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The year book, Sampson County

Date: 1946 | Identifier: F262.S3 S25 V. 1 1945/46
The year book, Sampson County / by Mrs. Taft Bass. Clinton, N.C. : [Mrs. T. Bass?], 1946. "A digest of facts and useful information about Sampson County, its town and business organizations"--Cover, 1945/46. "Printed and bound in Clinton, N.C., by the Sampson Publishing Company"--1945/46. more...
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SAMPSON COUNTY
YEAR BOOK
VOL. 1
1945-46
NO. 1

A digest of Facts and Useful Information
About Sampson County, its Town and
Business Organizations


[Illustration:


Drawing of tobacco plant]

DEDICATED TO THE CLINTON TOBACCO MARKET
Published by
MRS. TAFT BASS
Clinton, N.C.





Benley's

FOR SMART STYLES

IN WOMEN'S WEAR

WALL ST.

CLINTON, N. C.

THE JEWEL SHOP

FOR DIAMONDS, WATCHES RINGS AND RADIOS

Clinton's Newest Credit Jewelry Store

— EXPERT WATCH REPAIRING —

CLINTON, NORTH CAROLINA














[Illustration:

SAMPSON COUNTY
Map of Sampson County]









THE YEAR BOOK
SAMPSON COUNTY

By
Mrs. Taft Bass

PRINTED AND BOUND IN CLINTON, N. C.
BY THE SAMPSON PUBLISHING COMPANY1946







DEDICATED THIS YEAR
TO
THE CLINTON TOBACCO MARKET


[Illustration:


vignette]

The Clinton Tobacco Market has been voted the most worthwhile business achievement of the year 1945 for Sampson county, not only in rendering a great service to tobacco growers to this and other counties but in creating a general upturn in business and civic affairs. Local and county residents alike have benefitted through the establishment of the market, and the many new business establishments and the increased stocks and services of others have been made possible through its operation. Also made possible by the Clinton Tobacco Market is the new city bus service, a feature that few small towns can boast of, and one that materially assists both merchants and shoppers alike.

Probably the greatest achievement made possible by the operation of the market is the entry of the Sampson County Baseball Association in the Tobacco State League, thus bringing professional baseball to Clinton and Sampson county for the first time in its history. And, as a result of the activities of the Baseball Association, the Clinton high school ball park is now complete with stadium, bleachers and an adequate lighting system.

Three large warehouses will be in operation when the 1946 selling season opens, offering a combined floor space of approximately 180,000 square feet. Buyers from all leading tobacco companies will be stationed here throughout the season.

Located in the heart of one of the greatest tobacco producing areas in the world, the Clinton Tobacco Market stands as a monument to the growth and forward march of progress of Clinton and Sampson county.





JAY'S

QUALITY JEWELERS

The Home Of

Fine


[Illustration:


Drawing of diamond]

Diamonds

Watches : China Crystal : Birthstone Rings Sterling and Plate Silverware

Shaeffer and Eversharp Pens Many Other Gifts

Watch Repairing

Fine Stores at

CLINTON, N. C. - - ELIZABETHTOWN, N. C.

YOUR CREDIT IS GOOD AT JAY'S





Sampson County

HISTORY

Sampson county was formed in 1784 from part of Duplin County—162 years ago by legislative enactment and was named in honor of Colonel John Sampson, a prominent leader in Duplin and New Hanover counties.

The first settlers, however arrived in 1745 and took up land in the southern part of the county near the large streams. The early settlers were Scotch and Irish. English settlers moved in later, and as time passed many came from the eastern counties and from adjoining counties. The present population consists of descendants of the pioneers and of those immigrants who came at later dates. The proportion of Negroes is quite large. There is also a small colony of Croatan Indians along South River near Clement. Another colony of Indians live in Herring township where the State has erected a large school for all Indians in this section.

Clinton, the county seat, was incorporated in 1852, and is now the oldest incorporated town in the county. The first town, Lisbourne, located at the head of navigation, where the Six Runs joins Coharie and forms Black River, was chartered soon after the county was formed in 1784, and flourished greatly as a shipping and trading center. Its growth soon stopped and began to wane and at the present day no trace of the once thriving village remains. Legend has it that the victory of Richard Clinton in having the county seat located at Clinton over the protests of John Sampson, who favored Lisbourne, broke the heart of the little village, where already streets and squares had been laid off. The village fathers were foresighted enough to specify that streets should be 75 feet wide.

Roseboro, the county's second largest town, now is a thriving community of 1,095 persons.

Other incorporated towns in Sampson county, in the order of their incorporation are: Autryville, Salemburg, Garland, Turkey, Parkersburg, Newton Grove and Harrells Store.

While Sampson has produced many noted people, William Rufus King was probably the county's most celebrated son. It was he who was elected vice president of the United States with Franklin Pierce in 1852. He was the second son of William and Margaret Devane King.

Another distinguished son was Gabriel Holmes, who served North Carolina as governor, and after his term as governor was elected to Congress. The county is also the native home of Marion Butler, who was elected to the United States Senate; John E. Fowler and Graham A. Barden, past and present members of Congress.

A monument to King stands on the courthouse square in Clinton.





First Citizens Bank & Trust Company

CLINTON, NORTH CAROLINA

— Established 1898 —

A COMPLETE BANKING SERVICE

EVERY COURTESY, SERVICE AND ATTENTION CONSISTENT WITH GOOD BANKING ARE THE FACILITIES OFFERED BY THIS INSTITUTION

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation





PHYSICAL ASPECTS

Total Area963 square miles or 608,000 acres
Farm Land385,755 acres
Forest or woodland277,100 acres
RiversSouth and Black
CreeksSix Runs, Big Coharie, Little Coharie, Mills, Stewart and Turkey.
SwampsBeaverdam, Bearskin, Little Beaverdam, Youngs, Craddock, Gilmore, Big, Goshen, Seven Mile, O'Possum, Two Mile, Caesar, Cuwhiffle, Marsh, Old Mill, Merkle, Kill, Hoe, Mill, Rye, Bearskin, Wildcat, Bull Tail, Pharisee, Keiths, Clear Run, Horner, White Oak, Ward.
Roads173.7 miles of hard surface and 1,1001.7 miles of improved and gravel roads. 14.8% of all roads are hard surfaced.
State Highways crossing county24, 41, 55, 102, 403, 411 and 242.
U. S. Highways crossing county421 and 701

VITAL STATISTICS

Births 1945Deaths 1945
Wh.Col.Ind.TotalWh.Col.Ind.To.
Sampson County665492281,1781571152247
Clinton4125066137020
North Clinton30573901214127
South Clinton3229768127019
Dismal2716346151117
Franklin1444058615021
Halls372416266012
Herring251410494228
Honeycutt4540388123217
Lisbon8160242507
Little Coharie3328162128020
McDaniel13140273104
Mingo1932051163019
Newton Grove281404246010
Piney Grove213105293012
Roseboro2098021777014
South River242304776013
Taylors Bridge202504566012
Turkey203205278015
Westbrook191303267013

Marriage Licenses Issued114Divorces Granted51.





“Serving Sampson County”

Drink A BITE TO EAT


[Illustration:

DR.PEPPER
]

DR. PEPPER BOTTLING COMPANY

of Clinton, Incorporated

McKoy and Faison Streets

Clinton, North Carolina





REGISTRARS FOR VITAL STATISTICS

North ClintonMrs. Forest Gore, Route 3, Clinton.
South ClintonMrs. B. J. Williamson, Route 4, Clinton.
DismalMrs. Thelma J. McPhail, R.F.D., Autryville.
FranklinMiss Melissa J. Ward, Route 1, Kerr.
HallsMrs. D. W. Welsh, Route 5, Clinton.
HerringEstel Royal, Route 2, Roseboro.
HoneycuttO. T. Fann, Star Route, Salemburg.
LisbonMrs. Daisy Johnson, Ingold.
Little CoharieMrs. Lula Crumpler.
McDanielMrs. Rosa Surles. Route 1, Roseboro.
MingoH. M. McLamb, Route 2, Roseboro.
Newton GroveMrs. Roy G. Jackson, Newton Grove.
Piney GroveMrs. John W. Jackson, Route 3, Mt. Olive.
South RiverVance Rich, Garland.
Taylors BridgeMrs. Mattie M. Peterson, Route 2, Clinton.
TurkeyJohn T. Hudson, Route 1, Turkey.
WestbrookMrs. Ida Lee, Newton Grove.

TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES

Sampson county is served by two branches of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, one of the branches crossing the county and the other having its terminal at Clinton. Two major bus lines provide highway transportation to all portions of the county, with Clinton having its own city bus service, operated by the Sureway Motor Company.

Sampson county has its share of other public utilities, such as the Carolina Power and Light Company and the Tidewater Power Company, which are the two power companies which provide the electricity for their own distribution lines and sell current to the two Rural Electrification Authority membership corporations, the Four-County and the South River. The Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company has exchanges at Clinton, Roseboro, Garland and Newton Grove. Clinton has 930 phones, Roseboro 140, Garland 48 and Newton Grove 69. Seventy-five percent of these are in private homes.

The Railway Express Agency and the Western Union Telegraph Company also have agencies in the county.

Towns in Sampson county served by the Wilmington-Fayetteville branch of the A. C. L. are: Autryville. Roseboro, Parkersburg, Garland, Tomahawk, Kerr and Ivanhoe. The company's time-table shows stations at Hayne, Culbreths, Caison, Mints and Browns. Two trains each way are operated daily, one being for freight and the other for mixed cargo. On the branch which runs from Warsaw to Clinton, the time-table shows stations at Baltic, Turkey, Elliott, Moltonville and Milo.

The Queen City Trailways operates twenty-five schedules through Clinton daily on its Fayetteville-Kinston and Fayetteville-Jacksonville runs. All points on the highways across Sampson traversed by these scheduled buses are served, with additional trips being made to Salemburg from Roseboro. Charlotte is the western terminus of these schedules. This company also operates daily





SAMPSON

The Blue Ribbon County

OF EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA INVITES YOU AND WELCOMES YOU TO COME WHERE YOU WILL LOVE TO WORK, LIVE OR PLAY.

SAMPSON COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

L. A. Hall W. Eugene Johnson, Chm. Arthur Naylor County Seat, Clinton, N. C.





schedules on a route from Raleigh to Benson, Clinton, Elizabethtown and Myrtle Beach. Another schedule provides buses through a thickly-populated agricultural section in the county between Clinton and Dunn. The Atlantic Greyhound system has daily schedules which call for buses from Raleigh to Newton Grove, Clinton and Harrells Store in Sampson county and on to Wilmington. A total of 44 buses pass through Clinton daily.

State Highway Commissioner for the division, which is division three, is James A. Bridger, Bladenboro. Division engineer is T. T. Betts, Fayetteville, phone 310-3. District engineer is Blount Whiteside, Clinton, phone 586-1. The office of the senior right of way engineer, Withers Davis, is located in Clinton and serves the third division and a portion of the fourth division.

Clinton's airport is operated by R. A. Naylor, owner of the Clinton Flying Service, who has several planes available for charter trips or for instruction. Several privately owned planes are stationed on the field, which boasts of a modernly equipped hangar and other facilities.

POPULATION

19301940Percent IncreasePercent of WholeState Percent
Total40,80247,47718.4%100.0%13.2%
White26,01830,44917.0%64.1%11.8%
Negro13,67016,41220.0%34.5%16.7%
Indian39457946.9%1.3%35.9%
Foreign423711.9%.1%2.7%
Estimated population as of July 1, 194560,000

GOVERNMENT

County Officials
State Senators, Sixth DistrictHenry Vann, Clinton, N. C., Roy Rowe, Burgaw, N. C.
Member House of RepresentativesCharlie Fletcher Honeycutt, Clinton, N. C.
Clerk of CourtFreddie C. Butler, Roseboro, N. C.
Register of DeedsMrs. Pearl N. Britt, Clinton, N. C.
SheriffC. C. Tart, Sr, Clinton, N. C.
TreasurerFirst Citizens Bank & Trust Co., Clinton, N. C.
County AttorneyAlgernon L. Butler, Clinton, N. C.
Tax SupervisorR. Purdy Spell, Clinton, N. C.
Tax CollectorC. C. Tart, Sr., Clinton, N. C.
County AccountantR. Purdy Spell, Clinton, N. C.
CoronerDr. D. M. Royal, Salemburg, N. C.
SurveyorH. W. Johnson, Kerr, N. C.
Superintendent of HealthDr. J. H. Williams, Clinton, N. C.
Superintendent of Public WelfareMrs. R. B. Wilson, Clinton, N. C.





McPHAIL FLORIST

Dial 208-6

Fayetteville St.

Clinton

Flowers

FOR EVERY OCCASION

CORSAGES — WEDDING DECORATIONS SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN

FUNERAL DESIGNING

POTTED PLANTS, POTTERY AND GIFTS

CANARIES, CAGES & ACCESSORIES

GOLDFISH AND SUPPLIES

Philips Ice Cream Company

FOR DELICIOUS TREATS

Phone 581-1

Clinton, N. C.

WHOLESALE — RETAIL MANUFACTURED IN CLINTON, N. C.

By

A. Philips & Sons





Home Demonstration AgentMiss Eleanor Southerland, Clinton, N. C.
Negro Home AgentEdna Brinson, Clinton, N. C.
Farm AgentE. J. Morgan, Clinton, N. C.
Negro Farm AgentFrank Faison, Clinton, N. C.
Chairman Board of ElectionsStewart B. Warren, Clinton, N. C.
Game WardenW. I. Wright, Jr., Ingold, N. C.
Forest WardenKing Newkirk, Harrells Store, N. C.
Recorder's Court:
JudgePerry G. Crumpler, Clinton, N. C.
SolicitorCroom M. Faircloth, Clinton, N. C.
ClerkMrs. Beadie R. Spell, Clinton, N. C.
Superior Court:
Presiding JudgeHenry L. Stevens, Jr., Warsaw, N. C.
SolicitorJ. Abner Barker, Roseboro, N. C.
Juvenile Court:
JudgeFreddie C. Butler, Roseboro, N. C.
Probation OfficerLandon McSwain, Goldsboro, N. C.
County Commissioners:
W. Eugene Johnson, Chairman, Kerr, N. C.
Lattie A. Hall, Route 1, Autryville, N. C.
Arthur Naylor, Route 2, Roseboro, N. C.
Deputy SheriffJ. B., Packer, Route 3, Clinton, N. C.
Township Constables:
A. B. JacksonDunn, N. C., R. F. D.
L. H. HerringKerr, N. C.
H. W. RogersMagnolia, N. C.
J. B. GradyClinton, N. C.
Gethro BassDunn, N. C., R. F. D.
G. R. KnowlesGarland, N. C.
J. B. PackerClinton, N., C., R. F. D.
Amon LucasRoseboro, N. C.
I. D. KingNewton Grove, N. C.
A. E. RackleyClinton, N. C.
Kermit WestDunn, N. C., R. F. D.
E. L. RobertsTurkey, N. C.
J. H. MatthewsAutryville, N. C.
D. F. CurrieParkersburg, N. C.
Alvah TatumIngold, N. C.
T. H. HerringKerr, N. C.
C. H. VannClinton, N. C.
Justices of the Peace:
G. G. Tart, Sr.Newton Grove, N. C.
T. A. UnderwoodRoseboro, N. C., Route 1
R. P. JacksonRoseboro, N. C., Route 2
R. C. JusticeTurkey, N. C.
P. D. MerrittMagnolia, N. C.
J. R. FortnerClinton, N. C., Route 2
W. H. McCullenFaison, N. C., Route 1
C. R. BooneClinton, N. C., Route 1
C. C. StoneDunn, N. C., Route 5
Fred C. HawleyDunn, N. C., Route 5
Earl GrimesMt. Olive, N. C., Route 3





CLINTON CLEANERS

AND TAILORS

PHONE 487-1

CLINTON, N. C.

HAT BLOCKING

DRY CLEANING

Our Work Satisfies. Give us a trial.

Jno. B. Williams & Sons

Hardware & Farm Supplies

INTERNATIONAL DEALER

Sales & Service

Phone 421-1

Clinton, N. C.





O. T. FannRoseboro, N. C., Route 2
C. F. JacksonDunn, N. C., Route 5
L. M. CoreDunn, N. C., Route 5
J. H. BurchIngold, N. C.
R. O. MerrittTurkey, N. C.
R. C. MerrittMagnolia, N. C.
Clarence WigginsClinton, N. C., Route 3
Allie McCullenClinton, N. C., Route 3
W. Bryant DavisClinton, N. C., Route 3
M. E. BoneyClinton, N. C, Route 2
T. E. GodwinDunn, N. C.
Jonah HudsonSalemburg, N. C.
W. A. PettyGarland, N. C.
Stacy PageGodwin, N. C., Route 1
M. A. KingClinton, N. C., Route 4
N. E. BrockDunn, N. C., Route 5
Y. W. EldridgeNewton Grove, N. C., Route 2
Graham CarterGarland, N. C.
Percy L. StricklandDunn, N. C., Route 1
Gordon G. TartNewton Grove, N. C.
H. B. LambGarland, N. C.
S. A. RoyalRoseboro, N. C., Route 2
W. S. BlackmanNewton Grove, N. C.
J. G. SessomsParkersburg, N. C.
A. R. BullardAutryville, N. C., Route 1
Autry HerringClinton, N. C., Route 1
David McLemoreParkersburg, N. C.
Carlisle JacksonClinton, N. C.
R. H. WilliamsonClinton, N. C.
Frederick SimpsonRoseboro, N. C.
W. E. HairrAutryville, N. C., Route 1
C. I. RobinsonGarland, N. C.
R. W. WardKerr, N. C.
H. T. HinsonDunn, N. C., R. F. D.
A. M. TartNewton Grove, N. C.
Peyton BradshawClinton, N. C.
JailerPerry B. Lockerman, Clinton, N. C.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS

COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION:

John C. Warren, ChairmanRoute 1, Newton Grove, N. C.
W. E. PetersonRoute 2, Clinton, N. C.
B. E. JacksonRoute 1, Godwin, N. C.
J. C. ButlerRoseboro, N. C.
J. Hamp LewisClinton, N. C.
D. V. Carter, SuperintendentClinton, N. C.

STATISTICS FOR TERM 1945-46
WhiteNegroTotal
Pupils enrolled6,4993,3169,815
High School1,1412351,376
Elementary5,3583,0818,437





C. R. RICH

- Wholesale -

Heavy and Fancy Groceries

Phone 477-1

113-119 Elizabeth St.

Clinton, N. C.

COOK MACHINE SHOP

- MILL SUPPLIES -

REPAIRS OF MACHINES

SPECIAL MACHINERY BUILT TO ORDER

Railroad St.

Phone 337-1

Clinton, N. C.





Teachers20396299
High School53356
Elementary15093243
School Buses771188
Pupils Transported — Daily Average5,834
Number Miles — Daily Average2,913
Cost of Transportation$ 40,657.76
Cost per mile per year13.96
Cost per pupil per year6.97
Cost per bus per year462.02
Value of all school property$891,330.00

District Schools and Officials

CLINTON — Special Administrative Unit

L. C. KerrClinton, N. C.
P. G. BunnClinton, N. C.
J. H. CrumplerClinton, N. C.
Herbert L. Swain, City SuperintendentClinton, N. C.

White

Clinton High School —

1945-46 Enrollment 204;8 teachers.

Clinton Elementary School — Mrs. Gussie D. Parker, Principal.

1945-46 Enrollment 745;21 teachers;Total pupils 949.

4 buses serve both schools

Negro

Sampson County Training School — Total teachers 29; D. A. Thomas, Principal

1945-46Enrollment217 H. S.828 Elem.Total 1,045
Teachers6 H. S.19 Elem.Total 45
4 buses.

