The Teco Echo, October 31, 1931







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TECO ECHO
EAST CAROLINA TEACHERS COLLEGE
VOLUME VIII
GREENVILLE, N. C SA TURDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1931.
Don Cossack
Russian Male
Chorus Coming
Serge Jaroff, Leader
Thirty-Six Former Officers In Rus-
sian Imperial Arm�Russian
Church Music. Rnszian Folk
Sengs, and Russian Soldier
Songs.
The Dn Cossack Russian Male
Chorus is coming to E. C. T. C. No-
v� mbi 17lh. This chorus is known
as "The Singing Horsemen of the
Steppes It is their first extensive
tour in America, and Teachers Col-
lege is exceedingly fortunate in being
able to secure one of the hundred
c ocert dates they are giving in their
coast to coast tour. Last year they
sang in some of the leading eastern
cities, and were received with wild
enthusiasm.
Serge Jaroff has been their leader
for the five years they have sung to-
gether. The 36 men composing the
chorus, all former officers in the Rus-
sian Imerpial Army, are now expa-
triates. During their internmeni in
a prison camp in Bulgaria, they
formed a small chorus under the lead-
ership of Serge Jaroff. who had been
choir conductor. Their fame gradual-
ly spread abroad until to-day this
chorus is considered perhaps the
greatest in the world. They always
sing in uniform and with military
precision.
They will be heard in concert only,
and will not broadcast.
NUMBER 3.
COSSACK, RUSSIAN MALE CHORUS WHO WILL APPEAR NOVEMBER 17TII.
Student Journalist
Hold Conference
"at Duke University
'radically AH North Carolina Col
leges Are Represented�Varied
Program is Carried Out.�Teco
and Teocan are Represented.
Iniation Week
Great Success
New Students
Join Societies.
STUDENT BODY
ATTEND SALE
K. W. Cobb Talks To
Students on Tobacco,
President Wright Makes Arrange
ments for Students to Attend
Warehouses in Greenville.
Emersons Entertain
New Girls At a
Special Program.
MEN NOT WANTED" IS GIVEN.
-O-
H. J. McGinnis Speaks
Before Registrars Di-
vision E. Conference.
On October 20 the E C. T. C. stti
attended the tobacco sales in Green
ville. Arrangements were made will
the warehousemen by Presidi
Wright.
K. W. Cobb. Secretary of Grc
ville Tobacco Board of Trade gavi
review on tobacco in Greenville di
ing chapel.
"Besides work he said, "toba
is a recreation He then extend
hearty welcome to all the collt
girls to visit the various warehous
"Pitt county h: crntinu ' "n '
largest tobacco growing county i
world. Sixty thousand acres
A normal crop
t I
The new girls were entertained at
a special program given by the Emer-
son Society in the Austin Hall Mon-
day evening, October 26th, from six-
twenty to seven-ten o'clock.
Henry Oglosby, Master of Cere-
monies, announced as the first num-
ber, "My Cow Wouldn't Give Milk, So
I Sold 111 in sung by Catherine Jones,
accompanied by her sister, Louise.
Miss Jones sang several popular selec-
tions.
Immediately following this, Lib
Madrin and Hattie Sylivant, "two of
Ned Wayburn's proteges tap danced.
The main feature of the program
A. A. U. W. Will
Study Universities
Faculty Members
Speaks At A. A. U. W.
play, entitled:
"Men Not
ti
the
arc
will
Howard .1. McGinnis. Registrar of
E. C. T. C. made a talk before the I grown yearly
Registrars Division of the North Car- j average 715 pounds per acre. To-
olina College Educational Conference j baeco farmers start work in Decem-
Saturday. Mr. McGinnis spoke in be- j ber when they plant the beds, and the
half of the good, bad and indifferent I sales close the following year
anted
Cast of Characters,
srgaret Bronson�Lena Cherry Als-
! brook.
I Laura Fitzsimmons�Helen Carltc ��
!Mrs. Richard D. Kellog�Margaret
Woodbury.
Helen Stoddard�Virginia Woodbury.
in
student. Some of the colleges in
February. During all that time the
North Carolina have so many failures, j farmers start working in the U
he said, that it was his purp
�;e to co. Women aid a great
deal
bae-
ihb
cmraa
Y-n-v V
help solve the problem of student fail- j work. They do most of the grading
ares. He discussed the number of j and tying.
failures and the number that should) Greenville is the largest tobacco
fail. How many of these failures, he j market in the world, and it looks like
asked, are the colleges responsible j this year it is going to sell more than
for? How many are the homes re-j any other market. This large mar-
sponaible for? How many are the j ket is the result of the interest that
students themselves responsible for?; the business and professional men
Why do they fail" Should there be have taken in it.
an arbitrary standard? Could this I The sales began at nine o'clock at
standard be supported? Shall it be the five different warehouses. Five
set up and worshipped as god? hundred and sixty piles are sold an
How many students are in college hour, which makes six piles per
by chance? There should be some minute. During a normal sales day
way of aiding students in taking the one million and a half pounds of to-
eoarse they are fitted for. If they bacco is sold. The Greenville market
are in the wrong place whose fault j is the best and is getting better
is it? Following this discussion over six
Guidance was the main j hundred students were divided into
t
gave
students who failed because they were I facuity, and attended one of the five
in the wrong place. warehouses.
The price of tobacco went up three
cents per pound the clay the college
students attended.
o
student
ic for discussion. Mr. McGinnis j groups of 125 each, and placed under
everal illustrations of college i the direction of some menr.fr of the
Summers�Irma Dell Phillips,
istle�Elizabeth Farmer.
Frances Ayres�Pansy Lanier.
Gras.c Kellog�Anne Thompson.
Another interesting feature of the
program was a number sung by the
famous Emerson Male Quartet, en-
titled, "Oh, Emerson sung to the
tune of "Sweet Adeline The quar-
tet was composed of Pansy Lanier,
Irma Dell Phillips, Mary McCormick,
and Catherine Jones. Following this
selection, Miss Jones sang, "If You
Join the White and the Blue
As a closing number, all old Eraer-
sons were asked to stand and sing the
society song.
The program was given not only as
entertainment for the new girls, but
also to show the new girls a type of
work that the Emersons will be doing
throughout the vear.
A study of the universities, their
development and history was begun
at the first meeting of the year of the
American Association of University
Women.
Miss Lucile Turner as chairman of
the program committee introduced the
theme by saying that some knowledge
of the problems of the universities of
the earlier days might be helpful to
those interested in the universities of
the present.
