The Teco Echo, October 3, 1931






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THE TECO ECHO
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��.457 CAROLINA TEACHERS COLLEGE
VOLUME VIII
GREENVILLE, N- C, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1931.
THE FRESHMEN
REGISTRATION
BIG SUCCESS
The Freshmen of K. C. T. C ar
rived Monday afternoon and Tuesday
morning, September 28 and and 29th.
They were met at the train and bus
bj the members of the Y. W. C. A
cabinet The rooms were assigned U
them at Cotton Hall by the Dean oi
Women, Miss Annie L. Morton.
Lunch was served Tuesday at one
o'clock and following that all students
gathered in tin- Social Religous Build
ing. Dr. Meadows talked to them a
few minutes on the "Purpose of
Freshmen Week Following his
talk Dr. Wright, President of the Col-
lege, made an address. He welcomed
the Freshmen most cordially and let
them know that he was a friend of
the Freshmen.
Miss Kuykendall conducted some
music that was much enjoyed by all
the new girls.
"Student relationship to the Treas-
urer" was discussed by Mr. Spillman,
and "Student Relationship to tht
Registrar" was disscussed by Mr. Mc-
linnis.
Mi. Fort, chairman of the appoint-
ment committee, g ve them a briel
talk on Vhat Course Shall I Take?'
From four o'clock to five all Fresh-
nun toured the campus under the di-
rection of the student council.
Dinner was served in the old dining
hall at six o'clock.
The students gathered once more ir.
the auditorium at seven o'clock, ane
were introduced to the student gov-
ernment officers and the dormitory
officers. A short talk was made by
Miss Morton, and was followed by
college songs and yells by the cheer
leader.
Wednesday morning they registered
and paid their bills. In the evening
th y Isenibled in the suditorium
where they were introduced to the
major organizations on the campus.
College customs were discussed by
members of the student body. Rule
and regulations were explained and
pointed out by Millie Moore, president
of the student government.
Conduct at entertainments was dis-
cussed by the chief marshal.
Other courtesy talks were made on
the use of the Library, dining halls.
postoffiee, chapel, quiet hour and
study hour.
Thursday morning they met with
the House Directors in the dormi-
tories. This was followed by a physi-
cal examination at the infirmary.
At seven-thirty a free moving pic-
ture was shown in the auditorium of
the Austin Building.
MISS MORTON
SPEAKS TO THE
NEW FRESHMEN
o
In ending up an interesting talk to
the Freshmen Miss Annie L. Morton,
Dean of Women said:
Of course we have regulation here,
because there certain inhibitions and
prohibitions in the college experience
that the wise, discreet, respectful
person will recognize and cooperate
with.
Q. How to fit into your environ-
ment ?
1. Ask advice freely.
2. Accept help freely.
Put your best foot forward.
Make the best start possible.
Succeed as a roommate.
Be business like.
Consider your house director
friend. Make every effort tn
her part to make you comfortable ar.d
happy.
S. Form good study habits.
9. Meeting school social oblig -
tions.
10. Observe the requirements of the I generations How are we
j pay this debt? We realize
3.
4.
5.

7.
your
STUDENT BODY
ENJOYS TWO
GOOD PICTURES
Two shows have welcomed the stu-
dent body to their coming year at the
college.
Thursday evening, after registra-
tion, the students were thrilled by the
breathtaking experiences of "The
Lady Who Dared Billie Dove gave
a superb performance as the wife of
an American Ambassador, Sidney
Hlacknier, Conway Tearle, who was
once with the Carolina playmakers,
wa- excellent in the role of a smugg-
ler.
Saturday the student body again
flocked to the auditorium to see the
less exciting but just as interesting
story of "The Children of Dreams
Although the two pictures were of
entirely different types, they were
both accepted heartily by the students.
THEEMERSONS
WELCOME YOU
As the new year begins, once more
the Emersons welcome the new girls
to our campus. In 1&26 we began the
blazing of a trail into new fields of
literary endeavors, and to every new
girl we say, "Will you not go with
us on our adventure?" We're glad
you are here and we're willing to help
you any way to become adjusted to
your new surroundings.
RACHEL McKEY.
AROUND THE I
WORLD WITH
THE FACULTY
" 'Teacher, teacher, where have you
been ?'
'I've been�' "
The answers are numerous. Some i
I
have traveled, and others have stayed i
at home.
Mr. E. L. Henderson remained in
Greenville.
Dr. Adams spent two weeks vaca- i
tion in Richmond and Washington,
"seeing ball games and shows, looking
at the stars, and lots of other things
Mr. McGinnis took a ten day trip, '
passing through North Carolina and
Virginia, and over the mountains of
West Virginia, to his childhood home
in Danville. There he stayed part of
he week. After traveling through
Maryland, he spent a few days in
Washington, and then returned home, j
After staying awhile at her home in
-?alem. N. J Miss Newell studied for
six weeks at Columbis University, and
then went to camp.
Miss Charlton stayed in Savannah.
' leorgia.
Dr. Meadows went, during the sum-
ner, to his home in Shelbyville, Tenn.
Miss Mamie Jenkins after teaching
lere in summer school, went to Nags
lead. Pen Mar, Md Baltimore, and
ew York.
Miss Lois Grigsby stayed at White
lorn, Tenn.
Her home in Abbeville, S. C,
laimed Miss Greene through the
-ummer.
Miss Turner stayed at home, also,
n Pulaski, Tenn.
Mr. Deal stayed four days away
rom Greenville. Two he spent in
A'hite Lake, and two in Richmond.
Miss Thompson stayed in Leasburg.
North Carolina.
Another who chose to stay at home
is Mr. Picklesimer.
Mr. Cummings taught during sum-
mer school in the North Texas State 5ChooL Loyalty to the institution.
Teachers College, in Denton, Texas, h School organizations.
The remainder of the time he stayed 12. Be sure to write letters home.
in Trenton, Tenn. o
Dr. Frank stayed in Savannah.
Tenn. He remarked, "That's a big
town. It has a blacksmith shop, and
a grocery store; and I stayed, most of
f the time, in the grocery store
Mr. Holler went to Peabody Col-
lege, in Nashville, Tenn. One week
if his six weeks vacation he stayed in
Richmond. During the time, he saw
lamestown and Williamsburg. The
�emaining five weeks he stayed at
home, "helping Mrs. Hollar make
preserves, and can things
Miss Sallie J. Davis spent her vaca-
tion at Camp Toxanay.
For six weeks, Miss Laura T. Rose
vas at the Wisconsin University sum-
mer school. The rest of the summer
he "washed dishes" at her home,
Marine-on-St. Craix, Minn.
