride in his incalculable service as
for twenty-four years, and the deep sense of loss
n.
��T1
�f
peoj
prin
qua!
lP
iti
j,
i.
haraeter, a strong sense of justice, ability to judge
-d on understanding of human nature, staunch loyalty to
ind institutions as well as to people he found worthy, were
at made him a valuable officer of the College.
tility was marked by a passion for accuracy, and order-
ion of fundamentals that enabled him to select essentials
- of details that came to him; a sense of value in judging
ind materials; and a determination to carry every job through
. aever taking into account hours of labor involved. In
r depression he kept his balance sheets straight.
OS who have been closely associated with him will always
memory of his unique personality, his rare quality of mind.
diical outlook on life, his keen sense of humor, and his wisdom
�Ugh rich experience.
1 miss his pertinent comments on affairs, his gems of philosophy.
apt stories driving points home, his bits of humor, and most of all. his
sympathetic understanding.
he College and the community have sustained a great loss and we feel
place cannot Ik1 easily filled
(Signed) Mamie E. Jenkins,
Chairman.
Howard J. McGinnis.
Maria I). Graham.
liness: a re
�' m th n
both people
to ti fii �
prosperity
"Those o
treasure thf
bisphilosoj
gaine.i thrt
"Weshal
his
that his oh
Miss Ha.el Willis, who hat
many years has submitted tin
all loved.
is capable
oyal, untiring and capable�had an unfailing sense of humor, most
" and utter dependability and a keen, understanding nature which
Secretary
been secretary to the late J. B. Spilman for
following personal expression of him whom
Being closely associated with him in bis daily life Miss Willis
f really judging his innermost self :
One of his sweetest virtues was bis deep humility�in his service he
was loyal, untiring and c
com pl.t
endeared him to those who came close to him. He never went half way
with anyone in need�he always went the whole way. Always gave of
his time and substance unstinted where really needed�he was slow to
judge and never harshly.
"in his profound and silent way he went about his business while the
gayer things of life Beamed of no consequence in his scheme of things.
To associate with him closely in his daily life was to appreciate the finer
things, the steadfastness, sincerity and worthwhile things that went to
make up bis nature
(By Associated Collegiate Press)
You can teach an old dog new
tricks say Stanford University psy-
chologists. Age has little to do with
learning, and one can learn almost
as easilv at "0 as at 20.
Seven members of the Williams
College football team are on the
dean's list of high ranking scholars.
Four University of Pennsylvania
students have been put on probation
because of a poem deemed "sacrile-
gious" which appeared in the cam-
pus literary magazine.
A "clip or flying block from be-
hind on the football field is sufficient
grounds for assault and battery
charges, a Pennsylvania judge has
ruled.
The XYA has disclaimed liability
for students injured while working
on relief projects.
JUSTIFICATION
You may think perhaps that your editor was mistaken in her belief
that the printing of the resolutions adopted by the recent congress of the
NSFA is justifiable. If you are of that opinion, it is because you
read those thirty-three articles (found on page four) without an in-
quisitive nature. The NSFA being a national organization, the
resolutions decided upon by it, express the National opinion concerning
the matters in them. Is it not interesting, then, to scan these verdicts
with questions in your mind as to how closely this college agrees with
the majority of the colleges and universities in the United States; and
consequently, how closely you agree with the mass of American students?
I dare say that in the resolutions are found references to many subjects
foreign to you. Should they be foreign? Should they remain so? Or
should the disfavor registered in the resolutions concerning Hearst pub-
lications and newsreels arouse your interest to an extent sufficient to make
you want to know specifically what is objected to? On the other hand,
Members of the Southern Method-
ist frosh team planned to ride to
the Rose Bowl game in two chartered
box cars. Railroad officials de-
murred.
Liquor at parties and "cheek-to-
cbeek" and "streamline" dancing are
banned at Boston University.
Santa Clara valley, home of the
prune and the apricot in California,
has sunk five feet in the last 20
years. Stanford geologists plan to
"refloat" it.
sistance structure, on JNXA and CCC
lines, is being urged on the govern-
ment.
The Cotton Textile Institute of
North Carolina plans to build roads
of cofton in the near future.
The sophomore "Vigiliance Com-
mittee of Dickinson College,
Carlisle, Pa was run out of exist-
ence by freshmen this year.
A stiff course in logic should be
required of English teachers, says
Prof. Charles Swain Thomas of
Harvard.
Probably the oldest co-ed in the
country is a woman candidate for a
master's degree in archaeology at
Brown. She is 81.
Purdue's charter stipulates that
there be on the board of regents
"one farmer, one woman, and one
person of good moral character
College students haven't changed
much in the half-century he has been
observing them, says William C. Mc-
Cracken, retiring superintendent of
buildings at Ohio State.
If your grades average 90 or bet-
ter, you will find a job easily, in-
crease your salary $1,000 a year,
say M. I. T. analysts.
Texas Christian has an exhibit of
Bibles which includes some printed
as far back as 1380.
The Harvard Committee on Re-
search in the Social Sciences has re-
ceived a $300,000 Rockefeller
Foundation grant.
A permanent Federal youth sa-
lt's not a myth. According to
physical education department sta-
tistics from several universities, the
average freshman gets lighter and
shorter every year.
Education note: Joe E. Brown,
screen comedian, holds a D.M. degree
from Whittier College. D.M al-
legedly, is Doctor of Mirth.
We saw a cat the other day, a very
nice little kitten. We suppose it was
a cat, and not a pine forest. Oscar
tells us they are both carnivorous (or
something). Anyway, back to the
subject in hand, the aforesaid kitten
so impressed us with its timidity �M I sacrilegious by University adminis- I
gentleness that we decided to pick; trators. The fate of the author of,
it up to make friends with it. "VVitb the poem has not yi-t been deter-
leather gloves to protect our handsmined.
We, Oh, so very gently lifted it to ! Since all copies of the magazine!
our heart�that is, nearly�but were immediately recalled by the:
about half-way up, to our intense adniinistration it was impossible for
mortification, the abominable little! be student body to judge the merits
beast sunk his teeth through glove, ! the poem. The administration
finger nail el a It was probably a js appointing editors to replace those I
female. j barred so that the exact nature of j
I the piece will probably not le un-
We would like to drop a bit of j covered through the staff of the j
a hint to Roena to quit bragging i publication. Students on the cam-
about her boy friends, or at least to j pus are offering as high as $15 for
produce evidence of good intention a copy which may have found its
(no, Oscar, no phonograph records), way out of the office.
I Undergraduate groups on the
We have been unduly embarrassedr ,uv'rsity campus are reported to
more times than one in our life, but !uo preparing � statement asking the
tin
dan. 'is. I.
dan. 25,
Players.
Feb. 3. Tie-
Feb. 8, Ac.
Feb. 15, Tt:
Feb. �� K
Feb. 80,
j Dances.
-Mar. 7, Bel
Mar. 14, P
�. HahjHa
ins Stp
nth,
Reviewing our
Lthedule. we u!1 '
bad a f�My "
j c. T. C. won �
btroea played.
r, the first ga
j- c j. C. lost To W
KTingate made the oi
Ltme on the third p
F. C. T. C played a
j, defensive work w
aoe time Wingate hs
L. G. T. Cs one
boa!
thev lost
son made the long
me when he ran I
fro. In the n
a total of 9
,
Gala
f-
Wife
Spring
early this
Alumni
eijjarettes
ciean i
year.
still &
It certainly i-
one leaves sometl
copy f�.r this pa
Building late S.
because he can't
Sundays (even
must go to n Be
seven).
upon a
-�pe.
break whs
� boob "
i the As
r aftenus.
ve them �.