Miss Lois Grisby, the first speaker
of the afternoon, talking on "The
Earliest Universities gave some
jdea of the origins and institutions of
their early schools and colleges, this
was a most interesting opening of the
subject. Miss Emma Hooper follow-
ed this with a very interesting ac-
count of "The Professor and the Stu-
dent of the Middle Ages She read
extracts from old documents and
stories that proved that, after all,
teachers and students were as human
as they are now, and that the chief
difference between the old and the
new is that of buildings and equip-
ment.
The mass of business that had ac-
cumulated during the summer vaca-
tion and the important problem pre-
sented by the president suggest a busy
year ahead. Readjustment of commit-
tees, the forming of new committees,
and the. discussion of activity pro-
jects made the business meeting ex-
ceedingly interesting.
The A. A. U. W. is composed of
women who are graduates of college
and universities on the reorganize list
of class A Colleges.
LOOKING FORWARD
I
Henry Ward Beecher said: "No
! matter hove good the walls and the
, materials are, if the foundations
: are not strong, the building will
I not stand. By and by, in some
; upper room, a crack w:U appear
and men will say: 'Thei is the
crack but the cause is in the
! foundation So, if in youth you
lay the foundations of your charac-
ter wrongly, the penalty will be
I sure to follow. The crack may be
far down in old age, but somewhere
i it will certainly appear
College students are laying the
j foundations for success or failure
J in the future: the student who pre-
I pares his work regularly and well,
who engages in a limited number
of extra-classroom student activi-
ties, who conserves his time, and
who develops his personality, is
reasonably sure of success; the
loafer, the drone, the time-waster
may expect failure. It is the priv-
ilege of each student to determine
his destiny.
NOTICE.
All organizations must have per-
mission from the social committee
before they can use the auditorium.
They must also get from this com-
mittee the date on which they can
hold their regular meetings. Miss
Catherine f rcidy is chairman of
the committee.
�fefti. X&83&&
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n vi�e j
pRR piiiiiii
RACHEL McKEY,
MARJORIE FLYTHE.
The North Carolina Collegiate
Press Association held its fall meeting
at Duke University, October 22, 23,
and 24. There were approximately
forty college publications represented
The staffs of the Chroncile, Chantic-
leer, and Archive acted as host at the
convention.
The convention opened at 2:00
Thursday afternoon with the registra-
tion of delegates in the West Campus
Union, and was followed by a banquet
. 1 dance in the evening.
Fridaj the journalists attended
arious business meetings throughout
the morning, and attended the Duke-
Wake Forest football game and an-
�;� binnet in the evening. At
10:30 Saturday morning business
t&eetinga were held, and with their
adjournment at 12:30 the conference
ended.
The N. C. C. P. A. has attained
much prominence among the journa-
j listie organizations of the state. It
comprises at the present time 40 pub-
j iications representing 22 Universities
i and Colleges scattered about the
j state.
Those attending the conference
from E. C. T. C. were: Alice Tillie,
editor of the Teocan; Evelyn Wright,
I business manager of the Tecoan;
: Maggie McPherson, editor of the Teco
i Echo; Eoslyn Satterwhite, business
I manager of the Toco Echo.
The Thursday program was as fol-
lows :
2:00-6:00 P. M.�Registration of
delegates in the lobby of the West
Campus Union. Tea and Sandwiches
were served by the co-ed staff of the
Chr-nciie.
8:00 P. M.�Feature banquet in
West Campus Union. Short talks
were made by Ed Thomas, president
of the X. C. C. P. A and Martin
Green, president of the student gov-
ernment association at Duke. The
address of the evening was made by
J. C. Home, Jr of Rocky Mount, N.
C. graduate of Duke University and
president of the North Carolina Press
Association.
0:30-12:00 P. M.�Convention dance
for all uelegates by the Duke Blue
for all delegates and members of the
Duke publication staffs. Music was
furnished by the Duke Blue Devils.
The Friday program was as follows:
10n-i2:00 A. M.�Business Meet-
ing in "Y" hall of East Duke. Dele-
gates were divided into groups which
they represented. Open forum dis-
cussion was led by H. R. Devire,
director of public relations and alumni
secretary, Duke University; A. L.
Brandon, Rocky Mount Telegram; J.
B. Hubbell, Duke English department;
J. P. Hardison, of Raleigh.
2:00 P. M.�Duke-Wake Forest
football game.
8:00 P. .�-Banquet in West Cam-
pus Union. Address by Lewis Carr,
of New York Times and Saturday
Evening Post.
To-day closes initiation week at
E. C. T. C. Practically all the new
students joined one of the three Lit-
erary Societies on the campus. The
raniers succeeded in getting more
tew students. The programs of initi-
ation were each separate and each
uccessful.
Sidney Laniers
Baa! Baa! Baa! E. C. T. C. has
been inhabited by goats this past
week, or one would think so after hav-
ing heard the pitiful attempts of some
of the new girls to use goat language.
However, by the last of the week, they
had become quite successful in the art.
Perhaps the most enjoyable part of
initiation was the privilege of getting
up mornings at 6:30 to meet the old
goats, and learn from them some goat
manners and customs. Do you re-
member the old saying that one can
get used to anything? The freshmen
say they have given that a thorough
test this week, and as a result, they
have decided that it is obsolete.
Wednesday morning when they
trolled into class with their hair
dicked back, no make up on, and
adorned with their short dresses,
everyone on the campus could sym-
pathize with them, having once been
through with the same thing�or did
they need sympathy? And by the
way, did you know that belts and
sashes have gone completely out of
style? Ask a freshman.
We hated to hurt the feelings of the
co-eds, and make them lose all the fun
they're getting out of school, by not
leting the new girls talk to them, but
it was aboslutely necessary. We
hope they'll forgive us. That was a
least giving the old girls a break
wasn't it ?
"To every beginning there must b
an end and the end of this week wa
one that will not soon be forgotten.
Saturday was truly last but not least.
After the big parade and many tort-
ures through which they went, came
the big party. This truly made up for
everything they had endured during
the whole week. They nearly began
to see that after all, it was worth it.
TUCKER
President of Emerson Soc. President of Poe Society President of Lanier Soc.
Facutly Members
Attend Celebration.
MR. J. Y. JOYNER
SPEAKS IN CHAPEL.
On Saturday, Mr. J. Y. Joyner
spoke at the chapel session. Mr.
Joyner was the first chairman of the
Board of Trustees of this college and
did much toward making it the place
it is to-day.
Mr. Joyner said that good roads,
manufacturing, farming and pleasure
came second to a child. A child is the
greatest resource in this nation and
can do more than all the spindles and
trucks in the world.
Miss Davis. Miss Green, and Miss Rose
ave Enjoyable Trip�Bring
Back Interesting Report.
Miss Sallie Joyner Davis, member
of the History Department, Miss Mary
Green, member of the English depart-
ment and Miss Laura Rose member
of the History department attended
the celebration at Yorktown, October
IS and 19.