During her vacation, Miss Kath-
arine Holtzclaw saw New York,
Clarksville, Tenn Black Mountain,
and Asheville.
Miss Dora Meade was in Victor.
New York.
Mrs. Bloxton stayed in Williams-
burg and Driver, Va.
Miss Kuykendall stayed in Lexing-
ton, Ky.
New England called the Misses
Gorrell and Gray.
Miss Margaret Sammon and her
mother stayed for a week at Ridge-
crest.
Miiss Lewis went to new York, and
Miss Bonnewitz stayed in Van West,
Ohio.
Dr. ReBarker stayed "on the cam-
pus"�in the library and in Austin
Hall.
Miss Graham preferred to remain
at home in Warrenton, N. C.
Miss Williams stayed in Greenville,
Kentucky.
Dr. Slay taught for six weeks in the
University of North Carolina in
Chapel HiU.
Miss Cassidy stayed at her home in
Cleveland, Ohio.
Miss Wilson seems to want, not
only to "keep her vacation instead of
"spending" it, but also to "keep" to
herself what she did during the sum-
mer. However, from the information
she gave, we find that she stayed
mostly in Chapel Hill. She traveled
quite a bit, having gone to Pennsyl-
vania, and "the states in bewteen
For about three months Mr. Beecher
Flanagan haunted the state library in
Raleigh, delving into "old books and
dusty records Afterwards, he
traveled in Tennessee, Arkansas,
NUMBER 1
THE Y. W C. A
MAKES GOOD
BEGINNING
Friday evening at 6:30 th.
A. held its first meeting of
with a lai
new girls.
ram
V. W. (
'ist meeting of the year
audience of both old and
1 very inter, st ing pro-
gram was carried out The V. V.
was delighted with itsleaders and its
I'lrtVll
Th
ey extend
Welcome t(
PRESIDENT ROBE?! H. WRIGHT
SSES THE FRESHMEN
every one to morning watch held at
7:30 in the mornings.
COLLEGE OPENS
ITS TWENTY-
SECOND YEAR
E. C. T. C. opened its doors for the
; twenty-second year on September
'28th. with an enrollment which
! amounted to about 827 students.
The faculty, student council, Y. W.
C. A. cabinet, and the girls who hold
; working-positions on the campus co-
I operated wonderfully in making
1 Freshmen week a great success.
The president of the Y. W. C. A.
and the student government president
and officers met the trains and busses
that were loaded with Freshmen, and
showed them the way to the deans of-
fice and to their rooms.
The dormitories are all filled. The
Freshmen finished their registration
on Wednesday. The upper classmen
registered on Thursday. Friday the
regular class work began
There have been several changes
made this year. Freshmen and Sen-
iors are not allowed to carry but six-
teen hours of work, while Juniors and
Sophomores maximum of work is
eighteen hours.
No student is eligible to practice
teaching or graduation without an
average grade of a three.
Georgia, and other Southern states.
Miss Annie Morton stayed at her
home in Beaufort, North Carolina.
Mr. Fort went to York, S. C.
Miss Redwine taught summer
school here for six weeks, and spent
the remainder of the summer at her
home in Monroe, North Carolina.
Miss McGee stayed at her home in
LaGrange, Georgia.
Miss Elizabeth Hyman went to
summer school at Columbia Univer-
sity. The latter part of the summer
she spent in Rocky Mount.
Miss Frances Wahl stayed in Ar-
kansas, "running around everywhere"
Miss Willis went to Raleigh and
Wilmington.
Mr. Ginn stayed in Goldsboro.
Miss Wadlington was in Cadiz, Ky.
Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Henderson
went to Florida. I
Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Wrirght, Mrs
Spillman, and Miss Ross spent a wee c
in New York City.
Young friends, we are delighted to
have you with us at this beginning
of this college year. Dr. Meadows
says you have started on a four-year
voyage and will get acquainted with
each other�he took a trip and got
seasick, but still made friends�1 ex-
pect you will get homesick, in fact.
hope you will. If you want to cry go
ahead. There is no regulation against
it. But seriously, we are delighted
that you have found it so you can
come to college this year, and doubly
pleased to have you here with us.
George Peabody made this statement
on one occasion "Education, a debt due
from present to future generations
If the people of this great Republic of
ours could realize the great truth in
those few words by that great man
who loved his fellowmen�"Education,
a debt due from present to future
going to
(some of
j us do) that it is a debt that the State
of North Carolina owes; to the boys
i and girls of this old state of ours.
And North Carolina is striving, some-
times successfully, sometimes unsuc-
cessfully, but always with earnestness
to pay this debt that the present gen-
eration owes to the one coming for-
ward. For that reason the State of
North Carolina has built this insti- .
tution. Two million dollars, in round
numbers, have been spent here to give
the young white men and women who
wish to become teachers an opportun-
ity to get that kind of education which
will give them the greatest opportun-
ity to be of service in paying the debt
which we owe to the children of North
Carolina who are here. You have
come to this institution because it i
the institution of your choice; you
have come with a purpose, because
that has been characteristic of every
freshman class that has entered our
institution. You have come from
your homes with the determination
that you are going to fulfill a part, at
least, of the ambition of your lives
and the ambition of those back home
who have made sacrifices that yon
might come to college. You will meet
teachers and officers who have dedi-
cated their lives to the young people
of this state, but it is just as well
that I tell you at the beginning that
we cannot educate you. All this or-
ganization, all this money spent by tht
state, all the efforts put forward, the
annual appropriation of a hundred and
fifty thousand dollars is here to give
you an opportunity to educate your-
selves. It is an individual proposi-
tion. Do not work for your teachers.
Do not work for a grade. You are
here to grow and develop intellectual-
ly, to acquire facts, to get knowledge,
to get power that will enable you to
go back and be of service somewhere
in some community in this state, but
it is your jon. These teachers and of-
ficers are your friends. I am glad to
tell you young people that you have
come to a college where the whole or-
ganization is working together as one
perfect unit to help the students who
come here to attain the things that
they left home to attain, but it is
your job.
There is one thing that I find not
only among college students but a
large number of people in the world�
the horror of saying "I don't know
If you don't know, say so. That's
why you are here to learn. A high
school graduate went with his father
to see the president of the college in
which he planned to enroll and when
ENTERTAINMENT
COMMITTEE HAS
STARTED WORK
The entertainment committee is
working hard to bring to us good
entertainments this year among those
asked by the president, "How much d
you Know? he said, "I'm not sure
that I know anything The presi-
dent's answer was that perhaps h
-h� aid be enrolled in the senior class.
as it usually took a student three j
years to learn that.