DISTRICT NO. 1 —

J. H. Harris, ChairmanRoseboro, N. C.
M. M. SandyAutryville, N. C.
Dr. W. P. StarlingRoseboro, N. C.
I. V. BentonParkersburg, N. C.
T. W. CrumplerRoute 1, Clinton, N. C.

White Schools and Principals

Roseboro, Roseboro, N. C. — Herbert P. Naylor, District Principal, Roseboro.

1945-46Enrollment148 H. S.483 Elem.Total 6319 buses
Teachers6 H. S.13 Elem.Total 19





YOUR

PHILCO

DEALER

Bell Electric Co.

Box 573

Dial 582-1

305 Main St.

Clinton

Caison Bros.

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL

HARDWARE AND GROCERIES BUILDING MATERIALS

CLINTON, N. C.

C. H. CAISON

F. A. CAISON

PHONE 369-1





Autryville — Mrs. Columbia H. Page, Stedman, N. C., 133 Elem, 3 teachers.

Concord — Mrs. Annie P. Spell, Roseboro, 120 Elem., 3 teachers.

McDaniel — David A. McLemore, Parkersburg, 97 elem., 3 teachers.

Negro Schools and Principals

Roseboro, Charles E. Perry, Roseboro

1945-46Enrollment121 H. S.345 Elem.Total 4664 buses.
Teachers4 H. S.9 Elem.Total 13

Snow Hill, Woodrow W. Carr, Clinton, 80 Elem., 3 teachers.

Mt. Pleasant, John Milton Holmes, Clinton, 124 Elem., 3 teachers.

Piney Grove, Rosa E. Boykin, Rt. 3, Clinton, 57 Elem., 2 teachers.

DISTRICT NO. 2 —

Lundy Warren, ChairmanSalemburg, N. C.
J. L. HollandSalemburg, N. C.
Oscar Tate FannSalemburg, N. C.
Russell JonesRoute 2, Roseboro, N. C.
Hugh ButlerRoute 1, Clinton, N. C.

White School and Principal

Salemburg, Salemburg, N. C., O. C. Johnson, District Principal, Salemburg

1945-46Enrollment89 H. S.481 Elem.Total 5705 buses.
Teachers5 H. S.12 Elem.Total 17.

Negro Schools and Principals

Rosehill, John I. Kornegay, Route 2, Roseboro, 97 Elem., 3 teachers.

Sweetberry, Mrs. Pauline M. Solice, Clinton, 53 Elem., 2 teachers.

DISTRICT NO. 3 —

Bynum Jackson, ChairmanRoute 1, Godwin, N. C.
Alfred MatthewsRoute 1, Autryville, N. C.
W. D. HallRoute 1, Autryville, N. C.

White School and Principal

Clement, Route 1, Autryville, N. C., H. I. Tharrington, District Prin., Route 1, Autryville.

1945-46Enrollment59 H. S.488 Elem.Total 5477 buses.
Teachers3 H. S.13 Elem.total 16.

Negro School and Principal

Elizabeth, Mrs. Naomi H. Price, Clinton, 95 Elem., 3 teachers.

DISTRICT No. 4 —

Clayton G. Williams, ChairmanRoute 1, Godwin, N. C.
Dallie C. BaggettRoute 1, Dunn, N. C.
W. H. LambertRoute 1, Godwin, N. C.





CHICKS

U. S. APPROVED — PULLORUM PASSED

AND

Staf-O-Life Feeds

CLINTON HATCHERY

PHONE 300-1

CLINTON

ROYAL

• FURNITURE COMPANY

• FUNERAL HOME

AMBULANCE SERVICE NIGHT AND DAY

FURNITURE COMPANY PHONE 433-1

FUNERAL HOME, PHONE 437-1

J. Sebron Royal

A. Douglas Royal

Clinton





White School and Principal

Mingo, Route 1, Dunn, N. C., Don C. Huffman, District Prin., Route 1, Dunn.

1945-46Enrollment58 H. S.333 Elem.Total 3934 buses.
Teachers3 H. S.9 Elem.Total 12

Negro Schools and Principals

Pleasant Grove, A. F. Melvin, Route 1, Dunn, 116 Elem., 3 teachers.

Eureka, Margaret S. Butler, Route 1, Dunn, 40 Elem., 1 teacher.

DISTRICT NO. 5 —

S. O. Barefoot, ChairmanRoute 5, Dunn, N. C.
Ralph BassRoute 5, Dunn, N. C.
Fred TewRoute 5, Dunn, N. C.

White School and Principal

Plain View, Route 5, Dunn, Percy Hudson, Principal, Route 5, Dunn.

1945-46Enrollment69 H. S.360 Elem.Total 4295 buses.
Teachers3 H. S.10 Elem.Total 13.

DISTRICT NO. 6 —

Lee Rose, ChairmanRoute 2, Newton Grove, N. C.
Kermit WestRoute 2, Newton Grove, N. C.
Bert BlackmanRoute 5, Dunn, N. C.

White School and Principal

Westbrook, Route 2, Newton Grove, W. P. Moore, District Prin., Route 2, Newton Grove.

1945-46Enrollment69 H. S.296 Elem.Total 3653 buses.
Teachers3 H. S.9 Elem.Total 12.

Negro School and Principal

Littlefield,P. M. Lee, Clinton,77 Elem.,2 teachers.

DISTRICT NO. 7 —

James A. Parker, ChairmanRoute 1, Clinton, N. C.
Orie WarrenRoute 1, Clinton, N. C.
Estel RoyalRoseboro, N. C.

White School and Principal

Herring, Route 1, Clinton, J. H. Taylor, District Principal, Route 1, Clinton

1945-46Enrollment82 H. S.327 Elem.Total 4095 buses.
Teachers4 H. S.9 Elem.Total 13.

Negro Schools and Principals

Pinehurst, Lula R. Lee, Clinton,21 Elem., 1 teacher
New Hope, Mrs. Annie C. Sampson, Clinton28 Elem., 1 teacher
Harnett, Mary B. Davis, Route 5, Clinton13 Elem., 1 teacher
Midway, Mrs. Katie Jones, Clinton36 Elem., 1 teacher





RAWLS

JEWELRY STORE

— Since 1888 —

Quality Jewelry

GLASSWARE CHINA

SILVER GIFTS

OLDEST ESTABLISHED BUSINESS IN CLINTON

FRIGIDAIRE

REFRIGERATORS — RANGES — WATER HEATERS

BENDIX

EASY

MAYTAG

WASHERS

COMPLETE ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND CONTRACT WIRING SERVICE


[Illustration:

Barwick's
HOME APPLIANCES

]

Vance St.

Phone 397-1

Clinton, N. C.





DISTRICT NO. 8 —

H. I. Rayford, ChairmanNewton Grove, N. C.
J. B. WarrenNewton Grove, N. C.
Roy JacksonNewton Grove, N. C.

White School and Principal

Newton Grove, Newton Grove, N. C., Basil B. Castellow, District Principal, Newton Grove.

1945-46Enrollment48 H. S.284 Elem.Total 3324 buses.
Teachers3 H. S.8 Elem.Total 11.

Negro Schools and Principals

White Oak, Mrs. Ernestine Lucas, Clinton, 87 Elem., 3 teachers.

Cedar Point, Mrs. Daisy Henry, Newton Grove, 37 Elem., 1 teacher.

DISTRICT NO. 9 —

Sam L. Hollingsworth, ChairmanRoute 3, Mt. Olive, N. C.
W. B. SuttonRoute 1, Faison, N. C.
A. L. SuttonRoute 2, Faison, N. C.

White School and Principal

Piney Grove, Route 1, Faison, N. C., M. R. Barfield, District Prin., Route 1, Faison.

1945-46Enrollment73 H. S.306 Elem.Total 3795 buses.
Teachers3 H. S.8 Elem.Total 11.

Negro Schools and Principals

Sutton, Mrs. L. C. Cromartie, Route 1, Faison 37 Elem., 1 teacher.

Lane, Minnie S. Weeks, Route 3, Clinton 35 Elem., 1 teacher.

Poplar Grove, D. L. Robinson, Clinton, 87 Elem., 3 teachers.

Gum, Juanita Hill, Clinton 50 Elem., 2 teachers.

DISTRICT NO. 10 —

N. L. Daughtry, ChairmanRoute 3, Clinton, N. C.
P. H. OdomRoute 3, Clinton, N. C.
G. D. DardenRoute 5, Clinton, N. C.

White School and Principal

Halls, Clinton, Route 3, O. B. Bass, Principal, Route 3, Clinton.

1945-46Enrollment82 H. S.416 Elem.Total 4985 buses.
Teachers3 H. S.11 Elem.Total 14.

Negro Schools and Principals

Oak Grove, Mrs. Rebecca Walton, Route 5, Clinton, 59 Elem., 2 teachers.

Keener, J. T. Stewart, Clinton, 132 Elem., 3 teachers.

Brown, Mrs. Allie Mathis, Route 3, Clinton, 58 Elem., 2 teachers.





Isaac Hurwitz

BETTER STYLES — BETTER VALUES

DRY GOODS - - SHOES

MILLINERY - - READY TO WEAR

FINE CLOTHES

For Men, Women and Children

Quality Merchandise

Courteous Service

Clinton, N. C.

ALWAYS A GOOD SHOW

At The

Clinton and Gem Theatres

Clinton, N. C.





DISTRICT NO. 11—

J. C. Moore, ChairmanTurkey, N. C.
R. W. BlanchardTurkey, N. C.
Geo. W. HudsonTurkey, N. C.

White School and Principal

Turkey, Turkey, N. C., D. B. Oliver, District Principal, Turkey.

1945-46Enrollment50 H. S.260 Elem.Total 3104 buses.
Teachers3 H. S.8 Elem.Total 11.

Negro Schools and Principals

Royal Stevens, Mrs. Maggie Allison, Route 5, Clinton, 105 Elem., 3 teachers.

Turkey, LeRoy L. Smith, Clinton, 173 Elem., 4 teachers.

Bakers Branch, Mrs. Daisy Caldwell, Turkey, 55 Elem., 2 teachers.

Caldwell, Mrs. Esther Smith, Route 1, Warsaw, 40 Elem., 1 teacher.

DISTRICT NO. 12 —

Rufe Tew, ChairmanRoute 2, Clinton, N. C.
Paul J. BryantRoute 2, Clinton, N. C.
J. C. WestbrookRoute 1, Magnolia, N. C.

White School and Principal

Taylors Bridge, Route 2, Clinton, Mrs. Ella K. Peterson, Route 2, Clinton.

1945-46Enrollment34 H. S.176 Elem.Total 2103 buses.
Teachers2 H. S.5 Elem.Total 7.

DISTRICT NO. 13—

W. I. Wright, ChairmanIngold, N. C.
J. R. BullardRoute 1, Garland, N. C.
H. L. GreenIngold, N. C.

White School and Principal

Ingold, Ingold, N. C. Wilbert Peterson, District Principal, Route 2, Clinton.

1945-46Enrollment33 H. S.190 Elem.Total 223.4 buses.
Teachers3 H. S.5 Elem.Total 8.

Colored Schools and Principals

Ingold, Mrs. Josie Moore, Clinton, 108 Elem., 3 teachers.

Hamtown, Macyrene Peterson, Clinton, 50 Elem., 1 teacher.

Killett, Mrs. Isabelle Peterson, Clinton, 17 Elem., 1 teacher.

DISTRICT NO. 14—

Abel Warren, ChairmanGarland, N. C.
Dr. Amos N. JohnsonGarland, N. C.
S. L. SmithGarland, N. C.

White School and Principal

Garland, Garland, N. C., John A. Warren, District Principal, Garland, N. C.

1945-46Enrollment99 H. S.178 Elem.,Total 277.2 buses.
Teachers4 H. S.5 Elem.,Total 9.






[Illustration:


Photo of Belk-Williams Co. Inc. Dept. Store ]

CLINTON'S LEADING DEPARTMENT STORE

Belk-Williams Co.

“HOME OF BETTER VALUES”

PHONE 435-1

CLINTON, N. C.





Negro School and Principal

Garland, Willie M. McLean, Principal, Garland.

1945-46Enrollment72 H. S.230 Elem.,Total 302.2 buses.
Teacher3 H. S.7 Elem.,Total 10.

DISTRICT NO. 15—

J. M. Ezzell, ChairmanRoute 1, Rosehill, N. C.
E. F. JohnsonKerr, N. C.
P. E. RivenbarkRoute 1, Willard, N. C.

White School and Principal

Franklin, Harrells Store, N. C., R. R. Walker, District Principal, Kerr.

1945-46Enrollment68 H. S.264 Elem.Total 312.6 buses.
Teachers4 H. S.8 Elem.Total 12.

Negro Schools and Principals

Bland, Cato C. DeVane, Route 1, Kerr.

1945-46Enrollment42 H. S.135 Elem.Total 177.1 bus.
Teachers2 H. S.4 Elem.Total 6.

Keyton, Mary A. Fennell, Route 1, Kerr, 58 Elem., 2 teachers.

Kings Hill, Maggie Hollingsworth, Route 1, Kerr, 31 Elem., 1 teacher.

Kerr, Mildred DeVane, Route 1, Kerr, 47 Elem., 2 teachers.

Ivanhoe, Janie M. Boykin, Route 1, Rosehill, 51 Elem., 1 teacher.

EASTERN CAROLINA INDIAN TRAINING SCHOOL-Special Unit. FOR INDIANS

Harvey Brewington, ChairmanRoute 1, Clinton, N. C.
John R. JacobsRoute 1, Clinton, N. C.
Maryland MaynorRoute 1, Godwin, N. C.

Eastern Carolina Indian Training School, Clinton, Route 1. A. H. Wolfe, Principal, Clinton, Route 1.

1945-46Enrollment62 H. S.153 Elem.Total 215.2 buses.
Teachers3 H. S.5 Elem.Total 8.

PRIVATE SCHOOLS

Pineland College, Salemburg, N. C., Rev. W. J. Jones, President.

Enrollment 1945-46 — 650 Students with 60 teachers in 5 branches of the college.

This junior college was organized in 1912 by Mr. Jones and the late Mrs. Jones as the Pineland School for Girls, an outgrowth of the old Salemburg Academy. In 1935 Edwards Military Institute was added to the school system. At this time the five branches are: The school for girls, the military institute, the Junior Barracks of E. M. I., the Annie Kate White School for Young Girls and the business school. The physical plant is now valued at $600,000 the title to which now belongs to a non-denominational and non-profit corporation. Mr. and Mrs. Jones turned the property over to this corporation in 1926.

The board of directors is: Dr. G. L. Sykes, chairman; Mrs. Virginia Royal, Mrs. Emma Smith and C. S. Royal.





“SURE CURE”

Automatic Oil Tobacco Curer With Electric Blower

Cures entire barn evenly and well. No more scorched tobacco at bottom — raw tobacco at the top of your barn.

The constant, evenly circulated heat yellows the tobacco uniformly from butt to tip, and produces a sweeter, better quality leaf that will weigh more and bring higher prices.

NO FIRE HAZARDS

All Fire Outside Barn Encased in Steel Jacketed Furnace — Low Insurance — Low Operating Cost

— Big Saving in Man Hours —

On Sale At

Bass Tobacco Warehouse

McKOY ST.

CLINTON, N. C.





HOLY REDEEMER SCHOOL, Newton Grove, N. C., Sister Mary Paul, Superintendent.

A Catholic Parochial School with 58 children enrolled.

There are four Sisters of Mercy, who serve as teachers. One bus is used to transport children to school. A modern and up-to-date school is projected and will be constructed as soon as the materials are available.

SAMPSON COUNTY UNIT OF NORTH CAROLINA EDUCATION ASSOCIATION
President, O. C. JohnsonSalemburg
Vice-President, J. H. TaylorHerring
Secretary, Miss Mazie CurrieRoseboro

LEON L. DAUGHTRY POST AMERICAN LEGION

CommanderLindell A. Powell, Clinton.
Vice-CommandersJ. R. Glover, Salemburg; W. L. McPhail, Tomahawk; A. J. Bizzell, Clinton.
AdjutantD. V. Carter, Clinton.
Finance OfficerE. P. Matthews, Clinton.
Service OfficerP. G. Crumpler, Clinton.
Number of Members435.
Meeting Date4th Monday night monthly.

HEALTH DEPARTMENT

Superintendent of HealthDr. J. H. Williams, Clinton.
Nurses —
Mrs. Irene B. CarrollClinton.
Miss Louise PetersonClinton.
Mrs. Jessie E. TaylorRoute 1, Clinton.
Mrs. Ruby N. ButlerRoute 1, Clinton.
SanitarianBob C. Sandford, Clinton.

WELFARE DEPARTMENT

Superintendent of Public WelfareMrs. R. B. Wilson, Clinton.
Case WorkerMrs. Annie Ferrell, Clinton.
Case WorkerMrs. Geneva Strickland, Route 1, Clinton.
Special Case Worker for BlindMiss Ella Hutchinson, Clinton.
Superintendent of County HomeRichard Pope, Route 2, Clinton.





Whitley Auto Supply Company

AUTO PARTS — ACCESSORIES

Pennsylvania Tires and Tubes

119 Vance St.

Clinton, N. C.

Dial 495-1

Roseboro St.

Roseboro, N. C.

Dial 16-6

C. C. Tart Lumber Company, Inc.

Manufacturers of

Rough and Dressed Lumber

PHONE 549-1

CLINTON, N. C.





SAMPSON COUNTY CHAPTER OF AMERICAN
RED CROSS

ChairmanMrs. J. Sebron Royal, Clinton.
Vice-ChairmanF. B. Johnson, Clinton.
TreasurerMrs. Lola Peterson, Clinton.
SecretaryMiss Kathryn Barber, Clinton.
Publicity ChairmanJames H. Sivertsen, Clinton.
Home Service ChairmanD. V. Carter, Clinton.
First Aid ChairmanMrs. Hal Stewart, Clinton.
Junior Red Cross ChairmanMrs. Gussie D. Parker, Clinton.
Production ChairmanMrs. F. J. Honeycutt, Clinton.
Disaster ChairmanF. B. Johnson, Clinton.
Home Nursing ChairmanMrs. Myrtle Register, Clinton.
Executive SecretaryMrs. C. B. Barrus, Clinton.

SAMPSON COUNTY LIBRARY ASSOCIATION

LibrarianMrs. R. E. Williams, Clinton.
Assistant-LibrarianMiss Margaret Faison, Clinton.
Governing Board —
ChairmanD. V. Carter, Clinton.
Vice-chairmanMrs. R. A. McCullen, Clinton.
TreasurerMiss Eunice Cook, Clinton.
SecretaryF. B. Johnson, Clinton.

Organized in 1934. Books in library, 8,000. Located in basement of Court House. Maintains branch in Roseboro and sends collections to communities for re-circulation.

SAMPSON COUNTY MEDICAL SOCIETY

Dr. Glenn E. Best, PresidentClinton, N. C.
Dr. J. H. Williams, SecretaryClinton, N. C.

COUNTY PROPERTY TAX RATE

Tax Rate for 1945$1.20
General Fund.15
Poor fund and welfare.09
Health.08
County Debt Service.41
School fund.37
O. A. A., A. D. C., & Jail.10
Assessed Valuation$23,459,844.00
Bonded Indebtedness$984,110.00





Reynolds Drugs

COMPLETE PRESCRIPTION DEPARTMENT

PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED BY REGISTERED PHARMACIST

SODAS : SUNDRIES : CANDIES

Phone 333-1

Clinton, N. C.