. the paper
lay nights:
about the tops was the other night a(lministration for an open hearin
when the car we were driving with a i on ne merits of the poem in ques-
very charming young lady, and a
gentleman school teacher gave out
of gas on a very lonely road about
ten o'clock at night 30 miles from
home and 5 from a filling station.
With either one of the two, it would
have been all right, but with the
combination the situation was almost
intolerable.
"Bull sessions" are being en-
couraged at Arizona State college at
Tempe by an informal organization
formed for the purpose.
University of Akron students are
fined five cents for being late to class.
A Woodbury College co-ed who has
the use of only one hand is two weeks
ahead of other students in a typing
class.
Republicans plan to enroll 16
000,000 young men and women in
their "Beat Roosevelt" campaign.
University of Kentucky students
were recently lectured on "How to
Tell a College Man From the Birds
andFiihea
The higher ups are cracking down
again�this time on cleanliness�
with all the chaos of cleaning in the
dorms the poor gals haven't even time
to go to class. We heard some poor
young lady got lost in the maze of
furniture, and they sent Saint
Bernards in after her just in time to
save her life.
After much time and thought
we've compiled a glossary of terms
used in the "Y" store�this has been
requested by some of the people who
are in the dark as to what the people
at the counter are talking about.
This is the result of extensive, re-
search, but after all, we exit er (we
mean exist) to serve the public.
Cocoa�mildly insane.
Pop�the kin you love to touch.
Nabs�grasps.
Spoon�to neck.
Fountain�passing out (also, op-
posite of lost).
Clark�the person that waits on
you.
Dope�slightly foolish individual.
Sign�what one does when love is
lost.
Gum�command to follow.
Mars�Negro dialect for Mister
Doughnut�negative of do.
Wrigles�small ells.
Hubbub�old mother in a fairy
tale.
Caramel�same aa Dormitory,
tion.
Definition of tlmTtmlent bodv at
the University of British Columbia
as stated by the student paper:
"A comfortable body of nonde-
script spineless morons
That, we would say. is editorial-
izing.
Columnist suggestion: (not ours!)
Why not let the Rice Owls and the
Temple Owls plav it out for the
Hootball championship?
PITT
GIRLS! BUY YOUR
OLIVES AND CRACKERS
AT
Ishew'tt Grocery
DICKINSON AVE.
A PERMANENT TO BE PROUD
OF�$2.50 AND UP
SHAMPOO AND FINGER WAVE 50c
GRADUATE OPERATORS
Cinderella Beauty Parlor
Over Greenville Drug Phone 79g
LET,US REPAIR
THE DAMAGES
E. T. GOOR, JR SHOE SHOP
Wi�i�m, & W�Wr em
PHONES 6�0 .�d Ml
"Home of Good Shows"
WedThur. Jon. 15-16
JOAN BENNETT
GEORGE RAFT
IN
'SHE COULDNl
TAKE IT"
FriSat. Jan. 17-18
JAMES CAGNEY
IN
"FRISCO KID"
With MARGARET LINDSAY
gai;
als made Bereral nice i
standouts for E. I
ierebee, blociaBg ba b
Sinclair. Johnson.
Smith, linesmen. W
fir downs to the Pii '
Oak Ridge beat I
in the firt home gai
fbut the Pirates playi
ball to hold them to tl
Cadeta led in first d
The storv wa- diff
when K. C. T. C. met
final score waa E. (
Chowan, 0. Btowi
touchdowns to lead 11
Kapelec, Ferebee, '
Gibson scored one ea
led ('howan in fir-1 .
In the fourth gan
E. C. T. C. beat the '
of William and M
was the first (icf�T :
aii'l they had U a
strong teams. i : �
first downs 1 to :
In the fifth an I fii
the Pirates cam
end of tin- Bcorimj
: State Teachers '��� i
H-h. The Pirates
Sgam�- but they w re
�outweighed and this �.
them. ' The Pirates i
dWma to the Mom I
E. C. T. C. beal
in the final game of th
son who played for 1. -
to coming her did
E. C. T. C. led in 6
In the r-ix gam - p
�rates scored a total
I their oppont :�2.
led in firt downs 5 1 (
Aa the Teach rs � ill
player by gradnati
I ids i they should �
next year. This was
I Stowe, Cunninjr: am,
land, Price. Jord -
Smith and Ayers hi
E. C. T. C. St is
and a valuable asa 1
I Cunningham is a g
�got off several punts
l.vards and his ai
I than 45 yards for -
I proved himself to
j carrier and an ex�
I turner. We are exp i I
I from these men next
,
PIRATES MEET PANTHERS
FIRST GAME OF SEA
a
MonTues. Jon. 20-21
Cecil B. DeMilles'
CRUSADES
Wednesday, January
22
MAJOR BOWES'S
AMATEURS
ON TOUR
On Stage Matinee and N
COMING:
"CAPTAIN BLOOD
"RIFF RAFF"
"I DREAM TOO MUCH"
"KING OF IURLESQUT
� i
The basketball quii I
T. C. opened its schednb
nlit. Monday, by me I e
Panthers of High' Foil I C
The game started at i ight
Coach "Doe" Muthis of I
Started out playing a quartet x
ter men�Lester Ridenhom.
ani Stowe, Jimmie Johi
jraneis Ferebee�around who,
l'idt this year's team. The
; player�Carlos llolloman�is I
pater from Cary High Scl -
a new-comer to � C. T. C. -
High Point started a team
posed entirely of letter men�
P� and Harris, forwards; Cg
and Intrieri. guards; and Briaj
1 center.
This was a well fought gam
though E. C. T. C. had much
encouragement from the side 1
Id'A -anther9 of High Point Co
aia just as good playing.
ABLERS TO HAVE
FIRST TRAINING TAJ
-Wrs. Jeter has agreed to arri
5vlnV taMes for the Kami
ha18 18 e � time � �
t ever had the privilege of
T trainM� tables. This an
thf J ! f forward in ins
Physical capacity of the





1936
HOW HITTARTE
� " hi- weather"? ��
tl- king I ')�
clost to hi rnMa,
ing notion
li st
girS
�n n
Had
�h�j h
'?!)(
On
UH
�n a-
!g sj
V. I
t a rmer
Hugh M N
Kahler.