They brough back with them a de-
lightful report of both the town and
the celebration�below is a shorft
sketch of what they saw.
"My Yorktown celebration trip?-
A delightful memory of quaint co-
lonial houses, gay uniforms of con
I
tinentals and Red-coats lining 'the
narrow streets, salutes and cheers as
cur President and First Lady arrive,
silk top hats, thoughts of the present
Lord Conwallis so graciously taking
part, masses of troops in orderly ar-
ray crossing the battle-field, the
scarlet lines of the British slowly ap-
proaching and the laying dwn of their
arms, drums beating, bands playing,
old Ironsides in the harbor, thousands
of people everywhere and, best of all,
the spirit that prevaded the whole�
Not a jolly one of glorification but a
quiet strong spirit of genuine ap-
preciation of what the victory made
possible. It may sound sentimental,
I do not feel it so, but I felt as if I
were one of the man, there and yon-
der, together deeply, quietly, thankful
and happy. Was that the spirit of
America that I caught?"
REV. W. H. BRUNSON
SPEAKS AT VESPER.
Misses Nulton and Gor-
rell Render Voilin
Duet
Do we live without a purpose in
life, or do we ever come in contact
with people who have no purpose?
This questioned was asked by Rev.
Brunson, pastor of the Christian
Church, of Ayden, N. C, when he
spoke at Vesper last Sunday night.
Are you just drifting along? We
should have a purpose in college and
have the determination to succeed in
spite of all the handicaps which we
encounter. Along with our purpose
we should also have a definite plan.
Let each of us think for ourselves, act
for ourselves, even though we are
alone, if we are sure we are right our
plan should be in harmony with God's.
Each of us should have a plan and
purpose in life�a plan and purpose
for this college year�and have a
prize in view.
Well, the long-waited for week has
come and gone. This week, that both
the old and new girls looked forward
to with a good deal of enthusiasm.
The new girls looked forward with a
feeling of dread while the old girls
anticipated one of the biggest kicks
of the year. Here's when all the old
girls got revenge for their part in
last year's initiation. They have as-
sumed dictatorship and used their
authority.
Everyone expected one of the best
laughs of the season. They were
able to get to their mail without
squeezing through and being stepped
on by a mob of freshmen who had to
have their mail before breakfast.
This week the new girls had to stay
out of the postoffice until after meals.
Another thing that was dear to the
heart of every upperclassman was
that feeling that their rights of being
superior were not trampled on. Here
fo ronce they had their way. The new
girls had to stand aside for old girls
entering the dining room.
No make-up, old hats, 1928 style
dresses, and the Society pass-word
were also special features for the
week.
Saturday night was the climax, and
as the climax is always the most in-
teresting point this one was nothing
different. Cotton pajamas; old sweat-
ers wrongside out; one bedroom shoe
and one slipper; slickers, umbrellas;
hair in plaits, and noses red with lip-
stick furnished an interesting sight
for the audience.
Dr. Louis Ferdinand, 23, a grand-
son of the former German Kaiser,
worked for two years incognito at the
Ford Motor Co. in Detroit.
NOTICE!
Scribblers hold their regular
meeting on the first and third Wed-
nesday's at 6:30 in Room 212. Re-
porters and all others who are in-
terested in Journalism are urged
to attend.
i
V
1

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It
The Teco Echo
Published BiMonthly During The Col-
lege Year by The Student Govern-
ment Association of East Caro-
lina Teachers College.
Entered as set onel-elass matter De-
cember �. 1925, at the Postoffiee,
Greenville, N- C under the
Act of March ;?, 1879.
Subscription Pates for the College
Year, $l.r.O
Advertising Rates, 25c per Column
Inch per Issue
EDITORIAL STAFF
Maggie McPhersonEditor
Elizabeth Ilaywood . Managing Editor
Assistant Editors
Carolyn Conner, Marguerite Lane,
Estelle MeClees, Elizabeth
Thompson
Co-ed Staff
1. Y. WoodEditor
Eric TuckerAssistant Editor
Mamie E. JenkinsAdvisor
BUSINESS STAFF
Roslyn Satterwhite . . Business Mgr.
Mytrie Gray Hodges . . Asl Bus. Mgr.
Advertising Managers
Sara Johnson, Maty L. Pipkin, Ethel
Parker
( Circulation Managers
dare Wiliiiord Anne Thompson
Emma Lee WilkinsonTypist
M. WrightAdvisor
SATURDAY, 31, 1931.
Leisure grows in popularity,
now that so many people wonder
what is the use of working so
hard for money when you will
lose it if you try to save it.�
Elmer Davis.
It is not unlikely that in the
nexl 50 years America will be
divided into two worlds: the
world of Peter and the world of
pan,�Dr. Fulton Sheen.
Those people are strongest
who do not in an emergency let
their emotions dominate their
reason.�Aristide Briand.
Some of the new Poos seem to
blame Marjorle Flythe for their
present predicament, and are
showering their vengeance on
articles in her room. She wants
to know, "Is that nice?"
It seems that Laniers think
it's time for eo-eds to begin
primping. Certainly you have
noticed the latest versions of
Indian and Cowboy costumes
that are appearing around Aus-
tin Hall.
Two new Emersons forgot to
pay the proper respect for
Dr. Frank Wednesday morning.
Their society president reme-
died this by making the girls in-
terrupt class long enough to
make their best bow before His
Highness.
SCRIBBLERS
The Scribblers Club has been
organized so that an efficient
staff for the Teco Echo may be
-hosen. The present staff, who
have ever so slightly dipped
their fingers in ink, and attemp-
ted to put in print the news of
the campus, realize their weak-
ness and their lack of training.
It is their great hope that next
year there will be a staff to
which a newspaper and its parts
will not be strangers. It is
their desire that no other staff
will feel that the task is too big
for them.
All students, to be eligible for
the staff next ear must be a
member of scribblers, so if you
are interested in any phase of
newspaper work join the club
and support your college paper.
o
THOMAS A. EDISON.
Several days ago Thomas A.
Edison, one of the worlds most
famous men died. Yet, though
death has claimed him, no man
is more vitally living to-day
than Edison. There is probably
no living man whose influence
reaches so far and effects so
many lives as Edison through
his gigantic inventions.
A great number of his inven-
tions are essential parts of our
campus. Our electric lights,
dynamos, mimigraph machines,
radios, phonographs, and mod-
ern movies, are a result of the
great inventors works.
Edison put the millions he
made on his inventions back in-
to service for humanity. He
was no miser. Material wealth
held a very small place in the
life of this great personality.
Age was not his enemy. His
mind was still young with am-
bition and new ideas. He died
in the midst of a great dream�
the dream of a process for the
manufacture of rubber. Had
he lived it would soon have be-
come a reality and not a dream.