E. L. Peterson

INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS

PHONE 413-5

P. O. Box 366

Clinton, N. C.





COUNTY HOME

The average daily population at the county home for 1945 was 44. The average monthly cost per inmate was $23.04. The county home farm contains approximately 50 acres. Richard H. Pope is superintendent.

AGRICULTURAL DIVISION

Farm AgentE. J. Morgan, Clinton.
AAA SecretarySam L. Hollingsworth, Clinton.
Assistant Farm AgentT. C. Cornwell, Jr., Clinton.
Home Demonstration AgentMiss Eleanor Southerland, Clinton.
Assistant Hime Demonstratiin AgentMrs. Elizabeth Wade Peterson, Clinton.
Soil Conservation TechnicianH. L. Seagrove, Clinton.
Negro Farm AgentFrank Faison, Clinton.
Negro Home Demonstration AgentEdna Brinson, Clinton.
Number white farms under cultivation 19457,091
Number of white farm families6,382
Number of non-white farm families4,255
Total farm families10,637
Estimated number people engaged in farming37,876

CROP ACREAGE UNDER CULTIVATION

19441945YieldPerAcreApprox. Value 1945
Cotton35,00020,000200lbs.lint$1,160,000.00
Tobacco21,26923,1501,020lbs.10,311,486.00
Peanuts3,0001,5001,200lbs.162,000.00
Corn75,00070,55025bu.2,610,000.00
Soybeans18,00015,00017bu.510,000.00
Truck12,00012,0002,400,000.00
Total estimated value of all crops$23,053,486.00
Tobacco allotment in acres for 194626,092.5
Expected yield on allotment for 194627,000,000
Estimated number tobacco barns 19458,000

AGRICULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS

COUNTY SUBORDINATE GRANGE —

E. C. Watson, DeputyIngold

FARM SECURITY ADMINISTRATION —

L. A. Edwards, SupervisorClinton.
Mrs. Eloise S. Jones, Associate SupervisorClinton.

AAA COUNTY COMMITTEE —

Lorenzo D. Herring, ChairmanRoute 3, Clinton.
Vassie D. Robinson, Vice-ChairmanRosehill.
G. Jarman Sullivan, MemberRoute 1, Faison.





Sampson Hardware Company

KELVINATOR REFRIGERATORS

ELECTRIC RANGES

WATER HEATERS

THOR WASHERS

PEERLESS STOKERS

BUILDING SUPPLIES, PAINT

AND GENERAL LINE OF HARDWARE

Clinton, N. C.

HENRY VANN CO.

SALES


[Illustration:


Ford Motor Company Logo]

SERVICE

GENUINE FORD PARTS

COMPLETE GARAGE SERVICE

Phone 427-1

Clinton, N. C.





AAA COMMUNITY COMMITTEES —

(The first name in each instance is chairman).

Autryville: Rans B. Brock, Autryville; H. Bundy Bullard, Autryville route 2; Harvey J. Autry, Autryville.

Belvoir: Myron K. McLamb, Thomas J. Boone and Musco C. Canady, all of Clinton route 1.

Boykin's Bridge: James B. Alderman, Jr., Parkersburg, Route 1; David McLemore, Parkersburg, route 1; and Edgar A. Hobbs, Roseboro, route 1.

Clement: Edwards H. Williams, Quinton R. Wrench and Jacob H. Matthews, all of Autryville, route 1.

Concord: Thomas W. Crumpler, Clinton, route 1; F. Marvin Spell and Jeff Porter, Roseboro, route 1.

Corinth: Isaac C. Strickland, J. William Hardison, Ernest W. Wood, all of Dunn, route 1.

Delway: Hale R. Herring, John H. Vann and James A. Ezzell, all of Rosehill, route 1.

Halls Store: W. Estel Hairr, Freddie Giles and Bynum Jackson, Godwin, route 1.

Harrells Store: Robert W. Ward, W. Hybert Moore and H. B. Hall, all of Kerr.

Herrings School: Earl L. Daughtry, Leslie E. Tart and J. L. Livingston, all of Clinton, route 1.

Hickory Grove: Isaac C. Blackman, Newton Grove, route 2; T. Velton Matthews and O. Cooper Jackson, Roseboro, route 2.

Jernigan Mill: J. Lovett Barefoot and Sellio O. Barefoot, Dunn, route 2; Russell C. Barefoot, Dunn, route 5.

Kerr: A. Hugh Scronce and Odis W. Canady, Tomahawk, route 1; Wiley C. Ivey, Ivanhoe.

McDaniels: Charles R. Reeves and Jim G. Sessoms, Parkersburg, route 1; Vernon L. Moore, Roseboro, route 1.

Mt. Elam: Corbin Barefoot and Willard McLamb, Roseboro, route 2; Miles F. Jackson, Godwin, route 1.

Mt. Vernon: Marion R. Gainey, L. Franklin Barber and Harvey L. Pope, all of Clinton, route 5.

Merritt Store: Robert C. Merritt, Amos J. Johnson and Oscar L. Bryant, Magnolia.

Mingo: C. Newland Jackson, W. Henry Lambert and Dallie C. Baggett, Dunn, route 1.

Moores: Almon E. Rackley, Jessie E. Summer and Vivian T. Robinson, all of Clinton, route 2.





DR. M. L. O'BRIEN CHIROPRACTOR

CLINTON, N. C.

Phone 515-6

OFFICE HOURS 9 - 12 2 - 5

NIGHT HOURS MON. WED. AND SAT. 7-9

X-RAY LABORATORY

Automotive Parts Company

MANUFACTURES - DISTRIBUTORS FOR EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA

TIRES AND SUPPLIES WHOLESALE

Phone 301-6

Clinton





Newton X-Road: Preston E. Rivenbark, Willard, route 1; Alton Ezzell, Kerr; C. Bland Carr, Willard, route 1.

North Clinton: Charlie T. McCullen, Jr., Clinton, route 1; Hubert C. Smith, Clinton; Jethro Jackson, Clinton, route 1.

North Garland: Albert E. Carter, Lewis B. Merritt and W. Russell Carter, all of Garland, N. C.

North Halls: Peyton Bradshaw, Henry S. Daughtry and Joe H. Carr, all of Clinton, route 3.

North Ingold: Haynes L. Green, Ingold; I. Kenneth Carter and Luke McLamb, Clinton, route 4.

Newton Grove: J. Perdie Williams, Newton, route 2; T. Eugene Tart, Newton Grove, route 1; Willie E. Austin, Dunn, route 2.

North Roseboro: Eddis W. Cain, Roseboro; A. Ross Maynard, Roseboro, route 1; Raleigh F. Carroll, Salemburg Star route.

North Turkey: James E. Wright, Turkey; John W. Warren, Faison, route 2; E. Leslie Roberts, Turkey.

North Westbrook: N. Estel Brock, Dunn, route 5; A. Lee Rose, Newton Grove, route 2; Kirby West, Dunn, route 5.

Odie McCullen: Linwood D. King and W. Haywood Powell, Clinton, route 5; T. Floy Darden, Faison, route 2.

Piney Green: Perlie A. Tew and Purley J. Worley, Roseboro, route 2; William G. Lockerman, Clinton, route 1.

Piney Grove: M. Harvey Lewis, Faison, route 1; Huron L. Grimes, Mt. Olive, route 3; Stephen R. Jackson, Faison, route 1.

Plain View: Carl West, Dunn, route 5; Admon O. Tew, Dunn, route 1; Thomas H. Hawley, Dunn, route 5.

Poplar Grove: Robert Miller, Faison, route 2; Marshall M. Troublefield and Raymond L. Harrell, Faison, route 1.

Rowan: Frank Wallace and Henry S. Clement, Clinton, route 5; Richard Hairr, Clinton, route 2.

Salemburg: Clifford V. Howard, Roseboro, route 2; Roy D. Underwood, Clinton, route 2; Charles E. Norton, Roseboro, route 2.

Sivertsen's Store: J. Thomas Hayes, Godwin, route 1; Alex R. Bullard and Wiley G. Hall, Autryville, route 1.

South Clinton: J. Paul Parker, Robert L. Tew and Thomas Boykin, all of Clinton, route 4.

South Halls: Allie McCullen, Forest Hargrove and James D. Fort, all of Clinton, route 3.

South Garland: Jeff D. Johnson, Sr., Gordon Love and Abel Warren, all of Garland.

South Ingold: Abner M. Robinson, Clinton, route 4; Walter Watson, Ingold; H. Graham Balkcum, Clinton, route 4.

South Newton Grove: Luby Denning, Claude A. Sutton and Rupert Warren, all of Newton Grove, route 1.





F. L. Turlington Lumber Co.

MANUFACTURERS OF

Lumber

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL

Phone 287-1

Clinton, N. C.

PRODUCE

PULPWOOD

AND OPERATE YOUR OWN BUSINESS ALSO BE PAID FOR WOOD ACCORDING

TO FACTORY REPORT SHEET

Sell Through

W. T. McLEAN

Clinton, N. C.

- REPRESENTING -

N. C. PULP COMPANY





South Roseboro: E. Preston Sessoms, Roseboro, route 2; Colon H. Peterson and Henry W. Sessoms, Roseboro, route 1.

South Turkey: Richard H. Holland, James T. Bland and James A. Chesnutt, all of Turkey.

South Westbrook: G. Hubert Jackson, Dunn, route 5; Elijah Moore Baggett and Raymond Best, Newton Grove, route 2.

Spelltown: John C. Hall and Leon Williams, Autryville; Edward M. Spell, Roseboro.

Suttontown: Kern W. Vann, Mt. Olive, route 3; Major C. Sutton, Newton Grove, route 1; Shelton C. Daughtry, Faison, route 1.

Taylors Bridge: W. Randolph Price, Romie S. Williamson and W. Graham Peterson, all of Clinton, route 2.

SAMPSON COUNTY 4-H CLUBS

COUNTY COUNCIL
PresidentFloyd Bass, Route 3, Clinton.
Vice-PresidentFrances Wilson, Route 5, Dunn.
SecretaryClarisse Warren, Salemburg.

SENIOR CLUBS
NamePresidentNo. Member
Taylors BridgeJean Boney, Rt. 2, Clinton28
FranklinBobby Page, Route 1, Wallace17
GarlandScotia Davis, Route 2, Elizabethtown26
RoseboroDonna Grace New, Rt. 1, Roseboro31
SalemburgEmily Holland, Rt. 2, Roseboro9
HerringCharles M. Herring, Rt. 1, Clinton53
HallsDavid Wilson, Rt. 5, Clinton72
TurkeyNella Pha Sykes, Rt. 1, Turkey29
Piney GroveDoris Floyd, Rt. 2, Faison32
ClintonJack Morgan, Clinton82
ClementMary Ruth Edwards, Rt. 1, Godwin46
Plain ViewFrances Wilson, Rt. 5, Dunn68
MingoMarvel White Jackson, Rt. 5, Dunn35
WestbrookSherrill Keen, Rt. 2, Newton Grove24
Newton GroveClaudie Belle Britt, Newton Grove40

JUNIOR CLUBS
NamePresidentNo. Members
SalemburgClarisse Warren, Salemburg49
Plain ViewWiniford Ann Warren, Rt. 1, Dunn37
MingoSarah Barefoot, Rt. 1, Dunn39
WestbrookTheron Keen, Rt. 2, Newton Grove24
Newton GroveShirley Eldridge, Rt. 2, Dunn28
Piney GroveFrank Boyette, Rt. 1, Newton Grove17
ClintonRuby Finn, Rt. 5, Clinton33
Taylors BridgeAgnes Beck, Rt. 2, Clinton11
FranklinJuanita Peterson, Tomahawk43
IngoldMaxine Matthis, Rt. 2, Clinton16
RoseboroJoseph Adams, Rt. 1, Clinton37
HerringJeanne Vann, Rt. 1, Clinton25





It's RIGHT . . . Down to the Ground

SCO-CO

FERTILIZERS

FOR BIGGER YIELDS

FROM YOUR FIELDS


[Illustration:

SCO-CO FERTILIZERS
]

Manufactured by the

Southern Cotton Oil Company -

a neighborly institution serving

Southern farmers since 1887.

For Sale In Sampson County By

TAFT M. BASS — BASS TOBACCO WAREHOUSE

Clinton, N. C.

L. E. BOYETTE — BOYETTE'S COTTON GIN

Faison, Route 2

G. N. HERRING — McLAMB'S CROSS ROADS

MRS. J. L. HUDSON, D. P. HERRING AND

LUBY DENNING — NEWTON GROVE, N. C.





ClementNancy Tew, Rt. 1, Godwin60
HallsRobby Thornton, Rt. 5, Clinton61
TurkeyJohnnie Cottle, Rt. 1, Turkey34
McDanielsBetty Lou Cherry, Rt. 1, Parkersburg14
ConcordWalter Spell, Rt. 1, Roseboro38

SAMPSON COUNTY HOME DEMONSTRATION CLUBS

COUNTY COUNCIL OFFICERS —

President:—Mrs. Hubert Peterson, Route 5, Clinton.

Vice-President:—Mrs. Allen Westbrook, Route 2, Newton Grove.

Secretary:—Mrs. James A. Turlington, Route 1, Clinton.

Treasurer:—Mrs. B. C. Clifton, RFD, Faison.

COUNTY PROJECT LEADERS —

Foods and Nutrition: Mrs. W. I. McLamb, Garland.

Home Gardens: Mrs. C. B. Peterson, Route 2, Clinton.

Home Poultry: Mrs. Oscar McLamb, Route 4, Clinton.

Home Dairy: Mrs. Jap Williamson, Route 4, Clinton.

Food Preservation: Mrs. Stacy Autry, Clinton.

House Furnishings: Mrs. H. L. Green, Ingold.

Home Management: Mrs. R. W. Blanchard, RFD, Turkey.

Family Life: Mrs. R. A. McCullen, Route 3, Clinton.

Home Beautification: Mrs. J. S. Royal, Clinton.

COUNTY COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN —

Community Service: Mrs. Claxton Pate, Clinton.

Health: Mrs. J. H. Taylor, Route 1, Clinton.

Education: Mrs. W. I. Wright, Jr., Ingold.

Citizenship: Mrs. Viola Strickland, Route 1, Dunn.

Recreation: Mrs. D. P. Billard, Route 1, Clinton.

Loan Fund: Mrs. B. C. Clifton, RFD, Faison.

Markets: Mrs. O. A. Turlington, Route 1, Clinton.

4-H Club Leader: Mrs. Alvis Clack, Route 2, Clinton.

ANDREW'S CHAPEL—22 MEMBERS .

President—Mrs. David Wells, Route 1, Roseboro.

Vice-President—Mrs. A. H. Graham, Route 1, Roseboro.

Secretary—Mrs. H. M. Fillyaw, Roseboro.

BELVOIR—24 MEMBERS.

President—Mrs. J. G. Butler, Route 1, Clinton.

Vice-President—Mrs. John Butler, Route 1, Clinton.

Secretary—Mrs. Hugh Butler, Route 1, Clinton.

CLEMENT—38 MEMBERS.

President—Mrs. Clifford Jackson, Autryville.

Vice-President—Mrs. J. M. Page, Autryville.

Secretary—Mrs. Aullie Wrench, Autryville.

CONCORD—27 MEMBERS.

President—Mrs. J. R. Pate, Route 1, Clinton.

Vice-President—Mrs. J. R. Pate, Route 1, Clinton.

Secretary—Mrs. R. L. Tyndall, Route 1, Parkersburg.





— FOR —

Baby Chicks

— See —

Sampson Feed & Hatchery

INCORPORATED

Clinton, North Carolina

U. S. & N. C. APPROVED BABY CHICKS

“We Hatch Our Own”

— SEE —

HARMON A. REGISTER

FOR

FINE MEATS, STAPLE

AND FANCY GROCERIES

BIRDSEYE FROZEN FOODS

— GARDEN AND FIELD SEED —

Phone 349-1

Clinton, N. C.





DOBBERSVILLE—17 MEMBERS.

President—Mrs. C. J. Strickland, Route 3, Mt. Olive.

Vice-President—Mrs. A. A. Joyner, Route 3, Mt. Olive.

Secretary & Treasurer—Mrs. G. S. Strickland, Route 3, Mt. Olive.

FRANKLIN—42 MEMBERS.

President—Mrs. W. I. McLamb, Garland.

Vice-President—Miss Malissa Ward, Kerr.

Secretary—Miss Julia Peterson, Kerr.

HALLS—41 MEMBERS.

President—Mrs. Kennon Bowden, Route 3, Clinton.

Vice-President—Mrs. R. A. McCullen, Route 3, Clinton.

Secretary—Mrs. K. W. McLamb, Route 3, Clinton.

HERRING—24 MEMBERS.

President—Mrs. W. T. Warren, Route 2, Roseboro.

Vice-President—Mrs. B. A. Parker, Route 1, Clinton.

Secretary—Mrs. Hannibal Baggett, Route 2, Roseboro.

INGOLD—36 MEMBERS.

President: Mrs. L. M. McLamb, Route 4, Clinton.

Vice-President—Mrs. Alvah Tatum, Ingold.

Secretary—Mrs. W. I. Wright, Sr., Ingold.

IVANHOE—27 MEMBERS.

President—Mrs. P. L. Brown, Ivanhoe.

Vice-President—Miss Frances Robinson, Ivanhoe.

Secretary—Mrs. E. H. Brown, Ivanhoe.

JOHN M. FAISON—18 MEMBERS.

President—Mrs. M. M. Troublefield, Route 1, Faison.

Vice-President—Mrs. Henry Lewis, Route 1, Faison.

Secretary—Mrs. O. S. King, Route 1, Faison.

McDANIELS—13 MEMBERS.

President—Mrs. T. N. Surles, Route 1, Roseboro.

Vice-President—Mrs. David McLemore, Route 1, Parkersburg.

Secretary, Mrs. D. F. Simmons, Roseboro.

MARGARET CLARK—16 MEMBERS.

President—Mrs. Kay Autry, Autryville.

Vice-President—Mrs. L. R. Stone, Autryville.

Sec.-Treas.—Mrs. H. T. Tew, Autryville.

MINGO—29 MEMBERS.

President—Mrs. Norwood McLamb, Route 1, Dunn.

Vice-President—Mrs. Alton B. Jackson, Route 1, Dunn.

Secretary—Mrs. Ervin Barefoot, Route 1, Dunn.

NEWTON'S CROSS ROADS—21 MEMBERS.

President—Mrs. L. T. Highsmith, Willard.

Vice-President—Mrs. C. W. Sykes, Willard.

Secretary—Mrs. Alexander Newkirk, Willard.





KELLY & BEST

GENERAL MERCHANDISE

HARDWARE OILS

PAINTS VARNISHES

GARDEN & FIELD SEEDS

Clinton, N. C.

Fleishman's Dept. Store

CLINTON, N. C.

WE OUTFIT THE FAMILY WITH FINE MERCHANDISE AT LOW COST

A WARM WELCOME AWAITS YOU AT OUR STORE





NEWTON GROVE—24 MEMBERS.

President—Mrs. J. P. Eldridge, Four Oaks.

Vice-President—Mrs. H. I. Rayford, Newton Grove.

Secretary—Mrs. W. E. Thornton, Route 1, Newton Grove.

PLAIN VIEW—19 MEMBERS.

President, Mrs. Fred Tew, Route 5, Dunn.

Vice-President—Mrs. James West, Route 5, Dunn.

Secretary and Treas.—Mrs. A. M. Stone, Route 5. Dunn.

ROWAN—68 MEMBERS.

President—Mrs. Edwin Peterson, Route 4, Clinton.

Vice-President—Mrs. Obie Malpass, Route 2, Clinton.