LEGE THEATRE SHOWS
Little 1 r
tat SBftsr
edgcro

I
tep�
' 'olloe
Id M V
11 r
thougi
,s trill
�n ai? M
al fhsi
ooki i:
tola
ftarawi,
than or.
t be paper
v night a'
I T T
'Home of Good Shows"
ed. Thur. Jan 15-16
IOAN BENNETT
GEORGE RAFT
IN
E COULDNT
TAKE IT"
Fr. Sat. Jan l?'8
IAMESCAGNEY
Ifrisco kid"
rh MARGARET LINDSAY
iMon-Tues. Jan. 20-21
;ccil B. DeMiHes
RUSADES"
Wednesday, January 22
JOR BOWES'S
AMATEURS
ON TOUR
Stage Matinee a
ndN
COMING:
CAPTAINBLOOD"
"RIFF RAFF g,
, DREAM TOO Mjg
,Sg of iurlesou
fMTBALL SEASON
fffi PIRATES WAS
SUCCESSFUL ONE
ptes Scored Total of 77 Points
4 and Bade 54 First
Downs
E. &
T c WON HALF OF
THE GAMES PLAYED
fext Vimt
On!v (
s I
am Will Be Minus
, t This Year's
Member
THE TECO ECHO
Boys Basketball Schedule
PAGE THREE
Date
�I anuarv 19
�January 17
�January 28
anuarv 31
February 1
February
February ;
February 7
February 8
February 14
February 17
February
February
Februan
18
21
84
�e a � Hot evjfB
-hewPn.I
�i-mi
ths I&mi ' �� butI
'� hi Ii
�si ou.1
llKjf
N fotehaj
1" artner.
i-ts and
� mv1
'�"�" And
1 �m't no
1 wnwiaj i because� :
an ears j� i
they lavsI
B � rain.I
w claying Wf ears
r me the
'� "t&TXi-
99 holding
meat kfe
� i football
thai K C. T. 0.
hi �-t ul season.
three of the six
tine of the year
I 1 � � Wingate, 8 to 0.
the 01 ly tally f the
� play by a pass.
1 � i a fine game and
k � as superb. At
1 �� � had the ball on
yard line with
the next four plays
� � of yard. Oib-
� p si nm nf the
run 50 3 ards. Stowe
ral niee runs. Other
1 . T. were:
p back, 'arpeuter,
- n, Lindaey, and (J.
Wingate made 7
. - � the Pirates 4.
1; 1 the Piratea 6-1
� 1111 game of the year,
- played (rood tool
ei to this score. The
� � downs i� to 7.
. different, however,
I 1 C met Chowan. The
fa�l ss-oi as K. T. . 40;
Stowe scored three
� ad the Pirates, and
, � ���. Cunningham and
ih each. K. Q T.
. � � . firs! downi 2o to
game Ol the season
: i 1 � � the Norfolk Branch
� W i Marv. K)-1. This
- � � feal for the Bravea
be li playing some
- B ' 1 he Pirates led in
; to 4.
I 111 �! final home game
� out with the small
� . - �"ing. Appalachian
- ('ollt re beat them
itea played 1 fine
� �, i-v. � considerably
: this weight told OB
- made five tirst
1 " ' � l"tin'aineers nine.
1 at Louiaburg 18-6
� of tin year. (iil-
� lyed for Louisburg �rior
did all the scoring.
i in first downs 11
iea played the Pi-
� ital of 77 points to
ta 32. The Teachers
na 5 1 to
� rs w ill lose only one
iduation (Tom Den-
I bare B strong team
- was the first year
gham, Gibson, Hol-
Jordou, Hats-11, A.
era had played with
Stowe is a good passer
asset to any team.
B good punter. He
punts for f0 to 70
- average was better
� the year. Gibson
to lw 1 good ball
excellent punt re-
expecting big things
: next year.
PIRATES MEET PANTHERS IN
FIRST GAME OF SEASON
ball quint of � Q
ttfl schedule here last
iv. by meeting the
iliir'i Point College.
rted at eight o'clock.
SCathia ff the locals
g a quartet of let-
u r Ridenhour, Inr-
Iniuitie .lohnson, and
ee; around whom he
r's leam. The fifth
Holloman�is a big
ary High School and
. K. C. T. C. sports.
started a toam com-
of letter men�Mar-
is. forwards; Culler
wards; and Brinkley,
20
�2)
January
January
�Ianuarv 22
February II
February 25-29
Opponent
High Point College
Washington All Stars
Washington All Stars
(iuilford College
Ouilford College
Campbell College.
Lou is burg College
Presbyterian Junior College
Atlantic Christian College
Louiaburg College
ak Ridge Junior College
High Point College
Atlantic Christian College
College of Charleston
Tentative Games
William and Mary Extension
William and Mary Freshmen
Apprentices School, Newport News
William and Mary Intension
Fastern Carolina High School
Basketball tournament
Where
here
here
there
here
here
here
there
there
here
here
there
there
there
here
there
there
there
here
here
SIZING UP THE TEAM
Frances
Pern. X. (
Fcrrbr
B lives in Xew
He weighs 180 pounds.
He plays the forward position. This
is his second year as a regular. Be-
fore coining to E. 0, T. C. he played
four years as a regular on the Xew
Pern High School team. He is now
a SOphoraore. We expect many
points from him this season.
Ihiruani St our hails from Hope-
well, Va. He holds down one of
the forward positions. This is his
second year at the same. Before
coming to F C. T. C. he played
four years as a regular at Hope-
well High School and also on the
Freshman varsity at Virginia
Polytechnical Institute. A great
deal of the team's success depends
on Stowe.
James .( Johnson comes from
Cary, X. C. He has Wen E. C.
T. 7s outstanding athlete for the
last two seasons. He played, before
coming here one year at Greenville
High School, one year at Cary High
ehool, and two years on the Y. M.
He plays
team last
year, incidentally leing high point
man for the season.
tiMltSS , Johnson comes from
Cooleemee, X. O. He is a sopho-
more and played last year as a sing-
ular at the guard position. He
played four years at his home town
high school, two years of which he
captained the team.
Carlos HoHoman comes from
Gary, X
year ana we expec
BASKETBALL GETS
INTO FULL SWING
Girls Basketball Squad
'Name
Louise Shackleford
Helen Wilson
Louise Martin
Mickey Blanton
Margaret Martin
Mavis Parker
Marjorie Smithson
Berlyne Howard
Ruth Parker
Geraldine Tyson
Gladys Miller
Susie Pleasants
Home Address Height Wt Classification
Walstonbury
Louisburg
Jamesville
Shelby
Jackson
Belvoir
Elizabeth City
Salem burg
Woodland
St. Pauls
Alliance
Angier
r9"
5'1P
r
147 lbs. Freshman
148 lbs. Junior
128 lbs. "C"
135 lbs "O"
111 lbs. Senior
147 lbs. Freshman
104 lbs. Sophomore
127 lbs. Freshman
1.34 lbs. Sophomore
130 lbs. Sophomore
125 lbs. "C"
127 lbs "C"
The Point System Established
s
C, A.
sruard
team at Raleigh.
and was on the
Mow that the pigskins have lieen
placed in the moth bags for a while,
we hear the familiar pad pad of
leather upon wood and the whisk
of twine�basketball. Coach Mathis
has been rounding the men into
shape and it looks as if he might
have some good material.
Besides having all of last year's
team back, with the exception of
Jerry Davis, he has quite a few men
who will make the regulars fight
for their position. Candidates for
the squad include: Stowe, Gibson,
F. Hinton, Cunningham, A. Smith,
Avers, Johnson, Ridenhour, Calfee,
Ferebee. Hollornan, Proctor, Flem-
ing, Abernathy, Scarborough, Wil-
liams, Woolard, Wells, and Forrest.
Hollornan. who is a former Cary
High School star, is the best pros-
pect for center. Hollornan is 6 ft.
S in in basketball togs. He should
be very valuable to the team.
There is a lot of good material in
the ranks of the newcomers and
with the size of the squad Coach
Mathis should have plenty of re-
liable substitutes.
The above picture is one of Miss
Earhart in aviation togs.