Admit that you don't know and ask !
and you will find people here who will
take real pleasure in helping you find
the information you wish. A large
nuinbet of students are here now just
t be of service to you. The college
authorities haven't required these j
girls to come back, and the State of
North Carolina hasn't paid the ex- !
uense of it; they have come just be-
can o they want to help you. And
that spirit runs all through this col- j
i ge. Acquire knowledge, get all the
information you can, and when you
don't k ,ou, ak,
Ignorance, 1 sometimes think, is the
worst influence in the world. Ignor-
ance, the world over, has done more
damage to the human family than
war, famine, and pestilence combined.
George Washington probably died be-
cause of the ignorance of doctors who
attended him. Many, many young
men and women have died because of
the ignorance of those who were sup-
posed to doctor them. The terrible
condition this world is in today is be-
cause of the ignorance that has domi-
nated, the ruling classes in the vari-
us nations of the world. We are
bere as a band or an army with out-
faces to the world's worst enemy�
ignorance, and endeavoring to help
subdue that enemy. You have come
to join the ranks and we are here to
help y u. We want to help you make
the fight.
You are not going to find things
here like they were back home. I had
a girl come to college here one time
who brought a feather bed in her
I sunk. She stayed about three weeks
came to me in tears; was going home;
; lust "couldn't stand it etc. Finally
aid the food was the trouble, said
there wasn't anything she could eat�
: said she wanted some corn bread, col-
lards, and fat meat: That girl did go
home�and married three weeks after-
; ward. But I do want you to realize
i that it will not be like home, and there
j will be a lot of things to learn. This
organization is builded to fit on top of
5 our high school education Down in
L'ae lower grades you didn't have much
choice; in high school you had a little
more and with the greater liberty
came greater responsibilities. As you
go along in the scale of education the
greater the liberty the greater , re-
sponsibility. We are not going tc
try to make you study your lessons;
we are going to give the opportunity.
Be not deceived; God is not mocked;
whatsoever a man soweth that shall
he also reap. If you do your task
your career in college will be worth-
while, but it is your responsibility.
You will have a few, not many, but
a few rules and regulations to observe
and I think you should realize that
most of them are made by the stu-
dents themselves out of their experi-
ence in the college. They have made
a number of regulations to govern
themselves. And young friends, the
world today is suffering for the lack
of intelligent leadership, more than it
has during the past fifty years. We
need young men and women with
vision. We need young men and
women with ideals, who are willing to
sacrifice to accomplish the worth-
while. I hope that you will join the
that they have alread secured con-
tracts for are Don (ossox, Russian
male chorus, November 16, Galli-
Curei, January �') andAbbee Theatre
Irish plays, March 19,
The members of tthientertainment
committee are Mr. E.L. Henderson,
chairman, .Miss MamnJenkins, and
Mr. Ps
irncll Picklesimer from the fac
ulty. and Dorothy Sloan. Anne Horn
and Millie Moore from the student
body. This committee serves the col
lege without any pay for their
vices. Give them your support
cooperate with them by boosting
entertainments.
cr-
ind
the
-
WELCOME TO
FRESHMEN,
NOTHING MORE
With "The Bells" on our toes and
the spirit of "Lraphal" in our hearts,
the Poes welcome yon to (ear campus
and into our social group. . Even
Felix, our ma-cot, spreads his small
mouth in friendly greeting.
If you sing highly, dance gracefully,
argue convincingly or twit tie smooth-
ly, we have a place for you�
So-
Come on girls and take our hand.
We are the Poe Society band.
. We're the gang who want to he
true,
What we need is only you.
Welcome girls! We need you so.
Don't forget to be a Peel
MAJORIE FLYTHE, President.
THE SIDNEY
LANIER SOCIETY
"Baa! Baa! Baat" which when
translated means "we welcome all
new girls. This is the message that
our Goat sends to weleome every new
girl to our campus. He joins with us
'n "singing a song of praise" to the
Sidney Lanier Society and hopes that
you will join us in helping to make
our society a bigger and better
"flock
band who will labor and wait; who
are willing to sow the seed and wait
for the harvest; who are willing to be
disappointed but will not give up, who
are going forward and making the
world a better place to live in.
I saw a statement in the paper to-
day to this effect:
Seventy percent of the men in
WHO'S WHO in America are college
men, and only one person in a hun-
dred goes to college. One college man
in forty achieves distinction, while
only one non-college man in ten
thousand achieves distinction. Twelve
per cent of the white population in
North Carolina are illiterate. Young
friends, there is a great task lying out
in front of you; to remove the bond-
age of ignorance from the citizenship
of your state; to break the shackles
and to set the youth of North Caro-
lina free; that you may make your
whole state the thing that Aycock
dreamed it would be. You are here to
make your beginning in this great
war against ignorance in our state.
And may Jehovah give to each tf
you the opportunity to accomplish
your life's purpose.
?3981
-Zt'f

��?






THE TECO ECHO
Published BiMonthiv During The College Year by The Student
Government Association of East Carolina Teachers College.
Entered as seeond-class matter December 3, 1925. at the Postoffice,
Greenville, N. C under the Act of March 3, 1879.
Subscription Rates for the College Year, $1.50
Advertising Rates, 25c j er Column Inch per Issue
STAFF
Editor-in-Chief
Business Manage
Faculty Advisors
Managing Editor
Assistant Editor
Assistanl Editor
Assistant Editor
Assistant Editor
Maggie McPherson
Roslyn Satterwhite
Miss Mamie Jenkins
Mr. M. L. Wright
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Elizabeth Hay wood
Carolyn Conner
Elizabeth Thompson
Estelle McClease
Marguerite Lane
Assistant Busin,
Advertising Manage r
Adverl ising Manager
Advert ising Manager
(Circulation Managers
BUSINESS STAFF
Manager
Myrtie Gray Hodges
Sara Johnson
Mary L. Pipkin
Ethel Parker
Grace Williford
Anne Thompson
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3RD.
Knowledge comes, but wisdom
inurersT unyson.
We arc�,�o surroi
tions that( (
now are �1t j. j
Open Forum
In each edition of The Teco Echo
this column is set aside for the dis-
cussion of problems of our readers.
mded by tradi-
,vere living but
Havcloek Ellis. c
In this column you may give your
opinion on any question, or problem in
which you are interested. Your
miens ne,�noi are, nor will oe. op:nion may be worth something to
� Robert Browning- i someone else. This column has been
o ! gyei to you. Take advantage of it!