Secretary—Mrs. R. A. Tew, Route 2, Clinton.

SALEMBURG—36 MEMBERS.

President—Mrs. H. L. Gale, Salemburg.

Vice-President—Mrs. J. P. Turlington, Route 1, Clinton.

Secretary—Mrs. Otto Strickland, Route 1, Clinton.

TAYLOR'S BRIDGE—30 MEMBERS.

President—Mrs. Clayman B. Peterson, Route 2, Clinton.

Vice-President—Mrs. Charlie Powell, Route 2, Clinton.

Secretary—Mrs. Leroy Powell, Route 2, Clinton.

TURKEY—41 MEMBERS.

President—Mrs. Jim Chestnutt, Turkey.

Vice-President—Mrs. Agnes Matthis, Turkey.

Secretary and Treas.—Mrs. Willie Byrd, Turkey.

WAYCROSS—13 MEMBERS.

President—Mrs. John Smith, Route 1, Magnolia.

Vice-President—Mrs. Walter Merritt, Route 1, Magnolia.

Secretary—Mrs. H. L. Merritt, Route 1, Magnolia.

WESTBROOK—37 MEMBERS.

President—Mrs. J. L. Hudson, Route 2, Newton Grove.

Vice-President—Mrs. Fonnie Tyndall, Route 2, Newton Grove.

Secretary—Mrs. Marcellus McPhail, Route 2, Newton Grove.

NEW GROUP—10 MEMBERS.

President—Mrs. Wilbert Casey, Route 3, Mt. Olive.

Vice-President—Mrs. Ballard Sutton, Route 3, Mt. Olive.

Secretary—Mrs. G. J. Sullivan, Route 3, Mt. Olive.





Clinton Bottling Works

Bottlers

Of All Flavors

Clinton, N. C.

Adams & Johnson

MANUFACTURERS OF

Hardwood Lumber

Clinton, N. C.





NEWSPAPER PUBLISHERS OF SAMPSON COUNTY

CLINTON PUBLISHING CO., INC., Clinton, N. C.

Newspapers and Commercial Printing. Publishes
The Sampson IndependentClinton.
The Bladen JournalElizabethtown.

SAMPSON PUBLISHING COMPANY, Clinton, N. C.

Newspapers and Commercial Printing. Publishes
The Sampson NewsClinton.
The Roseboro NewsRoseboro.

MASONIC LODGES

Hiram Lodge No. 98, Clinton—156 Members.
Worshipful MasterJames I. Reynolds Clinton.
SecretaryNorwood P. Parker, Clinton.

Mill Creek Lodge No. 125, Newton Grove—43 Members
Worshipful MasterD. H. Jernigan, Rt. 3. Mt. Olive.
SecretaryLuby Denning, Rt. 1, Newton Grove.

Garland Lodge No. 664, Garland—41 Members.
Worshipful MasterE. B. Graham, Ivanhoe.
SecretaryL. A. Warren, Jr., Garland.

Mingo Lodge No. 206, Route 5, Dunn—34 Members.
Worshipful MasterWarren Jackson, Rt. 5, Dunn.
SecretaryPercy Hudson, Rt. 5, Dunn.

Coharie Lodge No. 379, Salemburg — Members.
Worshipful MasterA. R. Jones, Rt. 2, Roseboro.
SecretaryS. H. Creech, Salemburg.

POLITICAL DIVISIONS

BOARD OF ELECTIONSNAMES AND ADDRESSES
ChairmanStewart B. Warren, Clinton, N. C.
SecretaryEverett L. Peterson. Clinton, N. C.
MemberDr. A. N. Johnson, Garland, N. C.

DEMOCRATIC PARTY
PRECINCT CHAIRMANNAMES AND ADDRESSES
North ClintonJ. H. Lewis, Clinton, N. C.
South ClintonJ. Lofton Kerr, Clinton, N. C.
DismalBynum Jackson, Godwin, N. C.
Franklin
HallsG. D. Darden, Rt. 5, Clinton, N. C.
HerringFreddie Vann, Newton Grove, N. C., R-2.





The Sign of

‘FRIENDLY SERVICE’


[Illustration:

PURCHASING
MARKETING
COOPERATIVE

Company Logo]

The Farmers business, owned and operated by the Farmers of Sampson County, for the Farmers of Sampson County.

- DEALERS IN -

Farm Machinery

Fertilizer

Farm Supplies

Dairy & Poultry Feeds

Electrical Appliances

Tested Seeds

SAMPSON FCX SERVICE

Clinton, N. C.

W. E. Williamson, Mgr.

PLANS MADE TO INCREASE TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION FACILITIES

During the war years, no additional facilities could be provided to take care of the increased demand for telephone service because of War Production Board restrictions. The restrictions were issued to make communications equipment and materials available for the military forces.

Since V-J Day we have made plans to provide additional service in Clinton and will make plans to provide additional facilities for other exchanges and additional rural service.

The provision of additional facilities will depend entirely on our ability to secure materials and manpower.

Carolina Telephone & Telegraph Company





Honeycutts No. 1A. R. Jones, Salemburg, N. C.
Honeycutts No. 2J. G. Butler, Clinton, N. C., R-1.
LisbonW. T. Watson, Ingold, N. C.
Little Coharie No. 2N. B. Hill, Roseboro, N. C.
Little Coharie No. 1L. M. Cooper, Autryville, N. C.
McDanielsC. Lonnie Hobbs, Roseboro, N. C.
MingoH. C. Warren, Dunn, N. C, RFD.
Newton GroveLovette Warren, Newton Grove, N. C.
Piney GroveM. M. Troublefield, Faison, N. C., R-1.
Plain ViewE. B. Lockamy, Dunn, N. C., R-5.
South RiverJ. D. Johnson, Sr., Garland, N. C.
Taylors BridgeE. D. Allen, Rose Hill, N. C.
TurkeyW. R. Britt, Turkey, N. C.
WestbrookMarvin Wooten, Dunn, N. C., R-5.

PRECINCT CHAIRMEN — REPUBLICAN PARTY

North ClintonJohn B. Williams, Jr., Clinton.
South ClintonJ. Richard Parker, Route 4, Clinton.
DismalJ. T. Hayes, Route 1, Godwin.
FranklinW. E. Johnson, Route 1, Kerr.
HallsJ. M. Warren, Route 3, Clinton
HerringJohn Blackman, Route 2, Newton Grove
HoneycuttJames Trulington, Salemburg
Little CoharieC. W. Sessoms, Roseboro, N. C.
LisbonEugene C. Johnson, Ingold
McDanielB. L. Owen, Parkersburg.
MingoB. E. Jackson, Route 1, Godwin.
Newton GroveT. Eugene Tart, Newton Grove.
Piney GroveGeorge S. McKenzie, Route 2, Faison.
Plain ViewChalmers Jernigan, Route 5, Dunn.
South RiverJ. J. Stafford, Jr., Garland.
Taylors BridgeO. A. Matthis, Route 2, Clinton.
TurkeyR. H. Holland, Turkey.
WestbrookCraven E. Lee, Route 2, Newton Grove.

REGISTERED VOTERS —

TownshipRepublicansDemocrats
North Clinton7521,316
South Clinton448628
Dismal924133
Franklin211203
Halls394405
Herring535280
Honeycutt No. 1673320
Honeycutt No. 2207154
Little Coharie (Autryville)214131
Little Coharie (Roseboro)697681
Lisbon124191
McDaniel138173
Mingo538236
Newton Grove448271
Piney Grove259461
Plain View627275
South River124336
Taylors Bridge280180
Turkey266385
Westbrook283351
TOTAL8,1427,110





THE CHILDREN'S SHOP

“We Major In Minors”

Visit Our Shop For Everything

IN INFANTS AND CHILDREN'S WEAR

GIFTS

NOVELTIES

Frank Mocnik, Prop.

Main St.

Clinton, N. C.


[Illustration:


Drawing of Queen City Trailways Bus]

SERVING - -

Clinton and Sampson County with Superb Motor Bus Service

CONNECTING - -

Clinton and Sampson County with all major cities in North Carolina and all other states in the Union.

Queen City Trailways

417 West Fifth Street

Charlotte, N. C.





VOTES CAST 1944 — GENERAL ELECTION

For GovernorFor President
CherryPattonRooseveltDewey
4,0655,9034,2206,062

CHURCHES — White

MISSIONARY BAPTIST
ChurchPastor and AddressMembers
BeulahJ. B. Sessoms, Magnolia56
ClintonC. H. Hornsby, Clinton703
CenterR. F. Marshburn, Salemburg94
EbenezerE. C. Watson, Jr., Ingold43
EvergreenN. E. Gresham, Jacksonville91
GarlandR. F. Marshburn, Salemburg252
IngoldR. F. Marshburn, Salemburg223
Mt. GileadR. F. Marshburn, Salemburg263
Mt. VernonNo Pastor Listed94
New HopeJ. B. Sessoms, Magnolia150
Oak ValeJ. B. Sessoms, Magnolia55
Poplar GroveJ. B. Sessoms, Magnolia62
Piney GroveFulton Bryan, Wake Forest226
RowanE. S. Morgan, Clinton, Route 2494
SiloamL. L. Johnson, Magnolia169
TurkeyJ. B. Sessoms, Magnolia194
Union Grove38
AutryvilleG. N. Ashley, Salemburg174
Baptist ChapelI. K. Stafford, Buie's Creek317
BrownsJ. F. Blackman, Buie's Creek104
CenterR. F. Marshburn, Salemburg210
ClementC. B. Howard, Buie's Creek302
CorinthZ. G. Ray, Stedman89
ElizabethG. N. Ashley, Salemburg236
HarmonyR. F. Marshburn, Salemburg63
Hickory GroveJ. F. Blackman, Buie's Creek144
Long BranchG. N. Ashley, Salemburg129
Mary's ChapelFernie Naylor, Salemburg56
Mill CreekBaxter Walker, Fayetteville71
MingoI. K. Stafford, Buie's Creek174
MintzC. B. Horne, Rt. 1, Roseboro63
Mt. ElamC. E. Abernathy, Rt. 2, Fayetteville298
ParkersburgE. C. Watson, Jr., Ingold64
Piney GreenP. E. Downs, Salemburg168
Pleasant UnionBaxter Walker, Fayetteville72
RoseboroG. N. Ashley, Salemburg202
SalemburgG. N. Ashley, Salemburg294
SharonG. N. Ashley, Salemburg148
Spring BranchI. K. Stafford, Buie's Creek345
White OakZ. G. Ray, Stewman212
Union GroveBaxter Walker, Fayetteville194





CLINTON FLORAL & GIFT STORE

Clinton, N. C.

Dial 350-1

FLOWERS AND GIFTS FOR ALL OCCASIONS

CRYSTAL

GLASSWARE

METALWARE

BOXED GIFTS

LEATHER GOODS

ACME CLEANERS

DRY CLEANING

ALTERATIONS

HAT BLOCKING AND TAILORS

Prompt Pick-up And Delivery Service

PHONE 497-1

Vance St.

Clinton, N. C.





METHODIST
ChurchPastorMembership
ClintonJ. H. Lanning, Clinton701
KeenerW. N. Vaughn, Faison220
Garland ChargeJ. D. Young, Garland
Antioch90
Centenary142
Epworth126
Garland138
Johnson's Chapel88
Salem39
Roseboro ChargeD. M. Sharpe, Roseboro
Andrews112
Bethel255
Beulah57
Halls221
McGees39
TurkeyA. M. Williams, Warsaw85
Newton Grove ChargeR. L. Hethcox, Newton Grove
Hopewell137
Maple Grove95
Mt. Moriah63
Newton Grove196
Wesleys Chapel103

PRESBYTERIAN
Graves MemorialM. C. MacQueen, Clinton317
Holly GroveM. C. MacQueen, Clinton80

EPISCOPAL
St. John'sNo Rector at Present55

CATHOLIC
Most Holy RedeemerA Schonhart, Newton Grove321
Church of the Immaculate Conception,John Herold Clinton80

FREE WILL BAPTIST
ChurchPastor and AddressMembers
CorinthC. H. Coats, Rt. 3, Four Oaks89
Lee's ChapelW. H. Lancaster,213
Oak GroveR. B. Spencer, Ayden168
Roberts GroveM. E. Godwin, Route 5, Dunn152
Shady GroveR. H. Wooley, Durham305
St. PaulR. H. Hinnant, Micro208
West ClintonR. H. Jackson, Clinton36
BethanyG. L. Johnson, Stedman55
LebanonE. J. Cashwell, Roseboro21
Plain ViewLuther O. Smith, Bladenboro67
RoseboroJames E. Malpass, Clinton40
ZoarA. C. Wheeler, Watha60





DEEMS H. CLIFTON INSURANCE

LIFE - -

FIRE - -

AUTO AND CASUALTY

Phone 515-1

Clinton

Eastern Oil Co., Inc.

DISTRIBUTORS OF

ATLANTIC PETROLEUM PRODUCTS

Prompt Service - - Quality Products

DISTRIBUTING PLANTS

IN

Clinton, N. C.

Newton Grove, N. C.

Atlantic Products “Keep Up-Keep Down”





CHRISTIAN
Pleasant UnionRev. John W. Waterson, Wilson500
Carr MemorialRev. Horace G. Quigley, Wilson160

PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS
ChurchPastor and AddressMembers
ClintonO. T. Howard, Clinton67
SharonO. T. Howard, Clinton37
Holland ChapelJoe L. Russell, R. F. D., Roseboro25
St. MatthewS. J. Williams, Rt. 3, Clinton29
GoshenS. J. Williams, Rt. 3, Clinton43

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST
ClintonW. W. Scott, Clinton14
UNIVERSALIST
ClintonM. W. Cobb, Clinton70
Red HillM. W. Cobb, Clinton160

CHURCHES — Negro

A. M. E. ZION (METHODIST)
ChurchPastor and AddressMembers
St. StephenJ. T. Stewart, Clinton300
Ashley's ChapelJ. T. Stewart, Clinton200
Union ChapelJ. T. Stewart, Clinton100
St. ThomasL. W. Windley, Wilmington100
Sam SpringL. W. Windley, Wilmington150
Smith ChapelL. W. Windley, Wilmington50
New LightC. M. McCoy, Elizabethtown35
Clinton ChapelW. A. Turner, Warsaw50
Mt. Zion (Delway)W. A. Turner, Warsaw150
Trinity ChapelW. A. Turner, Warsaw50
Mt. ZionC. D. Ward, Wilson35
Pleasant WalkD. A. Purifoy, Wilson35

PRESBYTERIAN
Faison MemorialB. H. Brown, Elizabethtown6

DISCIPLES
Union GroveJ. F. McLaurin, Elizabethtown260
St. PaulM. L. Loftin, Rt. 2, Goldsboro135
Running BranchE. L. Uzzell, LaGrange80
Holly GroveJ. H. Harper, Kinston250
St. JamesS. D. Brown, Wilson25





SAMPSON RADIO & APPLIANCE CO.

Clinton, N. C.

RCA RADIOS AND VICTROLAS

BLACKSTONE WASHERS AND IRONERS

FADA RADIOS

COOLERATOR REFRIGERATORS

L & H RANGES AND WATER HEATERS

UNIVERSAL APPLIANCES

SUNROC WATER COOLERS

Anything Electrical - Installed - Repaired

— Superior Radio Service —

617 College St.

Phone 453-1

TPL MOTOR COMPANY

SALES


[Illustration:

CHEVROLET SUPER SERVICE
Chevrolet Motor Company Logo]

SERVICE

COMPLETE GARAGE SERVICE

CHEVROLET

Means Quality at Modest Cost And Economical Transportation

Phone 452-1

Clinton, N. C.





HOLINESS
Mount SinaiL. Bowens, Wilmington25
Morning StarL. R. Revels, Selma45

CATHOLIC
St. Benedict130

MISSIONARY BAPTIST
ChurchPastor and AddressMembers
First Baptist ClintonK. P. Battle, Rocky Mount600
Lisbon Street ClintonR. H. Walker, Burgaw375
Brown's ChapelH. H. Bobbitt, Fayetteville180

(Note: Information on churches other than those published was not available at the time of printing.)

SAMPSON DISTRICT OF THE TUSCARORA COUNCIL,
BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA

ChairmanE. L. Morgan
Vice-ChairmanF. B. Johnson
Finance ChairmanAbel Warren
CommissionerJames H. Sivertsen
Camping and Activities ChairmanPaul Cashwell
Organization and Extension ChairmanS. C. Baddour
Leadership and Training ChairmanRev. M. C. MacQueen
Executive BoardJ. H. Crumpler
Inter-RacialD. V. Carter

SCOUT TROOPS

Troop number and locationScoutmasterMembers
36 — GarlandRev. R. F. Marshburn27
37 — IngoldWalter Watson15
38 — RoseboroH. P. Naylor20
39 — ClintonJay Stewart20
51 — Franklin SchoolBillie Hall25
52 — Clement SchoolHarold Sivertsen, Quenton Wrench14
53 — Newton GroveR. L. Hethcox10
55 — SalemburgR. F. Gavin46
57 — MingoJ. B. Alderman10

CUB PACK

7 — ClintonRev. M. W. Cobb22

NEGRO SCOUT TROOP

66 — ClintonFrank Faison, Jr.29





CLINTON


[Illustration:

MAYOR J. C. MORISEY
]

MAYOR J. C. MORISEY

and The Town of

Clinton Dedicates This

Page to The

Clinton Tobacco Market

and Welcome

All Newcomers Who

Have Chosen to Dwell

In Our Midst





Clinton

When a community takes root — grows and branches out, the direction of its progress is largely determined by its early settlers and their descendants. Thus the “twig” of Clinton was early bent toward a place in the sun, and the “tree” into which this thriving community has grown since the past 94 years, is straight, tall and sturdy. Today it stands a living monument to the hardy pioneers and to the contemporary citizens, merchants and manufacturers who have contributed to its nourishment.

Clinton, the oldest and largest town in the county, had its actual beginning in 1852, when a charter for the town was granted. It was named in honor of General Richard Clinton, who donated a five acre square plot of ground on which the first courthouse, a log structure with jail and prison stocks was built. The county court, later succeeded by a board of commissioners, sold off into business lots the east side of the square, narrowing the courthouse site to about one acre on which the present courthouse, a structure, modern in every detail, now stands.

Being dependent to so large an extent upon agriculture for its business life, Clinton is widely known for its various markets. The newly established Tobacco Market sold over 11 million pounds of tobacco last season at one of the highest averages in the state, and with the erection of additional warehouses, more than twice this amount is expected to be sold during the 1946 seiling season. A redrying plant will be built as soon as equipment is available. The Sampson Fruit and Vegetable Market, one of the largest produce auction markets in the nation is located here. Classed as the largest green corn, pepper and huckleberry market in the world, 263.025 packages of fourteen different commodities were sold last season at a cash value of more than one-half million dollars.

Clinton also has a thriving livestock market, poultry and egg market, and an old established cotton market, which is probably the largest wagon market in the state.

Within the near future, or upon the availability of building materials, a new 100-bed hospital will be built in Clinton to serve Sampson county. A $200,000 bond issue has already been approved to cover one-half the estimated cost of the project. Application has been made for a license to operate a 1,000 watt radio station, which will cost approximately $40,000 to build and equip. Authorization for the issuance of $38,000 in bonds has been ordered for the purchase of land and the erection of a new county jail.

POPULATION19401930Percent IncreaseEst. 1946
Clinton3,5572,71232%6,000

Total Incorporated Area: 925 acres, in an octagon with 3,600 foot radius from courthouse.