GIRLS BASKETBALL
TEAM BSELECIED
Margaret Martin is Team Cap-
tain; Elizabeth Keith is
Manager
INTERVIEW
The following is an interview with
Ellen Jenkins concerning the XSFA
Congress.
Q. Was there any one speech
which impressed you more than the
others?
A. Wrell. there were so many
( He is a freshman thislsptdies and they were by such
t great things of prominent national men that all
The girls basketball team for this
year has been selected. The orig-
inal squad consists of twenty girls,
twelve of which are freshmen or
"C's There are seven of last
year's varsity on the squad, and
three letter girls�Ruth E. Parker,
Helen Wilson, and Margaret. Mar-
tin. Elizabeth Keith was elected
manager of the team for another
year. The captain of the team is
Margaret Martin; and the team is
being coached by Miss Lucile Nor-
ton.
Following is a list of the girls on
the original squad: Margaret Mar-
tin, Marjorie Smithson, Sue Pleas-
ant, Helen Wilson, Geraldine Ty-
son, Ruth E. Parker, T. Louise
Martin, Louise X. Martin, Hannah
Martin, Mavis Parker, Louise Blan-
ton, Louise Shackleford, Martha
Lean Beamon, Margaret Garner,
Hadeline Coley, Mary Anna Coop-
er, Berlyn Howard, Gladys Miller,
Callie Charleton, Doris Hollowell,
Due to the fact that only a few
games are scheduled for the coming
season, the squad has Wen limited
to twelve players.
Bieh
tad
Tl
well fought game. Al-
' I . I had much more
I . - ' from the side lines,
i of High Point College
W good playing.
RAMBLERS TO HAVrT
FIRST TRAINING TABLE
Km j,
Thim
the
r has agreed to arrange
bles for the Ramblers.
tirst time the girls team
Z r r !ia tle Plege of hav-
gtmuaing tables. This arrange-
&. f a stPP forward m insuring
Physical capacity of the team.
f feet inches tall. He� thcm vrere g��d- There was a
talk made by a student from Oxford
University, who was a guest at our
convention, which I liked. He des-
cribed the American Student he
knew after an eight week's stay in
the U. S. His opinion of us was
uncomplimentary in that, he claims
we aren't, good students. We are
going around in circles, looking for
something, but uncertain as to the
nature of that something. He ad-
mitted that as persons, we are all
right.
Q. Did you have an elaborate
social life while at the Convention?
A. No. but we had a sufficient
amount to allow us to become ac-
quainted with each other. For
instance, there was included in the
program an informal dance, ban-
quets, and formal dances. One
interesting thing to me was the fact
that there were three negro boys
from Atlanta attending the con-
vention. On the night of the formal
banquet they like everyone else ap-
peared in full dress. The night of
the first dance, the Southern and
Southeastern Regions called a meet-
ing at intermission, so as to further
the Southern Hospitality idea.
Q. Did you meet Tom Neblett,
the President of NSFA?
A. I had already met him at the
convention in Florida last year.
He is a good speaker and presides
unusually well.
Q. Was the hotel a very nice
one?
A. Yes, it's one of the largest
in Kansas City.
Q. Whom did you know on the
train ?
A. A girl from Spring Hope,
representing Greensboro College,
and two boys from State College.
We went all the way together and
had lots of fun.
Q. Didn't I hear something
about your pulling a publicity
stunt?
A. Oh no, but you are probably
referring to my accident in the
cafeteria. I started to get up from
my chair, and fell flat. I was so
embarrassed, for even the manager
came running to help me.
Q. What about seeing Eddie
Cantor!
A. I saw him in the Union Sta-
tion in Kansas City. He was
traveling and just happened there
at that time.
Q. What conference w to be
held here in the Spring!
A. The North Carolina Student
Federation convention wall be held
here then.
him. H
played four years of basketball in
his home town and two years with
the V. M. C. A. team in Raleigh.
Adrian Ayres, "Jew plays a
Blighty good game at forward. He
comes from Rocky Mount and is a
freshman. He has had much expe-
rience, having played five years for
his high school at Rocky Mount.
Fleming comes to us from
(Jrimesland. Although he is a
freshman we are expecting much
from him this year. He has had
experience playing for his home
town high school.
( Calfee is one of the steady
players. He plays at the forward
position. He has had much experi-
ence in that he played five years
varsity ball at Pellehaven and two
Tears independent ball. Injury
kept him out much of the time last
year.
Clarence Cunningham hails from
Hopewell, Va. He played four
years at Hopewell High and we are
expecting to see much action from
him in the next few years. He has
proven his ability as an athlete and
his many friends will enjoy seeing
him in action again.
George Willard is probably one
of the hardest working members on
the team although he does not take
an active part in the game. He has
the responsibility of keeping the
team fully dressed. He is manag-
ing the team.
HEADS OF SPORTS
ARE ELECTED FOR '36
At a recent meeting of the
Woman's Athletic Association the
following were elected as heads of
team sports.
Tennis�Marjorie Smithson.
Archery�Cally Charlton.
Croquet and Horseshoe�Louise
X. Martin.
Baseball�T. Louise Martin.
Track and Field Events�Betty
Lane. ,
Soft ball�Lavera Roberts.
Student pacifists who seek lowered
military expenses should be even
more fortified to learn that in the
opinion of many experts no nation
nor any combination of nations could
ever effectivey invade this country�
with one exception.
That exception is a union of -bng-
and snd Japan against America.
And that, of course, is about as like-
ly as a brotherly game of chess
between Josef Stalin and Morgan.
INDOOR SPORTS SECURE
ROOM IN CAMPUS BUILDING
The Woman's Athletic Associa-
tion has just secured a room up-
stairs in the Campus Building.
This is a great accomplishment as
it will moan now indoor sports in
which every member of the Associ-
ation may participate. Plans are
l�eing made to put curtains at the
windows, to provide comfortable
chairs, and to subscribe to sport
magazines.
Two new sports already decided
upon are croquet and table tennis.
This room may be used by any mem-
ber of the association. Students
wishing to join now may do so upon
payment of fifty cents for dues.
EXPERIMENTS WITH LETHAL
"DEATH RAY" TO BE MADE
This year the Woman's Athletic
Association has introduced to our
campus an Intramural Program
which affords every student an op-
portunity to participate in the sport
she likes best. Since this is the
first year this program has been in
this school the students might not,
at this time, realise its full mean-
ing and value. At the same time
a person is working for recreation i
she may win points toward a college'
award. It is the chief aim of this!
program to put athletics in a posi
tion that each student may take!
part in athletics as a means of recre-
ation. The point system is so ar-
ranged that any student may win
her college colors. The first award,
a monogram, may Ik? had by win-
ning 500 points. The other awards
have not leen determined yet. The
following is an outline of the point
system :
I. Team sport:
I. Basketball class team100
a. Basketball practices 10
b. Member of champion
team (additional) 50
c. Member of all star team100
Volleyball class team100
a. Member of champion
team (additional) 50
b. Volleyball practice 10
Softball class team100
a. Member of champion
team (additional) 50
b. Softball practices
Xote. � Soccer, fieldball
speedball to be added.
II. Individual Sports:
1. Tennis
a. renter tournament 10
b. 1st place100
c. 2nd place 75
d. 3rd place 50
e. 4th place 25
2. Archery
a. Enter tournament 10
b. 1st place100
c. 2nd place T5
d. 3rd place 50
e. 4th place
3. Croquet
a. Enter tournament 101
than
��. 4.