In coming years Biographies
will be written on him: school
children will study his life and
his works; encyclopedias will
praise him; scientist will honor
his memory; and into the far
corners of the universe his in-
ventions will serve mankind
down through the coming ages.
Open Forum
All students are urged to contri- J
hute to the Open Forum Column. !
LIBRARY LOGIC
ESSIE TESSIE
Nothing But Co-eds
(CO-ED COLUMN.)
DID YOU '
to ;
While dudk hunting iu
Mi ss Kukyendall aimed
and killed a four pound fbh.
Dr. Adams play an excell i I
game of bridge.
Onet the carm ok ; of a E. C.
T. C. Freshman an.
ntu ! ;
i a du
is to enter the r volvi
library
door iii t oo
I.
Loree Cagle received 7 U '�
the same pla e.
menti
inleiV 'ii
i dii s 1 rom
When swimming
Mr. Hollar- become
once.
Belts and sashes I av - me cm tn-
pletely out of style. Ask a Pre h-
iv.an.
That Henry Ogle by as! i 1 Mr.
Henderson the other day and s lid
"Good afternoon, Mr. Jeter
lTdo A.M.
CO-EDS JOINING SOCIETIES
Many of the Co-eds w re t�: kl
md thrown for a hi arty i- s 1 n
vhen the girls began a king Lhe
. e�U to join their Societies. Of en
Essie Says: , .
. . the Co-eds tost i iii in the end.
What a disappointment it is to some ,
�v n'dn 1 Societies have �� '
erirls when they rush to the pest, ' ,
' prominenf at E. C. 1. � . an I
a help tl
slip is the notice of a glee club meet- ! as v-c'
� leave college. It's �� in -
ing. '
The Freshmen came out "just as ' � � V'
they are" this week. No sugar coat- be308 thev � l J�� l �
ing was allowed. The old girls de-j1
cided nature meant for Freshmen t
be plain.
o
� r
i A1
j:
I i
C7t
iffue, thrilled by the thoughts of a.
package, only to find that the package j l( hi !p the ' oys a, ,K
N 0 QK V" Vfl
There Ought To Be A Law Ag
Initiation Week
'�
Well
-von �
CO-EDS
A la Daffcdils
I wandered lonely as a cl ud
Down to the P.O. to ��� Use my bill
When all atnee I h aid a li ud
She t; of laughter and of thrills;
In Austin Hall right near the sti ir
I saw a Co-ed loitering there.
I went my way as maidens do
When on some errand bent,
Again 1 heard a loving coo-
With thrills the air was rent;
I paused to learn the cause of glee
On the steps sat Co-eds, One, Tv. i
Three!
I wound my way with little choice
And through the students wiggle
When all at once I heard a voice
And a half a hundred giggled
CO-EDS ELE T CFFIC
Sec and 11 eas.
Bu incss Manas
Athlctii Comi i
�� Brown, Ch: i
Co ed Editi r Ive
Assistant Editor
Reporter G i rg
. v a
11-
ON ON
THE BOOK ROOM.
� Even 'h�- 1
that th;
I:
Wilker
DR. REBARKER CO-ED AD
I craned my neck and turned my headl Many ami
In the dooway stood another Cn-ed!t f;Kt
1 V� 1 I.
HITCH YOUR WAGON TO A
STAR.
"Nothing ventured, nothing
gained
The person who sets his goal
high is the one who obtains
heights in this life.
The higher the ambition the
higher the goal reached. If one
hitches his wagon to a star, even
though the star is not reached,
the goal reached is high; be-
cause in having such a high am-
bition and striving to realize it,
seme high degree of success will
be obtained.
Jt is the man who strives that
succeeds. The loafer and the
man who shirks his duty has no
place in the race. This is an age
of progress and forward move-
ment. If we are to succeed, if
we are to be worth while to our-
selves, and our school we must
set our goal high and strive to
reach it. We must hitch our
wagon to a star.
EMERSON, LANIER, POE ?
What society did you join?
This question was asked time
and time again all over the cam-
pus. Be an Emerson! Be a
Lanier! Be a Foe! Were the
answers they received.
With those cordial invitations
lief ore the poor freshmen, they
turned with a hopeless appeal to
the upperclassmen. "What so-
ciety must I join?" They im-
immediately met with the reply,
"Be an Emerson, Lanier, or
Foe whatever that particular
upperclassman happened to be.
So, Freshmen, since the up-
perclassmen didn't untangle the
web for you, it seems as if it was
a case of your own opinion in the
Society question. The one you
joined is the best.
There has been some discussion
lately as to why students are so care-
less with the books they use in the
library. Especially in the reference
room does one see the results of
neglect. Why is it that books are
left lying on the tables where they
were last used? Certainly it would
be easy to walk to the shelf where the
book was found, and put it again in
its place; and the work of the girls
who help there would be less. An-
other way to help both the workers
and the students who have to use the
reference books is to put the book in
its proper place. It requires only a
little more time to put volume nine
between volumes eight and ten, than
to stick it in the first vacant space
you see; but what a help to the next
one who wants to use it!
o
THE TOBACCO SALE.
On October 15th, President Wright
asked the student body if they should
like to go to a tobacco sale, especially
those who had never attended one.
Nearly everyone's hand went up. It
seemed funny that so many young
people living in the greatest tobacco
growing state in the union could have
grown up to the age of attending col-
lege and still be ignorant of the pro-
cedure of a tobacco sale.
Dr. Wright kindly consented to give
us two periods on October 20th for
these students who so desired to at-
tend a sale. Accordingly on this day
the student body assembled in chapel.
The air was keen with excitement.
Some were thrilled over the new
about-to-be experience, while others
were elated over the fact of a "class-
cut that won't count
After dividing the students into five
groups, putting each group under the
direction of some faculty member,
each leader with his followers depart-
ed to the different warehouses. Ar-
riving there the group was turned
loose to learn anything they could
from anyone they cared to ask.
About noon, after running up and
down the aisles, practically under the
auctioneer's feet, for an hour, every-
body came back. Some were the
wiser for the trip, having learned
from some men of the town a few
things of importance; yet the majority
got their blistered heels for nothing.
One thing that everyone knew was
that tobacco went up three cents per
pound while we were there. It is good
to think we do a little good in this ol'
world of ours.
helping the C -eds
The Co-eds api reci
;tratn
( !
Many smiles could be seen
when li . y h
I Reharker ws s their ad i or.
My Please remits tucked m my hand , , . .
j 'i.utvi r is u.Kmg an active i
I elbowed toward the door,
And c.n the journey upward met
Some Co-eds, Three or Four;
I cleared the stairs and made the j
grade
A Co-ed lounged on the balustrade!