AIns schools in America to- o
day are simply places for parrot- READ THE TECO ECHO,
ins facts.�Joh n Gould Fletcher.
I iii'U'V people by what they
arc nor will be.
sort of scrap paper has appeared. 1
wish to urge that before we come for-
ward with our criticism, that we know
just what is wrong or good about the
This is the first issue of The Teco
t u i i; , , U ! Echh to be published this term. The
t perpetually Ixuieve that a ,
1 i- . i :w, istatf has been handicapped by the lack
serious subject makes uiiat is ?� �i �
, , u - of news and time, but finally some
said about it important.� . , ,
Bailey.
o
The purpose of an education
is to help the truth in order that i paperi and go to the staff and make
we may do the right.�Dr. Boyd our criticisms and suggestions to
Edwards. them. Let us be sure that we don't
0 give The Teco Echo a glance then
Lartfe streams from little toss it aside and say there is nothing
fountains flow, m lt- Form the habit of reading
Tall oaks from little acorns . every word of it�Ads and all.
trrow.�David Everett �
.0 REQUIREMENTS OF A
It will be well for any oi you
who are thinking of running for , .
th president in the future to Understanding and apprecia-
remember thai the locusts will tion of other races and cultures
asrain in 1948. That
! � Will! US
year ill certainly be a bad one
for the White House.�William
Castle, Jr Under Sec. of State.
(i
The Teco Echo urges the fac-
ulty and officers to use the
columns of the pan r for official
announcements, mass meetings,
club meetings, and class meet-
ing's.
WELCOME FRESHMEN!
E. C. T. C.
(kt. 1, 1931
Dear Ma and Pr. and the folks;
I'm miserable! If yea den') conn
after me right av.iy Til jump rat ci
a window or something; fast see if
don't. Honestly ma and pa. my eyes
are all swollen f m crying and
look so ugly that nobdoy pays me a ,
mind. You'd think they didn't evei
knov. that I was president of my das
in high school and v ted the prettiest
jirl and everything, bat they ean'l
fool me. Of coure, when we have i
class meeting I'll probably be elected
to something or other, because all th
teachers last year said i ne look at :
showed that I had powers of leadei
ship. I don't care ab lit that though
I WANT TO GO HOME.
The girls up here aren't a lit nic
like I thought they would be. Why. I
�ilways thought when y u got t; eol
lege tht they came around and in-
vited you to feasts and things bit:
all I've seen to eat around hen- i.
hash in the dining room; Gee! :h"
:tlilti(. t.lltou.agenH.nt orlaMMH.np
home C. O. I-
Heaps of love,
MARGARET.
Lg . I
What every college girl mi I
unbreakable father Rotunda.
Jokes
I
Welcomes you to GreenvHl and r ipectj
! patronage un your oe.s need repairing
j J. PRESTON SMITH. Manager
GOODYEAR SHOE SHOP
�ou to (
patronage when y
V u're too conceited about your ;
Ooks J
Not at all. I don't think I'm half ;
is good-looking as I really am j
Rotunda. ! j
Lowe's Exclusive Millinery
a;irls aren't even polite. I smiled
one this morning and all she iaid was
�'hello, Freshman I wonder liov. j After all, you know, the best jokes
-she knew I was a Freshman? Any aren't printed: no indeed! They're
how she must be somebody importanl running around all over school! -
because I saw her walls i-ight up to on j Rotunda.
f the professors and speak and in j �
"Meet me at the corner to-night at ; .j���m�m"��� "
seven
"All right, what time will you be ?��
there"
THE COLLEGE GIRLS CHOICE
To Serve Is Our Pleasure
WARREN'S DRUG STORE
actually answered her.
Speaking of professors; in one o
my classes this morning Mr. Flanaga
(oh! ma, he's kinds y ling, an
human looking�not a bit like a pr
lessor) called me Miss Jones, and
told him that it would be alright t
call me Mary, 'cause all the folks a' write ont
home did. Something funny musi
have happened about then becausi
everybody laughed and Mr. Flanagan
got all red in the face. Just iike he ha
a fish-bone in his throat.
Well, ma and pa. I guess you all an
getting ready to go to bed now. Th
lights go off here at 10:30 rnd !
never do have time to bru h my ha:
)ne-hundrei times like it .ay in th
beauty book and roll it up on pa i
The (Id beds are so hard thai 1 jn
wish and wish for my feathi r-bed i
if I were there I wouldn't even f i a
Sis for crowding.
Ma, I'm trying to do just whal �
told me about being polite to every
body and not eating too fa t at th
table. I don't have to reim n be
about the forks, becau �� we don'
have but one. Some of the girl
were greedy enough to take orange
Wilson to coed: "I don't know
whether you belong here or not but !
I'll take your name any way
Senior: "Have you seen a govern-
nent book by mistake?" ' I
Freshman: "No, I haven't; did she
; i
old German woman went into j
he drug store and up to the clerk.
with the question mark beaming up- I
her fare, at!
WELCOME!
Quality Service
Lautares
i
"I wan; another boddle of dat same
wiune vot mein old man got ;J
"Oh, yes politely said the clerk.
"What was the name of the medi-
"I don't know: he said you knew
ie l.ar
�f I, ction
"What i- you
r name
"San
"Wk
"Yah
-Wii:
-I rai
"Wot
as mine husband
is your husband's name?"
hat ?"
dot's right
- right?"
Wott
n what is his last name?"
is his last name. Jacob is 4M
name. Jacob Wott is his i
SheafkVr Perns and Pencils
In The City. Skrip In All I olors
Fine Watch and Jewelry Repairing at Rea liable Price
Ilinton Jewelryo.
"At the Bis? Clock"
!
out of the diningroom at hiefast ' his fin
but not me! ' whole name. Wott is his name. Wott �
Gu'ess I'll have to close and go t ; i my name. Wott is both of our
bed. Please, please, come to see m names�Christian Observer.
and bring some good old fried
chicken. He: "I've never seen such dreamy
i
Love and ki ;ses,
MARY.
P. S. Send my tooth-brush.
�,�o
Dear family;
eves.
s; "You've never stayed
before�-Judge.
-o i
contemporary or remote. , ,
Ability and disposition to Dear famll" "Do y. a beluve ,n hered.ty? I
weigh evidence in controversial I What I'd give to see real folks Of course I do, replied the gently I
matters. j again -r-d to be treated witih � tiny egoist "Why, I ve got one of the
Ability and disposition to b't of consideration. This place is � bright t boys you ever saw
awful and I know I shall be gray-
headed if I stay here very long. I!t "Dearest, will you marry me?'