3.
10
and
25.
miles nor more than 10.
Honors are given at the
rate of an honor a mile.
See. The head of hiking shall
make a report within 8 hours
after the Like, including:
J. Names of hiking party.
2. Length of hike.
3. Total time of hike and time
out for resting.
4. Date of hike.
IV. Leadership.
1. Intramural manager 500
2. Assistant Intramural man-
ager300
3. Head of Dormitory300
4. Head of team sports200
5. Head of individual sports .100
6. Team captains 25
7. Coaching (B. B. by var-
sity) 50
8. Officiating.
a. Referee.
Team sports (per game) 10
Individual sports (per
game) 5
b. Scorers, timers and lines-
men (per game) 5
V. Field Day.
VI. Intramural Managers.
Sec. 1. Keep an accurate account
and file of all honors won during
the year.
Sec. 2. Cooperate with Director
and heads of sports in making a
schedule of each sport.
Sec. 3. Encourage the active par-
ticipation of all girls in school in
some form of athletic contest.
Sec. 4. Make a written report at
the end of the year (June 1)
stating:
1. Work of the year.
2. Sports carried on.
3. Xumbers taking part.
4. Honors won.
5. Awards made.
6. liecommendations to the in-
coming manager.
VII. Assistant Intramural Man-
ager.
1. Cooperate with Director,
US HAVE FIVE
GAMES LISTED
Schedule Includes Game With
Mitchell Junior College, Not
Played Previously
The girls basketball schedule for
this year does not include many
games so far, but the team hopes
that more games will be secured in
the near future. As yet there have
tn-cn only five games scheduled;
however, the manager. Elizabeth
Keith, is still trying to find other
girls' team for K. C. T. C. to play.
The squad this year is as strong
and as efficient as any team this
college has had thus far. and the
members are looking forward anx-
iously to their game�.
A game has bees scheduled with
Mitchell, a sdtooJ that EL C. T. C.
has not played before. Mitchell, a
Junior College located at States-
ville, is reported to have a very
creditable team.
The tentative schedule for this
year is as follows:
Mitchell�here tonight.
Appalachian�there February 1.
Wingate�here February 5.
William and Mary�there Feb-
ruary 10.
Wingate�there February 16.
Twenty-five prisoners at Alcatraz.
which houses the toughest Federal
criminals, are taking correspondence
courses at the L'niversity of Cali-
fornia.
heads of sports in making a
schedule of each sport.
b. 1st place1001 ec- 2- Eueemrage active participa-
c. 2nd place 75 j tion of all girls in schools in some
d. 3rd place 50
e. 4th place 25
Fields of Medicine, Chemistry, and
General Industry Thought to
be Involved in Ray
Berkley, Cal.�University of Cali-
fornia scientists here have completed
the set-up for man's first experi-
ments with a really lethal "death
day 14 times as powerful as the
X-ray, and so dangerous that ap-
proach from any direction to within
50 feet is unsafe.
The ray is a powerful beam of
neutrons, the ultimate particles of
atoms discovered four years ago
by English scientists.
The first sizeable beam of these
neutrons is produced in the heart
of the field of an 80-ton magnet by
a method discovered by Prof. E. O.
Lawrence of the University of Cali-
fornia.
Involved, though at present un-
predictable, are possibilities for the
fields of medicine, chemistry and
general industry. The neutrons,
streaming in all directions from the
big magnet, are not stopped by any
known type of shield, not even by
lead. They pass through the yard-
thick coils of the big magnet as if
it were so much paper, and nothing
will perceptibly slow them down
except water.
To experiment in safety the Cali-
fornia physicists have set up a re-
mote control panel 50 feet distant
from the magnet, with a tank of
water forming a three-foot thick
barrier.
As easily controlled as an electric
light, the beam is produced by a
12,000 volt current, "stepped up"
to 4,500,000-volt beam of neutrons.
4. Horseshoe pitching
a. Enter tournament 10
b. 1st place100
c. 2nd place 75
d. 3rd place 50
e. 4th place 25
5. Track and field events
a. Enter each event 3
b. 1st place each event 25
c. 2nd place each event 20
d. 3rd place each event 10
e. 4th place each event 5
f. High scorer 50
Events:
50 yard dash.
75 yard dash.
High jump.
Running broad,
nop, step, jump.
Baseball throw (distance).
Basketball throw (distance).
Soccer kick (distance).
III. Hiking.
Sec. 1. All hikes must be organ-
ized.
Sec. 2. The hike must be in the
country.
Sec. 3. The hike shall not be less
form of athletic contest.
Sec. 3. Assist head of sport in
coaching class teams.
VIII. Heads of Sports.
Sec. 1. Arouse and stimulate in-
terest in her sport.
Sec. 2. Have a full technical
knowledge of her sport.
Sec. 3. Take care of all publicity
of her sport.
Sec. 4. Coach, under the supervi-
sion of the Director and assisted
by the assistant Intramural Man-
ager, all class teams in her sport.
Sec. 5. Officiate, without additional
honors, in tournament games and
matches, if chosen.
Sec. 6. Encourage a love of fair
play and good sportsmanship.
Sec. 7. Make a written report with-
in two weeks after the close of
school.
IX. Captains.
Sec. 1. See that all equipment is
on hand for each practice and
game and that it is returned to
its place.
Sec. 2. Notify all candidates the
time and place of each practice
at least a day ahead of time.
Sec. 3, Be responsible for a uni-
form costume for her team.
Sec. 4. Determine the line-up of
her team in all games, make sub-
stitutions, have charge of her
team on the floor.
For
PHILCO RADIOS
SEE
FRANCIS WORSLEY
Complete Line
VALENTINE
NOVELTIES
W.T. GRANT CO.
Convenient Shopping Center
fcfaSw
SShJ
Prices ef AH
SHOES
CUT TO HALF
CAMPUS BOOT
SHOP
CHARLES HORNE DRUG COMPANY
COME, AND BRING YOUR FRIENDS
WITH YOU
ON SATURDAY NIGHTS TRY OUR
Special College Girls' Supper
LAUTARES
Lada.MSvAAAJMa.aMa-awiMi
VISIT US OFTEN AS WE HAVE
SPECIALS IN DRESSES EVERY DAY
ONE LOT OF DRESSES
SPECIAL $1.95 and $2.95
We appreciate your coming to see us, College Girls
WILLIAMS
"THE LADIES' STORE"
SALE!
HALF PRICE
All Suede and Suede Combination
LADIES' SHOES
College girls with thrifty ideas can't resist a sole like thts!
Our smartest suede and suede combination shoes are be-
ing sacrificed right now at the height of the season!
They re bargains everyone of them.
BLOUNT-HARVEY
ii
K; !





� " i . ! �
r

PAGE FOUR
THE TECO ECHO
MISSIONARY'S LIFE
STUDIEDJNVESPERS
Clough Was Converted in College
and Went to India to Tell
of Christ
John Everette Clough, one of the
greatest missionaries in history, was
the siilijeel of talk by Naomi Xewell
at tlie firsl Y V.cV vesper service
after Christmas,
she began with his early boyhood
when he traveled west to Michigan
in three covered wagons. Clough,
�he stated, was a leader in every-
thing lie did. but had no religious
training or environment. She told
of his career as general utility boy
for a surveyor and how he built him-
self up t government surveyor.