I lingered at the bulletin hoard
To learn just who was coaching,
The faces 'round broke into smiles
A Co-ed was approaching;
I sauntered down the hall toward
Fleming"
I �� it is
which to h
called s'a. ci
(�' a sure to
y u
things that this
i an find it p
��. indio, pai
months.
Campus Gossip
CO-EDS' CD INCES
Life is just
We came upoi
ng c
i v. e ca t
And met a Co-ed with some women!
we are forthwith setting down i r t
benefit of all the Co-eds, Then
more truth than poetry in it.
I leaned against the window sill
To read my "Daily Paper
And at the water f tint nearby
Stoed a Co-ed and a flapper;
Laughing and joking, jolly and gay
Merry as birds on a summer day.
I sat upon the steps to read
The "News of Other Worlds
And then I moved to let them pass-
A Co-ed and some girls;
Sauntering along despite the mass
A Co-ed and a little lass.
Continuous as the Stars that shine
And sing and dance on Old Broad-
way,
They stretched in never ending line
The students, bright and gay;
And as I down the walkway sped
Ambling along was another Co-ed!
I wandered leisurely with the crowd.
Down to the Mess Hall to be fed,
And there for once I sorely missed
The bright and cheerful Co-ed;
Absent�when the grace was said
The dead-game sport�the Co-ed!
o
WHAT IS IT?
What is it that:
Makes Seniors rush hither and
thither and never have time for any-
thing.
Makes girls grow gray.
Gives one the idea that maybe her
I. Q. isn't so high after all.
Is dreaded and feared throughout
college and in the end. becomes a
pleasure.
Makes girls stay off the street and
awa trom State and Capitol.
Causes one to haunt the library.
Starts a search for long forgotten
notes.
Is an excuse usually accepted as a
reason for not preparing lessons.
Affords interesting topics for con-
versation.
Excuses one from chapel.
Seems to make Seniors feel that
they are a privileged class.
Is enjoyed more than any terms
work in college.
It is Practice Teaching.
What Is Chance?
"Cheer op.
You have two chances-
One of getting the germ
And one of not.
�nd if you et the germ
You have twe chances- -
One of getting the disease
And oiio cf not.
�nd if you get the disease
Y ii have two ch nee -
One of clyinj
And one of not.
And if yon di �
Weil, you still have two li
FRESHMEN CO-ED INITIATION. I
It won't be long now. Don'1 you !
worry Co-ed Freshie the$Tl get you ; �
by and by. The Co-eds welcome allH
the girls lo the initiation, the more
the merrier. Please don't be em
harassed girls. It; all in fun.
o
Penney's saves
you moncv go
Hosiery
� � �
Gloves
� � �
Toiletries
nrl afl the
portam ao
rued for c
J. C. PENNEY
Company, Inc.
Greenville, N. C.
LOST, STRAYED, OR STOLEN.
The Co-eds and One other person
received a sudden shock when they
read the announcement that Honor-
able Frank Tyson of Ayden, N, C,
was missing at the particular momen
he should have been present, ,m-
mediately a search w?" begun
Charles King found ni nnd carried
him on his shoul'� to the important
engagement ie shoulel have already
attended.
Had
H
h rw d you si ep j
' il d up like that?
my eyes shut.
a lv .id the name f the '
E. C. T. C? WelL it is
about the girl who dreamed
ib bugs all night?
Oh, that is easily explained. She
has Miss Wilson.
JX4TE
w,
"�
m

�jr?.mi
HOW TO LIVE.
J
v4 go on living in thi weary World.
think of the banners left still un-
furled,
And of the brave deeds left still un-
done,
For in God's eyes there is praise for
everyone.
There are many now who are going
wrong,
There aro many now who are all but
strong.
We had cur first lesson in Greek at
the Tobacco sale last week.
f
Then � � '� �e continue to '
� ignore r wait,
When with a few words according
to their state,
We- can pat them up and on at a fas-
ti r gait.
We look to much on worldly things,
We seldom think of eleath or what it
brings.
Can we expect to in His sight win
success,
When everything but this life we
never unrest?
Friend, think not only of yourself, but
� other men.
Clean e first yeursclf, then vou can
see dearly your brother to
cieanse.
For lather than be praised ten times
by this sod
I had rather be smiled at one time by
God. �
�V"
. M
S3
Monday & Tuesday
Wednesday
WILLIAM HA1NES
"The New Get Rich Quick
Wailingford'
In Othe
By aeclimal I
que and Navam �
ng themselves
National A �
Spaniards the
divorce by t
nevei befi re
Wa 1 .��. i(IP j
an ai. U tit
y ars ag . ii
historic �. .
land ii the :
the in sti
tin- Eskim
Around
Mr .
imagin:
her hoi
all he.
t�. hei
Virgini!
"Nothii
You'll no
did during
on his mi
County, it
ness-km h
Then, v I I
Septemi i i
himself ai
mighty l m
Miss Gra
of the cam
Even thoug I
this fall Mr. Pra
hunting, lit als
golf. He hasi '�
town yet but �
While up there
Hams burg and Ji
IIuw man i
Dr. Meadows
fact He v. r.
hundred fifty ;
and Carteret I
some farm lain
visits the se oui
Mrs. Spillman just g
She went up to Y n
and she's going
Convention in n
November 9, 10, ai :
been called a day earl
a member of the Gem
being one of the three
"I've been wirkii
figuring, figii big,
Mr. McGinnisI
Wednesday andi
Registrar's secti
�olina College
speech on "Whv :
How to PreventIt
Mr. IScidesimer
been off any wh i
taught here in
maiiu'd in Cm em . I
eammer. "But,
and father and ail
visited me then
Mr. Deal reports thai
Elizabeth, class of 1930
watch offered by TavaJ
Company throuiirh W. L
pany to person must elo
ing number of watches m
by Tavannes Company in
Miss Williams says she'
she hasn't bees anywhc
anything lately except
letter h nne and read somi
little th ngs like that
Mrs. Bradsher stayed at
�during summer school
Mrs. Bloxton at the elosel
school she visited Raleigh,
home. She also spent a
relatives in Boxboro.
Mr. Flanagan attended
ing of the National Tax
and Southern Eastern EceJ
sociation in Atlanta, G
week. He reports to have
good discussions and
papers read. He paid a si
his home in Chattanooga
on his trip and returned to
Sunday night.
-





a m
i w
!N 7
insl
rJ?��3l
1
in �
(
���'SSBfc
I
I uesday
1IA1NES
Rich Quick
In Other Parts of The World
By acclimation, but with the Bas-
que and Navarre delegations absent-
ing themselves in protest, the Spanish
National Assembly last week gave
Spaniards the constitutional right of
divorce by mutual consent. Spain
never before has granted divorce.