WHITE'S
mentally project an undertak-
ing through its successive steps
before undertaking it.
Skill in explanation and pre-
diction.
Ability and disposition to look
beneath the surface of things be- have st'en that green-looking daughtei
fore passing judgment. of y�urs as sh ot out "f that nui
Ability to do reflective think- spattered car with old worn-out suit
I got here about 2:00 Monday,
rather shaken u� after riding ov r
that twenty miles of rough read in
our old tin lizzi�. I wish vou could
Sh� "No, I can never marry you.
Jack; but I hall always respect your
good taste�Montreal Star.
t
This lssui of The Teco Echo is
for you, Freshmen! All thei
week you have been welcomed
by various orginizations, and
now the College Newspaper
greets you.
You will find in this issue a
message from President Wright.
Miss Morton, and the president
r the major organizations on
the campus. They were writ-
ten for you. Keep them�you
will find thai th y will be of
value to you throughout your
Ln
college days.
It is 1 he hope oi
f the staff that
this issue of The Teco Echo will
be of value to you for informa-
tion, and also for a record of
your first week at E. C. T. C.
BOOST YOUR COLLEGE
PAPER!
We wan! a better paper, do
you? But we can't make it a
better paper without your sup-
port. Do you write poetry t Can
you write editorials? Have you
anything to contribute to make
The Teco Echo a bigger and bet-
ter paper?
This year we are beginning a
Reporters Club which will be
composed of all reporters, who
want to contribute. This club
will meet every two weeks, each
time to learn something new
about journalism- The success
of next year's Teco Echo, as well
as that of this year's paper de-
pends largely on this club.
Would .you like to lie a member?
Cooperation will make our
paper the kind of a paper we
want to send out. Can we count
on you?
ing.
Disposition toward continued
istudy and intellectual cultiva-
tion.
Critical and questioning atti-
tude toward traditional sanc-
tions.
Clarity in definition.
Discrimination in values in
reacting to environment, social
and physical.
Analytical approach to pro-
positions leading to the detec-
tion of fallacies and contradic-
tions.
Ability and disposition to ob-
serve accurately and systemati-
cally.
Understanding and skill in
the use of process of induction,
deduction and generalization.
The ability to see relation-
ships and accuracy in their in-
terpretation.
A freshness of interest with
respect to the developments of
knowledge. � InterCollegiate
Press News
An elderly looking patient was
shown into the doctor's surgery.
"So you have severe headaches,
pains in the back, and bilious at-
tacks?" said the doctor. "H'm! What
is your age, madam?"
"Twenty-five she replied coyly
The doctor continued to write.
"Yes�and loss of memory, too he
murmured.�Christian Observer.
There had been several earthquake
shocks in a certain district; so a mar-
ried couple sent their little boy to an
uncle who lived out of the dangerous
zone. A day or two later they re-
ceived a telegram:
"Am returning your boy; send
earthquake�Pearson's
SCHEDULE.
School Hours
j You Come, You See, We Conquer
Everything For The College Girl
cases in. her hands and numerou
bundles wrapped in newspaper tucked Rising Bell�C0 A. M.
securely under each arm. Breakfast�7:30 A. M. .
I had not the faintest idea which Recitations�8:15 A. M. to 12:25
one of the many buildings I was to M.
call my home for the next nin Lunch�12:60 P. M. except Sunday )
months. Nevertheless, I started oul ' :0� P. &.
up the board walk, heavy of feel and Recitations�1:25 P. M. to 4:25 P.M.
heart. Dinner�5:56 P. M.
Walking aimlessly for several Study hour� 70 P. M. to 10:30
minutes I at last caught sight of P- -�!�
several girls coming down the walk Lights out�100 P. M.
toward me. As I approached them 1 Office Hours of the Dean of Women
became more and more aware of my 8:30�10:30 A. M
Extremely Large Selection At Extremely Lew Pri'e
i
tight fitting waist, short skirt, old
run-over shoes, cotton stockings and
faded tam. Nearer and nearer they
came and weaker grew my heart
1:30�2:36 P. M.
Conference by appointment.
There are no office hours on Sun-
lav.
Just as I came even with them I ask- i House Keeper's Hours
ed them if they were Freshmen.
Honestly if I insulted them I did not
8:15 A. M.�10:00 A. M.
Infirmary Hours
mean to. Just the same thev turned! 8:0&�9:�0 A. M.
their noses up a block or two in the
air and completely ignored me.
With my feathers slightly ruffled.
I proceeded on up the walk. Again 1
saw some one�a girl. When I
reached her it seemed I could not
speak, but I knew I must or walk on
green as ever. I heard myseif as in
a far-off-voice�"Where is Wilson?"
She thawed a little, enough to point
out the building. Stuttering my
thanks, I fairly flew up the pave . When the girls finished eating I
"? IT!0, g aml slunibk'd;it a plate hardly touched; and fol-
lowed them out of the dining hall.
1:36�2:30 P. M.
6:30�7:88 P. M.
Girls needing medicine must get it
before 7:30 P. M. In case of emer-
gency girls may go to the infirmary
at any hour.
1. There must be quiet in the
dormitories, from 7:30 P. M. to 6:30
A. M.
sver eaten.
into room 4.
On reaching my room I found my-
self alone in a forsaken-looking place,
with bare beds, a table and two
chairs. No one can imagine my feel-
ings.
Once out I found myself alone in the
night.
After a long time I gathered
courage to face the loneliness of that
, . T , v i dreary room. To tired to take off
Just as I was about to burst intft, my clothes, I threw two sheets on the
tears I saw everybody running tol bed, crawled in between them and
ward the din.ng hall. Half-heartedlyV flooded my room in tears, too sick and
I entered the-race and arrived breath- lonely to have any interest in any-
lessly at thhe table of upper efessJ body or anything
men. None of them spoke to me or Thus passed my first day of my col-
seemed at all interested in whether I lege life. Today I feel better for my
starved or not. I know that meal j tears but I still want to come home
was the least digested of any I have Write to me real soon and give me
WELCOME
�fcj. C T. C.
GIRLS
Back to Greenville and Our Store
rememberWo ui in slyio :smi qualitv Rt,ulv l(V.
Wear, Dry Goods and X�ti�ns at the prices vuu can afford
to pay.
MEN
Wo extend you a most cordial WYloome and invite you to
V.SU us for your needs. We assure each of vou courteous
treatment and that you will be shown th, newest merchan-
disc at the right prices.
COME TO SEE US!
McKay-Washington Co.