Tax rate 1945-46 — $1.50

Assessed valuation$ 2,755,819.00





Clinton Style Shop

SMART WEARING APPAREL FOR THE SMART WOMAN AND MISS

Style and Quality Combined With Popular Prices

On Street to Postoffice

Clinton, N. C.

Fussell's Soda Shop

COMPLETE FOUNTAIN SERVICE

TOASTED GRILLED SANDWICHES SUNDRIES, MAGAZINES AND PAPERS ALSO

Sweet Milk - Buttermilk - Whipping Cream

SEMI-SOLID MILK SHAKES

Open 8 a. m. — 12 p. m.

Main Street

Clinton, N. C.





Bonded Indebtedness182,000.00
Registered Voters1,863
Received Charter1852

GOVERNMENT

MayorJ. C. Morisey
Town ClerkR. E. Williams
Assistant Town ClerkN. H. Larkins

BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS: W. T. McLean, J. R. Best, M. O. Register and R. E. Williams.

POLICE DEPARTMENT: E. L. Cherry, Chief; W. R. Thornton, W. B. Rich, J. A. Buckner and Rupert Warren.

FIRE DEPARTMENT: J. H. Bunch, Chief; and 20 volunteers.

STREET DEPARTMENT: John D. Strickland, Superintendent.

WATER DEPARTMENT: H. C. Bunch, Superintendent.

POST OFFICE — First Class

PostmasterFerdinand B. Johnson, Clinton
No. of p. o. box holders378
Estimated families served by boxes750
Number of city mail carriers2
Estimated number persons served by carriers4,150
Number of rural mail carriers5
Number of rural mail boxes1,535
Number of families served by rural carriers2,150
Estimated number persons served by rural carriers10,755
Total number served by postoffice17,905
Total number of employees26
Number pieces outgoing mail in 19451,481.324
Gross receipts for fiscal year ending June 30, ’40$21,902.64
Gross receipts for fiscal year ending June 30, ’45$44,686.11

CLINTON MERCHANT'S ASSOCIATION

PresidentH. L. Stewart
Vice-PresidentJ. C. Morisey
SecretaryMrs. Nancy P. Bailey

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: W. J. Calhoun, R. Ed. Williams, Eugene McLamb, W. F. Shuford, J. F. Daughtry, P. W. Blount and H. A. Register.

COMMITTEES:

Agriculture—E. L. Peterson, Chairman; W. E. Williamson, W. J. Calhoun and A. B. Butler.

Finance—C. R. Rich, Chairman; R. E. Williams, H. B. Barwick and Goldman Lovell.





Register's Drug Store

ALL PRESCRIPTIONS CAREFULLY COMPOUNDED OF PUREST DRUGS AND FILLED BY REGISTERED PHARMACIST

SODAS : TOBACCOS : SUNDRIES

Phone 491-1

Clinton, N. C.

Dodge - Plymouth

AND DODGE TRUCKS

BIG NAMES IN THE AUTOMOTIVE WORLD

DODGE

PLYMOUTH

Weeks - McLamb Motor Co.

Sales and Service

Phone 468-1

Clinton, N. C.





Legislative—P. H. Harrelson, Chairman; F. L. Turlington and P. G. Bunn.

Membership—L. A. Corbitt, Chairman; R. L. Flake, A. D. Royal and J. F. Daughtry.

Advisory—C. H. Caison, Chairman; Glenn Thornton, Wilton Boney and F. Grover Britt.

New Business—J. L. Austin, Chairman and F. J. Honeycutt.

Inter City Relations—Manly Jones, Chairman; M. O. Register, Clarence Shipp and Ben Jayson.

Transportation—Joe Boyette, Chairman; P. W. Blount, Troy Honeycutt and J. A. Elmore.

CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS

CLINTON LIONS CLUB — 72 MEMBERS.

PresidentC. H. Caison, Clinton.
SecretaryWm. G. King, Clinton.

CLINTON ROTARY CLUB — 52 MEMBERS.

PresidentJoe R. Best, Clinton.
SecretaryCroom M. Faircloth, Clinton.

CLINTON PARENT-TEACHER ASSOCIATION — 962 MEMBERS.

PresidentMrs. P. G. Bunn, Clinton.
SecretaryMiss Elizabeth Gooding, Clinton.

ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR — 58 MEMBERS.

Worthy MatronMrs. Mary Wells, Clinton.
SecretaryMrs. Mary B. Peterson, Rt. 5, Clinton.

CLINTON GARDEN CLUB — 60 MEMBERS.

PresidentMrs. A. E. Kennedy, Sr., Clinton.
SecretaryMrs. R. F. Royall, Clinton.

THE TUESDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB — 18 MEMBERS.

PresidentMrs. Harry Campbell, Clinton.
SecretaryMrs. Fred Caison, Clinton.

WOMAN'S CLUB — 17 MEMBERS.

PresidentMrs. Holt Robinson, Clinton.
SecretaryMiss Jane Thompson, Clinton.

CLINTON STUDY CLUB — 30 MEMBERS.

PresidentMrs. Algernon Butler, Clinton.
SecretaryMrs. R. E. Williams, Clinton.

CLINTON BOOK CLUB — 28 MEMBERS.

PresidentMrs. Annie Laurie Herring, Clinton.
SecretaryMrs. Emmett Powell, Clinton.

TEA AND TOPICS BOOK CLUB — 24 MEMBERS.

PresidentMrs. J. M. Atkins, Clinton.
SecretaryMrs. John B. Williams, Jr., Clinton.

AMERICAN LEGION AUXILIARY — 58 MEMBERS.

PresidentMrs. E. L. Cherry, Clinton.
SecretaryMrs. Julian Honeycutt, Clinton.

PRINCIPAL BUSINESS CONCERNS

Following is a list of the principal business concerns of the town.





DR. JOHN B. MANN

- Optometrist -

EYE EXAMINATIONS 2ND. FLOOR

OVER BUTLER'S PHARMACY

PNONE 566-1

CLINTON, N. C.

Clinton Milling Co.

CLINTON, N. C.

QUALITY CORN MEALS AND FEEDS

SHUCKING - HAMMER MILLING

John St.

Phone 286-1





(Those marked (N) are operated by and for the Negro race).

AUTOMOBILE SALES AND SERVICE

Henry Vann Co., Ford; Weeks-McLamb Co., Dodge-Plymouth; P. S. Carr Co., Chrysler-Plymouth; McArthur Buick Co., Buick; Flake's Sales and Service, Packard; Matthews Motor Co., Pontiac; T. P. L. Motor Co., Chevrolet; Sampson Motor Co., Nash; Britt Corp., Hudson; Register Motor Co., Willys Jeep.

AUTO REPAIR SERVICE

Warren Brothers Garage, Moore Brothers Garage, Dixon Garage, Paul Oxendine Garage (also used parts), King's Body Shop, Jane's Garage, (also used parts), Robert Vann Body Shop, Reeves and Crumpler Garage, Warren Garage, Perry Solice (N).

AUTO PARTS AND SUPPLIES

Western Auto Associate Store, Automotive Parts Co., Firestone Home and Auto Supplies, Dixie Motor Parts, Whitley Auto Supply, Economy Auto Supply.

BEAUTY SHOPS

Mildred's, Mrs. Jackson's, Harrelson's, Sampson, Bill's, Beadie's, Lizzie and Lucy's (N), Sampson (N), Steven's (N), Mary's (N).

BARBER SHOPS

Model, City, Court Square, Sampson, Cooper's (N), Sanitary (N).

BANK

First-Citizens Bank and Trust Co.

CAFES

New York, Jot ’Em Down, City, Hotel Coffee Shop, Frank Faison's (N), Mose Ray's (N).

COTTON GINS

N. C. Lee, E. L. Peterson, G. R. Ross.

DRY CLEANERS AND LAUNDRY

Clinton, Acme’ Ideal, Quality, City Service Laundry, Sampson (N), Budd's (N).

DIARY

Cumberland Dairies.

DRUG STORES

Joe Reynold's Drug Store, Butler's Pharmacy, Register's Drug Store, Chesnutt's Drug Store.

ELECTRICIANS

Bell Electric Co., Rackley Electric Co., Barwick's, Jackson Electric Co., Royal Electric Co.

ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES

Bell Electric Co., Barwick's, Sampson Radio and Appliance Co., Firestone Home and Auto Supplies, McArthur Appliance and Radio Co., City Appliance Co., Economy Auto Supply Store, Cashwell Furniture Co., Royal Furniture Co., B. J. Williamson, Royal Electric Co.

FLORISTS

Clinton Floral and Gift Shop, McPhail Florist.

FORESTRY SERVICE

Carolina Forestry Service.





An Invitation

TO ALL

Tobacco Growers

SELL YOUR ENTIRE CROP ON THE CLINTON MARKET AND GET TOPS IN PRICE, COURTESY AND SERVICE.

11,152,533 POUNDS

Sold Here Last Season At An Average of

$43.40

Clinton Tobacco Market

H. M. Campbell, Sales Supervisor

Clinton, N. C.





FLOOR FINISHERS

Landron C. Boney, Walter Lee Best.

HAULING AND TRUCKING

Pate's Transfer, Ruke Trucking Co., Strickland Trucking Co.

HATCHERIES

Clinton Hatchery, Sampson Feed and Hatchery.

INSURANCE

A. G. Robinson, Stewart and Faircloth, Deems Clifton, Hubbard Insurance Agency, Everette L. Peterson, Carson M. Johnson, W. P. Collins, H. J. Carr, J. Roland Bradshaw, Gate City Life Insurance Co.

LOANS

Clinton Building and Loan Association, Dunn Production Credit Corporation, Carolina Credit Company, Clinton National Farm Loan, Farm Security Administration, First-Citizens Bank and Trust Company.

MACHINE SHOP

Cook Machine Co.

MANUFACTURERS

Clinton Ice Manufacturing Co., ice; C. C. Tart Lumber Company, lumber; F. L. Turlington Lumber Company, lumber; Adams and Johnson, hardwood squares; McCullen's Mill, building supplies; North State Manufacturing Co., cabinets and woodwork; Sampson Electric Products Co., radio parts; T. Paul Sutton, cabinets and woodwork; Clinton Manufacturing Co., lumber; Sampson Tobacco Curers, oil curers.

NEWSPAPERS

The Sampson Independent and The Sampson News — both weekly and both also operate printing shops.

NEWS BUREAU

Mrs. Taft Bass, promotional campaigns and advertising.

NEWS STAND

Larry Powers, Fussell's Soda Shop.

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Kraft Studio, Clinton Photo Shop (N), Glamourtone Studio.

PLUMBERS

City Plumbing Co., Warren and McDaniel.

PRINTING SHOP

McKenzie-Grady Press.

PRODUCE, LIVESTOCK And POULTRY

Sampson Fruit and Vegetable Market, Sampson Livestock Market, Clinton Poultry and Egg Co., Sutton and Welsh Livestock Market and Abattoir.

REAL ESTATE

Sampson Realty and Auction Co., J. Lofton Kerr, H. B. Ipeck

RADIO REPAIRS

Bell Electric Co., E. W. Zimmerman, Sampson Radio and Appliance Co., McArthur Appliance and Radio Co., Barwick's, Firestone Home and Auto Supplies.





THE

CLINTON

Merchants Association

PROMOTES

The Growth Of The Town And

SERVES

Its Merchants

For Further Information Regarding

The Town, Write

Box 467

Clinton, N. C.

Daughtry Oil Company

DISTRIBUTORS

PETROLEUM


[Illustration:

SHELL
]

PRODUCTS

Gasoline, Kerosene, Fuel Oils

Tobacco Curing Oils

Lisbon St.

Phone 523-1

Clinton, N. C.





ROOFING AND INSULATION

Brookbank and Stone.

SANDWICH SHOPS

Fussell's Soda Shop, The Sandwich Shop, Philips Ice Cream, Carolina Fruit Palace, Mack's Place.

SHOE REPAIR SHOPS

Sampson Shoe Shop, Ideal Shoe Rebuilders, Arthur Chestnutt's (N).

SAW FILING SERVICE

Cooper's Saw Service ,Ivey's Saw Shop.

TYPEWRITER REPAIR SERVICE

Tom Vernon — McKenzie-Grady Press.

WELDING

Cook Machine Co., Autry Welding and Repair Works, John Crumpler's Blacksmith Shop, Clifton's Welding and Blacksmith Shop.

WAREHOUSES

Tobacco: Bass Warehouse, Big Sampson Warehouse, (Zack McWhorter - Ennis Bass) Warehouse. Cotton: Sampson Cotton Storage Warehouse.

RETAIL ESTABLISHMENTS

Building Supplies — Sampson Hardware Co., Clinton Hardware Co., Caison Brothers, Southern Supply Co.

Department Stores and Dry Goods — Belk-Williams Co., Leder Bros., Fleishman's Department Store, Tonkel's, Watson's, M. N. Ganim, Ed. Fleishman and Bros., Clothing and Shoe Store.

Dress Shops — Powell's Dress Shop, Clinton Style Shop, Benley's, The Children's Shop, So and Sew Shop.

Five and Ten: — Rose's, Eagle, Gregory's.

Furniture — Royal Furniture Co., Crumpler and Honeycutt, Cashwell Furniture Co., J. A. Elmore, Antiques; Malpass Antique Shop.

Feeds, Seeds, Etc. — Atkins Bros., H. J. Underwood, Clinton Milling Co., Sampson F. C. X. Service, Kelly and Best, Taft M. Bass, Annie J. Barbrey and Son.

Fertilizers — Taft M. Bass, Gainey and Brewer, E. C. Newman, N. L. Daughtry, Z. D. McWhorter, J. H. Carr, McLean Supply Co., Clarenge Wiggins, James Turlington, Britt Corp., A. E. Rackley, F. C. X. Service.

Fruits and Vegetables — Carolina Fruit Palace.

Groceries and Meats — Harmon A. Register, Capitol Market, Anne J. Barbrey and Son., A and P Tea Co., Pender's, Sutton and Welsh, Daughtry's Market, J. C. Crumpler (N), Wm. Royal (N), George Boone (N), James Ezzell (N).

Hardware—Sampson Hardware Co., Clinton Hardware Co., J. B. Williams and Sons, Caison Brothers, Kelly and Best, Caison and Johnson.

Jewelry and Jewelers — Rawls’ Jewelry Co., Jay's Jewelers, W. C. Owen.

Stables — L. C. Parker, Bizzell and Sutton, Tom Odom, Britt Corp., T. B. Draughon and Son.





Robert Vann Body Shop

COMPLETE BODY REBUILDING AND REFINISHING

CUSTOM MADE SEAT COVERS

— SATISFACTION GUARANTEED —

Phone 207-6

College St.

Clinton, N. C.

Clinton Manufacturing Company

MANUFACTURERS OF

Lumber

WHOLESALE & RETAIL

Phone 286-1

Railroad St.

Clinton, N. C.





WHOLESALE ESTABLISHMENTS

Grocery — C. R. Rich Co., D. J. Rivenbark, Cole Wholesale Co., T. M. Rich, Caison Brothers, Caison and Johnson.

Candy, Ice Cream and Sundries — Pine State Candy Co., Philips Ice Cream Co., Baker's Specialty Co.

Cotton Buyers — Bethune-Colwell Co., Johnson Cotton Co.

Bottled Drinks — Dr. Pepper Bottling Co., Clinton Bottling Co., Baucom Beverage Co.

Gas and Oil — Gulf Refining Co., P. W. Wellman, Distributor; Texas Company, C. C. Spivey, Consignee; Daughtry Oil Co., (Shell), J. F. Daughtry, Manager; J. C. Butler, Sinclair Distributor: Sampson-Bladen Oil Company (Purol), Hardin Kimrey, Manager; Eastern Oil Company (Atlantic), E. L. Johnson, Manager; National Oil Co., (Conoco), D. B. Morrison, Manager; Standard Oil Company of New Jersey (Esso), O. L. Walker, plant manager and B. J. Williamson, Essotane and Fuel Oil Distributor; Clinton Oil Company, (Cities Service), A. J. Bass, Manager; A. B. C. Oil Company (American Gas and Oil), Harper Cogdell, Manager.

Produce Buyers — A. W. Colwell and Son, George C. Thomas, George Kaleel.

ENTERTAINMENT AND RECREATION

Theatres — Clinton and Gem.

Pool Room — Clinton Billiard Parlor.

PROFESSIONS

Dentists — Dr. Wilbert Jackson, Dr. R. A. Turlington, Dr. J. B. Powell, Dr. E. G. Lee, Dr. W. E. Merritt (N).

Doctors — Dr. O. D. Parker, Dr. J. S. Ayers, Dr. Paul Crumpler, Dr. E. G. Best, Dr. V. R. Small, Dr. J. H. Kendall, Dr. D. J. Sammons (N), Dr. R. H. Lewis (N).

Lawyers — Algernon L. Butler, Edwin E. Butler, Cyrus E. Faircloth, Croom M. Faircloth, Stewart B. Warren, Howard H. Hubbard, A. F. Carroll, Walter Britt, P. D. Herring, Woodrow H. Peterson, John B. Williams Jr., Wm. G. King, A. McL. Graham, P. G. Crumpler, J. D. Johnson, Jr.

Ministers — Rev. C. H. Hornsby, Baptist; Rev. J. H. Lanning, Methodist; Rev. M. C. MacQueen, Presbyterian; Fr. John Herold, Catholic; Rev. O. T. Howards, Pentecostal Holiness; Rev. M. W. Cobb, Universalist; Rev. W. W. Scott, Seventh Day Adventist; Rev. J. T. Stewart, Methodist (N).

Funeral Directors — Royal Funeral Home, Crumpler and Honeycutt Funeral Home, Brock's Funeral Home (N).

Veterinarian —Dr. J. I. Weeks.
Chiropractor —Dr. M. L. O'Brien.
Optometrist —Dr. John B. Mann.





Crumpler - Honeycutt Furniture Company and Funeral Home

24 HOUR AMBULANCE SERVICE

Funeral Home

Phone 530-1

Fayetteville St.

Furniture Store

Phone 460-1

Vance St.

Clinton, N. C.

Sampson - Bladen

Oil Company, Inc.

DISTRIBUTING PLANTS IN

Clinton, N. C.

Phone 319-1

Elizabethtown, N. C.

Phone 273-6

PURE OIL PRODUCTS YALE TIRES

“Be Sure With Pure”

H. Manly Clark, Pres.

Hardin S. Kimrey, V-Pres.

Milton L. Fisher, Sec-Treas.





Roseboro

Roseboro, the second largest and oldest town in Sampson county, was chartered in 1891, and is thought to have been named for George McNeil Rose, prominent attorney for the old Cape Fear and Yadkin Railroad Company, who selected the community then known as Owensville, as a site for a station for his company.

Many stories have been told, however, as to how the town got its name, but one legend that has gone the rounds has it that the present town, located on what was then a beautiful persimmon bottom, had in the center, a very large and beautiful rose bush, so well developed and hardy, that people traveled great distances just to see it.

When engineers were surveying the right of way for the old Cape Fear and Yadkin railroad line, ’tis said they purposely curved the proposed line in order to pass this rose bush, because of its rare beauty. In this bend of the railway, so legend goes, a fine settlement grew and that when a name was discussed, Mrs. Annie White, who lived across the Coharie in White woods, proposed the name “Roseboro.”

Regardless of how Roseboro received its name, the town grew and developed, and with its many manufacturing plants probably ranks first in this respect for Sampson county. If not first, it has the distinction of having the only cotton mill, veneer plant and brick yards in the county, and is also the only town maintaining a playground for its children.

The Denny Veneer company maintains plants in both Roseboro and Rocky Mount, and ranks well up on the lists of similar industries of the state. Established in 1926, the company manufactures veneer and plywood used in the manufacture of fine furniture, and ships these supplies to factories in all parts of the United States. This company also uses great quantities of tapioca flour in the manufacture of glue, which comes chiefly from Java and some parts of South America.