Washington�(IP) � Discovery of
an ancient piece of armor, worn by a
northland warrior perhaps a thousand
years ago, in an excavation of a pre-
historic village on St. Lawrence Is-
land in the Bering Sea, has added to
the mystery surrounding the origin of
the Eskimo.
Among those being urged as a suc-
cessor to the late Senator Dwight YV.
Morrow of New Jersey is President
John drier Hibben of Princeton Uni-
versity.
Spain has broken the age-long com-
bination of church and state by voting
that the state no longer has a national
religion!
According to Henry B. Collins, Jr
the finding of beautifully carved tools.
weapons and ornaments at the site
makes it almost certain that the na-
tives of that region came from Asia.
Around The World
With The Faculty
Mrs. Jeter had the best time
imaginable this summer. She went to
bcr hom in l.ynchburg, Va and say
ill I her old friends�just entertained
to her hearts content. She toured
Virginia one week with her son.
'�Nothing eventful but I had a very
pleasant time she states.
You'll never guess what Mr. Gimm
did during his vacation. He worked
on his mother's farm in Greene
County, Its the first time in '�Good-
ness-knows when" that he's done that.
Then, when everybody was gone in
September he stayed there right by
himself and worked. He had a
mighty lonesome time.
Miss Gray said she had not been off
of the campus since the term began.
Even though Bill Hearne's isn't here
this fall Mi. Frank still goes squirrel
hunting. He also plays quite a bit of
g�.lf. He hasn't been up to York-
town yet but he hopes to go this fall.
While up there he plans to visit Vil-
liamsburg and Jamestown.
How many of you folks know that
"Dr. Meadows is a farmer? It's a
fact. He owns three thousand five-
hundred fifty acres of land in Craven
and Carteret County. He also owns
some farm land near Washington. He
visits these quite frequently.
Mrs. Spillman just goes everywhere.
She went up to Yorktown Saturday
and she's going to the Baptist State
Convention in Winston-Salem on
November 9, 10. and 11. She has
been called a day early because she is
a member of the General State Board,
being one of the three women on it.
"I've been working like a Turk�
figuring, figuring, figuring stated
Mr. McGinnis I went to Durham
Wednesday and Thursday to the
Registrar's section of the North Car-
olina College Conference. I made a
speech on "Why Student Fail and
How to Prevent It
Mr. Picklesimer says he has not
been off any where this fall. As he
taught here in summer school, he re-
mained in Greenville also during the
summer. "But, "he said, "my mother
and father and all the little ones
visited me then
Mr. Deal reports that his daughter,
Elizabeth, class of 1930 won a $40.00
watch offered by Tavannes Watch
Company through W. L. Best Com-
pany to person most closely estimat-
ing number of watches manufactured
by Tavannes Company in forty years.
Miss Meade and Miss Correll re-
port that: The music class he'd its
first practice recital Wednesday eve-
ning in the Campus Building. Th c
taking part were: Mary Robb, Edna
Farrow, Evelyn Maynard. Dorothy
Humphreys. Maude Reyonlds, Edith
Marslen ler, Melba Watson and Eliza-
beth Smith.
The practice recitals are held twice
each month.
The program on Wednesday eve-
ning was exceptionally well rendered.
: Society:
'RESBYTERIAN GIRLS
DELIGHTFULLY ENTERTAINED
Monday evening, the Presbyterian
girls enjoyed a delightful party al the
Presbyterian Church. As we Reared
the church grounds, a witch directed
us to a wide open space where every-
one was gathering. Here we were
divided into different groups�owls,
bats, cats, devils, etc. Contests be-
tween the groups followed. Each
group elected its cheer leader and
yelled for its contestant. Unhappily,
the "devils as usual won out in the
contests. But the "bats" received the
prize for the most pep.
Each group then lined up and filed
into the basement of the church, where
many skeltons, and ghosts gave u- all
creepy feelings�although we did try
to convince ourselves that it was only
Halloween. A very appalling ghost
story was told to the dumb stricken
crowd. Then we were 'Mowed to go
into the numerous booths to learn our
fate in many different subjects�
Francis Harvey's occupation, by the
way, is to be a sweet, loving mother!
Some learned that they would inherit
money at the age of 45. Of course
some of the prophecies were not so
pleasing.
We were again allowed to go out
on the grounds. But we were led on
mysterious paths. Happily all along
the way we found peanuts, apples,
doughtnuts, marshmallows, and last of
all a big cup of hot tea to warm our
dampened spirits after our trip to the
underworld.
It was a real party. Thanks to the
Presbyterians!
-O-
SUPPER WITH MRS. HOWARD.
Miss Williams says she is sorry but
she hasn't been anywhere or done
anything lately except "to write a
letter home and read some and a few
little things like that
Tuesday night the nominating com-
mittee of the Student's Club met at
the Parrish House to decide on the
nominees for this year. The mem-
bers of the committee found on ar-
riving at the Parrish House that they
were to cook supper which they did
with much enjoyment. The table
was set in front of the open fire in
the Students Center, and a sapper
consisting of steak, potato chips,
pickles, jam, hot rolls, and coffee was
served. After supper every one sat
around the fire and toasted marsh-
mallows.
Those present were the members of
the committee: Carolyn Conner, Marg-
uerite Lane, Catherine Faugher, Joy
Pickard, Mrs. Howard and Capt.
Estabrook.
Mrs. Bradsher stayed at E. C. T. C.
during summer school. She helped
Mrs. Bloxton at the close of summer
school she visited Raleigh, her former
home. She also spent a week with
relatives in Roxboro.
Mr. Flanagan attended a joint meet-
ing of the National Tax Association
and Southern Eastern Economical As-
sociation in Atlanta, Georgia, last
week. He reports to have heard very
good discussions and interesting
papers read. He paid a short visit to
his home in Chattanooga, Tennessee
on his trip and returned to E. C. T. C.
Sunday night.
At the Blue Ridge Conference this
summer East Carolina Teachers Col-
lege was represented by Cullie Staf-
ford and Millie Moore.
Miss Annie Morton went to Beau-
fort Monday afternoon, taking with
her her mother, who had been with
her since Sunday morning. She re-
turned Wednesday.
Mrs. A. D. Frank delightfully enter-
tained at a buffet dinner Saturday
night a group of history majors.
(Continued on Page 4)
THE CHARLES STORES CO.
Wish To Thank
THE COLLEGE GIRLS
For Their Interest Shown In The Style Show
Of Yesterday
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COTY'S FACE POWDER 79c
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Phone No. 500 Greenville, N. C.
i
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BPH8MI

i





KKPORTOUIAI. STAFF.
Y W. C. A.�Elizabeth Denny.