"The Ladies Store"
400 Evans Street
HO
W
orat I
(,
1 III -
U.
g ieri
member
u in
self i
ideaU
the -i i
ii.t a
bperate �
ment n
Wr.
every g.r
ftl B1 - .
had
Y. W. (
Gd
Satur N
delight! .j
the
Bu B
danced
VVJi- � '
darn, tl
i be � � n
After
the k �-
Austin lit
We're
you'll Lk�
JTOB hu; p
home. C
for th
BdM
ttritiet
college j
all r�-�
Teco Y.i

I'OKIl
A wi-t
A bit
A brand
Hatboxj
quired tim
A notic
knee.
Tears
that branl
A look
girls pa?
BhsU-r
With fit
A box
grape vinJ
A shinvl
A swea
high schi
outside.
Questio
f CE!
It isn't
Ineep.�Sol
The fid
hardests
It floatj
An Apg
away.�Ad
Is it hoi
It won't
Step onl
l





j whose ads appear in The Teco Echo.
E. C. T. C.
Read the Inter-Collegiate Press
; News. You will find it interesting.
Now that you are here aren't you
; triad you came to EL C. T. C?
E. C. T. C.
� Usually the E. C. T. C. girls wait
until they have been here a week to
ay. "I'm broke hut this term they
i it with the same breath they set
their hat boxes down with.
E. C. T. C-
She "Best girl I saw you with last
night ?"
IK�"Necks best
FRESHMEN FACULTY TEA. ���������.���-����������,�
Baby needs New Shoes.�Cleopatra.
Oh Henry Ann Boleyn.
What a whale of a difference.�-
Jonah.
Came the Dawn Mayor Walker.
Don't give up the Ship.�Sevine.
After me the deluge.�Volstead.
�Queems Blues.
Wilson Hall parlor proved to be an
excellent sitting for the Freshmen
Faculty Tea held Wednesday after-
noon. This tea, which is an annual
event on our campus, seemed to be
unusually pretty this year because of
the abundance of flowers used to dee-
orate the room.
The first guests arrived shortly
after five o'clock and were introduced
to a receiving line composed of Dr.
K H. Wright, Miss Wright, Miss
Morton. Collie Stafford. Y. W. ( A.
president, and Millie Moore, Student
; vernment president. They were
served punch and wafers. Music was
furnished daring the evening by
Dorothy Sloan.
The new girls met and chatted
with others for one short hour. The
afternoon iproved to be an enjoyable
one for all.
THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT
ASSOCIATION WELCOMES �01 .
This is the only organization of
which all students of the college be-
come members as soon as they enter.
li order to know just what student
govi riment means, it is well to re-
mem er something of what it does foi
its h our own college. It develops
-if control and encourages right
ideal- and personal responsibility it.
the students. Our student govern-
ment also keeps in close touch and co-
operates with the student govern-
ment movement in other colleges.
Wit good spirit and cooperation of
every -rirl, let us make this year the
m St - icces- ful one that we have ever
had.
o
Y. W. C. A. AMI STUDENT
GOVERNMENT ENTER-
TAIN THE EKESIIMEN
Saturday night the Freshmen wen
delight'ul entertained at a dance in
the auditorium of the Social Religious
Building. New girls and old jriris
danced to-got her harmoniously. It
was u ig time for all students. This
dance given annually in honor of
the nev girls.
Afte refreshments had been served
the girls gaily left for the show in the
Austin auditorium.
ELCOME NEW GIRLS.
We're glad you're here and we hope
you'll like it. It is our wish to snake
you hap y and to make you feel at
h mi . ' all on us at any time.
CULLIE STAFFORD.
President Y. W. C. A.
o
NOTICE.
r-
COLLEGE SONtJ.
Hurrah for our college so free!
May her banner sweep onwar
ever.
The college for you and for me,
With standards of the right.
Then we'll cheer for our college
always
As she fights with a mighty endeavor.
From the depth; of our hearts we will
say,
That by her right and by her might,
She'll live forever!
Moscow- An ancient city, believed
t" have thrived in the second to fourth
centuries before Christ, has been dis-
covered by Soviet archeologists, bur-
ied on the floor of the Black Sea on
the southwestern extremity of the
Crimean Peninsula.
Divers found the city under 40 feet
of water, and reported the ruins to be
those of a city in the shape of a great
horse shoe, with walls, towers, houses
and underground tunnels honeycomb-
ing the whole.
The archeologists believe the city
was destroyed in the gradual sinking
if the land, which is known to be
creeping rapidly into the sea.
The approximate dates of the city
.cere established by red clay earthen-
ware and crockery lying about.
o��-
The Smart Shoppe
Welcomes
The
Faculty and Students
of
E. C. T. C.
MILLIE MOORE I
President of Student Body
Girls of E.C.T.C. I
it
WE WELCOME YOU ALL )
i
j ?�
jl -
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I i
I i
i i
i i
� i
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i
When Up Town
Make The Smart Shoppe
Your Headquarters
"We Cater to the College Girls"
BACK.
Visit us for your Sni1
Dress, Coats Hats or Spor
Togs.
We Sell It For Less
Williams
Phone 566
Greenville
; I
Campus Gossip!
We heard this on a Freshman: She
was trying to register. Having ac-
I Uired all the necessary cards and
Lvaded through the complicated pro-
rdure without mishap she began to
! better about the matter. But lo!
rhere -as the table marked "Informa-
tion" that she hadn't visited. With a
! wncast expression, she asked an up-
per classman. Do I have to go
j there?"
Here's another one! One Senior
ate breakfast with five Freshmen this
m rning. They had oranges. But
the Freshmen were too polite. They
left their orange n the plate. They
happened? The Senior has one half
lozen oranges in her window.
MEET ESSIE ESSIE
Seniors vs. Freshmen.
E. C. T. C,
And yet another: Maggie McPher-
son was looking for somebody to type
The Teco Echo. She asked several
Freshmen if they knew anyone who
could type. "No said one, "but I'll
find the editor of the paper. If she
can't type then she'll tell you who
can
Freshmen t
Senn
to
morrow:
E. C. T. C.
omforting thought
As s on -s you get organized
for th- year, elect your Teco
Echo reporter so that your ac-
" iivities can be nubli hed in your
college paper. Send the name of ;
The one comiorung tnougnt mat
all Freshmen Lave, is that no one ex-
pects him to be anything but green.
1 he Seniors have to appear wise whin
all the time tiny know they are the
dumbest on the campus.