Resolutions Adopted By
The NSFA Congress
Ait'
to b
W as
Discussion groups on varied sub-
jects relating to campus and national
issues recommended certain resolu-
tions to the Congress as a guide in
carrying out NSFA policy and
activities. The following are only
the resolutions adopted by a ma-
jority of the delegates assembled in
plenary session.
1. Kesolved ; that NSFA work for
a reduction of initiation fees for
national honorary societies, or en-
courage the development of local
fraternities to take their place.
2. Resolved; that NSFA (D sup-
ports the principle of integrity of
the news, (2) condemns the vieious
ami unAnieriean propaganda being
spread by Hearst publications, (3)
facilities provided by the NSFA-
CIE agreements such as student
identity cards, travel tours and
conferences.
Resolved; that the NSFA make
a thorough investigation ami report
available to colleges upon the exist-
ing forces and conditions operating
upon rates of foreign money ex-
change for travelling American stu-
dents with emphasis upon obtaining
agreements similar to those existing
for German Reichchecks.
15. Resolved : that the President
of the NSFA, in his work of carry-
ing out Article IV, section 2 of the
Constitution with respect to aca-
demic freedom, be authorized anil
encouraged to cooperate with the
OUgu tie was
sI- religion, sin
converted in college and
determined not
! pointed out. he
('Hi
� i is a
� orite
in-1
be-
rt'ul follower of Christ,
alizing his call in life to
ionary, he went to India
to minister unto one of
� castes. Here, she said.
the people through many
(1 baptized many, his
�rmon being. "Come untoltjj tju
thai arc heavy laden ami
yon rest
she concluded, he was
to come home to die and
ir written on his tomb-
his name is. " Re still
1 am God. "
praises the work of the American i s i , � . � .
Vl �. , , ,� -i i , n National Education Association, the
.Newspaper Guild, and all news- T , .
.J2 , ,� �" i League tor Educational Freedom.
papers working to preserve an i i i � � T ,
"isnraisnrwj by the Progressive Edu-
honest. and free press, (4) that a
be
sponsored
, � , , , cation Association, the American
committee be appointed to suggest , ,�,�� rr , , .
. , , . g , , oe :rederation of I eaehers, the Ameri-
a plan tor the boycott of Hearst � , s i ;K rT � ,
lt- � , ' , ican t ml Liberties I nion and other
publications and newsreels. ,� . ,
.� iu. i tl t motTa groups working toward the same
. Kesolved; that NSrA go on (mj
record as favoring cooperation be-
tween member and non-member col-
leges within the individual states
aim of (1) encouraging
non-member colleges to NSFA
membership and points of view, and s"PP0ts
(2) favoring, where needed, the
ll�. Resolved; that NSFA go on
record as approving the American
iat
RUGBY IS DECLARED
SAFER GAME THAN
FOOTBALL TODAY

Ass
v
tree
XUJr
E
: .
ated Collegiate Press
.�The safety of rugby
to football and its small
�. together with the ease with
the game can be learned are
nts for wider adoption of the
i game being offered by au-
thorities aroused by this jministrations be petitioned to in-
lude as part of the college currieu-
Vouth Act
17. Whereas the NSFA firmly
the principle that the Fed-
eral Government should assume
responsibility for providing an op-
portunity for needy students to ob-
tain higher education, cultural and
recreational advantages, appron-
� ticeship. occupational training and
lieges which do not employment, and whereas the NSFA
is of the opinion that the NYA as
it is now instituted is inadequate to
meet this responsibility, therefore.
be it resolved that the NSFA urge
the national government to provide
sufficient funds to adequately care
for these needs, and be it further
resolved that the NSFA recommend
increased effort to eliminate the in-
justices in allotting advantages,
waste and unworthy projects.
organization of subsidiary NSFA
units within the respective states.
4. Resolved: that (1) NSFA go
on record as favoring the adoption
of Honor Systems among thost
schools and
already have such a system, 2
NSFA go on record as favoring the
sponsoring among high school and
preparatory schools on the part of
the institutions of higher learning,
student government as a prepara-
tion for the more intricate points
of Honor System to be had at col-
lege.
5. Resolved; that University Ad-
wmmmmmmmmtammm
education and of other social prob-
lems.
28. Resolved; that NSFA go on
record as favoring government
ownership of public utilities.
29. Resolved; that the NSFA go
on record as opposed to all direct
consumption taxation, particularly
sales taxes.
30. Resolved; that the NSFA go
on record as favoring the public
housing program financed by the
government for the benefit of those
classes who cannot afford to par-
take of the benefits of our modern
housing.
31. Resolved; that in colleges
where the compulsory activity fee
pays for dances and the payment of
the year book, and the payment of
the clubs, exclusive of the Athletic
control, that this money be spent by
students under the jurisdiction of
the student council with the faculty
sitting only as advisers.
32. Whereas there are many mal-
adjustments in the present economic
system, and whereas many college
students and young graduates are
unemployed and have good pros-
pects of remaining so, be it resolved
that the president of NSFA appoint
a committee on vocational guidance
for students of college and post
graduate years, to actively promote
cooperation with the Government
on employment and vn ttional guid-
ance and with private agencies.
S3. Resolved; that this convention
urge that in those colleges that do
not have sufficient to carry on an
adequate athletic program for
women, that funds be appropriated
from student government to further
the activities of the Women's Ath-
letic Association.
on; to strive for those ideals set up
when we were all togeher.
"When the books are closed they
must balance. On one side we find
hard work, on the other, success;
on one side suffering, on the other
the ability to sympathize; on one
side long hours of study, on the
other marked wisdom.
"He balanced his books. You and
I could very well follow his exam-
le and try to balance our books,
right He said an
some day,
�UK1 lWi" lw" snnfH-o mil on iirist
pie
as he put it,
auditor would come in
I when he slipped out on ('
in eele-
of that
submitted
mas morning amid toe joy
brat ion of the birthday
Child born years ago
his looks to the Great Auditor of
the Universe.
been approved
Those books havt
EVEN PROFESSORS
MAKE MISTAKES
I'res
DR. SIMPSON INTERESTED BY
JONES-LONG CONTROVERSY
am
LATE TREASURER IS PAID
TRIBUTE BY PRESIDENT
equal
�rh toil of gridiron deaths.
dl fatalities this season
the peak year of 1931 when
4t players were killed.
Because the highest number of
fatalities occurs every year among
high school players
igh schools nave (
seduled football, rugby
is an especially suitable
(Continued from page one)
that style, had he been a short story
writer. His humor was always
without sting; his stories were good
as well as entertaining.
He was capable, a very capable
many j
regular!
is
and because
have dropped
se
. ; , 18. Be it resolved; that the NSFA
� iiim Sex Hygiene courses for which 'impart to NYA that they suggest to i person. It means much to find a
j University credit will be given. various college presidents that some person thoroughly trustworthy one
i. Whereas the introduction of of the aid received by colleges from j to whom you can turn a job'and
such unAnieriean measures as the NYA sources be used in payment for
j teacher's oath, student loyalty and !student-led forums outside of the
sedition bills into our legislatures ! college. Be it further resolved that
by jingoistic and pseudo patriotthe Forums Committee recommend
ic groups, is contrary to the funda- ;to NSFA that it sponsor forums for
mental ideals of education in a true j American universities, these forums
Idemocracy and contrary to the to be financed by proposed or avail-
jfundamental guarantees in the Bill 'able funds.
of Rights of the Constitution, and, 10. Resolved ; that the NSFA col-
whereas the implication of these lege information concerning true
cooperatives as they apply to col-
lege life and distribute that infor-
"Due to injuries and the expense of ry, be it resolved that NSFA exert Jmation to member colleges together
equipment, a number of schools have every possible effort to bring about j with suggestions for a tentative pro-
discontinued playing American ;the defeat or repeal of these cedure in starting a cooperative in
by
tfa
sa
N,
ivocan
iitute.