The Hill Spinning Company, also established in 1926, is the only mill of its kind in the county, and manufactures high grade cotton yarns used in weaving, knitting, cotton rug and upholstery materials. This company has operated continuously since its inception, which speaks well for its management, since most mills of a similar nature have had numerous strikes and other labor troubles in recent turbulent years.

Two large brick plants and a milling company supplies Roseboro and the county with adequate building supplies.

The oldest drug store as well as the oldest hardware store in the county is located at Roseboro, and the many other fine retail and wholesale establishments coupled with fine churches and schools make the town an ideal place in which to live and do business.





ROSEBORO

“The Friendly Town”

FASTEST GROWING

MUNICIPALITY IN SAMPSON COUNTY

Encourages The Progress of The Town

Boosts Its Schools and Churches.

And is Proud of Its Many Fine Manufacturing

Plants and Retail Stores

COME TO SEE US!

N. B. Hill, Mayor





POPULATION19401930Percent IncreaseEstimated 1946
Roseboro1,09684030%1,175

Total incorporated area: Two miles.

GOVERNMENT

MayorN. B. Hill
Town ClerkMrs. Freddie Butler

BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS: J. M. Henley, A. J. Butler, A. D. Underwood, C. A. Herring, W. L. West

FIRE DEPARTMENT: W. L. West, Chief. 14 volunteers.

POLICE DEPARTMENT: M. D. Tew, Chief; J. E. Mayes.

STREET DEPARTMENT: M. D. Tew, Superintendent.

WATER DEPARTMENT: W. L. West, Superintendent.

Tax rate, 1945-46$1.80
Assessed valuation$546,547.00
Registered voters305

POSTMASTER: James M. Hall. Second class office.

CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS

ROSEBORO ROTARY CLUB — 24 MEMBERS

PresidentW. L. West, Roseboro
SecretaryJ. L. Owen, Roseboro

TWO ARTS CLUB — 24 MEMBERS

PresidentMrs. A. C. Herring, Roseboro
SecretaryMrs. Bynum Hall, Roseboro

ATHENIA LANIER CLUB — 24 MEMBERS

PresidentMrs. W. L. West, Roseboro
SecretaryMrs. Edgar Herring, Roseboro





HILL SPINNING CO.

SPINNERS OF HIGH GRADE

KARDED KNITTING YARNS

ROSEBORO, N. C.

“The Only Textile Plant In Sampson County”

HAS BEEN IN CONTINUOUS OPERATION SINCE 1926

We Employ 150 People When At Peak Production, Composed Mostly of Natives of This Vicinity

NO STRIKES OR LABOR TROUBLE IN OUR HISTORY.





ORDER EASTERN STAR — 54 MEMBERS

Worthy MatronMrs. M. B. Wilson, Roseboro
SecretaryMiss Della Poe, Roseboro

PRINCIPAL BUSINESS CONCERNS

Following is a list of the principal business concerns of the town.

AUTO SALES AND SERVICE

Coharie Motor Co., Chevrolet; Bryant Motor Co., Ford; Roseboro Auto Co., DeSoto-Plymouth; Wilson Motor Co., Kaiser-Frazer.

AUTO ACCESSORIES

P. J. Patterson.

BEAUTY SHOPS

Roseboro Beauty Shop, Patterson's.

BANK

First-Citizens Bank and Trust Co.

CAFES

Roseboro Cafe, Melvin's Coffee Shop.

COTTON GINS

Roseboro Gin and Fertilizer Co., Howard-Turlington Co.

DRY CLEANERS

Matthews Dry Cleaners.

DRUG STORES

Tart and West, Davis and Melvin.

FLORIST

McLamb Floral Co., Rose's Gift Shop.





TART & WEST

Oldest Drug Store In Sampson County

— EXCLUSIVE REXALL AGENCY —

— Complete Prescription Department —

SODAS : CANDIES : SUNDRIES

Phone 22-1

Roseboro, N. C.

First Citizens Bank and Trust Company

ROSEBORO, N. C.

— Established 1898 —

A COMPLETE BANKING SERVICE

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation





GARAGES

Gardner's.

INSURANCE

Freddie C. Butler.

MANUFACTURERS

Hill Spinning Co., Karded Yarns; Denny Veneer Co., veneer; Roseboro Milling Co., building supplies; Crumpler Brick Co., Brick; Edwards & Hales Brick Yard, Brick.

PLUMBERS

A. G. Rowley.

RADIO REPAIRS

Horne's Radio Shop.

SHOE REPAIR SHOPS

Melvin Shoe Shop, Hollowell's Shop.

RETAIL ESTABLISHMENTS

Building Supplies and Hardware — A. R. Harris and Son,

Roseboro Supply Co., Roseboro Hardware Co.

Furniture — Butler Furniture Co.

Groceries and Meats — Rupert Holland, C. B. Tyson, Patterson's, Wilson's Market, Holland's Market, Pat's Place, H. S. Lewis Fish Market.

General Merchandise — J. D. Monsour, D. E. and W. C. Caison, Henry's Place, Westbrook's 5 and 10c Store, The Cash Store.

Jeweler — L. J. Owen, Rogers.

Stables — W. C. Caison Mule Co., Burgess and Howard.

Undertakers — Butler Furniture Co.

Fertilizers — Howard-Turlington Co., Roseboro Gin and Fertilizer Co.

Entertainment and Recreation — State Theatre, Roseboro Pool Room.

Service Stations — Bill Underwood's, Spivey's, J. R. Bedsole, Raynor's, Hinson Carroll.

PROFESSIONS

Doctors — Dr. J. S. Brewer, Dr. W. P. Starling, Dr. E. T. Sessoms.

Dentists — Dr. T. P. Bullard, Dr. A. D. Underwood.





Butler Furniture Co.

ROSEBORO, N. C.

“Sampson's Largest Furniture Store”

A Complete Line of Home Furnishings and Electrical Appliances

Distinctive Funeral And Ambulance Service

Day Phone 29-6

Night Phones 48-1, 18-1, 56-1

A. R. Harris & Son

HARDWARE — FARM IMPLEMENTS

BUILDING SUPPLIES

PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES

A. F. Harris, Prop.

Phone 34-6

Roseboro, N. C.





Baseball Schedule

FOR ALL HOME GAMES OF

The Sampson Blues

AT CLINTON BALL PARK

1946 Season

MAYJUNEJULYAUG.SEPT.
Sanford989101
13182029
302921
31
Angier112
121113122
22212322
Dunn562
16151715
26252726
S'field8788
18171918
27262928
Wilm'ton1423
241343
23144
2514





FREDDIE C. BUTLER

Insurance Agency

INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS ANYWHERE - - ANYTIME

Representative of The

AMERICAN INSURANCE GROUP

Phone 27-6

Roseboro, N. C.

Roseboro Milling Co.

Phone 37-1

Roseboro, N. C.

MANUFACTURERS OF

SASH, DOORS AND MILLWORK STAIR WORK, MANTELS AND ALL KINDS OF INTERIOR FINISH BRACKETS, SCROLL AND TURNED WORK, WINDOW AND DOOR FRAMES, SCREENS





The Church Carpet

Strange as it may seem, if Mrs. Barker hadn't been the victim of arthritis, chances are that the Roseboro Baptist Church would still be longing for a new floor covering.

In one of Ezekiel's great visions he says “the Spirit entered into me and set me on my feet.” That same spirit entered into Mrs. J. Abner Barker of Roseboro, set her upon her feet and limbered her hands for the Lord. Becoming crippled with arthritis about four years ago, Mrs. Barker, who has taught a Sunday School class in the Roseboro Baptist Church for the past thirty years and has headed many movements of progress from time to time, was very much worried that she would no longer be able to serve her church and her community.

Her physician, Dr. J. Street Brewer, to encourage her to help herself, suggested that she exercise her hands in sewing, and herein Mrs. Barker saw a chance to be of real service.

The Birth of An Idea

One day as she sat painfully sewing on an apron, an idea came to her that was to culminate in a handsome $600 carpet for the floor of the Roseboro Baptist church. So, with her usual efficiency she set to work. First, she wrote several letters to state dignitaries, friends and acquaintances, telling of her plan to make and sell the aprons for $1 each and to apply the proceeds on the church carpet. In several instances, she sent along samples of the garments, receiving promptly a check from each recipient and in many cases a word of cheer and encouragement.

As the idea grew, people all over the state and in several other states began to place orders for the aprons, some to help out on the church carpet and others to retain as a souvenir of an unselfish spirit. Among those purchasing the aprons will be found former Governor and Mrs. J. Melville Broughton, Thad Eure, Secretary of State, W. T. Bost, Edwin Yales, Mrs. R. L. McMillan, Carl Goerch, former Governor Hoey, Cameron Morrison, Senator John S. Hill, Senator Josiah Bailey, Congressman and Mrs. Graham Barden and Mrs. R. J. Reynolds.

One of the aprons is also a prized possession of Mrs. Evelyn Walsh McLean, owner of the famous Hope diamond, and the mother-in-law of North Carolina's former Senator Reynolds. The story in time pervaded the White House, and Mrs. Roosevelt's personal secretary sent along several placques to be used in furtherance of the plan.

Used Her Own Funds

Mrs. Barker purchased materials for the aprons out of her own funds and applied the entire proceeds from each sale on the purchase of the carpet, thus spending something like $300 as well as supplying the daily labor for a period of two years or more. But Mrs. Barker in trying to help her church also worked a miracle upon herself;





A. G. ROWLEY

Plumbing and Heating

ESTIMATES FURNISHED

ROSEBORO, N. C.

Horne's Radio Shop

Roseboro, N. C.

Guaranteed Repairs on Any Make of Radio Large Stock Parts and Radio Batteries

O. E. HORNE, Prop.





the very thing that theologians always have insisted will be done if people have faith. Today her condition im improved so much that she is able to drive her car and engage in practically all of her former activities.

In April of 1944 when the carpet was officially presented to the church, people came to worship with the Roseboro Baptist from Raleigh, Kinston, Goldsboro, Salemburg, Clinton, Turkey, Fayetteville and Dunn. Rev. G. N. Ashley, pastor, and Rev. W. J. Jones, former pastor, officiated at the presentation ceremony, which included many county and state dignitaries.

Mrs. Barker is 57 years of age and was born and reared in Sampson county, the daughter of Robert N. and Alice (Highsmith) Butler. As Miss Florence Butler she grew up on her father's farm, attended public schools, Salemburg Academy, later Meredith College in Raleigh, and the University at Chapel Hill. For fourteen years she taught school in country districts. On May 1, 1912, she became the bride of J. Abner Barker, now solicitor of the Sixth Judicial District, and came to live with him in Roseboro where she has resided since.

Mrs. Barker has been indentified with every worthwhile undertaking for community betterment, and it was largely through her efforts that the Community Center in Roseboro came into being. Until ill health forced her to resign, she was vice chairman of the Democratic Executive Committee of Sampson County for many years.

An Incentive To Faith

Mrs. Barker's triumph over bodily ills through exercise in the Lord's behalf, is an incentive today to the waning faith of many, who with tortured minds and bodies, spend their days in self-pity and hopelessness. Her courage and faith should be held as a banner to those who are “weak and heavy laden.”





SALEMBURG

THE HOME OF

Sampson County's Only College

IS LOCATED IN THE HEART OF THE CHIEF AGRICULTURAL SECTION OF THE STATE

For Further Information

Write To

RANBY ROYAL, MAYOR

Salemburg, N. C.





Salemburg

The history of Salemburg is very largely the history of its schools and colleges. The town derived its name from Old Salem Baptist church, and when the postoffice was established it was necessary to add “burg” to Salem to distinguish it from the Salem in Forsyth County.

The town grew up around the church and the schools. The population of the town is about 396, and the schools bring in around 700 students from many states and foreign countries.

Salemburg, incorporated in 1905, is situated in the heart of a highly developed agricultural section of Sampson county, and easily leads the county in farm production.

The Salemburg Baptist church was organized 100 years ago, and the church now has on a building and enlargement program to celebrate the completion of the first century of its service.

The first high school — the old Salemburg Academy — was organized January 1, 1875, with a board of ten trustees who operated the school until it was taken over by Prof. G. F. Edwards. The present Pineland College, Edwards Military Institute, and associated schools are in a large way the outgrowth of the old Academy.

The town of Salemburg has been a pioneer in rural social organization. The first Community League in North Carolina was established at Salemburg on March 31, 1914. The experiment was successful because those responsible for it interpreted the community-life problems of Salemburg in terms of the farmer's own needs, since Salemburg is a farming community. Committees were appointed on Social Life, Education, Moral Conditions, Health Conditions, Improvements, and Woman's Work. Salemburg and the community it serves have provided a wonderful example of town and county cooperating to make community life satisfying.

The town of Salemburg furnished its full quota of fighting men both in World War I and World War II. Now that peace has returned to the Salemburg folk, the village is taking on new life and looks forward to bigger and better times in the years just ahead. Much building is under construction, new stores and business houses are opening up, a theatre has recently been opened, homes and other buildings are getting a new coat of paint, and in every way the town is prospering.

POPULATION19401930Percent IncreaseEst. 1946
Salemburg371318396
Total Incorporated Area — About one mile.

GOVERNMENT

MayorRanby Royal
Town ClerkS. H. Creech

COMMISSIONERS: James Royal, Alton Royal, Iverson Royal, LeRoy Baggett, Roy Carter.

POSTMASTER: Mrs. Lucille White, Second Class Office.

Tax Rate, 1945-46.50cts.





PINELAND COLLEGE

A Standard Junior College for Young Women W. J. Jones, President.

Two years of accredited college work. Four years high school. Courses in Home Economics, Music, Art, Expression and Physical Education.

Two years of Business training. Fall term opens September 3, 1946.

ANNIE KATE WHITE SCHOOL FOR GIRLS

From the first through the eighth grade.

For Further Information Address

Pineland College

Salemburg, N. C.

EDWARDS MILITARY INSTITUTE

A standard junior college

Four years accredited high school

Spacious, modernly equipped Gymnasium

Two years of business training

Lessons in orchestra, band instruments, also glee club training

Courses in Art, Piano, Voice and Violin

Courses in Aviation, Mechanical Drawing.

Fall term opens September 3, 1946

JUNIOR BARRACKS

Boys from the first through the eighth grade For Further information, address

EDWARDS MILITARY INSTITUTE

Salemburg, N. C.





CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS

PARENT-TEACHER ASSOCIATION115 members
PresidentJames P. Turlington
Vice-PresidentMrs. Harvey Spell
SecretaryMrs. Lyman White
OES COHARIE 19059 members
Worthy MatronMrs. J. S. Brewer
Worthy PatronL. M. Jackson
TWENTIETH CENTURY BOOK CLUB16 members
PresidentHostess for meeting
Secretary-treasurerMrs. L. R. Baggett

PRINCIPAL BUSINESS CONCERNS

Following is a list of the principal business concerns of the town:

(Those marked “N” are operated by and for the Negro race.

AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRS

Owen Matthews.

BEAUTY SHOPS

Mrs. Eva Smith Vann.

BARBER SHOPS

Alfred Hall, W. B. Cooper

DRUG STORES

Salemburg Drug Store.

DRY CLEANERS

Rob Williams (N)

ELECTRICIANS

Eddings Electrical Supply Shop, James Tanner.

FLORISTS

Salemburg Floral Co.

SHOE REPAIRS

Thomas Bullard.

RETAIL ESTABLISHMENTS

Robert Royal, groceries and market. Pineland Store, general merchandise. C. S. Royal, general merchandise. R. M. Crumpler, groceries. Ranby Royal, groceries and meats. Roy Carter, groceries.

SERVICE STATIONS

Carter's Station, K. N. Palmer, H. P. Porter.

ENTERTAINMENT

Alice Theatre.





Carter Furniture Company

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND EMBALMERS

HOT POINT ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES

GARLAND, N. C.

Night Phone 37-1

Day Phone 39-2

L. A. Warren & Son

Pharmacists

DRUGS

SUNDRIES

SEEDS

Phone 17-2

Garland, N. C.





Garland

The town of Garland, like many others in Sampson county and the state, came into being largely through the railroads. In 1885 the old Cape Fear and Yadkin Railway Company decided to extend its line from Fayetteville to Wilmington in order to link the western part of the state with the eastern part at Wilmington.

Depots were planned by the company in Sampson county at Autryville, Roseboro, Parkersburg, Tomahawk, Kerr and Ivanhoe, but none at Sloan's Crossing, now the town of Garland, and how the pioneer citizens of that community set to work to get a depot in their midst reflects the fighting spirit and civic pride that lives on to this day through the town's progressive merchants, residents, and manufacturers.

Not only Sloan's Crossing, but Ingold, a thriving country village with stores and a postoffice located about four miles east, needed and wanted a railway line, since all of their freight was shipped by slow steamboats at Clear Run, the head of navigation on Black River. A mass community meeting was called and Jeff D. Johnson, Sr., was sent to Greensboro to confer with railway officials of the company. His trip was successful and a depot was built at Sloan's Crossing.

While the railroad company was grading and building, the three pioneer merchants of the town, Jeff D. Johnson Sr., and the late Edgar C. Herring and William Sloan, were erecting their store buildings, homes were under construction, and soon large numbers of people began to move into the village.

Since a postoffice was to be established at Sloan's Crossing also, it became necessary that a permanent name be given the new town, so again a meeting of the citizens was called and various names were offered. The name of “Garland” was suggested by the late Sam T. Johnson, after the second assistant postmaster general in the first Cleveland administration, and was adopted by both the post office department and the railway company.

The late E. C. Herring was appointed the first depot agent and served about 15 years, and the late William Sloan, the first postmaster, served continuously for more than 25 years. The first mayor of the town was Jeff D. Johnson, Sr., and he too served more than a quarter of a century.

Garland is located about halfway between Clinton and Elizabethtown, 12 miles north of the famous White Lake summer resort. The town is served adequately and well by a branch of the Scottish Bank, with deposits exceeding one half million dollars, and has many fine manufacturing firms and a merchandising business that transacts more than a million dollars annually in the stores and various business estabishments.

Tobacco, peanuts, cotton, strawberries and Blueberries, are the principal money crops in the immediate section of Garland, and timber products bring an annual return of many thousands of dollars. An average of fifty cars of pulpwood and twenty cars of lumber are shipped from Garland monthly throughout the year, in addition to large amounts shipped by trucks and sold locally.





J. J. Stafford & Sons

GINNERS AND FERTILIZER DEALERS

WE BUY AND SELL

FARM PROPERTY

PHONE 13-4

GARLAND, N. C.

Love Hardwood Co.

MANUFACTURERS OF

Hardwood Furniture

Dimensions

PHONE 38-2

GARLAND, N. C.





POPULATION19401930Percent IncreaseEstimated 1946
Garland64050925%750

Total incorported area: One Square Mile.

Tax rate 1945-460.50
Assessed Valuation$250,000.00
Registered Voters210
Received Charter1907

GOVERNMENT

MayorH. B. Lamb, Garland
Town ClerkColeman Carter, Garland

Board of Commissioners: Mrs. A. N. Johnson, Coleman Carter, H. C. Blackburn, Ottis Howard, James Smith.

Postmaster: Mrs. R. L. Cromartie (acting) Third Class Office.

PRINCIPAL BUSINESS CONCERNS

Following is a list of the principal business concerns of the town.

(Those marked (N) are operated by and for the Negro race).

AUTO REPAIR SERVICE

Garland Garage, J. K. West, Prop.

BARBER SHOPS

Model Barber Shop.