Poe Society -Catherine Flasher.
Emerson Society�Annie C. Baker.
I anier Society�Myrtle G. Bodges.
Senior Class-Leila EBen Belk.
Junior Class-Bertha Walston.
English Club-Nina Walston.
Athletic AssoGrace Williford.
AlumnaeKatherine Wahl.
Co-ed Club �George WOkersom.
Views of Faculty
Hazel Willis was discovered making
doll dresses in her room last night,
E C Hollar was seen last night
washing dishes. He doesn't like for
us to know he is hen peeked but�
Lucille Turner forgot she wasn't
taUdng to her freshmen class when
she said, "Shame on you" to 1 -
Wright
Did you see Laura Rose taking her
daily dozen the other day? Some
teachers can be most undignified when
they try.
lay morning at 10:00 o'clock in the
ipartment of the brides parents in
he historical Maxwell House.
The marriage united two old and
widely known North Carolina families,
he bride being the daughter of the
ate Frederick Clifford Spence and
, grand-daughter of R. B. Babington,
,f Gastonia, N. C. She received her
arly education at Marion Junior Col-
lege, Marion, Va and later attended
East Carolina Teachers College,
Greenville, N. C, where she graduated
n June, 1931 .
The bridegroom is a prominent
voung business man of Greenville, a
graduate of the University of North
Carolina and a member of the Delta
Sigma Phi Fraternity.
O
VttlLETIC ASSOCIATION
HOLDS MEETING.
SOCIETY NEWS
(Continued ir tn Page 3)
Miss Morton, Miss Wahl, Miss
McCee, and Miss llyman spent the
week-end of October IKih, in Norfolk
Virginia. The parly chose the Manteo
route to Norfolk. Many places of in-
terest including Kill-Devil Hill, Nag's
Head, and Fort Raleigh were visited
by the touring party.
Athenians Get More New Members
Misses Catherine Cassidy, M.iry
Greene, Lois Grigsby, Louise Williams
and Agnes Wadlingtcn motored te
Washington for dinner Saturday
night.
SUNDAY SCHOOL CLASS
WAS ENTERTAINED
SENIOR DOINGS
Through the cow
I wish to e � I
can: ing y u n�
appointment 0
ion i f
P
my aa
able I
Did you see the excited group of
?irls Saturday in the parlor having
their fingers measured for rings .
Ves! They were Seniors, and the
Senior rings are ord" As Presi-
dent Wright says, there i. always ajyoa so loi
Lime when a girl wants her finger � r. � k f
measured; and this was one of the j
times. This year the rings are being
bought from our local dealer, Mr.
Rest, so we are as. ured of satisfac-
tion.
Girls, yen have something to look,
forward to before Christmas. What
is it? The Senior play. The Com-
mittees are working hard trying to
fleet, the play and the coach.
Lost a Senior privilege. The priv-
ilege of having nothing to do when
�or
my regrets for
:ii j so much dis-
afternoon. II" l"
Uthma 1 v.as un-
SOPHOMORES i:
�: i �i
ll i
� the "joy
f� IV. aid to.
.( u are a Senior a
t E. C. T. C. Whi n
Baa!
LILLY
ride '
Hi 1
truly,)
i T.
At the Sophomo
beld in Boom 113,
October 22, Stella B
pre ident, and Mai
pre ident.
Other ffie, is el
Lynn Pipkin, sen
Crawford, fcreasui
Humphrey, studei I
,enta ive
�tentative
tuth
A r.n�
Hi
n
��'
Fi
n a
Sallie Joyner couldn't even find
Roanoke Island on the map yesterday.
The pressure around here was too
much for Beecher last week. He had
to take a week end vacation. Of
course he said he was attending some
kind of a meeting hut-any how Miss
Morris persuades him to chase all the
girls out of his room immediately
after class. Their crushing" may
prove fatal.
On October 17th, the old and new
members of the Athletic Association
met in the Campus Building. There
are two teams of the association-the
Athenians and the Olympians. The
captains of both teams did good work
in gaining new members. Bertha
Walston was successful in gaining the
most members for the Athenian team.
Various games, contests, dancing
and refreshments were enjoyed. We
hope the girls' interest in athletics
will continue.
It is the desire of the Athleic As-
sociation to make the basket ball
games an event that every one will
enjoy. This will require work. If
there is any one who does not know-
where the ball court is�it is on the
back campus. Come out and practice
with your team.
I wish I could have seen Howard
McGinnis the other day when the
policeman got him for flirting.
Dr. and Mrs. Rebarkcr delightfully
entertained a group of the college
class from the ' Immanuel Baptist
Church, at their home on Tuesday
afterno n. The party was entirely in-
formal, as the main object was to
have all the girls become acquainted
with each other, and with he teacher.
The girls greatly enjoyed the games
of anagrams and Ping Pong which
were played throughout the after-
noon.
The guests were invited to try their
art of candy making, and there seem-
led to be quite a few artists, if their
candy was a sample of their work.
At five-thirty the guest expressed
their thanks for the good times af-
forded them by their host and hostess.
and departed for the college much en-
couraged by the results of an after-
noon of fun.
we were Freshmen, we understood
that the Seniors bad a privilege of
having nothing to do. Now that we
tre Seniors we find that it was in
rain illusion or else the privilege has
(�ill lost. If found, the Senior?
would appreciate its being returned to
them.
o
V
l i
as s
m ��� �
ib K
t-day
ice
'II
� a i
R nt.
I
�I ).i
T done
"W1
n r.
Albert Einstein, it is said
seen without his pipe.
Jdith
gears
never made
I error, and
it 1 taV.n it
t I want to
baritone or
oure not.
Pre iii
dent
� f C
T
w
! ICTTIRE SHOV -
APPEAR HI
THE Ki: i
111
�i ml
.1
r
is rarety
m C
Dec
ibei 12
sber 19
SCRIBBLERS HOLD REGULAR
MEETING WEDNESDAY.
A Class in Journalism is to be Con-
ducted.
FORMER STUDENT TO
APPEAR ON PROGRAM
At a New York State Conference
soon to be held in New York City,
Julia Taylor of the class of '21 is to
appear on the program. Her subject
will be, -Minimum Public Welfare
Work for Children
Julia has been doing welfare work
in New York for a number of years
and has been very successful in it.
o
MEETING OF ALUMNAE
OFFICERS.
A meeting of the Alumnae officers
was held at the home of Miss Graham,
Friday evening, October 16th, for the
purpose of discussing plans for the
coming year. Those present were:
Miss Graham, Miss Jenkins, Deanie
Boone Haskett, President of the As-
sociation and Grace Smith who is
corresponding secretary.
��o�
VISITORS.
Quite a number of our former stu-
dents were visitors on the campus this
week.