It is my sincere belief that rug-
�an take an important place in
scholastic athletic program
Ed Dickinson, rugby coach at j measures is not only false but is
san College. Hempstead, L.I. j derogatory to an intelligent citizen-
foot bal
ested i
like
ball.
Although tlit
fostering tin
c rugby develop as an early
port, it is evident that the
i till an immediate fall need
schools not playing foot-
or repeal of
e of us inter- measures wherever they occur and
sport would
Dickinson played for three years
on the Yale varsity team, and at
present plays with the New York
Rugby Club. He is vice president
of the
club. He
Eastern Rugby Union.
any given school,
that all similar regulations of eol- 20. Resolved; that NSFA go on
lege administration or city be record as favoring the entrance of
�P-�Sif . , , , x. , the United States into the League of
Resolved; that the NSFA go Nations with the provision that we
A rugby player can be equipped denned.
on record as supporting the Nye-
Kvale Bill, making military training
optional instead of compulsorv.
8. Resolved; by the NSFA that
the subsidization of athletes par-
ticipating in intercollegiate compe-
tition be uneonditionallv con-
fer abou
contrast
rectly to
Rugbi
gam D
play �
cc' ; ierat
meeting
a pven
from th
$3.50, Dickinson said, in ' Be it further resolved that the
he emergency as it occurs
iving plays on the spot as
I to a football player, who
i a machine, carrying out
assignment under orders
signal caller.
allowing their name, and the name
of their team to be used in com-
mercial advertisement for which
� the fo necessary eor-
quip a football man.
s a highly individualistic
kinson said. The rugby
ne of a group voluntarily I they receive financial remuneration
g to advance the ball, 'be likewise condemned.
9. Resolved; that NSFA go on
record as favoring American par-
ticipation m the Olympic games
next year.
10. Whereas in some colleges
students have no voice in the
assembly programs which the stu-
dent body at large attend, be it re-
I solved by the NSFA that there be
student representation upon the
Committee, on group which dictates
the type and nature of assembly
engage in the activities of the League
of Nations only up to the point of
Military action.
21. Resolved; that the NSFA
recommend that all American col-
leges be required to give courses in
International Relations and inter-
national organizations. Further
resolved that the NSFA go on record
practice of some college coaches in jas furthering the establishment of
FOOTBALL DECLARED TO BE
BIG BUSINESS IN COLLEGES
�the winners
count above
By Associated Collegiate Press)
New Haven. Conn.�Football is
Big Business in over 70 per cent of jpr�granis
American colleges, according to
President James Rowland Angell
of Yab. who charges that in these
schools it is the crowd
�the receipts�that
everything else connected with the
game.
Should college football, with its
sub-rosa subsidization of players,
lose out in the competition for
popularity with the professional
teams, and follow college baseball
into obscurity, there are three pos-
sible solutions for schools that re-
fuse to countenance any but strictly
amateur procedure. Dr. Angell says.
The three ways out cited by the
Yale president are: Endowments
rendering the athletic program inde-
pendent of gate receipts; discon-
tinuing some or all sports as finan-
cial responsibilities of the colleges
and leaving them up to the students;
or the abandoning of the whole pro-
gram of "college sports as public
spectacles" with a return to the in-
formal games of the pre-Victorian
era.
11. Resolved; that the NSFA
sponsor an organization of college
editors to further disseminate col-
legiate news and work for the more
complete freedom of the college
press.
12. Whereas the case of Dr.
A. J. A. Kraus has been brought to
the attention of the NSFA, we in-
struct the Executive Committee of
the NSFA in New York to investi-
gate the facts and if the Committee
finds that the college has dismissed
Dr. Kraus on the ground of mental
unfitness merely as a guise to cover
their opposition to his policies, the
Executive Committee shall take the
steps which are to the best interests
of Dr. Kraus.
13. Resolved; that NSFA should
continue its activities as the United
States representative of Inter-
national Student Service.
14. Resolved; that the NSFA con-
tinue its affiliation with the CIE for
the coming year. Be it further re-
solved that our universities be more
widely informed as to the travel
International Relations Clubs in
open forums in various colleges that
are members of NSFA.
22. Resolved; that NSFA con-
tinue its membership in the National
Peace Conference.
2:?. Resolved; that the NSFA go
on record as approving the exten-
tion of the present Neutrality Act.
24. Resolved; that the NSFA go
on record urging American Youth
never again to go beyond the borders
of the United States to participate
in a foreign war.
25. Resolved; that the Executive
Committee give consideration to the
possibility of beginning the fiscal
year July 1 rather than September 1.
26. Resolved; that the "Mirror"
be abolished within two months un-
less 1000 subscriptions are avail-
able.
27. Resolved; that students should
actively participate in curriculum
revision; that students should take
the responsibility for emphasizing
the understandings, attitudes, skills
and other learnings to be gained
from college courses rather than on
credits and grades; that the guid-
ance program of colleges and uni-
versities should be adequate as to
number and qualification of counsel-
ors, for emphasis upon the values
both of college courses and extra-
curricular activities, and for the
cultivation in each student of a
critical and creative attack upon the
problems confronting him; that
more serious attention be given to
the nature and scope of the curricu-
lum in our schools, and that both in
and outside of the classroom greater
emphasis should be placed upon
study and solution of student
problems, of general problems, of
know that it will be well done.
Everyone who knew him, who
worked with him realized that what-
ever task was given him would be
well done. I have in my pocket
statements from various officials
throughout the state, from students,
from people who had1 known him
in Raleigh, and practically every-
one mentioned his capability. I
have a letter from a member of the
Board who says she has never
known a more capable person. As-
sistant Director of the Budget Dun-
lap says he has never dealt with a
person who had a finer personality
and who understood his business
better than Mr. Spilman did.
"I would characterize Mr. Spil-
man as being a loveable person. I
could name hundreds who loved
him: I don't think I could name
anybody who knew him well and
didn't love him. I don't think he
was ever hated, or adversely criti-
cized; students would go out wor-
ried because they couldn't meet
their obligations, but I think they
realized that Mr. Spilman was try-
ing to help them.
"He was a gentlemanly person,
a thorough gentleman, a gentleman
of the old school, a man who re-
spected the rights and privileges of
others. For about seven years he
and I use to walk to and from the
college together, before either of us
had a home here, and I learned him
quite well; yet, in spite of that, Mr.
Spilman would come into my office
after I was made president, and
never take a seat, until he was asked
to. He observed those nice cour-
tesies in a way few people observed
them. You will not find a person
among the thousands who have been
in his office who was not treated
with the utmost courtesy.
"On the twenty-fifth of December
he closed his books. Christmas
morning, while children everywhere
were happy, he went to join those
who had gone before. Some of us
feel like the last leaf on the tree,
or as Thomas Moore put it
'I feel like one
Who treads alone
A banquet hall deserted
Some years ago there was a group
of eight men who use to meet in
the offices in die evenings and dis-
cuss plans for the institution. Of
the eight I am the only one left.