BANK

Scottish Bank of Garland.

CAFES AND EATING PLACES

Smith's Grill, Smith's Hot Dog Stand.

DRUG STORE

L. A. Warren & Son.

DRY CLEANERS

Brown's Dry Cleaners (N).

MANUFACTURERS

Sampson Electrical Products Co., radio parts; Love Hardwood Squares Co., hardwood squares; W. H. Carter, lumber and shingles; J. C. Carter, Sr., lumber.





Abel Warren & Co.

GENERAL MERCHANDISE

Dry Goods, Notions, Shoes, Hardware, Builders’ Supplies, Feedstuffs, Seeds, Groceries.

FARM MACHINERY

AND FERTILIZERS

Phone 14-1

Garland, N. C.

SINCLAIR PRODUCTS

Lamb's Service Station

GOODYEAR TIRES TUBES AND ACCESSORIES

Complete Service From Bumper To Bumper

H. B. LAMB, Prop.

Phone 38-4

Garland, N. C.





RETAIL ESTABLISHMENTS

Groceries and Meats — Abel Warren & Co., Norris & Co., Amos L. Carter, J. C. Carter, Jr.

Furniture and Undertakers — Carter Furniture Co.

General Stores — Abel Warren & Co., J. J. Stafford & Son, Hutchin's.

Ginners — J. J. Stafford & Son.

Loans — Scottish Bank of Garland.

Machine Shop — G. A. McLelland's Machine Shop.

Real Estate — J. J. Stafford & Son, farm property.

Service Stations — Lamb's Service Station, S. L. Thorp Service Station, Garland Service Station.

Professions — Doctors: Dr. A. N. Johnson, Dr. W. H. Sloan, Dr. R. S. Cromartie.

Harrells Store

This thriving village was incorporated in March of 1943, and now has a population of around one hundred people. The town derived its name from the store established by Mr. Harrell several years ago, and now has several modern business establishments. No tax rate is levied on property within the town limits.

GOVERNMENT

MayorR. R. Walker
Town ClerkB. H. Hall

COMMISSIONERS: H. P. Page, R. W. Ward, L. L. Johnson, D. A. Jones.

Total Incorported area: One Square Mile.

BUSINESS CONCERNS

R. H. Melvin & Bros., H. P. Page, Bland & Bland, Bland & Smith, W. L. Jones, J. W. Johnson, W. A. Garland, Matt Powell, A. B. Murchinson Garage, Jones Garage.





Cliffeious Brock's

FUNERAL HOME HOME OF

PEOPLES MUTUAL BURIAL ASSOCIATION

24 Hour Ambulance Service

604 McKoy St.

Clinton, N. C.

Phone 527-6

832 S. Center St.

Mt. Olive, N. C.

Phone 203

James A. Ezzell

WHOLESALE & RETAIL

Quality Groceries and Meats

Phone 288-6

514 Lisbon St.

Clinton, N. C.





Newton Grove

Newton Grove is a thriving and prosperous community of about 400 persons and is situated in the northern part of the county in one of the richest agricultural sections of the state.

It had long been a town before it received its charter in 1935. There are two versions of the naming of the town: One to the effect that Blackman Lee, a large landowner in that section, said he was going to build a “new town”. Consequently several store buildings were erected, one in a large grove, hence “Newton Grove.” The other story is to the effect that Lewis King was an ardent admirer of Sir Isaac Newton and that the town was named in his memory.

Located at Newton Grove are the Catholic schools for white and colored pupils.

POPULATION19301940Estimated 1946
Newton Grove150339400

Total incorporated area: About 565 acres, in a circle one mile radius from center of town.

GOVERNMENT

MayorJ. O. Williams, Newton Grove.
Town ClerkMiss Theresa Cox, Newton Grove.
Town CommissionersH. A. Bizzell, R. D. Weeks, H. I. Rayford, P. B. Gregory, Miss Theresa Cox.

Postmaster (3rd Class) Mrs. Harvey Warren, Newton Grove.

BUSINESS CONCERNS

General Stores—H. A. Bizzell, R. E. Britt (also bus station), P. E. Jones Store, Madrey Bass, R. G. Bradshaw (also barber shop), D. P. Herring.

Cotton Gin—Samson Warren (also lumber mill), H. B. Tart (also lumber mill).

Service Stations and Garage—Aman and Jones Garage, Newton Grove Service Station.

Oil and Gas Distributors—Wellman and Jones Oil Co., Eastern Oil Company.





BUTLER'S PHARMACY

SODAS - SUNDRIES - CANDIES

EXCLUSIVE REXALL AGENCY

Complete Prescription Department

Phone 462-1

Clinton, N. C.

LEDER BROS.

“Clinton's Finest Store”

THE HOME OF ADVERTISED BRANDS

We Outfit The Family With The Season's Best Styles and Fabrics

Main St.

Clinton, N. C.





Court Week In The
“Gay Nineties”

It was just sixty-three years ago that Judge McCoy was pounding the gavel and calling for order in the February term of court. People from all over Sampson county had started long before daylight in order to be in town when the justice called the session to order. Court week overshadowed all your conventions or drug store get-togethers ever thought of today. Damsels fixed their hair at home instead of going to the beauty parlors, and fancy mustaches adorned the upper lips of the gay young blades about town.

Clinton's main street was a mass of carts, wagons and buggies. That was the hi-ho era when a rainy day turned the thoroughfare into a glorified playground for kiddies wishing to make mud pies, and the livery stables were doing a brisk business. Vance street was known then as Grog Row, and it is said it derived its name from the fact that whiskey was sold in every building on the street.

Court week in those days was a cross between our present day county fairs and a horse trading convention. All your relatives came to spend the week and quilting bees were the order of the day for the women, who traded gossip, recipes and quilt patterns industriously. Horse trading, cock fighting and attending court kept the men busy throughout the day, while at night, young and old alike, “joined hands, circled to the right and promenaded home” to the command of the fiddler, who scraped his bow far into the night at various homes during the week.

It was in those days that the rumble seat was still unknown, and most of the belles were tired of trying to pitch the proverbial “woo” in a hard backed porch swing. Anyone with a horse and buggy could cause the feminine heart to flutter. Honestly, you'd be surprised at the glamour that could be inspired by an old plug mule.

Yep, the old cracker barrel and the red-hot pot bellied stove was found in all the stores, the mule twiched his tail at the tying rail, and the loafers even as now, were discussing politics, religion and women.

The judge came to town on Saturday before court convened and remained until it was over. They had no court stenographers in those days and jurors and witnesses were required to sleep in the courthouse. Fires were built on the grounds to warm by, and open wells on the north, east and west sides of the square furnished drinking water for man and beast alike.

Buck Hill was Sheriff then, James S. Bizzell was holding down the job of clerk of court, and Joe Robinson was register of deeds. Court records, which were written in longhand, show J. I. Beaman, L. A. Powell, R. M. Crumpler, and A. B. Chesnutt to be members of the county board of commissioners. Lisbon township hung up a record that year by being the only precinct in Eastern North Carolina to vote for prohibition.





Ride City Buses

ANYWHERE IN TOWN FOR 10 CENTS

Charter Buses

AVAILABLE

Sureway Motor Coaches

Clinton, N. C.

Clinton Concrete Block Company

MANUFACTURERS OF

CONCRETE PRODUCTS

Building Blocks of all Sizes

ELECTRICALLY VIBRATED

E. T. Bass, Prop.

Phone 281-6

Clinton, N. C.





One of the greatest trials ever to be held in the county, according to the late Henry E. Faison, was “The People vs Williams Mill Pond, in which the said people of Clinton contended that their drinking water was contaminated by the mill pond.

Another sensational case was the suit of Mrs. Arabella Peterson against Sherwood Barksdale for breach of promise. It is said that the trial so affected the feelings of the lady that she wrote a book in later years called “The Wounded Dove” in which she described her trials and tribulations in great detail.

One of the most gruesome executions of a decade occurred in Clinton several years later. Archie Kinsauls, charged with the murder of Jim Herring, attempted to commit suicide the night before he was scheduled to be hanged by slashing his throat with a razor. He was granted a reprieve of thirty days, and the story goes that when the rope was placed around his neck at the end of this period, the stitches were broken in his throat, causing the blood to spurt in all directions. This hanging proved to be such a gory sight that a petition was drawn up asking that the place of future executions be changed to Raleigh.

The first automobile was seen in Clinton between 1912 and 1915, and Jamie Hubbard was the proud owner of this snorting, groaning monster that frightened children and horses alike almost out of their wits.

The first typewriter was owned by the late Richard L. Herring, and ’tis said that his office was jammed for several days by curious sightseers. It was one of the old blind models and would seem like something out of the Ark to our present day stenographers. However, it was a step up in the town's march of progress and they were accordingly proud.

With the advent of 1946 A. D., it's a far different story. Most of the muddy roads are gone, streamlined cars fill every available parking place and gals talk “dirt” in drug store booths.

The only building now standing on the courthouse square to remind us of the gay 90's, is the brick structure occupied by the firm of Kelly and Best.





ATKINS BROS.

BUYERS OF CORN, PEAS & SOY BEANS

AT HIGHEST CASH PRICES

WHOLESALERS OF FLOUR, FEED AND FIELD SEEDS — LARGEST AND MOST MODERN GRAIN AND BEAN CLEANER IN THIS SECTION

We Solicit Your Patronage

Thomas & Floy St. on ACLRR

Phone 215-1

P. S. Carr Company

CLINTON, N. C.

CHRYSLER - PLYMOUTH

DEALER

COMPLETE LINE OF PARTS SERVICE ON ALL MAKES OF CARS

McKoy St.

Phone 439-1





The Marker

Unselfish Idea of Ivanhoe Gentleman Results In Memorial To Four Strangers Killed in Line of Duty Near His Home.

From Ivanhoe comes another example of the generosity and unselfishness of the people of Sampson county in the person of G. E. Fisler, rural mail carrier, who set to work to raise funds to build a marker in the memory of four Army flyers, killed near his home when the plane in which they were riding crashed unaccountably in a dense swamp.

“My neighbors and myself were deeply distressed over this accident, Mr. Fisler said, and wanted to do something to perpetuate the memory of these men. We felt that this was the least we could do for those who gave their lives in our midst in order that we night some day again enjoy peace and happiness.”

Mr. Fisler made an appeal for funds in the Black River Presbyterian church on the Sunday following the accident, and a sizeable amount was donated towards the purchase of the marker. Other surrounding churches and communities contributed liberally and the amount necessary for the cause was soon raised.

Although the funds were donated by Sampson county citizens, the marker was erected on the spot nearest the accident, which places it on a dirt road in Bladen county, seven and one-half miles southeast of Smith's store, known in the old days as the Wilmington-Fayetteville stagecoach road. The plat of ground on which it stands approximately sixteen feet square, was a gift of Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Graham, who reside near by.

It is a beautiful stone marker, approximately six feet high, and is of well balanced proportions. In addition to the name of the men who died, the marker bears the following Latin inscription:

“Vincit Qui prium gerit,” which when translated into English means “He Conquers Who First Makes An Attempt.”

The men were killed in line of duty when their Army Cargo type plane crashed into a densely wooded area in the midst of a waist deep pond, the nose diving some eight or six feet into the ground, completely burying the body of the co-pilot in mud and slime. Three of the bodies, badly charred, were recovered the following day by Army searchers from Fort Bragg, and the fourth, that of the copilot, five days after the accident.

“It was horrible,” Mr. Fisler said, “I waded into the vicinity of the crash and saw what I first thought was a peculiar looking stick. Investigation proved it to be the bone in the forearm of a man, and when I yanked it out of the ground I found attached to it, a complete hand and wrist. All the time I was probing around with other curious onlookers, the body of the soldier lay buried beneath the plane wreckage, unknown to any of us.

According to eye-witnesses of the crash, which occurred late on the afternoon of August 27, 1943, the concussion from the explosion





FOR ALL THE NEWS READ

The Sampson News

First In News, Features & Pictures

FOR EXCELLENCE IN PRINTING COME TO US. OUR SHOP, MOST COMPLETE & MODERN FOR JOB PRINTING IN THIS SECTION, HAS THE ONLY KLUGE AUTOMATIC PRESS IN SAMPSON. STOP IN AND SEE IT IN OPERATION. THIS BOOK WAS PRINTED ON THE NEW KLUGE, PICTURED BELOW.


[Illustration:


Photo of printing press]

Sampson Publishing Co.

James H. Sivertsen, Owner

John Upchurch, Foreman





of the plane was so great that debris was scattered over a five mile area, and although a search party was organized immediately, it was the next day before the wreckage was found.

The names of the men, all from other states, are inscribed on the marker as follows:

Lt. Richard G. Shipley, age 23, Fresno, Calif.; Lt. Howard R. Johnson, 23, Sheffield, Tex.; Sgt. Robert M. Anderson, 23, San Ysidro, Calif.; Sgt. Roger H. Knowlon, 22, Rochester, N .Y.

Mr. and Mrs. Fisler are the parents of nine children, five of whom saw service in the last World War. One of their sons, Navy Lt. Frank Fisler, holder of the Navy Cross, was lost over the Solomons.

Three other sons, Danny, Jack and Harry, saw foreign service also. Danny, with the Signal Corps in Italy, Jack, as a paratrooper, and Harry, as an aerial engineer. A daughter, Margaret, was a member of the Women's Auxiliary Corps.

Mr. Fisler has been in correspondence with the immediate survivors of the fliers, and has received many touching missives from their wives and parents, all of whom have expressed themselves as completely overwhelmed at the wonderful thing Mr. Fisler and his neighbors did in erecting a memorial to complete strangers. They plan a pilgrimage to the site soon.

The marker, erected in April of 1944, eight months after the tragic accident, keeps lonely vigil today in the sad whispering of the pines, a silent reminder of those who died that we might be free.





Spivey Oil & Electric Co.

Lisbon St.

Clinton, N. C.

PETROLEUM

PRODUCTS

Texaco

U. S. TIRES

AND TUBES

ADMIRAL RADIOS

RECORD CHANGERS

REFRIGERATORS

HOME FREEZERS

RANGES

FROGIL OIL HEATERS

Wilson Motor Co.

DEALER FOR

KAISER - FRAZER

AMERICA'S FIRST 1947

MOTOR CARS

PHONE 446

ROSEBORO, N. C.





Uncle Charlie Corbett And His Store

Efficiency experts, business analysts and various other individuals who emphasize the necessity for neatness and orderliness in business would go stark raving mad after taking one look at the store of Mr. Charles R. Corbett, down at Ivanhoe, according to Carl Goerch, author, publisher and commentator, who has featured Uncle Charlie and his store in several of his publications.

Mr. Corbett enjoys a distinction which probably isn't possessed by another merchant in the world. For eight or nine years not a single customer has entered his store. The reason for this is that they can't get into the place. It is packed from floor to ceiling with the wildest dis-array of merchandise you have ever seen in all your life. Through the center of the establishment is a narrow lane, just large enough to accomodate Mr. Corbett. If he ever gains fifteen or twenty pounds, he'll be out of luck, because he won't be able to squeeze through the narrow passageway.

He started business at Ivanhoe about thirty-six years ago, opening up in a little store close to the railroad station. His system of merchandising was simple. He ordered his goods from traveling salesmen, threw the merchandise into the store upon its arrival, and sold it as customers asked for it.

As a rule, every store is more or less divided into departments. If you want to buy garden seed, you'll find it in one department; if you want to buy drugs, you'll find them in another department, and so on. But Mr. Corbett doesn't worry about things of that nature. Not in the slightest. If a shipment of coal-scuttles arrives, he pitches ’em back into the store. If a shipment of dress goods is next to come in, it goes on top of the coal-scuttles. And if some plow points are received, they'll go on top of the dress-goods.

As the years went by, the stock of merchandise increased until the store was just about bulging with goods. One day a young clerk, who was helping Mr. Corbett, pulled out something from the bottom of a pile of goods and upset the whole pile.

“Gosh!” he exclaimed ruefully, “How'll I ever get it all straightened out?”

“Dont bother about it,” said Mr. Corbett, “We've got too much stuff in here anyway.”

So he rented a vacant structure about 200 feet distant and proceeded to open up a new store. That's the one in which he is doing business today. The other place is still there, too, and he uses it as sort of an auxiliary, or annex. In addition, he has a third building which he uses for a warehouse.

The new store went the same way as the old one. As the years passed, Mr. Corbett's stock of goods continued to grow in the same haphazard manner as in the former location. The building is about 50 feet long and 30 feet wide. Goods are piled up to the very door. There's no place for the proprietor to sit down, so he usually can be found sitting out on the little porch in front. He never has the slightest trouble finding whatever it may be that his customers order.

“I reckon that a lot of store-keepers in big cities would make fun of my place,” said Mr. Corbett, “but my system suits me and my customers all right. What's the use of wasting time arranging stock and keeping things in order, when you can sit out on the porch and talk to your neighbors?”





SUTTON & WELSH

MEATS - GROCERIES

Phone 490-1

CORNER VANCE AND SAMPSON STREETS

LIVESTOCK MARKET

AND ABBATOIR

Auction Sale Each Tuesday, 2 p. m.

1 Mile From Clinton On Fayetteville Road

Malpass Antique Shop

GLASSWARE

CHINA

ANTIQUES

305 Lisbon St.

307 Vance St.

CLINTON, N. C.





He's a rather tall, slim, elderly man—probably about 72 years old—with a long, white, drooping moustache. His hair, too, is white. He is of a philosophical nature, and very few people have ever seen the old gentleman worried or out of sorts.

And so, while other merchants may be agonizing about window displays, advertising campaigns, arrangements of goods and other things of that nature, Mr. Corbett goes serenely on his way. He buys his merchandise, dumps it into his store, waits for customers to call for it, and then sells it to them. And, after all, these are the basic fundamentals of merchandising.

“Sometimes people tell me that I ought to modernize my store,” commented Mr. Corbett, “and that I ought to fix up the place a bit, but I tell them that it ain't necessary. To tell the truth, I doubt whether I'd do a penny's worth of more business. Folks have got sort of used to my way of doing things, and I believe if I were to make a change it would worry them almost as much as it would worry me. So I reckon I'll stick to the same system that I've been using for the past 35 years—and that ain't no system at all.”

Mr. Corbett also has another innovation in his business that is rather interesting. Most stores have a space reserved for an office; with a desk, typewriter, stationery and other supplies available. Not so, Mr. Corbett, however.

His right coat pocket is his office. It is usually filled with 30 or 40 letters, which Mr. Corbett explained, he attended to whenever the inclination struck him to do so. As a rule, whenever he gets a letter, he sticks it on the inside of the batch in his pocket, and then he works from the outside. By means of this system, every communication takes its regular turn. He says the plan works out satisfactorily for everybody concerned.

Despite his rather slack way of doing business, he has made a first-class living out of his store. Not only that, but he has a high credit rating and salesmen are always glad and willing to let him have all the merchandise he wants.





Clinton Poultry and Egg Company

TOP PRICES FOR POULTRY EVERY DAY IN THE YEAR

Bring Us What You Have

PHONE 285-1

LOCATED AT PRODUCE SHED

CLINTON, N. C.





Autryville

Back before the turn of the century, Capt. J. L. “Jim” Autry erected a couple of stores near the edge of Black river as a trading post for western Sampsonians who sold him turpentine, and later the railroad came through and a station depot was erected bearing the name “Autryville.”

Of course the village was dubbed Autryville before the Atlantic Coast Line came through, but that made it more official, and shortly thereafter the town was incorporated and chartered. That was in 1891, and for awhile Autryville appeared destined to grow into one of the larger towns of the county.

Slow commerce and improved transportation facilities combined to draw trade elsewhere however, and finally the ACL discontinued its station in 1937.