E. C. T. C.
Il you walk into a room that is
�potlessh- clean and orderly it be-
longs to a Freshmen, !ut if the 1 ds
tie unmade and articles are lying
Don't cry little Freshmen,
Don't you cry
You'll be a Sophomore
By and bv.
Millie Moore, while kindly assist-
ing the Freshmen, called out to one
going by the office, "Have you check-
ed in?" Imagine how she felt when
some one told her that the girl grad-
uated from here four years ago.
WELCOME
E. C. T. C.
STUDENTS
VISIT OUR STORE
WELCOME!
Our Store Is Your Store.
The Newest In
Dresses, Coats, Hats
BLOOM'S
"College Outfitters"
Watches �7.r( Up
Watch Bracelets . $UQQ Up
Fountain Pens $1.00 l'p I
All Colors Skrip
Poe Pins Lanier Pin-
Emerson Pins
Pearl Set Guards
ij
W. L. BEST
"College Jeweler"
" all reporters to the Editor of The
Teco Echo.
PORTRAIT OF A FRESHMEN.
A wistfui loo
A bit of bravado
A brand sew dress
Hatboxes adorned with recently ac-
quired sticky's;
A noticeable movement about the
knees.
Tears abovt to spill over and ruin
that brand n m complexion.
A look of wonderment as two old
girls paaa who actually look happy.
Blistered heels.
With flustered parents in town.
A box of grapes in band from the
grape vines back home.
A shiny tiunk.
A sweater over one arm with a
high school letter carely placed on the
outside.
Questions.
� o
I CELEBRATED SAYINGS
It isn't th orginal cost; its the up-
keep�Solor in.
The first hundred years are the
hardests.�Methuselah.
It floats Noah.
An Apple a day, keeps the doctor
away.� Adam.
Is it hot enough for you?�Nero.
It won't be long now�Sampson.
Step on it. Sir Walter Raleigh.
where they hit�that r om belongs to
senior.
Elizabeth Highsmith asked an old
crl if she could direct her to the
campus. Lets hope she found it.
?
I
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i
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I i
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?� f
Welcome Back
College Girls-
Gome see our New Low
Prices on Coals, Dress-
es and Accessories.
E C T C
"Twas said that Rebecca Pittman
If the Freshmen haven't been wel- was :lskcd to g0 call Cullie Stafford.
corned enough to make them feel at Rebecca hesitated a moment, then
home, it isn't the fault of the word saJd"Er�shall I call her Miss?"
welcome.
E- � T- C. "Are Johnie and Henrietta self-
"No news mean good news .cntt�red?"
Times must be picking up around; -Self-centered? Why they think
here' I that 'Hail, Hail, the gang's all Here'
E- C. T. C. j js a duet
"My word is law" say the upper
classmen to the Freshmen. Mr. Henderson: "Miss Norris, have
E. C. T. C vou had anv education?"
' ' ' ,s L Adelia Norris: Batting her eyes
ind looking indignant. "I reckon I
! I have! I've graduated from Beaufort
High School
Freshmen�it won't last forever.
Tales about the laundry list, black
cats, bull dogs, and billy goats are
already hovering about the campus.
E. C. T. C.
Don't cry! It isn't but :j months
before Christmas.
E. C. T. C.
The Seniors look pityingly at the
tears in the Freshmens eyes and say. I
"There sits me four years ago
E. ( T. C.
We're back again. We hope every-
body had the happiest vacation ever.
E. C. T. C.
We congratulate our college on its
Freshmen.
E. C. T. C.
Even the smallest Freshmen might
grow to be the biggest of Seniors.
Freshmen! Read the advertising
column, and patronize the stores
WELCOME
i
j E. C. T. C. GIRLS BACK
j
TO GREENVILLE
I !
j May the 1931-1932 School j
j Term be both pleasant as
well as profitable to you.
i �
J RENFREW PRINTING
j COMPANY
WELCOME J)
College Girls J
We are glad to have you with j .
us again, and hope you will let j j j.
us serve vou during vour stay '
here. j � j
W. A. Bowen Co.
"A Smart Place to Trade"
YOUNG'S
Our Prices Are !
i
Shampoo & Finger Wave .$1.00
Finger Wave 75c I
i
Special Prices On Permanent j
Waves i
$4.50 $5.00 and Up f
j
i
i
To Students & Teachers I
i! j Welcomes E. C. T. C. Students
Special
6 Shampoos and Fiinger Waves
For $5.00
Buy A Card and SAVE
The Vanitie Boxe j
Five Points�Next to State
Theatre
i
To Greenville and Our Store
New shipment of latest styles in dresses
shoes arrive weekly�priced moderately.
I $1.95 $2.98 $4.95 J
Visit Us
Young Mercantile Company
Dickerson Avenue
4
it

-mki
� x �
� � � "�





MEfCOlEGIATE
Ljci
New York (IP) The College so
nii r fared rather more badly thar
the college fre hnian in a report is-
saed this pasl week by the Caraegh
Ft andation for the Advani � ment oi
Teaching.
According to thhe report, based or
tests given more than 10,000 eolleg
I udi nts in'em ?yIvania olleges am
universitiestheivages of forget
ting" causi �nior to lose, evei
bef re g � iHJ� hi :sheepskiin, mucl
of the knoiid ��h had acquired
during four. school.
"The i�' � ' c re � Ruizes onlj
f.l out oi �(0 w Iin familiar use
by edueatci! per the report
said. "The college n the
word supply� f ; In ordinary student
appeal's to 1e aim.it i.i glible and in
m me easis y injurious
"The schi il atl college curricu-
luni thi i)l 1 a� d, "consists of
little else bHi �- ated packages of
;pecific ide;IS, �' rr gated for the
time being i elected femen pelf-contained exwtrses, -c and cut off by
cxaniinat h n -ander nits from any
other liv ingeortdilon Th' saered-
no of suchy temS of credit coinage
dominal - I)th teaih ��' and pupil. .
"The ravii fornation which the
courses h � re � nl an 1 which, with
proper 1n a,�might have con-
trihuti (1 to afin b� iy of intellectual
equipment, 1vas dumped outright at
the clo e ofhe u �essive terms, and
when the stuilenl �;me t ui of college
his ffectiveknowldgc amounted to
little more tllan wben as a freshman
he entered ti inslit id ion
fore the tenth annual meeting of the
International Student Service at
Mount Holyoke College here, Dr. W.
f. Kotschnig of Austria said he be-
lieved the unemployment situation
�ould be blamed on the colleges for
.heir failure to cope with vital econ-
�mic problems.