Those who are gone are President
Wright, Professor Wilson, Profes-
sor Austin, Professor Underwood,
Dr. Laughinghouse, Mr. Ragsdale
and Mr. Spilman. Are they in
some other realm moving plans for
future development? Do those who
pass before still speak to us? Is
there recognition in that other
realm? Certainly they speak to
me. They tell us not to become dis-
couraged; not to give up; to carry
(Continued from page one)
(1 retaliation did to the crowd!
"Jones, too, was not unmoved; but
ie did manage to keep his temper
When he arose to speak, he Ban
all my experience as a writer
speaker, this is the first time
1 have been attacked before 1 have
lown my own hand. 1 am persuaded
that one of two scriptural quota-
tions must apply: either
wicked fieeth where ao man
sueth or 'There is greater rejoh
ing in Heaven over one
repenteth than over ninety-nine that
need no repentance
"As much as I admire Percy Long.
1 should hate to have been in his
shoes that morning concluded Dr.
Simpson.
(By Associated Collegiate rress
Princeton, N. J.�Summoned to
Washington last August to work for
one day as a consultant for the
National Youth Administration.
Prof. George A. Graham of tin-
Princeton University Department of
Politics is still waiting for the $18
in salary and expenses due him Hi-
four successive attempts to eolleet
it have been baffled by more red tape
than even a professor of politics
could believe existed.
On his return to Princeton after
his one day's service, Prof. Graham
dutifully filled out his itemized ex-
pense sheet and sent it to Washing-
ton. Two weeks later he got a letter
from the Comptroller General of
the United Stales informing him
that he had made several mistake
and must till out a new account.
it seems that Prof. Graham had
put down all his expenses when he
should have tumped all his living
expenses under a $5 per diem ac-
, In j count. He corrected the error and
and J hopefully sent the corrected ac-
that count back.
ALUMNAEN
.Miss
daughter
Page All
Parker .1
Mrs. He!
R P Jon
'o ernlw i
home, afl
Streel )
was a n
Normal e
Jones-AUea
nada
.M
birth
Birth An
nouocemea-
Mad
irs jli.
f Roc
.on u h
Aiumaae
re
The
pur-
joi
sinner that
Whenever controversy begins over
any new thing, you can generally be
sure that thing has begun to amount
to something.
So it is with American proletariat
literature. For years critics have
been moaning the want of a virile,
real literature of the masses. As the
red ink years have continued the
proletarian spirit in literature has
steadily grown.
A significant localized contro-
versy has occurred at the University
of Michigan. There the editors of
the Daily have put the bee on the
library officials for not including in
their files the important recent works
about the working classes. Only the
journalism library has them, they
contend. As significant books not
accepted in the regular library they
name, "Land of the Free "To Make
My Bread and "Crisis of the
Middle Class
ROY KITTRELL
CLOTHING
and
ACCESSORIES
Popular Prices
GREENVILLE, N. C.
Two weeks later he received letter
No. '1 from the government. Th
time he had to put his initials over
each of the individual items and add
the exact time to the minute of his
arrival and departure from Wash-
ington. Moreover, a correction he
had made in ink was ordered
changed to typewriting.
Another fortnight passed, and
the long-suffering pedagogue was in-
formed he would have to swear in as
a government employe. Still game.
Prof. Graham went to a notary
public and took the governmental
oath promising "to uphold and de-
fend the Constitution This done,
another notice went off to the
Comptroller, giving notice that
WPA Adviser Graham had taken
oath of office and was at last an em-
ploye of the government.
u0r
I'HIMOIUDIOS
SEE
ALBERT GASKINS
IF QUALITY IS YOUR GUIDE
OUR STORE
Wilt Be
YOUR STORE
GARRIS GROCERY
Be Smart
Wear a
HEBER FORBES
Model
i-Thread Chtffml
Ringlets Gaynode
Silk Hoit
79
pftif
Pure silk! Full fashwwc
They're CRYSTAL
CLEAR: Exquisite for
dressy outfits, yet stunt
New shades 8-1
J. C. PENNEY CO.
Do yon want your Kodak Films
Developed promptly and skillfnllv?
SLIPS $1.98 - $2.98
$1.00 HOSE for 69c
THE GLORIA SHOPPE
'The Foshion Comer"
Bring them to us:
BAKER'S STUDIO
BIG REBUCTI
�I ENTIRE STOCK
BEGINNING FRIDAY, JANUARY 17
DRESSES, $7.95 $395
HOSE$1.00 69
sups$1.00i .50
THE SMART SHOPPE
Across from Bonk Bldg Dickinson Avefltf
CHARLES STORE
Wishes
To Thank Your for Your Post
PATRONAGE
To Extend a Hearty Greeting
for a
PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
Watch For Teco Echo Advertising Contest In Next
1 300
CIRC U LAT I
VOLUME XII
ROOSEVELT BALL
tt HELD Op
Greenville Shares C
President's Birl
With College
��SMILING BILL" MAYO"
HIS ORCHESTRA
W. W. Lee Is Chair:
mittee at Work To M.i
Big Occasion
The thir-1 am i
:n Greenville
Roosevelt's bu I
the Campus B
SO. It is tii-
fourth birthdaj
hT'dtal by similar
out the United S1
will be divided Ex I
civic health � � �"
Springs Foui d
receiving a g� "�
turns. Tiie ball
is being spons
(Jreenvillk: and all
will participate.
"Smiling Bill x'
orchestra will fui
climax of the pi
Presidential radi
be delivered at �
expected that am
in the Campos B
address may !� bea
present.
W. W. Lee is
and all the
working to m
mheant of tin i
the raising of ft
from infantib : a
Dormitory si
attend the ball
o by meeting tl
ments:
1. Student-
dance with fr.
dips by 2 :�)) p. i
ary 30.
2. Student- v .
Cotton Parlor, -
permission book
Campos Buildii g
3. Students wh
must also sign out
sion book.
4. Students v
Cotton Parlor to
,and will not lea
time to return to
5. Student- i ;
Parlor, dismiss f
be in their resp
11:45 p. m.
The music
Special ticket- fi
may be pureha-
of twenty-live c
office of the Dean
COLLEGE ENTRANCE TOO
SAYS COLUMBIA DlRECTj
Xew York (NS1
mial report. Pra
director of adm;�
University, point,
the depression mat ;
leges had lowered
standards and had a
methods to attract sti
attempt to mainta
figures, he said, thes
have made eollege
asy, resulting in the d
value of a college degn
"There have been twonael
altering entrance req
Mr. Bowies explaii ;
iy adopted without pub
raent, has been to drop tl
tive admissions requirem ts
1930 many well established c
bad reached the point wher
refused to accept students wi
� the bottom quarter of
secondary school class.
"This condition, however,
be maintained only as long a
was a sufficient number d
cajits with good secondary
records to keep the enrollme
to pre-depression figures. H
as economic conditions ma h
Possible for many to continue
education and forced others to
tax-supported instead of pi
Histitutions, there arose an
Mediate pressure, to admit stuj
Who would formerly have bf
jeeted. Naturally many co
yielded to this pressure,
naturally the quality of theii
dents suffered.
"The other and more
Pnbliciaed form of 'liberalu
Of entrance requirements
� K





Title
The Teco Echo, January 14, 1936
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 14, 1936
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.02.154
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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