Edna Thomas West, of the A. B.
class of '31 was a visitor here this
week-end. She is teaching at Pantego.
Miriam Mullen, A. B. class of '31,
was a visitor on the campus during
the week.
was on the campus this week. She is
teaching in the grammar grades of
Stokes.
Mrs. W. T. Crater, who was Inez
Pittman, of Washington, N. C, visited
relatives in Greenville during the
summer.
Miriam Ausbon of the two-year
class of '31, who is teaching at Chicod
was on the campus this week.
Bettie- Pearl Fleming is again
teaching in High Point, N. C.
Irene Fleming, who is teaching in
Raleigh, was home for the week-end
recently.
Louise Hudgins of the two-year
class of '30 was on the campus this
week. She is also teaching at Stokes.
Elizabeth Carswell, of the freshman
class is the third member of her
family to attend school here. Her
step-mother, who was Miriam Sham-
hart, was here in "22 and "23. They
now.live in Jacksonville, Fla.
Besides her step-mother, Elizabeth's
aunt, who was Thelma Shamhart
graduated from here in '21. Thelma
is now Mrs. Guy E. Weeks of Peters-
burg, Virginia. She has two children
Thelma and Guy, Jr.
The Scribblers met Wednesday, Oc-
tober 21st, in the club room to learn
more about editing a paper.
Miss Grigsby, who had previously
been asked to meet with the club, gave
a very interesting discussion, and
some practice on beginning straight
news articles. She gave the five W's
of a news story�Who, What, Where,
When and Why� and to these she
added How.
o
THE VIOLIN ENSEMBLE
HAS REORGANIZED.
HIGH LIGHTS IN CHAPEL
President Wright made a very good
comparison on Friday at chapeL He
compared the interest taken by the
state in highways of knowledge and
highways of commerce. There ha-
been placed on gas a higher tax s
that good roads may be constru ted
hut the state has seen fit to discour-
age education by deducting 20 from
the salary of teachers.
Shall we neglect the child, allow its
life to be less complete, and subtract
from its chances of success, or shall
we build more and better roads?
The violin ensemble has re-
organized under the leadership of
Miss Gorrell. This is a small group
playing music for violin, piano, flute,
and cello, and meets on Thursday
evenings.
IT'S A SHAME!
By Bertha Walston
Funny, why I never thought of it,
Yret I seldom ever think.
Funny, why I never thought I loved
you.
'Til that afternoon, sitting by the
brink.
The water, how it sparkled
In the last rays of sun!
And the scenery all around us seemed
to be a painting
That some artist had neatly done.
Throwing in a dusk of sunset
And letting a stream go rippling
through,
Then he gave the finishing touch
By carelessly dropping a spot of paint.
And he let me call it you.
The trees were standing 'round
A whispering hope to me,
And you sat looking in the water
Where our images you could see.
But I wasn't thinking of our images,
Nor the sunsets beautiful hue;
The thought that occupied my mind
Was, simply, that I loved you.
Funny, why I never thought of it,
And why I didn't try to kiss you!
It's a shame I wasn't thinking,
Yet I seldom ever do.















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�-V
A recent marriage of interest waf
that of Miss Mary Wilson Spence
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jamef
Clarke of Nashville, and Marvin Dixon
Sugg, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry C.
Sugg of Greenville, N. C.
The marriage was solemnized Tues
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THANKSGIVING HOLIDA1
BEGIN NOV. 25.
VOLUME VIIJ
Armistice Day
Legion Prograi
Is Great Succel
Gypsy Smith, Jr Spe;i
To Large Auddienc
MRS, J 11. H VLDROP SIM
The Armistice Daj Pn gran
the American Legion �
ed, wa- hi in the Campu I
of the Hart Carolina achei i
on Wednesday, Novi tnber
11:0(1 o'clock. Thi P I
twet-n the files f
took their places at
o'clock taps wen sound) .
Reverend W II. C � rl
invocation. Th� audio
sang "America. In tl
President Wright, Di I
wan in charge of the
Mrs. J. II. Wakh
heart of the Posl, deligl
accompanied by Mrs. Sn
lege sang the chorus I ;
Home Fires Burning" an : Mi
drop sang the verses.
Dr. Adams riti duced I
by saying that be ha I
perfect or an adequat
speech, arid tl al e a
m-vcr been laid � n b
present to the audit-no
greatest evangel I reachei
lived- Rev. Mr. Gj
reason for this popu irii
took up hi. fal bei
ing a message :
everyone.
Mr. Smith began h 5 tall
ing Dr. Adams in the
his father was bo 1 ng . �
Gypsy's father is preachii g .
delphia with 618 churcl -
him. He is 72 years Id has
ed for ")5 years on five �
Gypsy thinks that his fathei
are the only people in tl na1
have never had an accredit! . I
nr an accredited missionary
them. They have on!y beei
fore the sheriff.
Mr. Smith said: "I iiki tl
way of celebrating Armi ti �
much tetter than the Am i
day at 11:00 o'clock in Englai
store is closed, every wheel s
every man, woman and child, v
at home, in school or in thi -
for a few moments to . I
those men who paid thi
sacrifice. Every airplam
its course so planned that it �
be in flight at this tinu
We go hack today so that �
understand the less ns th ;
problems of the present
prophesies of the future. E
gave to the colonies a bn it! �
government and this they
more, and so they fought f
think that the Mother Country
have understood her child bet
do not think they were ever dh
I think it was purely a ma
separation.
There was a period of tra
the new form of govermm ,
we were faced with the quest
slavery arid states rights '� �
War was begun, and for fi or yea
continued. Following this
period of great progress: Win i
at the State of Texas. I find :
land, England, Wales, Italy, S
Portugal, and Belgium o a d
placed in it and still havi
land remaining to make 61 stau
size of Rhode Island. If I e
Ireland and drop it down in the G
Lakes, it would make only the si
est island. The Rhine, the Rl
and the Tiber would not be s,
as the mouth of the Mississippi.
"And then 1914 came. I eaa
forget it. I was sitting in my ro.irJ
the city of Cambridge, when my f at
rushed in with a telegram in
hand. It was from London, and it
from Lord George. My father
called to meet that man in Londo
once. Sometime later he rushed
and said: 'My God, it's war
Kitchener had just told the Brit
cabinet that there were twenty
or twenty-four thousand soluil
ready to go to war. These he
could be placed in back of the Erei
at a moment's notice. Lloyd Gei
hesitated and said: No, those
came back would come back
cripples. But Lloyd George could
keep back these men; however, wl
he did have to send his countrynj
(Continued on Page 6)
J
����lIStBi�
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Title
The Teco Echo, October 31, 1931
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 31, 1931
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.02.98
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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