The town limits extend from the river on the west side one mile east along the Fayetteville-Clinton highway (N. C. 24) and approximately one-half mile north-south.

POPULATION193019401946 (est.)
11993120

PRINCIPAL BUSINESS CONCERNS

I. L. Vinson Service Station and Cotton Gin, M. M. Sandy, general merchandise; Autryville Spply Co., owned by A. T. Sessoms; W. G. Brown, dry goods, Hubbard Nunnery, general merchandise; Horne's News Stand, owned by David Horne; J. S. Hall Service Station; Faircloth Grist Mill, owned by E. B. Faircloth.

Autryville has one church, Baptist, located on the east edge of town, of which Rev. G. N. Ashley of Salemburg is pastor.

The town has not elected a board of commissioners in several years, and Mr. Luke M. Cooper has served as its mayor for some time.





TURKEY

HOME OF THE LARGEST

ITALIAN

PEPPER MARKET

IN THE

WORLD

For Further Information Regarding The Town and Its Resources Write To

B. H. SUTTON, Mayor

TURKEY, N. C.





Turkey

Turkey Township was named for Turkey Creek, which was so named for the large number of turkeys inhabitating the region in Colonial times. The first white people to visit this township were probably explorers sent out by the Colony headed by Sir John Yeamans, to explore the tributaries of the Cape Fear River.

The first permanent settlers were the Thomson family of Stirling, Scotland, who settled here in 1781 and who were followed a few years later by a colony under the leadership of Col. John Sampson, many of whom settled in this community, and many of the descendants of these families still live on land granted to these settlers by King George II.

This community prospered in Colonial times because of its close proximity to the seat of government of the county and because it was intersected by the New Bern and Wilmington stage roads.

In the annals of the American Revolution we find the following Turkey men volunteering their services for the cause of independence: Col. James Keenan, Capt. James Thomson, Capt. David Dodd, Lieut. Curtis Ivey, Andrew, Thomas, John, William and Stephen Thomson, Joseph Herring, James Faison, Henry and Zebulon Hollingsworth and Thomas Hicks.

In the War Between the States among the Turkey men who distinguished themselves are the names of Lieut. Col. Franklin F. Faison and Capt. Elias F. Shaw, both of whom gave their lives in this catastrophe.

The post offices in ante bellum times were Spring Vale and Six Runs, located on the New Bern road, however in 1886 when the Warsaw-Clinton branch of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad was built on the site of the old plank road, the post office was moved to the present village of Turkey. At that time there was only one store and it was operated by Mr. John McCallop. A few years later another store was built by Mr. Ed Mann, who served as postmaster and depot agent.

In 1899 a school was opened by the Hon. B. F. Grady for boys and girls which was known as the Turkey Male Academy. It was operated for two years, and it was while living on his plantation nearby that Mr. Grady wrote his scholarly work entitled “The Case of the South against the North.” Private and church schools had existed from colonial times, but the first public school was opened in 1883 near the home of Mr. Curtis Thomson and was taught by Miss Mary H. Moore. Several such schools were later built, which were consolidated into the present Turkey high school.

The present village of Turkey was incorporated in 1913, just prior to World War I. The population is about 200, 97% of which are white. The census of 1940 listed no foreign born or non-Protestants for the township.

In colonial and ante bellum times the principal crops were cotton and corn, but in later years Turkey has become renowned for its truck crops, and now has the distinction of being the world's largest Italian pepper market.

POPULATION19401930Estimated 1946
Turkey175142200

Total Incorporated Area — About One mile.





B. J. Williamson

Your ESSO Dealer

Distributor For

ESSOTANE PRODUCTS

Essotane Stoves and

Other Home Appliances

STEWART - WARNER RADIOS

Phone 497-6

217 Vance St.

Clinton, N. C.

J. A. ELMORE

ANTIQUES, OLD GLASS AND CHINA PIANOS AND USED FURNITURE

Phone 301-1

308 Vance St.

Clinton, N. C.





GOVERNMENT

MayorB. H. Sutton
Town ClerkL. S. Moore

COMMISSIONERS: D. M. Myers, L. S. Moore, J. E. Knight, J. E. Jones.

POSTMASTER: Mrs. Lucy Williamson. Third Class Office.

POLICE DEPARTMENT: E. L. Roberts.

BUSINESS CONCERNS

General Stores—E. W. Britt, J. W. Shipp, R. E. Moore, Tom Hudson.

Service Stations and Groceries—Earl Hudson, J. Arthur Powell.

Lunch Counter and Groceries—Carl Ezzell.

Cotton Gin—W. H. Carroll.

Blacksmith Shop and Garage—J. N. Carroll.

Fertilizer—G. W. Massey, Raymond Justice.





CLINTON OIL CO.

DISTRIBUTORS OF

CITIES SERVICE

PETROLEUM PRODUCTS

GASOLINE, KEROSENE, FUEL OILS, AND ALL KINDS OF LUBRICANTS

A. J. BASS

— Owner - Operator —

Warsaw Road

Clinton, N. C.





A Sampson Tour

On a sight-seeing tour of Sampson county, many interesting relics of a by-gone age will be found, and many thrilling tales will be related by old-times. For instance, there is the one about “Nigger Head Road” that the late Henry E. Faison loved to tell. Now a plain country dirt road, it is hard to picture the heads of Negroes strung on poles at intervals for several miles.

Back in 1831 the Nat Turner insurrection broke out in Southampton County, Virginia. It seems that Turner urged the slaves to run away from their masters and when he got enough leaders together, he would start a rebellion. His method of agitating the slaves spread, and soon there were small revolts among the Negroes of Bladen, Carteret, Jones and Onslow counties.

When the people of Sampson county discovered an insurrection plot similar to that of Turner, steps were taken immediately to put it down. So they killed the colored leaders and hung their heads on poles along the road as a lesson to other rebellious Negroes. The folks in that section of the county have called the place “Nigger Head Road” ever since.

Another interesting spot to visit is the old William Faison home northeast of Turkey. The original tract of land contained 200,000 acres and was given to Felix Kenan at the outbreak of the Revolutionary War by the King of England. Kenan was a Tory and after foreseeing that the Americans would win the war, he passed his property on to his brother, James Kenan, who was a colonel in the Revolutionary forces. The property is now owned by heirs of the late Albert Britt.

The land was then handed down for many generations until William Faison of Sampson county bought it at an auction sale. He bought 5,000 acres of the original tract and built a new home 500 yards west of the Kenan home. During the Civil War the Kenan house was burned by Sherman.

Mr. Faison was interested in horses and once paid $5,500 in gold for a stallion which he brought all the way from Quebec. He had quite a large stable with twenty stalls and a central feed and harness room, with a long passage running from one end to the other. From this stable, which is still standing, Shaw's famous Confederate cavalry was mounted.

The barn was solidly constructed of cypress logs, and it took 40,000 hand-hewn shingles to cover it.

Also on the property are eight or ten small houses that were used as slave quarters before the Civil War. One of the shacks has its windows covered with bars and it was here that runaway slaves were placed.

Another unique building on the Faison place is the three-story smoke house with a belfry on top. The bell was used to call the farm hands from the fields to meals. Around 20,000 pounds of meat could be stored in this building.

Also of interest is the old post office which is a one-room building similar to the slave shacks. This post office was also the stage coach stop. When the coach driver came down the road in the old days, as he rounded the bend approaching the inn, he would blow the same number of blasts on his horn as there was passengers in the coach, so that the inn-keeper would know how many guests to expect to dinner.

Probably of interest to some is the graveyard formed in





SAMPSON FRUIT AND VEGETABLE MARKET, INC.

CLINTON, N. C.

Fruits and Vegetables At Auction

RENDERING SERVICE TO BOTH GROWER AND BUYER

J. Frank Colwell, Pres.

E. L. Dudley, V-Pres.

J.C. Weeks, Jr., Sec-Treas.





the shape of a cart-wheel on the old Billy Faison place. In the center of the plot are the four old-fashioned cement box-type graves of James and William Faison and their wives. James Faison, a Revolutionary hero, was the founder of this branch of the family in North Carolina.

Around the four central graves are the tombstones of the fourteen Faison children and their families arranged in a circle. The plot is laid out to represent a giant cart-wheel, with the founders of the family as the hub and the children as the outer rim.

Then there is the huge pecan tree which folks hereabouts say is the largest in the world. The tree measures 23 feet, 7 inches around, 18 inches above the ground, and is of immense height. It grows on what was once the Curtis Thomson farm, and ’tis said that President Madison gave a pecan sprout to one of Thomson's ancestors and that he brought it all the way from LaGrange, Texas, by horseback. The tree still flourishes and in recent years has produced from $75 to $100 worth of nuts in one season.

The old Thomson house was once the home of Senator Marion Butler. It is now owned by Miss Sallie Fryar.





Mrs. Taft Bass

CORRESPONDENT

State Daily Papers

AND WIRE SERVICES

Promotional and Advertising Campaigns Handled For All Types Business Concerns, Clubs, Organizations and Individuals.

Information wanted on all Happenings of Unusual Nature in Sampson County

Phone 318-1

P. O. Box 463

Clinton, N. C.





The First Automobile

We have often heard questions and answers like these: Who invented the cotton gin? Eli Whitney. Who invented the steamboat? Robert Fulton. Who invented the sewing machine? Elias Howe. Who invented the telegraph? Samuel Morse. Who invented the telephone? Alexander Graham Bell. Who invented the airplane? Orville and Wilbur Wright.

But to the question: Who invented the automobile? We find no answer. Why? Because the man who really invented the automobile lived right here in Sampson county, North Carolina, and because he did not call it an automobile, he never received credit for his invention. Probably never having obtained a patent on it, may have helped to deny him the credit.

The name of the inventor was Perry Green Cook, who lived near Turkey, in Sampson County, the grandfather of the present Cook brothers who own and operate the Cook Machine Company, right here in Clinton, N. C.

Mr. Cook labelled his invention a “steam buggy.” It was along in the 80's or early 90's, that Mr. Cook contrived his invention. It was a vehicle propelled by steam, and really worked, but not so well guided, for soon after he contrived it he “fired up” the machine, got into it for a ride around his estate, but due to insufficient steering mechanism, the machine ran into a row of bee-gums, overturning many of them, and the frightened honey bees, fancying themselves suddenly attacked by a new and unheard of monster, gave battle to Mr. Cook and stung him mercilessly.

Mr. Cook used wagon wheels on the steam buggy, and a crankshaft bent out of a wagon axle. A steam boiler about three feet high with a grate in the bottom for wood and coal, and holes in the top to allow steam to escape, was placed at the front of the contraption, and the engine was arranged on the right. He was unable to travel more than forty or fifty yards at one time due to leakage of steam.

Not being in a position to continue his experiments further, Mr. Cook set the vehicle aside, but not before numerous people in and out of the state had come to view his “steam buggy.” He predicted that before too many years had passed, the world would become motrized.

Mr. Cook also invented a turning plow that he manufactured and sold for many years. He did not seek a patent, and eventually saw his plow produced and sold in large numbers by a company specializing in farm machinery. He is also said to have invented a veneer machine made out of wood, and to have used it very successfully in making cups for strawberries.

His grandson, L. V. Cook, seems to have inherited the old man's love of machinery, and also a part of his keen brain. He invented a sawmill edger in 1928 that is being used in many mills today, and if anything can be fixed or built in his line of work, you may rest assured that Mr. Cook can do it.

The boiler that his grandfather used on his “steam buggy” has been carefully preserved, and can be found at the Cook Machine Company today, apparently in first class condition.





The Typesetter

This book would not be complete without some mention of Sue Neil Grady, the little lady who set the type for it. She struggled valiantly to correct our-misspelled words, and we sincerely hope she was successful.

Sue Neil has just about the most highly paid position in the newspaper field, and her love of her job is evident. She got printer's ink in her blood at the tender age of seventeen, and it has been flowing strongly ever since.

Definitely a glamous girl type, she is a picture to behold, as seated at the keyboard of her monstrous machine, she sets copy for two papers, various phamplets, books, and a tremendous amount of commercial job work.

When she runs out of copy, she is wont to operate the mailing machince, run the job press, and write society notes. On top of all these duties, she is her firm's bookkeeper, and is as efficient in this department as in her own. In fact, Sue Neil can do just about anything there is to do, both in the back shop, or in the front office.

Apparently, she has thrived on printer's ink, for today at the age of twenty-seven, she has a lovely peaches and cream complexion, blonde hair (real) with a coppery tint, and a sweater girl figure.

Unusual in a woman operator, Sue Neil can and does help keep up her machine. She is as handy with a pair of pliers or a screwdriver as most girls are with a lipstick, and it is no unusual occurrence to walk in and find her deep in the bowels of her intertype, with face and hands smudged, and streaks of ink in her hair and on her clothes.

Also a rare trait in a newspaper plant, Sue Neil attends strictly to her own business and lets other people attend to theirs. If you ask her for advice, she gladly gives it, and will help you in any way she can, but otherwise, she ventures no comment.

She will probably refuse to set this chapter, for she seeks no praise. In that event, we will set it the best way we can.





Conclusion

This book attempts to give a partial picture of Sampson county, its past, and its possible future. It has a two-fold purpose: first, to acquaint Sampson county citizens with their county; and second, to furnish authentic information to outsiders about Sampson county which will help them get a true picture of the possibilities it possesses.

The information contained herein has been carefully checked and re-checked, and all chapters of a statistical nature were prepared by the various bureaus and organizations on the subjects they represent. It is our belief that all historical data recorded here is substantially correct, and for that which may be in error, we can only ask for the kind forebearance of any who may be aggrieved because of it.

For accuracy of statement, we have sought to be painstaking. However, great the effort to prevent mistakes, though, it is only natural that some will creep in. For instance, in listing the business concerns in each of the towns in Sampson county, it is possible that some may have been left out. This was not intentional, and we especially want to ask the pardon of Roseboro, our second largest town, for omitting one of their brick plants. Roseboro has three fine brick plants, instead of two, as stated in that section of the book. The one omitted is the Roseboro Brick Company, owned and operated by Rod Burgess and Wade Howard, two of the town's most progressive young citizens.

The data concerning towns other than Clinton was compiled by the residents of each, and the assistance we have received has been marked by extraordinary kindness and generosity, for which we here express our sincerest thanks.

To the advertisers who so generously supported this effort with advertising, we extend special thanks. Without their support, the task would have been impossible. Readers, we are sure, will look upon their advertisements as helping to complete the picture of Sampson county, and it was for this reason that we refused to accept advertising outside the county.

The book is not as complete as we would have liked, but due to the fact that we were not among the lucky ones to get a new car, it was extremely difficult to visit the various sections of the county. Many kind invitations have come in from all over Sampson, and many interesting bits of information have been received concerning the various communities. We regret that we did not receive much of this in time for publication.

The Year Book will be published annually. Each edition will be dedicated to the most outstanding business or civic achievement of the year in which it is published, and will be based on the service rendered to the county at large.

To each and everyone, who in any way, so generously helped in the compilation of this book, we offer our sincerest thanks.

If these pages help to better inform Sampson county citizens about their county, and others about the great possibilities yet awaiting development here, our efforts will be amply repaid.

— MRS. TAFT BASS

Clinton, N. C.





Index

AUTRYVILLE111
CLINTON59-61-63-65-67-69-71
GARLAND91-93-95
HARRELS STORE95
NEWTON GROVE97
ROSEBORO73-75-77-79
SALEMBURG87-89
TURKEY113-115

SAMPSON COUNTY:

Agricultural Division33
Agricultural Organizations33
AAA Community Committees35-37-39
American Red Cross31
Boy Scouts57
Baseball Schedule81
Crop Acreage33
Churches33
Churches51-53-55-57
Dedication3
4-H Clubs39
Government Officials11-13-15
Health Department29
History5
Home Demonstration Clubs41-43-45
Library Associatiin31
Masonic Lodges47
Medical Association31
Newspaper Publishers47
North Carolina Education Assoc.29
Physical Aspects7
Political Division47-49-51
Population11
Schools15-17-19-21-23-25-27
Schools, Private27-29
Tax Rate31
Transportation Facilities9-11
Vital Statistics7
Vital Statistics, Registrars9
Welfare Department29

SHORT STORIES

Court Week, Gay ’90's99-101
The Church Carpet83-85
Uncle Charlie Corbett's Store107-109
The First Automobile121
The Marker103-105
A Sampson Tour117-119
The Typesetter122
Conclusion123





INDEX TO ADVERTISERS
Automotive Parts Co.36Horne's Radio Shop84
Adams & Johnson46Jay's Jewelry Store4
Acme Cleaners52Jewel Shop, The(Inside Front Cover)
Atkins Bros.102
Benley's(Inside front cover)Kelly & Best44
Belk-Williams26Love Hardwood Co.92
Butler Furniture Co.80Lamb's Service Station94
Butler, Freddie C.82Leder Bros.98
Butler's Pharmacy98McPhail Florist12
Bass, Mrs. Taft120McLean, W. T.38
Baucom Beverage Co.(Inside Back Cover)Mann, Dr. John B.64
Malpass Antique Shop108
Barwick's22O'Brien, Dr. M. L.36
Bell Electric Co.18Philips Ice Cream Co.12
Bass Tobacco Whse.B. CoverPeterson, E. L.32
Clinton Cleaners14Pineland College88
Cook Machine Shop16Queen City Trailways50
Caison Bros.18Rowley, A. G.84
Clinton Hatchery20Rich, C. R.16
Clinton & Gem Theatres24Royal Furniture Co.20
Clinton Bottling Works46Rawls Jewelry22
Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Co.48Reynolds Drugs32
Register, Harmon A.42
Clinton, Town of58Roseboro, Town of74
Clinton Style Shop60Roseboro Milling Co.82
Clinton Milling Co.64Sampson- Bladen Oil Co.72
Children's Shop, The50Sureway Motor Coaches100
Clinton Floral & Gift Store52Stafford, J. J. & Sons92
Sampson County10
Clifton, Deems H.54Sure Cure Tobacco Curer28
Clinton Tobacco Market66Sampson Hardware Co.34
Clinton Merchants Assoc.68Sco-Sco Fertilizer40
Clinton Manufacturing Co.70Sampson Feed & Hatchery42
Crumpler-Honeycutt72Sampson FCX48
Carter Furniture Co.90Sampson Radio & Appliance Company56
Cliffeous Brock96
Clinton Concrete Block Co.100Salemburg, Town of86
Car, P. S. Company102Sampson Publishing Co.104
Clinton Poultry & Egg Co.110Spivey Oil & Electric Co.106
Clinton Oil Company116Southern Cotton Oil Co.40
Dr. Pepper Bottling Co.8Tart, C. C. Lumber Co.30
Daughtry Oil Company68Turlington, F. L. Lumber Company38
Eastern Oil Co., Inc.54TPL Motor Co.56
Ezzell, James A.96Tart & West78
Elmore, J. A.114Turkey, Town of112
First Citizens Bank & Trust Co.6Vann, Henry Co.34
First Citizens Bank & Trust Co.78Vann, Robert Body Shop70
Williams, Jno. B. & Sons14
Whitley Auto Supply30
Fussell's Soda Shop60Weeks-McLamb Motor Co.62
Fleishman's Dept. Store44Warren, L. A. & Son90
Hurwitz, Isaac24Warren, Abel94
Harris, A. R. & Son80Wilson Motor Co.106
Hill Spinning Co.76Williamson, B. J.114










[Illustration:

ZIMBA KOLA
"There's always a thirst time"
BAUCOM
BEVERAGE
CO.
Clinton, N.C.

]

BAUCOM

BEVERAGE CO.

CLINTON, N. C.





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