Philadelphia.�Five hundred thous-
ind dollars which he had in his ori-
ginal will bequeathed to Yale Univer-
ity, will go to Lehigh University in-
tead, under a codicil discovered in the
vill of the late Dr. Charles W. Mac-
Sarlane, economist and engineer, who
lied last May.
The codicil explained that the ex-
�hange was made because the donor
elieved the money would do more
rood in the smaller school.
The bequest will enable Lehigh to
omplete an economic history of the
Roman Empire started by Dr. Mae-
Farlane, who was engaged for many
vears in the preparation of the his-
tory and who gathered many thousand
xeerpts and references to sources,
which he partly catalogued.
mam ?�
I
Delaware, O.�Scientists at Perkins
Observatory at Ohio Wesleyan Uni-
versity hope that before the solar
�clipse visits this part of the country
aext year they will have ready for
use the mammoth 09-inch mirror, the
third largest in the world, now being
installed in the observatory.
Wear This Black I
i
Spooning.
Our hearts leap up
When we behold
A spoon upon the table:
It says dessert
Is on the way�
Another Aesop's fable!
ten commana-
ave guided his
, as follows by
FELT
HAT
with a saucy "hide-
one-eye" tilt!
$95 !
You'll like thi little rolled
brim Felt Hat with derby
(1'iiwn! The velvet 1 rest �
lightly on your curl
Montgomery Ward Co.
mm
Welcome
Back!
m �
Remember � � �
PENNEY'S
is the place
your money
8-t-r-e-t-c-h-e-s
unbelievably
when you buy
smart new
clothes and
accessories!

i i
j IEN IN GREENV1I.LE EAT j
�AT� j
!
THE SHAMROCK I
i
j
KS. M. h. TURNAGE, I'rop. j I
!
I'Ik ne 500 GreenviHe, N. C. j
THE GREENVILLE CAFE
Just what you want, just wh n y u
The Best of Food
r
HILL HORNE
Dependable Druggist
I
fL
�b nnM�r v-�-aia� Umm"
Dininpr Room
WELCOME E.B.T.C
From the pen of
Theadore
Dreiser
With
Phillip Holmes
Sylvia Sidney
Frances Dee
SHOWS
2:15 -
7:00 -
0:00
Simla, India
ments which he sa
own conduct w re s
Mahatma Gandhi:
Truth; Ahi
translated into
Brahmacharya, wh
quatel expre: ed
raint of the palai
orates as eating ;
tenance of the hod
intoxicating drinks and drugs such as I a j j
opium and tobacco; Abstaining from i -rvvAi cro
the possession of things for thwn- -f - r����-�,��m
selves; Adherence to life's law that -
one's bread mu t be earned by the ���umhh,
sweat of "lie's brow; Swadeshi, the jj
belief that man's primary duty is to J j
serve his neighbor; IVlit' in the i
Clip Coupon and return t Business Manage
v hieh may be
tglish as love;
i may be inadc-
ehastity; Rest-
which he elab- '
the mere sus- Name
ab ;taining from ,
id d: uars such as
i
I
I Please enter my subscription for
j Echo for the incoming- school year.
tie i
v- i
I
i i ?
i J College Girls !
1 extend you a hearty welcome '
M i
I . Greenville. Our store is the j
ce for you to get Cards, Sta-
ru iv. Diariii-s, Etc. ?
I I
I D. Ellington & Co.
AN
MERiCAN
TRAGEDY
if
PRICES�Mat: All Seats 25c Eve: Ba3 25 On
STATE THEATRE
! I
Old friendships are never forgotten, and !
I
Greenville's Finest Enl
2SSv "f S tTolrreli fahh-1" IhM old fiends will glow with appreciation for
j that most personal gift�your pfooiograph.
B30I
orid; Fearle
(i.�in
gee
Sell' i'll
Maiei �
The present j i
scoffing and
Dr.
Walter A.
!
. nenrdia Thealogical Semi- �
nary, P . Louis, said here in an ad- f
dress before a Luther Day celebra- ; !
tn.n audience.
Chieago - The mud pies that chil-
dren often make could be eaten with
enjoyment by many adult; in various
parts of the world, according to facts
revealed in "Geogphagy " a book pub-
lished recently by Dr. Rerthoia I.au-
fer, curator of anthology at the Field
Museum of Natural History.
Dr. lifer has made extensive re-
si arch in g ophagy, whieh is the prac-
tice of ealin.tr clay, loam and other
type of soil, and has published the
results of his studies throughout
many countries in both ancient and
modern times. His investigations be-
gan with records of earth eating in
China.
Traces of the custom have been
found in Indo-China, Malayasia,
Polynesia, Melani ;a. Australia, In-
dia, Burma, Siam, Central Asia, Si-
beria, Persia. Arabia, Africa, Europe,
North America, Mexico, � Central
America and South America.
As a rule not every kind of earth is
eaten, according to Dr. Laufer, but
only those kind- which recommend
themselves through certain quailities
of eolor, odor, flavor, softness and
plasticity.
Gcophagy occurs among the most
civilized nations as well as among
primitive tribes. It hears no relation
to climate, race, creed or culture. It
is a habit that oecurs among individ-
uals and not among any particular
tribal or social group.
The women of Spain, says Dr. Lau-
fer, once believed the eating of earth
was an aid to a delecate complexion
and the ladies of ihi Spanish aristo-
cracy in the 17th Century had such a
passion for geophagy that the ecclesi-
astic and secular authorities took
steps to combat the evil.
Arrange now for an early appointment.
BAKER'S STUDIO
WELCOME
Come to see our selection of Fall Slippers
I Hose In All the New Fall Shades.
j Coburn Shoe Store
"Your Shoe Store"
COLLEGE GIRLS
Austin, Texas.�Professor Alfred
Kennge.tt, instructor of romance
languages at the University of Texas,
while on a visit to Germany this sum-
mer, met a woman salesman in a hat
shop, liked her looks, and three days
later married her. The couple made
a wedding trip to Locarno, then re-
turned to the United States Aug. 12.
A HEARTY
WELCOME
To the Returning- Students
and to the Freshmen.
i
j
i
i
i
i
We extend to you a most hearty
Welcome and hope that we will
have the pleasure of serving you
during: your stay here.
VISIT OUR STORE
OFTEN
We are always glad to see
you and serve you.
South Iladley, Mass.�Speaking be-
Blount- Harvey Co.
Always Showing Something New In
LADIES SHOES AND HOSIERY
Griffin Shoe Co Inc.
ti
Smart Footwear1'
LI


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Title
The Teco Echo, October 3, 1931
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 03, 1931
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.02.96
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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